Harare Declaration – A Global Call for Action to Stop EPAs

We salute this important historic moment which opens with the Summit of Cochabamba, which holds the challenge of deepening a process of regional integration which expresses the peoples’ interests.

The peoples of America have suffered from the application of an economic model which is based on market fundamentalism, privatisation and free trade, which has led to a growth in inequality, the deterioration of labour conditions, unemployment, the spread of informal-sector work, degradation of the environment, deepening discrimination against women, poverty, marginalisation of indigenous and rural communities and the loss of State capacity to promote development and economic policies.

With the aim of widening and deepening these policies, there were attempts to create the Free Trade Agreement of America (FTAA) and regional Free Trade Agreements, by which Governments abandoned any attempt at autonomous development based on the internal market which respect all human, social, economic, cultural and environmental rights.

The peoples of the Continent have been protagonists of a struggle against this model, contributing decisively to stopping FTAA and agreements between countries which privilege trade and the interests of multinationals.

This growing organisation of popular movements in South America includes indigenous communities, small-scale farmers, marginalised inhabitants of cities, women, young people, students, workers together with all the social organisations. They have defined this new political and social moment which is advancing in the formation of new governments sensitive to popular demands, who distance themselves from the agenda of the US Government and corporations and who seek their own path. This political time which South America is living offers an historical opportunity, which we can’t miss, to advance towards a true sovereign integration for the peoples.

The South American Community of Nations can not be an extension of the free trade model based on the exports of basic goods and natural resources, indebtedness and the unequal distribution of wealth.

The creation of a real South American Community of Nations can not be a process which excludes popular demands, therefore it needs an authentic social participation.

We consider that we need another type of integration in which cooperation prevails over competition, the rights of its peoples over commercial interests, food sovereignty over agroindustry, the actions of the State in providing wellbeing over privatisation, a sense of equity over the desire for profits, respect for the environment instead of the looting of natural resources and gender equity rather than sexual division of work. We also must prioritise the recognition, respect and promotion of indigenous communities’ contributions rather than the marginalisation, exploitation and conversion into folklore of their values and economic and traditional traditions.

The Community must be a promoter of peace and a guarantor of peoples’ human rights; and against imperial pretensions, opposed to the interference of troops, the installation of foreign military bases and the participation of occupying forces in third countries.

The efforts to construct a Community of South American Nations will only bear fruit, if we change the type of development and defend the sovereignty of nations

The peoples of the Continent will continue to promote integration, by and for the peoples, participating with our own demands and proposals.

We are willing to promote dialogue which leads to real results, maintaining our struggles of resistance which ensure the protagonism of popular movements in the process of integration, promoting true democracy and well-being for our peoples.

For the Integration of the Peoples, Another America is possible.

From the 27-30 March, decease 2006 we the undermentioned organisations involved in the Stop–EPA campaign, from Africa and Europe met in Harare, Zimbabwe, at meeting organised the umbrella of the Africa Trade Network. We deliberated on the developments since the campaign was adopted and discussed strategies for the coming period.

It has been two years since civil society organisations, social movements, and mass-membership organisations across Africa, the Caribbean, the Pacific and Europe adopted the campaign to STOP the Economic Partnership Agreements (EPAs) as currently designed and being negotiated between the European Union and ACP groups of countries.

The campaign was adopted on the grounds that in their current form, the EPAs are essentially free-trade agreements between unequal parties: Europe, with its overwhelming economic and political power, and the fragile and dependent economies of the ACP countries. In addition, the process of the negotiations is imbalanced and rushed, allowing the EU to impose its interests and agenda, and dictate the momentum of the negotiations to suit its own needs and purposes.

Two years since the adoption of the campaign, there is wide-spread recognition among governments, inter-governmental institutions, parliamentarians, civil society actors and a diverse range of social constituencies across the ACP, Europe and the rest of the world of the dangers posed by the EPAs to the economies and peoples of the ACP countries. This has yet not led to fundamental changes in the nature of the EPAs and the process of negotiations.

Member governments of the European Union, which have publicly adopted policy positions in direct contradiction to the negotiating mandate of the EC, have not followed up with action to change that mandate. Strong unofficial reservations expressed by other member-governments continue to remain as unofficial reservations.

