“Open Regionalism” or Alternative Regional Integration?

Eduardo Gudynas

In Latin America, website like this confusion and ambiguity over trade and regional integration continue to be commonplace. Different governments declare their dedication to strengthening relations between countries, stomach but their trade policies indicate otherwise. On this slippery terrain, the concept of “open regionalism” has often been used to justify very different stances.

In practice, “open regionalism” has been associated with projects as discordant as the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), the Community of Andean Nations, Mercosur, and even unilateral trade policies like those practiced by Chile. It has been defended from orthodox economic stances, but it has also been invoked in progressive politics. So, what is “open regionalism” and what is its recent history in Latin America?

ECLAC Presents “Open Regionalism”

The concept of “open regionalism,” as it is practiced in Latin America, originated in ECLAC’s proposals of the early 1990s. Those ideas were part of an attempt to generate new concepts about development, and they ultimately led to the presentation of three documents: “Productive Transformation with Equity” (PTE) in 1990, followed by “Sustainable Development: Productive Transformation, Equity, and Environment” in 1991, and finally the “open regionalism” program in 1994.

ECLAC’s original document defines “open regionalism” as a process that seeks to “reconcile,” on the one hand, “interdependency” resulting from free trade pacts and, on the other, interdependency “imposed by market conditions resulting from trade liberalization in general,” where “explicit integration policies complement and are compatible with policies that increase international competition.” At the same time, ECLAC suggests that this regionalism is distinct from simple market liberalization or unfettered export policies because it contains “a voluntary ingredient in its integration accords reinforced by geographical proximity and cultural affinity between the countries in the region.”

ECLAC conceived of integration as an essentially commercial process based on reducing tariffs and opening up national markets to foreign trade and investment. Deregulation was not confined to a particular region, but rather to the whole world, and it was assumed that conventional competition mechanisms would operate, thus allowing better insertion of the export sector. This perspective was marked by economic reductionism, and consequently other issues, specifically political issues, were not adequately addressed.

“Open regionalism” has direct antecedents in the ideas of PTE, which was an attempt to provide alternative development in response to the “lost decade” of the 1980s. The PTE showed strong optimism about trade and export liberalization as an avenue to economic growth. But there is also a clear relationship with the type of “open regionalism” that was being discussed in Southwest Asia at the time. Since the inception of the Asian Pacific Economic Commission (APEC) in 1989, it made “open regionalism” its focal point. The commission never presented a formal definition of the term, however, so the term remained vague and encompassed many distinct standpoints, although it favored flexible relationships between countries, open membership, trade liberalization on both regional and global levels, measures for facilitating trade, and promotion of regional insertion into the global market, including, in some circumstances, the extension of the most favored country’s treatment to non-members (see for example Bergsten, 1997, Kuwayama, 1999).

ECLAC’s proposal is in line with the type of trade liberalization defended by APEC. Both respond to a vision where relationships between countries are “open” rather than “closed,” and do not inhibit trade. It was understood that several previous experiences had failed to improve trade (for example, the experience of the Latin American Association for Free Trade between 1960 and 1980) or rather had focused “inward,” producing poor export results and closing markets. The model presented by ECLAC was NAFTA—an orthodox free trade agreement, which at the time was just getting underway, despite clear signs that it failed to address key issues (like labor, the environment, and border management) and did not establish mechanisms for political coordination. It is important to note that, at the time, ECLAC failed to note that NAFTA, rather than creating a framework for integration, served as an instrument for asymmetrical relationships and a new means of regulating goods.

The attempt to reconcile broad trade liberalization with a system of trade agreements between neighboring countries, along with the insistence on an exclusively commercial view of integration, caused the concept to remain unclear. It was used to defend different trade agreements within Latin America, applied to FTAA negotiations, and today the State Departments of both Brazil and Chile present themselves as defenders of “open regionalism” despite the fact that their actions are very different.

A detailed examination of ECLAC’s “open regionalism” reveals that, in spite of its intentions, it never became an alternative, and that, on the contrary, its emphasis on conventional economic proposals facilitated the neoliberal reforms implemented over the last decade. The use of the idea helped generate the illusion of embarking on a different path, but in reality the proposal was imprecise in several ways, conservative in others, and it failed to address key problems. Because the proposal focuses on the market, it exists in a “political vacuum” on various planes: the politics of development; international politics, including ideas about globalization, and grassroots politics.

Emphasis on the Market

“Open regionalism” centers on the market. It does not include proposals for social, political, or environmental integration. Pressing issues such as migration were left aside, and designs for common production policies on a regional level were never studied. Furthermore, no detailed studies were carried out concerning the possibility of coordinating production between countries, since it was hoped that trade and the market would improve resource allocation.

In these matters, “open regionalism” is evidently part of ECLAC’s idea of “productive transformation with equity” (PTE). PTE contained various positive aspects, like insisting on reducing inequality, strengthening interaction between the public and private sectors, and promoting science and technology. But the proposal also contributed to the political environment that definitively dismantled inward-oriented import substitution development strategies as well as national market protections. Well-documented studies demonstrated the weaknesses of import substitution and large state-owned enterprises, but no proposals emerged that were substantially different from the neoliberal model of the time or that had palpable results convincing to skeptics. For this reason, both these criticisms and the ideas of PTE ended up contributing to the market reforms of the 1990s, getting closer and closer to the ideas of the Washington Consensus.

In this way, the proposal deteriorated into a sort of mercantilist development strategy, where “open regionalism” was to follow the path of market liberalization, tariff reductions, import increases, and reliance on growth resulting from increased exports, etc.
Optimism facing Globalization

ECLAC posited that globalization, especially in its economic sense, represented a positive opportunity and consequently, regional integration became a way of mediating successful insertion into the global economy. This has key consequences, since “open regionalism” did not contradict globalization, but rather, served to promote it.

Since then, ECLAC has conducted studies questioning the impacts of global processes, but “open regionalism” has never offered a conceptual criticism of globalization or even seemed concerned with the issue. Instead, “open regionalism” has seen globalization as a sea of possibilities to be exploited.

One could even say that “open regionalism” is suggestive of an odd sort of inverse “glocalization.” In effect, the business vision of “glocalization” propagated from the East consisted of adapting global ventures to local circumstances in order to penetrate markets and achieve higher profits. ECLAC’s approach was the inverse: it favored adjusting local productive chains in order to penetrate the global market. The global market dictated what should be produced.

An Undefined International Framework

Another surprising limitation of “open regionalism” is its conception of relations between countries that seem to exist in a geopolitical vacuum. It does not address regional conflicts, diplomatic tensions, national security implications, or regional and global power struggles. It would seem that the connection between nations only occurs through trade, and that the most critical issues affecting Latin America (border tensions, drug trafficking, and migration) are left on a secondary plane, or else will be resolved by trade.

ECLAC’s vision of international relations is also left unclear. Regional integration cannot take place in a vacuum of political relationships between States, nor can their interactions be thought of as existing solely on a trade level. It was never explored whether “open regionalism” would develop in the context of power struggles in an international arena, or whether it would take shelter in idealistic stances defending rights and responsibilities in a multilateral world.

The Forgotten Citizen

Finally, the proposal offers no word on citizen politics, since “open regionalism” does not explore in detail mechanisms for promoting citizen participation to take part in the integration process. ECLAC subscribes to a “contractual” concept of integration, where governments exchange trade concessions and the agents nurturing connections between countries are import and export businesses. From this perspective, the institutional strength of regional pacts is based on just a few minimal binding instruments, clearly geared toward managing trade and resolving trade disputes, but ignoring key issues like supra-nationality.

True regional integration in Latin America will only be possible when active participation of the citizenry is achieved, including a broader vision of regional citizenship.

An Insufficient Vision

ECLAC’s “open regionalism” was without doubt, a well-intentioned, but insufficient vision. Key aspects to building regional integration were not adequately addressed, and, beyond a few references to overcoming several of these problems, the core of the proposal was built on trade liberalization. This emphasis on the market, combined with the variety of issues mentioned in ECLAC’s reports, resulted in a vague proposal, with little descriptive or predictive capacity. Its lack of definition allowed it to be invoked in very different contexts to defend distinct arguments.

The result was an enormous confusion when the governments of Latin America called upon “open regionalism” to defend diverse, and at times, contradictory positions. ECLAC’s ambition to create a powerful concept that would serve as a reference for governments did not materialize. Moreover, ECLAC failed to initiate a fruitful discussion about viable alternatives, distinguishable from those being promoted by the commercial and economic centers of the Northern Hemisphere.

It is because of this lack of definition that “open regionalism” facilitated the neoliberal reforms that prevailed during the 1990s, when prescriptions for trade liberalization seeped into the integration experiments of Latin America. But in addition to facilitating these changes, the negative effects were redoubled, since the proposal presented itself as an “alternative,” thereby distracting many from seeking other paths. Many of the regional integration experiments of Latin America ended up becoming processes that stressed insertion into the global economy and economic dependence, and trapped countries into exporting raw materials without industrializing. Parts of the proposal reinforced neoliberal reforms, especially its focus on the free flow of capital, providing them with political and social legitimacy.

Without doubt, an alternative program of regional integration is needed. Perhaps some aspects of the ideas proposed 10 years ago by ECLAC can be used, but they must be framed within another context and develop a different conceptual basis. Furthermore, a new program, if genuinely committed to sustainable development and strengthening national and regional citizenships, should break from ECLAC’s “open regionalism” and find another stance in the face of globalization.