For its part, the European Commission has constructed new rhetoric to sell the EPAs and justify continuation of its mandate. It has encouraged false hopes of increase in European development assistance to ACP countries, and used different forms of pressure, including aid conditionality, to continue to override the reluctance of ACP groups to yield to its interests.

On the part of governments in the ACP countries, individual and collective public positions, which have effectively repudiated the EPAs in their current forms are not translated into policy and negotiating positions. Dependency on aid, and concern for the maintenance of preferences seem to have disproportionately influenced governments into accepting the ECs terms and parameters of negotiations. In some instances, secretariats of the regional groups and machineries whose role it is to facilitate the negotiations on behalf of the ACP groupings have abandoned the policy directions of national governments which make up the region, and have tended to promote the perspectives of the EC.

An immediate outcome of these developments is the negative effect of the EPA negotiations on autonomous ACP regional integration initiatives. On-going regional integration initiatives and processes have been hijacked and diverted, and many historical and political African regional configurations have been split.

Added to the above situation, the current deadlock in the WTO negotiations has lead to increasing pressure on bilateral and regional free trade negotiations.

All these developments affirm validity of the positions and concerns of the STOP EPA campaign, and make its demands even more urgent.

We are inspired by the global mobilisation that the campaign has generated and welcome the increasing numbers of diverse groups of stakeholders and networks of actors who have joined or otherwise taken up the cause of the campaign.

Although civil society engagement with the EPA negotiations is increasing, we are still very much concerned by the lack of involvement of the majority of affected citizens, workers and farmers in ACP countries and the lack of openness and transparency in the negotiations.

We reaffirm the positions and demands of the STOP EPA campaign. We reject the EPAs in their current form. They will:

•    expand Europe’s access to ACP markets for its goods, services, and investments; expose ACP producers to unfair European competition in domestic and regional markets, and increase the domination and concentration of European firms, goods and services;
•    thereby lead to deeper unemployment, loss of livelihoods, food insecurity and social and gender inequity and inequality as well as undermine human and social rights; 
•    endanger the ongoing but fragile processes of regional integration among the ACP countries; and deepen – and prolong – the socio-economic decline and political fragility that characterises most ACP countries.

We re-affirm our demand for an overhaul and review of the EU’s neo-liberal external trade policy, particularly with respect to developing countries, and demanded that EU-ACP trade cooperation should be founded on an approach that:
•    is based on a principle of non-reciprocity, as instituted in Generalised System of Preferences and special and differential treatment in the WTO;
•    protects ACP producers domestic and regional markets; 
•    reverses the pressure for trade and investment liberalisation; and 
•    allows the necessary policy space and supports ACP countries to pursue their own development strategies.

In further pursuit of the goals and demands of the campaign we make the following demands.

Governments of the ACP countries
The primary responsibility for promoting the interests and needs of the people in ACP countries and of defending them against the ravages of free trade agreements with the EU lies with the governments in the ACP countries, both in their individual and collective capacities, acting at national, regional and ACP-wide levels. In this regard we call upon ACP governments:

•    to heed to the call of their citizens over the EPAs and ensure that hopes over increased aid, and concerns about the future of preferences does not lead to sacrificing the economic and developmental future of their people;
•    to live up to their policy statements and positions on the EPAs and to translate these into positions in the processes of engagement over the EPA;
•    to reassert their policy authority on the negotiations over the regional secretariats, and to ensure that the latter do not undermine stated policy positions in the negotiations;

European Union – Member States

The European Union has a responsibility to live up to its stated developmental objectives. We demand that member-governments of the European Union should 
•    assert their authority over the EC on issues concerning ACP-EU co-operation for the promotion of sustainable development in the ACP countries;
•    change the EC’s negotiating mandate in relation to the EPA negotiations; and to this end;
•    ensure that the EPA review mandated for this year is comprehensive, all-inclusive, transparent, and substantive and places sustainable development at the centre.

Finally we call upon civil society organisations, social movements, and mass-membership organisations across the ACP and Europe to join the campaign, and engage with their governments on the issues of ACP development in relation to the EU.

Harare, Thursday, 30 March 2006

1.    Mwelekeo wa NGO (MWENGO), Zimbabwe
2.    Third World Network-Africa, Ghana
3.    ACDIC, Cameroon
4.    Alternative Information Development Centre
5.    AIPAD TRUST, Zimbabwe
6.    Alternatives to Neo-liberalism in Southern Africa (ANSA)
7.    Civil Society Trade Network of Zambia
8.    CECIDE, Guinea
9.    Christian Relief and Development Association (CRDA), Ethiopia
10.    Economic Justice Network, South Africa
11.    ENDA, Senegal
12.    GENTA, South Africa
13.    GRAPAD, Benin
14.    InterAfrica Group, Ethiopia
15.    Labour and Economic Development Research Institute (LEDRIZ), Zimbabwe
16.    Malawi Economic Justice And Network 
17.    Southern African People’s Solidarity Network (SAPSN)
18.    SEATINI, Zimbabwe
19.    TradesCentre, Zimbabwe
20.    Zimbabwe Coalition on Debt and Development (ZIMCODD), Zimbabwe
21.    Action Aid
22.    ACORD
23.    Both Ends
24.    ChristianAid
25.    ICCO
26.    KASA/WERKSTATT OKONOMIE
27.    One World Action (VIA Project)
28.    Oxfam International
29.    Traidcraft
30.    11.11.11

Breaking Imperial Ties: Venezuela and ALBA

Mario Hubert Garrido
Mario Hubert Garrido
La Habana, 13 abr (PL) Frente a los Tratados de Libre Comercio (TLC), proyecto neoliberal impulsado por Estados Unidos, el gobierno boliviano abogó hoy aquí por una relación estrecha entre los pueblos en interés de su bienestar social.
? Proponen respaldo jurídico a lucha contra el ALCA
Al intervenir ante delegados al V Encuentro Hemisférico de Lucha contra el Area de Libre Comercio de las Américas (ALCA), que sesiona en esta capital hasta el sábado, Pablo Solón expuso a nombre del ejecutivo de Evo Morales lo que estimó una alternativa para la integración de las naciones de la región.
El Tratado de Comercio con los Pueblos (TCP) es una respuesta al agotamiento del modelo neoliberal, fundado en la desregulación, la privatización y la apertura indiscriminada de los mercados, aseveró.
Solón explicó a representantes de agrupaciones y movimientos sociales que a diferencia del ideario capitalista, el TCP introduce en el debate sobre la integración comercial la complementación, la cooperación, la solidaridad y el respeto a la soberanía nacional.
La iniciativa que defiende el gobierno del presidente Morales, añadió, incorpora objetivos como la reducción efectiva de la pobreza, la preservación de las comunidades indígenas, los recursos naturales y los valores autóctonos de la cultura.
EL TCP entiende el comercio y la inversión no como fines en sí mismos, sino como medios del desarrollo y el beneficio para las naciones del continente, precisó.
A preguntas de Prensa Latina, el también representante del movimiento boliviano por la soberanía y la integración de los pueblos, señaló que el TCP no se contrapone a la Alternativa Bolivariana para las Américas (ALBA).
En ese sentido significó que se trata de un proceso que prevé paso a paso en el plano bilateral el fortalecimiento de los productores y reconoce el derecho de los pueblos a definir sus propias políticas agrícola y alimentaria.
También comentó que el TCP postula la complementariedad frente a la competencia, la convivencia con la naturaleza en contraposición con la explotación irracional de los recursos y la propiedad social frente a la privatización.
Bolivia se propone alcanzar una integración que trascienda el campo comercial y cuya filosofía es alcanzar el desarrollo endógeno justo y sustentable en base a principios comunitarios.
Una vertiente particular del TCP es la indígena, que promueve el trabajo como un espacio de felicidad para la familia, en respuesta a milenarias tradiciones, y donde el mercado deje de ser el nuevo patrón, comentó.
Sobre las amenazas de los TLC, cuyas acciones más recientes están en los pactos concertados por Estados Unidos con Centroamérica, Colombia y Perú, señaló la subordinación a las grandes trasnacionales, en detrimento de la autodeterminación.
La falacia del libre comercio es parte de la estrategia imperialista de dominación junto al militarismo y una represión que amenaza criminalizar la protesta, desgranada ahora en tratados bilaterales y plurilaterales que igualmente ponen al hemisferio en peligro, subrayó.
En la segunda jornada del foro contra el ALCA también expusieron líderes de la Convergencia de los Movimientos de los Pueblos de las Américas (COMPA), Jubileo Sur, la Organización Continental Latinoamericana y Caribeña de Estudiantes (OCLAE) y la Marcha Mundial de las Mujeres.
Representantes de la red en defensa de la humanidad y contra el terrorismo mostraron además sus páginas web y resaltaron el papel de los intelectuales en la crítica de los agonizantes modelos neoliberales y la búsqueda de alternativas, donde el ALBA despunta como paradigma.
A 12 años de establecido el primer tratado de libre comercio entre Estados Unidos, Canadá y México, hay más pobreza en los países del Tercer Mundo, menos empleo y salario, lo que demuestra que cualquier proyecto similar ya perdió su primera batalla en América Latina, subrayaron.
Los asistentes a la quinta edición de estos encuentros hemisféricos condenaron también los intentos de Estados Unidos de militarizar la región so pretexto de la lucha contra el narcotráfico y el terrorismo.
pgh/ga