Translated for the Americas Program by Nick Henry.


Eduardo Gudynas is an information analyst at D3E (Desarrollo, Economía, Ecología y Equidad en América Latina; www.globalization.org). He is a regular columnist for the IRC Americas Program (online at www.americaspolicy.org ). The opinions expressed here are solely those of the author. Email: globalizaciond3e@gmail.com.

To reprint this article, please contact americas@ciponline.org. The opinions expressed here are the author’s and do not necessarily represent the views of the The Center for International Policy’s Americas Program

For More Information

Bergsten, C.F., 1997, Open regionalism, Institute International Economics, Working Paper 97-3.

CEPAL, 1990, Transformación productiva con equidad, CEPAL, Santiago.

CEPAL, 1991, El desarrollo sustentable: transformación productiva, equidad y medio ambiente, CEPAL, Santiago.

CEPAL, 1994, El regionalismo abierto en América Latina y el Caribe, CEPAL, Santiago.

Kuwayama, M., 1999, Open Regionalism in Asia Pacific and Latin America: A Survey of Literature, CEPAL, International Trade and Development Finance Division, Santiago.

Alternativas para las Américas

Alianza Social Continental

La ASC es una red de organizaciones laborales y coaliciones ciudadanas que representa a más de 45 millones de personas a lo largo de las Américas. Fue creada para facilitar el intercambio de información y la conjunción de estrategias y acciones con miras a construir un modelo alternativo y democrático que beneficie a nuestros pueblos. La ASC es un espacio abierto a organizaciones y movimientos interesados en modificar las políticas de la integración continental y en promover la justicia social en las Américas.
>Descargar PDF