By Ernesto Montero and Haraldo Romero, salve www.trabajadores.co.cu
Before an audience of more than 25,000 gathered at Havana’s Revolution Square, which coincided with the signing of the Bolivarian Alternative for the Americas (ALBA) agreement one year ago between Cuba and Venezuela, Bolivia officially joined the regional integration agreement through its Peoples Trade Agreement (TCP).

Cuban president Fidel Castro, Bolivia’s Evo Morales and the Venezuelan leader Hugo Chavez presided over a crucial event in the history of Latin American integration.

Before an audience of more than 25,000 gathered at Havana’s Revolution Square, which coincided with the signing of the Bolivarian Alternative for the Americas (ALBA) agreement one year ago between Cuba and Venezuela, Bolivia officially joined the regional integration agreement through its Peoples Trade Agreement (TCP).

Earlier, during a meeting in the Havana Convention Center, Evo Morales proposed to Hugo Chavez that the Andean Community of Nations (CAN) be recast under the name “Anti-imperialist Community of Nations,” in response to the fact that two member states of CAN, Columbia and Peru, had signed unilateral Free Trade Agreements with the United States.

“We must re-establish CAN, and we have already thought of a new name: the Anti-imperialist Community of Nations,” said Morales as he signed the document joining Bolivia to the ALBA agreement, along with co-signers Fidel Castro and Hugo Chavez.

The idea for the ALBA agreement -a model of regional political and economical integration based on solidarity- was first endorsed by Fidel Castro and Hugo Chavez in December 2004. It was subsequently consolidated with a set of agreements on April 29, 2006, created as an alternative to the Free Trade Area of the Americas (FTAA) agreement that the US government is continuing to force upon the region.

President Morales was the first to speak at the event, also attended by Sandinista leader and presidential candidate Daniel Ortega. “We never thought we would make it to where we have come,” said Morales, speaking of Bolivia’s inclusion in the struggle of Cuba and Venezuela. He added that his country is now “united with big brother Fidel Castro in the integration of Latin America.”

“We want to do our part in this great unity of Latin America and the Caribbean for our liberation. The indigenous peoples of Bolivia and America were condemned to extermination, historically looked down upon and humiliated, marginalized and excluded. We in Bolivia have decided to liberate our country.

“Thanks to a democratic revolution we were victorious last year and now we want to tell our Commander-in-chiefs that we will be at their side until we have liberated Latin America. To achieve this, we must gain control of our natural resources,” said Morales.

“We are prepared to acquire control over Bolivia’s national oil resources, to continue the struggle of our ancestors, of Che Guevara and of so many political and trade union leaders throughout Latin America. Our people will never abandon this struggle for our natural resources,” he said.

“There are now three of us to defend the peoples of Latin American, and I am convinced that this new peoples’ trade agreement, within the framework of ALBA, will be joined by other countries in the region,” said Morales.