ASEAN EPG, civil Society and ASEAN Charter

Fellow Presidents and People of South America,
In Cusco, December 2004, the presidents of South America took up the commitment of developing a “South American space, integrated in political, social, economic, environmental and infrastructural spheres” and affirmed that “South American integration is and has to be an integration of the peoples”. In the Declaration of Ayacucho they declared that the principles of freedom, equality, solidarity, social justice, tolerance, respect for the environment, are the fundamental
pillars for this community to achieve an economically and socially sustainable development “that takes into account the urgent necessities of the most poorest, as well as the special requirements of the small and vulnerable economies of South America”.
In September 2005, during the First Meeting of Heads of States of the South American Community of Nations held in Brazil, a priority agenda was approved that included, amongst, other things, the themes of political dialogue, asymmetries, physical integration, environment, energy integration, financial mechanisms, economic trade convergence and the promotion of a social integration and social justice.
In December of that same year, at an Extraordinary Meeting held in Montevideo, the Strategic Commission of Reflection over the Process of South American Integration was conformed to elaborate “proposals destined to pushing forward the process of South American integration, in all its aspects (political, economic, commercial, social, cultural, energy and infrastructure, amongst others)”.
Now at the Second Summit of Heads of States we need to deepen this process of integration from above and below. With our people, with our social movements, with our productive business owners, with our ministers, technicians and representatives. That is why, at the next Presidential Summit to be held in December in Bolivia we are also pushing forward a Social Summit for dialogue and construction in a joint manner, a real integration with the social participation of our peoples. After years of having been victims of misnamed “development,” today our people have to be the actors in finding solutions for the grave problems of health, education, employment, unequal distribution of resources, discrimination, migration, exercising of democracy, preservation of the environment and respect for cultural diversity.
I am convinced that our next meeting in Bolivia needs to pass from declarations to action. I believe we need to advance towards a treaty that makes the South American Community of Nations a real South American bloc at the political, economic, social and cultural level. I am sure that our peoples are closer than our diplomacies. I believe, with all due respect, that we, the presidents, need to shake up our foreign ministries so that they rid themselves of routine and confront this great challenge.
I am conscious of the fact that our South American nations have different processes and rhythms. That is why I am proposing a process of integration at different speeds. Let us walk an ambitious but flexible road. One that allows all of us to be a part of it, allowing each country to take up the commitments they can, and allow those who want to accelerate the pace do so towards the conformation of a real political, economic, social and cultural bloc. That is how other processes of integration have developed in the world and it is the most adequate path for advancement in the adoption of supranational instruments that respect the times and sovereignty of each country.
Our integration is and has to be an integration of, and for, the peoples. Trade, energy integration, infrastructure, and finance need to be at the function of resolving the biggest problems of poverty and the destruction of nature in our region. We cannot reduce the South American Community of Nations to an association that carries out
projects for highways or gives credit that ends up essentially favouring the sectors tied to the world market. Our goal needs to be to forge a real integration to “live well”. We say “live well” because we do not aspire to live better than others. We do not believe in the line of progress and unlimited development at the cost of others and nature. We need to complement each other and not compete. We need to share and not take advantage of our neighbour. “Live well” is to think not only in terms of income per capita but cultural identity, community, harmony between ourselves and with mother earth.
To advance in this path we propose:
At the social and cultural level
1)Let’s liberate South America of illiteracy, malnutrition, malaria and other scourges of extreme poverty. Let’s establish clear targets and a mechanism of monitoring, supporting and completing these objectives that are the basis for the construction of an integration at the service of human beings.
2)Let’s construct a South American public and social system to guarantee access to all the population for services such as education, health and drinkable water. Uniting our resources, capacities and experiences we will be in a better condition to guarantee those fundamental human rights.
3)More employment in South America and less migration. The most valuable thing we have is our people and we are losing it due to a lack of employment in our countries. Labour casualisation and the shrinking of the state have not brought about more employment as they promised two decades ago. Governments need to intervene in a coordinated manner with public policies to generate sustainable and productive jobs.
4)Mechanisms to diminish disparity and social inequality. Respecting the sovereignty of all countries, we need to commit ourselves to adopting measures and projects that reduce the gap between rich and poor. The wealth needs to be and should be distributed in a more equitable manner in the region. For that we need to apply diverse mechanisms of a monetary, regulatory and redistributive type.
5)A continental fight against corruption and mafias. One of the largest problems that our societies confront is corruption and the establishment of mafias that begin to perforate the state and destroying the social fabric of our communities. Let’s create a mechanism of transparency at the South American level and a Commission to struggle against corruption and impunity that, without violating juridical sovereignty of nations, carries out investigations of grave cases of corruption and illegal enrichment.
6)South American coordination with social participation to defeat narco-trafficking. Let’s develop a South American system with the participation of our states and our civil societies to support us, to articulate and banish narcotrafficking from our region. The only way of defeating this cancer is with the participation of our peoples and with the adoption of transparent measures and coordination between our countries to confront the distribution of drugs, money laundering, trafficking of precursors, fabrication, and production of cultivations that are derailed for these ends. This system needs to certify the advance in our struggle against narcotrafficking, surpassing the tests and “recommendations” that have until now failed in the fight against drugs.
7)Defense and pushing forward of cultural diversity. The greatest wealth of humanity is its cultural diversity. The homogenization and marketing for monetary gains or for domination, is an attack against humanity. At the level of education, communication, administration of justice, the exercising of democracy, territorial ordering and the management of natural resources, we need to preserve and promote the cultural diversity of our indigenous peoples, mestizos and all population that have migrated to our continent. At the same time we must respect and promote an economic diversity that comprehends forms of private, public and social-collective property.
8)Decriminalisation of the coca leaf and its industrialization in South America. Just as the fight against alcoholism can not lead us to criminalizing barley, nor can the struggle against narcotics lead us to destroying the Amazon in search of psycho-tropical plants, we must finish with the persecution of the coca leaf which is an essential component of the cultures of the Andean indigenous peoples and promote its industrialization for beneficial aims.
9)Advance towards a South American citizenry. Let’s accelerate the measures that facilitate migration between our countries. Guaranteeing the full vigilance of human and labour rights and confronting traffickers of all types, until we achieve the establishment of a South American citizenry.
At the economic level
10)Complementary and not naked competition between our economies. Rather than following the path of privatization we need to support ourselves and complement each other to develop and promote our state companies. Together we can forge a South American state airline, a public telecommunication service, a state electricity network, a South American industry of generic medicines, a mining-metallurgical complex, in synthesis, a productive apparatus that is capable of satisfying the fundamental necessities of our population and strengthen our position in the world economy.
11)Fair trade at the service of the peoples of South America. Within the South American Community fair trade must take primacy to benefit all sectors, and particularly small businesses, communities, artisans, campesino economic organizations and producer associations. We have to move towards a convergence of CAN [Andean Community of Nations] and MERCOSUR [Common Market of the South] under new principles of solidarity and complementation that surpasses the rules of the free markets that have fundamentally benefited the multinational and some exporting sectors.
12)Effective measures to surpass the asymmetries between countries. In South America we have at one extreme countries with a Gross Domestic Product per capita of $4000 to $7000 per year and at the other extreme countries that barely reach the $1000 per inhabitant. To tackle this grave problem we have to effectively comply with the all the dispositions already approved in CAN and MERCOSUR in favour of the less developed countries and assume a group of new measures that promote processes of industrialization in those countries, that give incentives to exportation with added value and improving the terms of exchange and prices in favour of smaller economies.
13)A Southern Development Bank. If in the South American Community we created a Bank of Development based on 10% of the international reserves of the countries in South America we would begin with a fund of $16,000 million that would allows us to effectively attend to projects of productive development and integration under the criteria of financial recuperation and social content. As the same time, this Bank of the South could be strengthened with a guarantee mechanism based in the current value of primary materials that we have in our countries. Our “Bank of the South” needs to surpass the problems of other “development” banks that charged commercial interest rates, financed essentially “profitable” projects, conditioned access to credit on a series of macroeconomic indicators or the contracting of predetermined provider and executing companies.
14)A compensation fund for the social debt and asymmetries. We need to take up innovative mechanisms of financing like the creation of taxes on airline tickets, tobacco sales, arms trade, financial transactions by the large multinationals that operate in South America, so as to create a compensation fund that allows us to resolve the grave problems of the region.
15)Physical Integration for our people and not only for exportation. We have to develop infrastructure in regards to roads, waterways, and corridors, not just or only to export more to the world, but rather above all else to help communication between the peoples of South America, respecting the environment and reducing asymmetries. Within this framework we need to revise the Initiative for South American Regional Integration (IIRSA), taking into account the preoccupations of the people that want roadways to be built within the framework of poles of development and not highways used only for exports, through the middle of corridors of misery, and to increase external indebtedness.
16)Energy Integration between consumers and producers in the region. Let’s form an Energy Commission of South America to:
– Guarantee the supply of each one of our countries privileging the consumption of resources existing in the region
– Ensure, via common financing, the development of the necessary infrastructures so that the energy resources of the producing countries reach all South America.
– Define fair prices that combine the parameters of international prices with solidarity criteria aimed towards the South American region and redistribution in favour of the less developed economies.
– Certify our reserves and stop depending on the manipulations of the multinationals.
– Strengthen integration and complementation between our state gas and hydrocarbon companies.
At the level of environment and nature
17) Public policies with social participation to preserve the environment. We are one of the most privileged regions in the world in terms of environment, water and biodiversity. This obliges us to be extremely responsible with these natural resources which can not be treated as just another product to be sold, forgetting that on these depends life and the actual existence of the planet. We are obliged to conceive of an alternative and sustainable handling of natural resources recuperating the harmonic practices of cohabitation with nature of our indigenous people and guaranteeing the social participation of the communities.
18) South American Committee for the Environment to elaborate strict norms and impose sanctions on the large companies that do not respect these rules. Local political interests can not be relied upon to guarantee respect for nature, that is why I propose the creation of a supranational organisation that has the capacity to dictate and carry out environmental norms.
19) South American convention for human rights and access for all living beings to water. As a region privileged with 27% of fresh water supplies in the world, we need to discuss and approve a South American Convention on Water that guarantees access to this vital resource to all living beings. We need to preserve water, in its different uses, from processes of privatizations and the market logic that are imposed in trade agreements. I am convinced that this South American treaty on Water would be a decisive step towards a Global Convention on Water.
20) Protection of our biodiversity. We can not allow the patenting of plants, animals and live materials. In the South American Community we have to apply a system of protection that on one side avoids the piracy of our biodiversity and on the other side guarantees the domination of our countries over these genetic resources and traditional collective knowledge.
At the level of political institutions
21) Let’s deepen our democracies with greater social participation. Only a greater openness, transparency and the participation of our people in the taking of decisions can guarantee that our South American Community of Nations advances and progresses down the right path.
22) Let’s strengthen our sovereignty and our common voice. The South American Community of Nations can be a grand lever to defend and affirm our sovereignty in a globalised and unipolar world. Individually as isolated countries some can be more easily susceptible to pressure and external conditioning. Together we have more possibilities to develop our own distinctive options in different international scenarios.
23) A Commission of Permanent Convergence to elaborate a treaty for CSN and guarantees the implementation of agreements. We need an agile institution, transparent, un-bureaucratic, with social participation, and which takes into account existing asymmetries. To advance effectively we need to create a Commission of Permanent Convergence made up of representatives of the 12 countries which,
leading up to the Third Summit of Heads of States, elaborates a project for a treaty for the South American Community of Nations , taking into account the particularities and rhythms of the distinct nations. Similarly, this Commission of Permanent Convergence, via groups and commissions, should coordinate and work together with CAN, MERCOSUR, ALADI, OTCA and difference sub regional initiatives to avoid duplicating efforts and to guarantee the application of the commitments we take up.
I hope that this letter strengthens the thoughts and construction of proposals for an effective and positive Second Summit of Heads of States of the South American Community of Nations, I leave you reiterating my invitation for our meeting on 8-9 December in Cochabamba, Bolivia.
Regards,
Evo Morales Ayma
President of the Republic of Bolivia.
October 2, 2006
Alexander C. Chandra
The ASEAN Eminent Persons Group (EPG) has recently conducted an open consultation with members of the civil society groups throughout Southeast Asia in the process of the making of the ASEAN Charter. The process took place in Ubud, hospital Bali, rx on 17 April 2006. Aside from the representatives of ASEAN non-governmental organizations (NGOs), unhealthy the ASEAN EPG also gathered inputs from the ASEAN Inter-Parliamentary Organization (AIPO) and the ASEAN Human Rights Working Group (AHRWG). Special consultation between members of the EPG and the academic community, particularly those within the ASEAN – Institute for Strategic and International Studies (ASEAN-ISIS), was also held prior to the consultation with members of the wider civil society groups.
At the consultation process that was concentrated on one of the main pillars of the ASEAN Community, the ASEAN Political and Security Community, members of the EPG heard and gathered views and inputs from all sections of the civil society before providing recommendations on the ASEAN Charter and the future of ASEAN as a regional organization. The recommendation will then be passed to the High Level Task Force (HLTF), which will be established after the upcoming ASEAN Summit, in Cebu, the Philippines, in December 2006.
Members of the civil society groups, under the auspices of the Solidarity Asian People’s Assembly (SAPA), submitted a joint input on the elements pertaining ASEAN political and security co-operation. SAPA itself is a network of NGOs throughout Asia that engaged in campaigns and advocacy on various issues of public interests at national, regional, and international levels. Previously, members of SAPA had conducted numerous discussions regarding the relevance of civil society engagement in ASEAN since 2005. Prior to the meeting with members of the EPG, SAPA also conducted two days meeting in Ubud to prepare its contribution in the making of an ASEAN Charter.
In general, members of SAPA were excited about the possible establishment of an ASEAN Charter. In its submission to the EPG, SAPA supports the move by ASEAN leaders to develop an ASEAN Charter as a step towards deepening integration in the region through the formalization of agreements and understanding, the regional recognition of rights, and the regionalization of standards and mechanisms. Moreover, SAPA also welcomes the EPG’s recognition of civil society’ rights to participate in the making of an ASEAN Charter.
On its perspectives on the concept of regionalism, members of SAPA believes that regionalism should be considered as a step towards the advancement of ASEAN’s people interest, which stresses mutual benefit and co-operation among states and people of Southeast Asia. Apart from that, SAPA views the regionalism in Southeast Asian should go beyond regional integration and should incorporate genuine regional solidarity, as well as the foundation for ASEAN’s venture into external relations.
Specific on the proposal in the making of the ASC, SAPA announces five basic principles. Firstly, in the view of SAPA, ASEAN Charter should broaden the definition and reference to security. In this regard, the Charter should have distinctive chapters that address conventional and non-conventional security issues that emerge in the Southeast Asian region. Secondly, the Charter should reiterate a more conducive political environment for peace, security, and stability. Thirdly, the Charter should also introduce the element of human security, which would encompass not only freedom from violence, but also freedom from threats to people’s live, such as hunger, poverty, disease, etc. Fourthly, the Charter should harmonize the existing ASEAN instruments and norms with international norms and standards. And, finally, the Charter should also define ASEAN key stakeholders. In this regard, the Charter should recognize the diversity and potential contributions of the people in Southeast Asia in the ASEAN decision-making processes.
In the end, SAPA’s submission once again reiterates the importance of the advancement process for an ASEAN Charter. It is clear, therefore, that one of the key concerns amongst members of Southeast Asian civil society groups is their ability to engage in all ASEAN decision-making processes. In this context, Southeast Asian civil society groups demand for a democratic and inclusive process that includes clear mechanisms for participation in national and regional consultations.
During the consultation process, members of the EPG also met with a representative from the AIPO. Unfortunately, AIPO, which was expected to play an important role in the making of an ASEAN Charter, was incapable to provide any significant inputs to the EPG. Instead of providing substantive recommendations to the members of the EPG, the representative of AIPO expressed his concerns regarding various dilemmas experienced by the AIPO. It is very unfortunate that AIPO is still left far behind from other members of Southeast Asian civil society in terms of the advancement of the idea of an integrated Southeast Asia.
What is more interesting is the fact that only three members of the EPG were active in making comments or response regarding the civil society’s input submissions. The three members of the EPG, including Tan Sri Musa Hitam of Malaysia, who also acted as the EPG chair, Ali Alatas of Indonesia and Fidel V. Ramos of the Philippines were outspoken to ensure that the inputs from members of the civil society were taken into consideration in the making of an ASEAN Charter. It would be interesting, however, if other EPG members, particularly those from the newer ASEAN member countries, such as Cambodia, Lao PDR, Myanmar and Vietnam (also known as the CLMV countries), would share their thoughts and views regarding many of the inputs provided by members of the civil society groups.
Nevertheless, it is clear that members of the civil society groups throughout Southeast Asia are starting to show keen interest to the ASEAN regional project. However, it remains to be seen as to how the recommendations from members of the EPG to the HLTF would evolve. Some of the demands made by members of the civil society groups can be too radical by some of the ASEAN member governments. The participation of the civil society groups in the decision making processes in countries such as Burma is still limited, whilst freedom of expression in an older member of ASEAN, such as Singapore, is still constrained. Yet, the EPG – civil society process of consultation is an important step to ensure an ASEAN Charter that reflects the need and interest of Southeast Asian people at large.
The author is Research Co-ordinator of the Institute for Global Justice (IGJ).
www.asiasapa.org

Identifying an Alternative Vision for Regional Integration in the Americas

The adoption of the new „Reform Treaty“ for the EU comes at a time of financial crisis, enhanced economic uncertainty and rising social inequality. Additional risks arise from the precarious situation in the areas of energy use and climate change and from mounting imbalances in the world economy. The new Treaty will not enable the EU to master these problems and challenges. On the contrary it will strengthen the neo-liberal policy framework which has contributed to the critical situation.
>Download the report (PDF)

In Budapest on 16th of June 2008 a political movement called Social Charter 2008 was founded by 37 individuals and 8 civil Society Organisations*. The founding document says:
„After two decades of the systemic change the society, the economy and the culture in Hungary are in more and more worse conditions. The Hungarian society is characterized by growing and deepening social inequalities, salve extremely low wages and saleries, neoliberal-inspired forceful dismantling of the welfare system, wide spread poverty including child poverty and striking social disparities. Hungary’s economic structure is deformed, its overwhelming majority are owned by multinational companies. Culture is vegetating, credibility of democracy is shrinking, unbearable polarization of social conditions makes the country unlivable for the majority of the society. The justified criticism to the political class has undermined the confidence in public institutions.

For the above reasons signatories of the Hungarian Social Charter 2008 invite all people who have completely different idea about our country’s future. We are convinced that we cannot face our social problems without making an end of the lies prevailing in Hungary.”

The three basic lies are as follows:

  • Religeous-like preaching and use of competition principle and market fundamentalism
  • Hungary can catch-up to the Western living standard by accepting the enforced rules, dismantling the social system and the state, serving openly the great powers and multinational capital, forcing of privatization and brain washing of people
  • Promising individual advance and beating consumerism as the meaning of life. Everybody has got enormous possibilities if (s)he is diligent, clever and smart enough.
  • Founders of the Social Charter 2008 consider themselves as leftists of the 21st century: friends of the trade unions and civil society organisations, humanists, environmentalists, feminists, alterglobalists, anti-war activists, marxists, adversaries of exclusion and racism. They wish to fight for social emancipation and to become a movement built on wide social basis that is able to fulfil the political representation of the Left if necessary. The Charter is open to any individual or organisation agreeing with its goals and ready to work for the society.

    *Individuals: Alföldi Andrea, Uti György, Czöndör Gyula, Gold J. Márton, Komáromi István, Bánszegi-Tóth Erzsébet, Dr. Ujj Béla, Galló Béla, Félegyházi Tamás, Szombati László, Szabó Szilárd, Noé Krisztina, Vajnai Attila, Váradi Janka, Trasciatti Attila, Fisch Róbert, Góger Arnold, Burján Barnabás, Bakó András, Mersei Norbert, Szigethy Károly, Kovách Géza, Totyik Tamás, Bánfalvi Gy?z?, Sarkadi Zsolt, Nehéz Gy?z?, Morva Judit, Hrabák András, Hajdú Miklós, Dombovári Sándor, Kiss Gábor, Sípos József, Tamási Ibolya Asztalos Armand, Kertész Lóránt, Kékesi Zsolt

    Organisations: Civil Parliament, Green Association for Human Being Nature and Society, Movement for Social Democracy, Workers’ Party 2006, Leftwing Union of Youth, Youth Organisation of Workers, Alternative Movement for the Left (AML), AML Party Branch Organisation Hungarian Socialist Party Debrecen.
    Observers: Várady Tibor, representing Humanist Party and Kulcsár Péter, representing Social Democratic Party of Hungary
    Remark: ATTAC Hungary joined the Hungarian Social Charter 2008 on 4th July 2008.

    In Budapest on 16th of June 2008 a political movement called Social Charter 2008 was founded by 37 individuals and 8 civil Society Organisations*. The founding document says:
    „After two decades of the systemic change the society, the economy and the culture in Hungary are in more and more worse conditions. The Hungarian society is characterized by growing and deepening social inequalities, sale extremely low wages and saleries, neoliberal-inspired forceful dismantling of the welfare system, wide spread poverty including child poverty and striking social disparities. Hungary’s economic structure is deformed, its overwhelming majority are owned by multinational companies. Culture is vegetating, credibility of democracy is shrinking, unbearable polarization of social conditions makes the country unlivable for the majority of the society. The justified criticism to the political class has undermined the confidence in public institutions.
    For the above reasons signatories of the Hungarian Social Charter 2008 invite all people who have completely different idea about our country’s future. We are convinced that we cannot face our social problems without making an end of the lies prevailing in Hungary.”
    The three basic lies are as follows:

  • Religeous-like preaching and use of competition principle and market fundamentalism
  • Hungary can catch-up to the Western living standard by accepting the enforced rules, dismantling the social system and the state, serving openly the great powers and multinational capital, forcing of privatization and brain washing of people
  • Promising individual advance and beating consumerism as the meaning of life. Everybody has got enormous possibilities if (s)he is diligent, clever and smart enough.
  • Founders of the Social Charter 2008 consider themselves as leftists of the 21st century: friends of the trade unions and civil society organisations, humanists, environmentalists, feminists, alterglobalists, anti-war activists, marxists, adversaries of exclusion and racism. They wish to fight for social emancipation and to become a movement built on wide social basis that is able to fulfil the political representation of the Left if necessary. The Charter is open to any individual or organisation agreeing with its goals and ready to work for the society.
    *Individuals: Alföldi Andrea, Uti György, Czöndör Gyula, Gold J. Márton, Komáromi István, Bánszegi-Tóth Erzsébet, Dr. Ujj Béla, Galló Béla, Félegyházi Tamás, Szombati László, Szabó Szilárd, Noé Krisztina, Vajnai Attila, Váradi Janka, Trasciatti Attila, Fisch Róbert, Góger Arnold, Burján Barnabás, Bakó András, Mersei Norbert, Szigethy Károly, Kovách Géza, Totyik Tamás, Bánfalvi Gy?z?, Sarkadi Zsolt, Nehéz Gy?z?, Morva Judit, Hrabák András, Hajdú Miklós, Dombovári Sándor, Kiss Gábor, Sípos József, Tamási Ibolya Asztalos Armand, Kertész Lóránt, Kékesi Zsolt
    Organisations: Civil Parliament, Green Association for Human Being Nature and Society, Movement for Social Democracy, Workers’ Party 2006, Leftwing Union of Youth, Youth Organisation of Workers, Alternative Movement for the Left (AML), AML Party Branch Organisation Hungarian Socialist Party Debrecen.
    Observers: Várady Tibor, representing Humanist Party and Kulcsár Péter, representing Social Democratic Party of Hungary
    Remark: ATTAC Hungary joined the Hungarian Social Charter 2008 on 4th July 2008.

    Por Fernando Bossi. Congreso Bolivariano de los Pueblos.
    Exposición de Fernando Ramón Bossi, seek buy no rx Secretario de Organización del Congreso Bolivariano de los Pueblos, en el Foro que se realizó en la III Cumbre de los Pueblos, Mar del Plata, 3 de noviembre de 2005.
    Antes de comenzar con la exposición, quiero agradecer a los organizadores de este evento el haberme invitado a participar y compartir con ustedes algunas reflexiones con respecto al ALBA.
    Asimismo debo manifestar que es un verdadero honor poder compartir esta tribuna con dirigentes de la talla de Jorge Ceballos, coordinador nacional del Movimiento Barrios de Pie y miembro del Secretariado Político del Congreso Bolivariano de los Pueblos, como también con el amigo Aníbal Mellano, genuino representante de las pequeñas y medianas empresas argentinas, hombre comprometido con la causa de los pueblos.

    Normalmente sucede que en las conferencias donde el tema central es el ALBA, la Alternativa Bolivariana para la América, no se habla del ALBA, sino que se habla sobre el ALCA. Se expone sobre el ALCA, se plantea todos los males que conlleva esta propuesta imperialista y se concluye afirmando que el ALBA es todo lo contrario. A lo sumo se mencionan algunos ejemplos: Petrosur, Telesur o Banco del Sur. Pocas veces se intenta explicar la propuesta bolivariana de integración, y cabe aclarar, que el ALBA no es solo una respuesta al ALCA, no es solo eso, sino que la trasciende en todos sus aspectos.

    Es por esto que, con la intención de no repetir la tradicional conferencia sobre el ALBA pero donde no se habla del ALBA sino del ALCA, es que me tomé la tarea de bosquejar 10 puntos de aproximación a la propuesta ALBA y el rol de los pueblos en su construcción.