Evo Morales then took the opportunity to invite Peruvian presidential candidate Ollanta Humala who is currently facing Alan Garcia in the second round of elections, to join them.

Morales urged Humala to participate in the inauguration in La Paz of “Operation Miracle” – a humanitarian initiative spearheaded by Cuba and Venezuela aimed at providing corrective eye-surgery to millions of Latin Americans over the next few years.

The Bolivarian president thanked Fidel Castro and Hugo Chavez and their countries for supporting this program that will provide thousands of low-income Bolivians with free eye surgery.

“Small solutions begin this way, in the government’s first three months of the Movement Toward Socialism, which is attempting to recast Bolivia so as to put an end to the colonial status and free-market “neo-liberal” economics. Our natural resources should be placed in the hands of the Bolivian people,” he asserted.

“The industrialization of the natural gas, he added, will be a solution so that our country ceases being a beggar state, as the preceding governments left it. This is a struggle for independence and socialism, despite the resistance of some oligarchic sectors in my country. But the Bolivian people will defeat that oligarchy.”

Morales added that “I agree with what we have signed today, which will not only integrate our three countries, but many countries.” He then expressed his thanks for a recent credit of $100 million and a donation of another $30 millions to Bolivia from Venezuela.
“Bolivia is not alone, but neither are you,” he assured, referring to Cuba and Venezuela. “Many social and political movements will continue to be joined with this motion that you lead.” He stated that he had not made a mistake when predicting the future of many Cubas and many Fidels in Latin America.

“There are provocations, there are conspiracies in Bolivia, but we are not afraid of them. It is the time to stand up for Latin America and to unite, regardless of regional or other interests. The struggle for our three countries continues.”

In his speech, Morales described Fidel Castro as revolutionary sage and Chavez as the revolutionary father, while he called himself a revolutionary son of these two leaders. “They are three revolutions, including the cultural revolution in Bolivia,” he said.