    1) El ALBA es un proyecto histórico

    Si bien nace como propuesta alternativa al ALCA, el ALBA responde a una vieja y permanente confrontación entre los pueblos latinoamericanos caribeños y el imperialismo. Monroísmo versus Bolivarianismo, tal vez sea la mejor manera de plantear los proyectos en pugna. El primero, aquel que se resume en “América para los americanos”, en realidad “América para los norteamericanos”. Ese es el proyecto imperialista, de dominación, saqueo y rapiña. El segundo es la propuesta de unidad de los pueblos latinoamericanos caribeños, la idea del Libertador Simón Bolívar de conformar una Confederación de Repúblicas. En síntesis: una propuesta imperialista enfrentada a una propuesta de liberación. Hoy ALCA versus ALBA.
    Por lo tanto debemos de entender que el ALBA reco
    noce sus antecedentes en la mejor tradición de las luchas independentistas y por la unidad.

    Ahí aparece, entonces, la figura del Precursor, Francisco Miranda, con un Plan de Gobierno para esta región, a la que él llamaba Colombia. Y nos encontramos, sin duda, con la obra y el pensamiento del Libertado Simón Bolívar. Es necesario leer, estudiar, reflexionar sobre la “Carta de Jamaica”, su discurso en el Congreso de Angostura, la carta a Martín de Pueyrredón, la Convocatoria al Congreso Anfictiónico de Panamá, los acuerdos Mosquera-Monteagudo, Mosquera-O Higgins, Santamaría-Alaman, la correspondencia con José de San Martín y tantos otros documentos que anuncian el camino del ALBA.

    Y no nos podemos olvidar tampoco de Sucre, de las proclamas de Hidalgo y Morelos, del general San Martín, de Artigas y su reforma agraria, de la “Ley Gaucha” de Güemes, del Plan de Operaciones de Mariano Moreno, de los escritos económicos de Belgrano, de la obra de Simón Rodríguez, del proyecto de Federación de Bernardo Monteagudo, de la obra del hondureño Cecilio del Valle y de la lucha por la Confederación Centroamericana de Francisco Morazán. En todo ese período, de no más de 20 años, se generó, a través del pensamiento y la acción, doctrina revolucionaria, programas, proyectos, emprendimientos y leyes conducentes a la integración y la independencia con justicia social. Creo que es uno de los períodos más brillantes de nuestra historia.

    Pero también, en esa dirección, luego de la derrota del proyecto bolivariano, las fuerzas populares se recomponen y vuelven a la histórica lucha. Levantan banderas de unidad Eloy Alfaro en Ecuador, Martí en Cuba, Ezequiel Zamora en Venezuela, Felipe Varela en Argentina, Ramón Emeterio Betances en Puerto Rico… y tantos otros.
    El mismo gran patriota y revolucionario nicaragüense “El general de Hombres Libres”, Augusto César Sandino, escribirá su proyecto de unidad latinoamericana: “Plan para la realización del sueño supremo de Bolívar”. Y esto solo para mencionar algunos mojones de nuestra historia.

    Al buscar lo más contemporáneo, lo más reciente, aparecen Perón y Getulio Vargas con el ABC; Salvador Allende y la Universidad Latinoamericana; la voz de Fidel diciéndonos “Sólo habrá salvación en la unidad”; Francisco Caamaño desde la República Dominicana; Velasco Alvarado desde el Perú mariateguista y tupacamarista; Torres y Marcelo Quiroga Santa Cruz desde Bolivia; Omar Torrijos desde Panamá; Carlos Fonseca desde Nicaragua; João Goulart desde el Brasil; Gaitán desde Colombia; el Che Guevara desde toda Nuestra América… En fin… voces, guías que marcan un rumbo claro hacia la unidad y la segunda y definitiva independencia.

    Es por eso que el ALBA tiene antecedentes gloriosos, viene de lo profundo de la América insurgente, tiene raíces, hondas raíces que lo convierten en un proyecto histórico de construcción de la Patria Grande.

    2) El ALBA es creación heroica

    Como bien lo señalaba el amauta peruano José Carlos Mariátegui, la revolución en esta parte del mundo será “creación heroica, nunca copia o calco”. “O inventamos o erramos”, nos decía Simón Rodríguez. Vale decir que la tarea de construir el ALBA será sin manuales ni “fórmulas mágicas”.

    De nada nos sirven los ejemplos de la Unión Europea, ni mucho menos la forma en que Estados Unidos alcanzó su unidad, a costa de rapiña, genocidio indígena e invasiones. La Unión Europea tampoco, porque esa unión se establece de manera defensiva, bajo los parámetros del capitalismo y solo para acumular fuerza en su competencia con Estados Unidos y Japón. La Unión Europea es una estrategia de una serie de naciones en el marco de la lucha intercapitalista e interimperialista. Ninguno de estos son modelos de integración que nos puedan servir a los latinoamericanos caribeños.

    Es por esto que los americanos del Sur tendremos que inventar, bucear en nuestra historia, escuchar las “voces del pasado que nos señalan el futuro”, al decir de Eduardo Galeano; implantar un modelo endógeno regional que conduzca a una unidad que sea producto de nuestra propia obra, para cubrir nuestras necesidades y representar nuestros intereses.

    3) El ALBA se sostiene en las potencialidades de América Latina y el Caribe

    América Latina y el Caribe es una de las regiones más ricas en recursos naturales del planeta. Aprovechar nuestras potencialidades es la clave para el desarrollo y bienestar de nuestros pueblos.
    ¿Dónde están nuestras potencialidades y de qué manera las aprovechamos hoy? Donde quiera que busquemos encontraremos riquezas inmensas en nuestro continente; pero también encontraremos que esas riquezas no son usufructuadas por nuestros pueblos. Es por ello que en inmensas sabanas, llanos y pampas, con tierras inmejorables para la agricultura y la ganadería, con una potencialidad infinita para producir alimentos, conviven millones de nuestros hermanos que padecen hambre.

    Por otro lado, nuestra región es rica en energía y minerales. Petróleo, gas, carbón y energía eléctrica, gracias a los enormes recursos hídricos. Tampoco nos falta hierro, cobre, estaño, zinc, aluminio, oro, plata, cemento, cal. Sin embargo la ausencia de industrias y el proceso de desindustrialización desatado por la implementación de las políticas neoliberales es otro dato de la realidad.

    Tenemos la mayor reserva de agua potable del planeta, un recurso que hoy es estratégico y lo será mucho más en los próximos años. Pero pese a tener esa inmensa riqueza, más de un 30% de los 500.000 niños que se nos mueren por año, por razones que serían fácilmente evitables, mueren por diarrea infantil; a causa de falta de agua potable.

    Somos una de las regiones más ricas en biodiversidad. Por otro lado también somos la región donde más especies se van extinguiendo por la acción irracional de las empresas multinacionales.

    Tenemos una cultura de miles de años que ha sido sistemáticamente negada por la cultura elitista y extranjerizante. El aporte de las culturas de los pueblos originarios, su relación con la naturaleza y su cosmovisión, tienen que ser incorporadas urgentemente por nuestras sociedades, en la lucha por el mejoramiento de la convivencia humana y la vida en armonía con el ambiente. La diversidad y la originalidad son los pilares fundamentales de una frondosa cultura latinoamericana caribeña que hasta hoy ha sido secuestrada y negada para los propios latinoamericanos caribeños.

    Y también contamos, dentro de las enormes potencialidades, con una historia digna de un pueblo que nunca se ha resignado a la sumisión y el vasallaje. Mientras los europeos se jactan de haber parido a un Alejandro Magno, a un César, a un Napoleón, nosotros, los latinoamericanos caribeños, podemos decir con orgullo que ésta ha sido tierra de Libertadores y nunca de conquistadores.
    En síntesis: tierras fértiles, ríos imponentes, biodiversidad, energía, minerales, una cultura milenaria y una historia heroica de lucha son las riquezas principales que sostienen la construcción del ALBA.

    4) El ALBA se apoya sobre valores anticapitalistas

    La mesa del ALBA está asentada en cuatro elementos, que son impensables dentro de los parámetros del capitalismo:
    a) La complementación.
    b) La cooperación.
    c) La solidaridad.
    d)El respeto a la soberanía de los países.
    Ejemplifiquemos con base en los acuerdos ya alcanzados.
    a) Complementación: Aquí se encuentran entre otros los acuerdos de Argentina y Venezuela. Argentina produce alimentos que hoy Venezuela necesita y Venezuela tiene combustibles que para la Argentina de hoy son indispensables. Complementación en base a nuestras potencialidades.
    b) Cooperación: Acuerdos petroleros entre Brasil y Venezuela. Brasil se especializa en la explotación petrolera “mar adentro”; Venezuela en la producción en “tierra firme”. Ahí entonces se produce un acuerdo de cooperación, cada uno socializa sus conocimientos en las áreas que más se ha especializado.
    c) Solidaridad: Petrocaribe. Los países caribeños tienen muy poca riqueza en hidrocarburos. Venezuela, de manera solidaria –sin regalar nada-, ayuda a estos países a adquirir combustibles a precios justos.
    d) Respeto a la soberanía: Todos los acuerdos sin excepción se realizan respetando la soberanía y el derecho a la autodeterminación de cada nación firmante.