source link: Political Affairs Magazine

Before an audience of more than 25, health 000 gathered at Havana’s Revolution Square, which coincided with the signing of the Bolivarian Alternative for the Americas (ALBA) agreement one year ago between Cuba and Venezuela, Bolivia officially joined the regional integration agreement through its Peoples Trade Agreement (TCP).
1 May 2006
Bolivian President Calls for Creation of Anti-imperialist Community of Nations
By Ernesto Montero and Haraldo Romero, www.trabajadores.co.cu
Cuban president Fidel Castro, Bolivia’s Evo Morales and the Venezuelan leader Hugo Chavez presided over a crucial event in the history of Latin American integration.
Before an audience of more than 25,000 gathered at Havana’s Revolution Square, which coincided with the signing of the Bolivarian Alternative for the Americas (ALBA) agreement one year ago between Cuba and Venezuela, Bolivia officially joined the regional integration agreement through its Peoples Trade Agreement (TCP).
Earlier, during a meeting in the Havana Convention Center, Evo Morales proposed to Hugo Chavez that the Andean Community of Nations (CAN) be recast under the name “Anti-imperialist Community of Nations,” in response to the fact that two member states of CAN, Columbia and Peru, had signed unilateral Free Trade Agreements with the United States.
“We must re-establish CAN, and we have already thought of a new name: the Anti-imperialist Community of Nations,” said Morales as he signed the document joining Bolivia to the ALBA agreement, along with co-signers Fidel Castro and Hugo Chavez.
The idea for the ALBA agreement -a model of regional political and economical integration based on solidarity- was first endorsed by Fidel Castro and Hugo Chavez in December 2004. It was subsequently consolidated with a set of agreements on April 29, 2006, created as an alternative to the Free Trade Area of the Americas (FTAA) agreement that the US government is continuing to force upon the region.
President Morales was the first to speak at the event, also attended by Sandinista leader and presidential candidate Daniel Ortega. “We never thought we would make it to where we have come,” said Morales, speaking of Bolivia’s inclusion in the struggle of Cuba and Venezuela. He added that his country is now “united with big brother Fidel Castro in the integration of Latin America.”
“We want to do our part in this great unity of Latin America and the Caribbean for our liberation. The indigenous peoples of Bolivia and America were condemned to extermination, historically looked down upon and humiliated, marginalized and excluded. We in Bolivia have decided to liberate our country.
“Thanks to a democratic revolution we were victorious last year and now we want to tell our Commander-in-chiefs that we will be at their side until we have liberated Latin America. To achieve this, we must gain control of our natural resources,” said Morales.
“We are prepared to acquire control over Bolivia’s national oil resources, to continue the struggle of our ancestors, of Che Guevara and of so many political and trade union leaders throughout Latin America. Our people will never abandon this struggle for our natural resources,” he said.
“There are now three of us to defend the peoples of Latin American, and I am convinced that this new peoples’ trade agreement, within the framework of ALBA, will be joined by other countries in the region,” said Morales.
Evo Morales then took the opportunity to invite Peruvian presidential candidate Ollanta Humala who is currently facing Alan Garcia in the second round of elections, to join them.
Morales urged Humala to participate in the inauguration in La Paz of “Operation Miracle” – a humanitarian initiative spearheaded by Cuba and Venezuela aimed at providing corrective eye-surgery to millions of Latin Americans over the next few years.
The Bolivarian president thanked Fidel Castro and Hugo Chavez and their countries for supporting this program that will provide thousands of low-income Bolivians with free eye surgery.
“Small solutions begin this way, in the government’s first three months of the Movement Toward Socialism, which is attempting to recast Bolivia so as to put an end to the colonial status and free-market “neo-liberal” economics. Our natural resources should be placed in the hands of the Bolivian people,” he asserted.
“The industrialization of the natural gas, he added, will be a solution so that our country ceases being a beggar state, as the preceding governments left it. This is a struggle for independence and socialism, despite the resistance of some oligarchic sectors in my country. But the Bolivian people will defeat that oligarchy.”
Morales added that “I agree with what we have signed today, which will not only integrate our three countries, but many countries.” He then expressed his thanks for a recent credit of $100 million and a donation of another $30 millions to Bolivia from Venezuela.
“Bolivia is not alone, but neither are you,” he assured, referring to Cuba and Venezuela. “Many social and political movements will continue to be joined with this motion that you lead.” He stated that he had not made a mistake when predicting the future of many Cubas and many Fidels in Latin America.
“There are provocations, there are conspiracies in Bolivia, but we are not afraid of them. It is the time to stand up for Latin America and to unite, regardless of regional or other interests. The struggle for our three countries continues.”
In his speech, Morales described Fidel Castro as revolutionary sage and Chavez as the revolutionary father, while he called himself a revolutionary son of these two leaders. “They are three revolutions, including the cultural revolution in Bolivia,” he said.
source link: Political Affairs Magazine
By Ernesto Montero and Haraldo Romero, pharmacy www.trabajadores.co.cu
Before an audience of more than 25,000 gathered at Havana’s Revolution Square, which coincided with the signing of the Bolivarian Alternative for the Americas (ALBA) agreement one year ago between Cuba and Venezuela, Bolivia officially joined the regional integration agreement through its Peoples Trade Agreement (TCP).