    5) El ALBA es una construcción popular

    El ALBA es inconcebible sin la participación de los pueblos, que es “vital, como el oxígeno para los seres humanos”, dijo el comandante Chávez.
    Ya hace muchos años atrás, el general Perón se había manifestado sobre este tema, planteando la importancia de la participación popular en la tarea de la integración. Decía, el tres veces presidente de los argentinos, en la misma dirección que lo plantea Chávez, que la presencia de los pueblos en la lucha por la unidad latinoamericana caribeña es lo esencial, “porque los individuos mueren, los gobiernos pasan, pero los pueblos quedan”.
    Y en esa tarea titánica es que los pueblos definirán su futuro.

    6) El ALBA es un capítulo del proceso revolucionario mundial

    La tarea de los pueblos es titánica, colosal, como consecuencia de los desafíos que impone el momento. Veamos por ejemplo:
    Sin la participación activa de los pueblos es imposible, para cualquiera de nuestros países, alcanzar la verdadera independencia. Porque no puede haber independencia sin justicia social, “¡de qué vale la independencia, Simón, si los pobres siguen mendigando, si los indios siguen extendiendo la mano para pedir limosna!”, le escribía Manuela Saenz al Libertador, cuando este marchaba ya hacia su tumba, derrotado por los intereses egoístas de las oligarquías nativas y el colonialismo.

    Pero esa independencia sin justicia social no se alcanzará si los pueblos no avanzan hacia la unidad latinoamericana caribeña, porque solo en esa unidad es que se consolidará la verdadera independencia y justicia social.

    Y esa unidad de Nuestra América tampoco será suficiente si no logramos un nuevo orden mundial, no capitalista, que alcance la armonía entre las naciones, la convivencia pacífica entre los seres humanos y una nueva relación con el ambiente y la naturaleza.
    Vale decir, que la tarea de los pueblos es de lucha permanente hasta lograr un mundo con justicia, libertad e igualdad. El ALBA entonces, es un suceso, un eslabón en esta cadena de objetivos, del proceso revolucionario necesario para conservar la especie humana y enterrar cualquier forma de explotación del hombre por el hombre.

    7) El ALBA es una forma de integración que no parte de lo mercantil
    Lo primero que hay que hacer, en la nueva propuesta de integración, es romper con la lógica capitalista, la lógica del lucro y la ganancia, la lógica de la competencia, la lógica de la economía como crematística . El ALBA debe partir de la integración, en primera instancia, desde lo político y desde lo social. Y esto implica la movilización popular.
    Ahí tenemos, desde lo social, tareas que ya se vienen llevando y otras que deberán acometerse con la movilización de las fuerzas populares: campañas de alfabetización, de vacunación, de atención médica, la red de universidades populares, los talleres de artes y oficios, la red de medios de comunicación alternativos, la central de trabajadores latinoamericanos caribeños, la central de campesinos de Nuestra América, la red de defensa de nuestros recursos naturales, en fin, una cantidad de emprendimientos que deberán salir del seno del pueblo y los gobiernos progresistas del continente. Asimismo, desde lo político, debemos alentar iniciativas como la conformación de la Red de Parlamentarios para la Integración, constituida en El Salvador, a iniciativa del Frente Farabundo Martí para la Liberaci&oacut e;n Nacional (FMLN) y el Congreso Bolivariano de los Pueblos; contribuir a conformar una poderosa red de alcaldes e intendentes latinoamericanos caribeños, que impulsen mecanismos de integración desde el poder local; el apoyo y la solidaridad permanente con las fuerzas políticas progresistas que aspiran a lograr buenos resultados en las elecciones que se avecinan en todo el continente… Ahí están los compatriotas Evo Morales, Andrés Manuel López Obrador y Daniel Ortega, futuros presidentes de Bolivia, México y Nicaragua, respectivamente.

    Resumiendo, cada vez es más necesario que las fuerzas políticas y sociales de la América Latina Caribeña, las fuerzas democráticas, patrióticas, antiimperialistas, revolucionarias, se constituyan en un poderoso movimiento popular latinoamericano y del Caribe y actúen coordinadamente, como verdadero Estado Mayor de la revolución en Nuestra América. Esa es la propuesta del Congreso Bolivariano de los Pueblos.

    8) El ALBA es una herramienta política

    El ALBA debe ser una herramienta política para la liberación. Ahora, como toda herramienta deberá ser eficiente y flexible ante las circunstancias ¿Porqué digo esto? Porque creo que el ALBA deberá actuar también como barrera de contención ante las nuevas tácticas que el imperialismo utilizará para dominarnos. Por ejemplo: ante la derrota imperial de querer imponer el ALCA de un solo manotazo, aparecen los “alquitas”, los Tratados de Libre Comercio (TLC) como un camino indirecto para alcanzar el ALCA.
    El gobierno estadounidense pretende aprovechar la mayor debilidad que tenemos los latinoamericanos caribeños: la desunión. Entonces aplican la fórmula, inteligentemente yo diría, de derrotarnos uno a uno. .
    Pero ante esa nueva iniciativa colonialista, ante esa propuesta de veintipico de alquitas o TLC, que en la sumatoria parirían el ALCA, nosotros, los pueblos de Nuestra América, con los gobiernos progresistas y las organizaciones populares, tendremos que imponerles 100 “albitas”, 1000 “albitas”, 10000 “albitas”. Cada uno de estos acuerdos que se realicen con el espíritu del ALBA, serán ladrillos sólidos en la construcción de la Confederación de Repúblicas Latinoamericanas Caribeñas. Esa es la tarea de hoy de las fuerzas populares por la integración.

    9) El ALBA es el programa de la Revolución Latinoamericana Caribeña
    Los pueblos de Nuestra América hemos pasado a una nueva etapa. Debemos dar el salto de la etapa de la protesta (sin dejarla de lado, por supuesto), a la etapa de las propuestas. La resistencia es necesaria, pero es hora ya de pasar a la ofensiva.
    Por eso el programa ALBA debe ser construido con los pueblos y debe ser divulgado entre los pueblos. Las tres etapas propias de toda lucha revolucionaria debe ser trabajada también en la construcción del ALBA:
    a) Educar, convencer sobre la necesidad del ALBA.
    b) Propagandizar y difundir entre las masas populares la “buena nueva” del ALBA.
    c) Organizar y movilizar en torno a la construcción concreta de la integración entre los pueblos.
    Como muy bien decía el Canciller venezolano Alí Rodríguez, “es necesario que los pueblos sientan los beneficios de la integración”. Esa es tarea de las fuerzas populares, hacer llegar los beneficios de la integración a través de las campañas y misiones sociales.
    Recomiendo que leamos el folleto “Construyendo el ALBA desde los pueblos” , un verdadero programa revolucionario de integración, que surgió de las propuestas de las organizaciones populares latinoamericanas reunidas en infinidad de eventos y a través de varios años de lucha y esfuerzos. Ese material no es un material acabado, sino que se enriquece cotidianamente a través de las nuevas experiencias, aportes, estudios y emprendimientos que llevan adelante los diferentes artífices de la integración.

    10) El ALBA es un salto estratégico a una nueva etapa.
    El ALBA ya está instalado, les guste o no les guste a los imperialistas y a las oligarquías. De nosotros dependerá que avance más o menos aceleradamente. El ALBA cuenta con un dispositivo fundamental a la hora del combate:
    a) Cuenta con un líder decidido y que ya ha dado suficientes muestras de convicción y coraje: el comandante Hugo Chávez.

    b) Cuenta con un Estado Mayor de calidad, que son los dirigentes de las organizaciones populares de América Latina y el Caribe.

    c)  Y cuenta con un ejército de millones de soldados: el pueblo latinoamericano caribeño, dispuesto a construir, en paz, la Patria Grande de los Libertadores.

    Es por esto que la alternativa hoy ya no es “vencer o morir”; la alternativa de hoy es mucho más exigente, mucho más tremenda, de mayor responsabilidad aún. Como decía el patriota venezolano José Félix Ribas: “necesario es vencer”.
    Muchas gracias.

    Por Fernando Bossi. Congreso Bolivariano de los Pueblos.
    Exposición de Fernando Ramón Bossi, buy Secretario de Organización del Congreso Bolivariano de los Pueblos, en el Foro que se realizó en la III Cumbre de los Pueblos, Mar del Plata, 3 de noviembre de 2005.
    Antes de comenzar con la exposición, quiero agradecer a los organizadores de este evento el haberme invitado a participar y compartir con ustedes algunas reflexiones con respecto al ALBA.
    Asimismo debo manifestar que es un verdadero honor poder compartir esta tribuna con dirigentes de la talla de Jorge Ceballos, coordinador nacional del Movimiento Barrios de Pie y miembro del Secretariado Político del Congreso Bolivariano de los Pueblos, como también con el amigo Aníbal Mellano, genuino representante de las pequeñas y medianas empresas argentinas, hombre comprometido con la causa de los pueblos.
    Normalmente sucede que en las conferencias donde el tema central es el ALBA, la Alternativa Bolivariana para la América, no se habla del ALBA, sino que se habla sobre el ALCA. Se expone sobre el ALCA, se plantea todos los males que conlleva esta propuesta imperialista y se concluye afirmando que el ALBA es todo lo contrario. A lo sumo se mencionan algunos ejemplos: Petrosur, Telesur o Banco del Sur. Pocas veces se intenta explicar la propuesta bolivariana de integración, y cabe aclarar, que el ALBA no es solo una respuesta al ALCA, no es solo eso, sino que la trasciende en todos sus aspectos.
    Es por esto que, con la intención de no repetir la tradicional conferencia sobre el ALBA pero donde no se habla del ALBA sino del ALCA, es que me tomé la tarea de bosquejar 10 puntos de aproximación a la propuesta ALBA y el rol de los pueblos en su construcción.
    1) El ALBA es un proyecto histórico
    Si bien nace como propuesta alternativa al ALCA, el ALBA responde a una vieja y permanente confrontación entre los pueblos latinoamericanos caribeños y el imperialismo. Monroísmo versus Bolivarianismo, tal vez sea la mejor manera de plantear los proyectos en pugna. El primero, aquel que se resume en “América para los americanos”, en realidad “América para los norteamericanos”. Ese es el proyecto imperialista, de dominación, saqueo y rapiña. El segundo es la propuesta de unidad de los pueblos latinoamericanos caribeños, la idea del Libertador Simón Bolívar de conformar una Confederación de Repúblicas. En síntesis: una propuesta imperialista enfrentada a una propuesta de liberación. Hoy ALCA versus ALBA.
    Por lo tanto debemos de entender que el ALBA reco
    noce sus antecedentes en la mejor tradición de las luchas independentistas y por la unidad.
    Ahí aparece, entonces, la figura del Precursor, Francisco Miranda, con un Plan de Gobierno para esta región, a la que él llamaba Colombia. Y nos encontramos, sin duda, con la obra y el pensamiento del Libertado Simón Bolívar. Es necesario leer, estudiar, reflexionar sobre la “Carta de Jamaica”, su discurso en el Congreso de Angostura, la carta a Martín de Pueyrredón, la Convocatoria al Congreso Anfictiónico de Panamá, los acuerdos Mosquera-Monteagudo, Mosquera-O Higgins, Santamaría-Alaman, la correspondencia con José de San Martín y tantos otros documentos que anuncian el camino del ALBA.
    Y no nos podemos olvidar tampoco de Sucre, de las proclamas de Hidalgo y Morelos, del general San Martín, de Artigas y su reforma agraria, de la “Ley Gaucha” de Güemes, del Plan de Operaciones de Mariano Moreno, de los escritos económicos de Belgrano, de la obra de Simón Rodríguez, del proyecto de Federación de Bernardo Monteagudo, de la obra del hondureño Cecilio del Valle y de la lucha por la Confederación Centroamericana de Francisco Morazán. En todo ese período, de no más de 20 años, se generó, a través del pensamiento y la acción, doctrina revolucionaria, programas, proyectos, emprendimientos y leyes conducentes a la integración y la independencia con justicia social. Creo que es uno de los períodos más brillantes de nuestra historia.
    Pero también, en esa dirección, luego de la derrota del proyecto bolivariano, las fuerzas populares se recomponen y vuelven a la histórica lucha. Levantan banderas de unidad Eloy Alfaro en Ecuador, Martí en Cuba, Ezequiel Zamora en Venezuela, Felipe Varela en Argentina, Ramón Emeterio Betances en Puerto Rico… y tantos otros.
    El mismo gran patriota y revolucionario nicaragüense “El general de Hombres Libres”, Augusto César Sandino, escribirá su proyecto de unidad latinoamericana: “Plan para la realización del sueño supremo de Bolívar”. Y esto solo para mencionar algunos mojones de nuestra historia.
    Al buscar lo más contemporáneo, lo más reciente, aparecen Perón y Getulio Vargas con el ABC; Salvador Allende y la Universidad Latinoamericana; la voz de Fidel diciéndonos “Sólo habrá salvación en la unidad”; Francisco Caamaño desde la República Dominicana; Velasco Alvarado desde el Perú mariateguista y tupacamarista; Torres y Marcelo Quiroga Santa Cruz desde Bolivia; Omar Torrijos desde Panamá; Carlos Fonseca desde Nicaragua; João Goulart desde el Brasil; Gaitán desde Colombia; el Che Guevara desde toda Nuestra América… En fin… voces, guías que marcan un rumbo claro hacia la unidad y la segunda y definitiva independencia.
    Es por eso que el ALBA tiene antecedentes gloriosos, viene de lo profundo de la América insurgente, tiene raíces, hondas raíces que lo convierten en un proyecto histórico de construcción de la Patria Grande.
    2) El ALBA es creación heroica
    Como bien lo señalaba el amauta peruano José Carlos Mariátegui, la revolución en esta parte del mundo será “creación heroica, nunca copia o calco”. “O inventamos o erramos”, nos decía Simón Rodríguez. Vale decir que la tarea de construir el ALBA será sin manuales ni “fórmulas mágicas”.
    De nada nos sirven los ejemplos de la Unión Europea, ni mucho menos la forma en que Estados Unidos alcanzó su unidad, a costa de rapiña, genocidio indígena e invasiones. La Unión Europea tampoco, porque esa unión se establece de manera defensiva, bajo los parámetros del capitalismo y solo para acumular fuerza en su competencia con Estados Unidos y Japón. La Unión Europea es una estrategia de una serie de naciones en el marco de la lucha intercapitalista e interimperialista. Ninguno de estos son modelos de integración que nos puedan servir a los latinoamericanos caribeños.
    Es por esto que los americanos del Sur tendremos que inventar, bucear en nuestra historia, escuchar las “voces del pasado que nos señalan el futuro”, al decir de Eduardo Galeano; implantar un modelo endógeno regional que conduzca a una unidad que sea producto de nuestra propia obra, para cubrir nuestras necesidades y representar nuestros intereses.
    3) El ALBA se sostiene en las potencialidades de América Latina y el Caribe
    América Latina y el Caribe es una de las regiones más ricas en recursos naturales del planeta. Aprovechar nuestras potencialidades es la clave para el desarrollo y bienestar de nuestros pueblos.
    ¿Dónde están nuestras potencialidades y de qué manera las aprovechamos hoy? Donde quiera que busquemos encontraremos riquezas inmensas en nuestro continente; pero también encontraremos que esas riquezas no son usufructuadas por nuestros pueblos. Es por ello que en inmensas sabanas, llanos y pampas, con tierras inmejorables para la agricultura y la ganadería, con una potencialidad infinita para producir alimentos, conviven millones de nuestros hermanos que padecen hambre.
    Por otro lado, nuestra región es rica en energía y minerales. Petróleo, gas, carbón y energía eléctrica, gracias a los enormes recursos hídricos. Tampoco nos falta hierro, cobre, estaño, zinc, aluminio, oro, plata, cemento, cal. Sin embargo la ausencia de industrias y el proceso de desindustrialización desatado por la implementación de las políticas neoliberales es otro dato de la realidad.
    Tenemos la mayor reserva de agua potable del planeta, un recurso que hoy es estratégico y lo será mucho más en los próximos años. Pero pese a tener esa inmensa riqueza, más de un 30% de los 500.000 niños que se nos mueren por año, por razones que serían fácilmente evitables, mueren por diarrea infantil; a causa de falta de agua potable.
    Somos una de las regiones más ricas en biodiversidad. Por otro lado también somos la región donde más especies se van extinguiendo por la acción irracional de las empresas multinacionales.
    Tenemos una cultura de miles de años que ha sido sistemáticamente negada por la cultura elitista y extranjerizante. El aporte de las culturas de los pueblos originarios, su relación con la naturaleza y su cosmovisión, tienen que ser incorporadas urgentemente por nuestras sociedades, en la lucha por el mejoramiento de la convivencia humana y la vida en armonía con el ambiente. La diversidad y la originalidad son los pilares fundamentales de una frondosa cultura latinoamericana caribeña que hasta hoy ha sido secuestrada y negada para los propios latinoamericanos caribeños.
    Y también contamos, dentro de las enormes potencialidades, con una historia digna de un pueblo que nunca se ha resignado a la sumisión y el vasallaje. Mientras los europeos se jactan de haber parido a un Alejandro Magno, a un César, a un Napoleón, nosotros, los latinoamericanos caribeños, podemos decir con orgullo que ésta ha sido tierra de Libertadores y nunca de conquistadores.
    En síntesis: tierras fértiles, ríos imponentes, biodiversidad, energía, minerales, una cultura milenaria y una historia heroica de lucha son las riquezas principales que sostienen la construcción del ALBA.
    4) El ALBA se apoya sobre valores anticapitalistas
    La mesa del ALBA está asentada en cuatro elementos, que son impensables dentro de los parámetros del capitalismo:
    a) La complementación.
    b) La cooperación.
    c) La solidaridad.
    d)El respeto a la soberanía de los países.
    Ejemplifiquemos con base en los acuerdos ya alcanzados.
    a) Complementación: Aquí se encuentran entre otros los acuerdos de Argentina y Venezuela. Argentina produce alimentos que hoy Venezuela necesita y Venezuela tiene combustibles que para la Argentina de hoy son indispensables. Complementación en base a nuestras potencialidades.
    b) Cooperación: Acuerdos petroleros entre Brasil y Venezuela. Brasil se especializa en la explotación petrolera “mar adentro”; Venezuela en la producción en “tierra firme”. Ahí entonces se produce un acuerdo de cooperación, cada uno socializa sus conocimientos en las áreas que más se ha especializado.
    c) Solidaridad: Petrocaribe. Los países caribeños tienen muy poca riqueza en hidrocarburos. Venezuela, de manera solidaria –sin regalar nada-, ayuda a estos países a adquirir combustibles a precios justos.
    d) Respeto a la soberanía: Todos los acuerdos sin excepción se realizan respetando la soberanía y el derecho a la autodeterminación de cada nación firmante.
    5) El ALBA es una construcción popular
    El ALBA es inconcebible sin la participación de los pueblos, que es “vital, como el oxígeno para los seres humanos”, dijo el comandante Chávez.
    Ya hace muchos años atrás, el general Perón se había manifestado sobre este tema, planteando la importancia de la participación popular en la tarea de la integración. Decía, el tres veces presidente de los argentinos, en la misma dirección que lo plantea Chávez, que la presencia de los pueblos en la lucha por la unidad latinoamericana caribeña es lo esencial, “porque los individuos mueren, los gobiernos pasan, pero los pueblos quedan”.
    Y en esa tarea titánica es que los pueblos definirán su futuro.
    6) El ALBA es un capítulo del proceso revolucionario mundial
    La tarea de los pueblos es titánica, colosal, como consecuencia de los desafíos que impone el momento. Veamos por ejemplo:
    Sin la participación activa de los pueblos es imposible, para cualquiera de nuestros países, alcanzar la verdadera independencia. Porque no puede haber independencia sin justicia social, “¡de qué vale la independencia, Simón, si los pobres siguen mendigando, si los indios siguen extendiendo la mano para pedir limosna!”, le escribía Manuela Saenz al Libertador, cuando este marchaba ya hacia su tumba, derrotado por los intereses egoístas de las oligarquías nativas y el colonialismo.
    Pero esa independencia sin justicia social no se alcanzará si los pueblos no avanzan hacia la unidad latinoamericana caribeña, porque solo en esa unidad es que se consolidará la verdadera independencia y justicia social.
    Y esa unidad de Nuestra América tampoco será suficiente si no logramos un nuevo orden mundial, no capitalista, que alcance la armonía entre las naciones, la convivencia pacífica entre los seres humanos y una nueva relación con el ambiente y la naturaleza.
    Vale decir, que la tarea de los pueblos es de lucha permanente hasta lograr un mundo con justicia, libertad e igualdad. El ALBA entonces, es un suceso, un eslabón en esta cadena de objetivos, del proceso revolucionario necesario para conservar la especie humana y enterrar cualquier forma de explotación del hombre por el hombre.
    7) El ALBA es una forma de integración que no parte de lo mercantil
    Lo primero que hay que hacer, en la nueva propuesta de integración, es romper con la lógica capitalista, la lógica del lucro y la ganancia, la lógica de la competencia, la lógica de la economía como crematística . El ALBA debe partir de la integración, en primera instancia, desde lo político y desde lo social. Y esto implica la movilización popular.
    Ahí tenemos, desde lo social, tareas que ya se vienen llevando y otras que deberán acometerse con la movilización de las fuerzas populares: campañas de alfabetización, de vacunación, de atención médica, la red de universidades populares, los talleres de artes y oficios, la red de medios de comunicación alternativos, la central de trabajadores latinoamericanos caribeños, la central de campesinos de Nuestra América, la red de defensa de nuestros recursos naturales, en fin, una cantidad de emprendimientos que deberán salir del seno del pueblo y los gobiernos progresistas del continente. Asimismo, desde lo político, debemos alentar iniciativas como la conformación de la Red de Parlamentarios para la Integración, constituida en El Salvador, a iniciativa del Frente Farabundo Martí para la Liberaci&oacut e;n Nacional (FMLN) y el Congreso Bolivariano de los Pueblos; contribuir a conformar una poderosa red de alcaldes e intendentes latinoamericanos caribeños, que impulsen mecanismos de integración desde el poder local; el apoyo y la solidaridad permanente con las fuerzas políticas progresistas que aspiran a lograr buenos resultados en las elecciones que se avecinan en todo el continente… Ahí están los compatriotas Evo Morales, Andrés Manuel López Obrador y Daniel Ortega, futuros presidentes de Bolivia, México y Nicaragua, respectivamente.
    Resumiendo, cada vez es más necesario que las fuerzas políticas y sociales de la América Latina Caribeña, las fuerzas democráticas, patrióticas, antiimperialistas, revolucionarias, se constituyan en un poderoso movimiento popular latinoamericano y del Caribe y actúen coordinadamente, como verdadero Estado Mayor de la revolución en Nuestra América. Esa es la propuesta del Congreso Bolivariano de los Pueblos.
    8) El ALBA es una herramienta política
    El ALBA debe ser una herramienta política para la liberación. Ahora, como toda herramienta deberá ser eficiente y flexible ante las circunstancias ¿Porqué digo esto? Porque creo que el ALBA deberá actuar también como barrera de contención ante las nuevas tácticas que el imperialismo utilizará para dominarnos. Por ejemplo: ante la derrota imperial de querer imponer el ALCA de un solo manotazo, aparecen los “alquitas”, los Tratados de Libre Comercio (TLC) como un camino indirecto para alcanzar el ALCA.
    El gobierno estadounidense pretende aprovechar la mayor debilidad que tenemos los latinoamericanos caribeños: la desunión. Entonces aplican la fórmula, inteligentemente yo diría, de derrotarnos uno a uno. .
    Pero ante esa nueva iniciativa colonialista, ante esa propuesta de veintipico de alquitas o TLC, que en la sumatoria parirían el ALCA, nosotros, los pueblos de Nuestra América, con los gobiernos progresistas y las organizaciones populares, tendremos que imponerles 100 “albitas”, 1000 “albitas”, 10000 “albitas”. Cada uno de estos acuerdos que se realicen con el espíritu del ALBA, serán ladrillos sólidos en la construcción de la Confederación de Repúblicas Latinoamericanas Caribeñas. Esa es la tarea de hoy de las fuerzas populares por la integración.
    9) El ALBA es el programa de la Revolución Latinoamericana Caribeña
    Los pueblos de Nuestra América hemos pasado a una nueva etapa. Debemos dar el salto de la etapa de la protesta (sin dejarla de lado, por supuesto), a la etapa de las propuestas. La resistencia es necesaria, pero es hora ya de pasar a la ofensiva.
    Por eso el programa ALBA debe ser construido con los pueblos y debe ser divulgado entre los pueblos. Las tres etapas propias de toda lucha revolucionaria debe ser trabajada también en la construcción del ALBA:
    a) Educar, convencer sobre la necesidad del ALBA.
    b) Propagandizar y difundir entre las masas populares la “buena nueva” del ALBA.
    c) Organizar y movilizar en torno a la construcción concreta de la integración entre los pueblos.
    Como muy bien decía el Canciller venezolano Alí Rodríguez, “es necesario que los pueblos sientan los beneficios de la integración”. Esa es tarea de las fuerzas populares, hacer llegar los beneficios de la integración a través de las campañas y misiones sociales.
    Recomiendo que leamos el folleto “Construyendo el ALBA desde los pueblos” , un verdadero programa revolucionario de integración, que surgió de las propuestas de las organizaciones populares latinoamericanas reunidas en infinidad de eventos y a través de varios años de lucha y esfuerzos. Ese material no es un material acabado, sino que se enriquece cotidianamente a través de las nuevas experiencias, aportes, estudios y emprendimientos que llevan adelante los diferentes artífices de la integración.
    10) El ALBA es un salto estratégico a una nueva etapa.
    El ALBA ya está instalado, les guste o no les guste a los imperialistas y a las oligarquías. De nosotros dependerá que avance más o menos aceleradamente. El ALBA cuenta con un dispositivo fundamental a la hora del combate:
    a) Cuenta con un líder decidido y que ya ha dado suficientes muestras de convicción y coraje: el comandante Hugo Chávez.
    b) Cuenta con un Estado Mayor de calidad, que son los dirigentes de las organizaciones populares de América Latina y el Caribe.
    c)  Y cuenta con un ejército de millones de soldados: el pueblo latinoamericano caribeño, dispuesto a construir, en paz, la Patria Grande de los Libertadores.
    Es por esto que la alternativa hoy ya no es “vencer o morir”; la alternativa de hoy es mucho más exigente, mucho más tremenda, de mayor responsabilidad aún. Como decía el patriota venezolano José Félix Ribas: “necesario es vencer”.
    Muchas gracias.

    Draft prepared by Alexandra Spieldoch, Center of Concern/U.S. Gender and Trade Network, for distribution at Trade-Finance Meeting in Lima, Peru October 3-5, 2005 In assessing the different paths to regional integration in the Americas ? more specifically the mechanisms for trade-finance linkages in policymaking and the need to take stock of how liberalization is being pushed throughout the LAC region ? it is important that the social issues, as well as the reaffirmation of human rights and sustainable development, not be lost in the technical discussion. These are questions which are at the core of the work towards identifying the role of the state within a globalizing economy. Redefining the productive sector in the context of development must put the human person and the environment at the core of the
    discussion (as has obviously not been done to date). As such, it is important to challenge some of the myths and to identify some of the disturbing trends which are occurring today in the LAC region as a result of liberalization and to think about redefining our terms towards an alternative agenda.
    >Download PDF