Cuban president Fidel Castro, Bolivia’s Evo Morales and the Venezuelan leader Hugo Chavez presided over a crucial event in the history of Latin American integration.
Before an audience of more than 25,000 gathered at Havana’s Revolution Square, which coincided with the signing of the Bolivarian Alternative for the Americas (ALBA) agreement one year ago between Cuba and Venezuela, Bolivia officially joined the regional integration agreement through its Peoples Trade Agreement (TCP).
Earlier, during a meeting in the Havana Convention Center, Evo Morales proposed to Hugo Chavez that the Andean Community of Nations (CAN) be recast under the name “Anti-imperialist Community of Nations,” in response to the fact that two member states of CAN, Columbia and Peru, had signed unilateral Free Trade Agreements with the United States.
“We must re-establish CAN, and we have already thought of a new name: the Anti-imperialist Community of Nations,” said Morales as he signed the document joining Bolivia to the ALBA agreement, along with co-signers Fidel Castro and Hugo Chavez.
The idea for the ALBA agreement -a model of regional political and economical integration based on solidarity- was first endorsed by Fidel Castro and Hugo Chavez in December 2004. It was subsequently consolidated with a set of agreements on April 29, 2006, created as an alternative to the Free Trade Area of the Americas (FTAA) agreement that the US government is continuing to force upon the region.
President Morales was the first to speak at the event, also attended by Sandinista leader and presidential candidate Daniel Ortega. “We never thought we would make it to where we have come,” said Morales, speaking of Bolivia’s inclusion in the struggle of Cuba and Venezuela. He added that his country is now “united with big brother Fidel Castro in the integration of Latin America.”
“We want to do our part in this great unity of Latin America and the Caribbean for our liberation. The indigenous peoples of Bolivia and America were condemned to extermination, historically looked down upon and humiliated, marginalized and excluded. We in Bolivia have decided to liberate our country.
“Thanks to a democratic revolution we were victorious last year and now we want to tell our Commander-in-chiefs that we will be at their side until we have liberated Latin America. To achieve this, we must gain control of our natural resources,” said Morales.
“We are prepared to acquire control over Bolivia’s national oil resources, to continue the struggle of our ancestors, of Che Guevara and of so many political and trade union leaders throughout Latin America. Our people will never abandon this struggle for our natural resources,” he said.
“There are now three of us to defend the peoples of Latin American, and I am convinced that this new peoples’ trade agreement, within the framework of ALBA, will be joined by other countries in the region,” said Morales.
Evo Morales then took the opportunity to invite Peruvian presidential candidate Ollanta Humala who is currently facing Alan Garcia in the second round of elections, to join them.
Morales urged Humala to participate in the inauguration in La Paz of “Operation Miracle” – a humanitarian initiative spearheaded by Cuba and Venezuela aimed at providing corrective eye-surgery to millions of Latin Americans over the next few years.
The Bolivarian president thanked Fidel Castro and Hugo Chavez and their countries for supporting this program that will provide thousands of low-income Bolivians with free eye surgery.
“Small solutions begin this way, in the government’s first three months of the Movement Toward Socialism, which is attempting to recast Bolivia so as to put an end to the colonial status and free-market “neo-liberal” economics. Our natural resources should be placed in the hands of the Bolivian people,” he asserted.
“The industrialization of the natural gas, he added, will be a solution so that our country ceases being a beggar state, as the preceding governments left it. This is a struggle for independence and socialism, despite the resistance of some oligarchic sectors in my country. But the Bolivian people will defeat that oligarchy.”
Morales added that “I agree with what we have signed today, which will not only integrate our three countries, but many countries.” He then expressed his thanks for a recent credit of $100 million and a donation of another $30 millions to Bolivia from Venezuela.
“Bolivia is not alone, but neither are you,” he assured, referring to Cuba and Venezuela. “Many social and political movements will continue to be joined with this motion that you lead.” He stated that he had not made a mistake when predicting the future of many Cubas and many Fidels in Latin America.
“There are provocations, there are conspiracies in Bolivia, but we are not afraid of them. It is the time to stand up for Latin America and to unite, regardless of regional or other interests. The struggle for our three countries continues.”
In his speech, Morales described Fidel Castro as revolutionary sage and Chavez as the revolutionary father, while he called himself a revolutionary son of these two leaders. “They are three revolutions, including the cultural revolution in Bolivia,” he said.
source link: Political Affairs Magazine

Tim Anderson Green Left Weekly

In late 2005, pilule while war raged in the Middle East and oil prices rose drastically, governments and oil companies repeated the “market forces” mantra, saying there was nothing they could do about oil prices. However, the Venezuelan government-owned US-based petrol distribution company Citgo (with eight refineries and 14,000 petrol stations across the US) decided to discount up to 10% of its US sales, so that poor families in cold-weather US states could have access to heating oil over the northern winter. Citgo sold over 40 million gallons of oil to 150,000 poor US households at a 40% discount.
anderson_breakingimperialties

Las disyuntivas del ALBA

Elizabeth Jelin
The current process of globalization is effecting substantial changes in the economic, thumb social and political organization of the world today. Inter- national capital flows, the opening up and deregulation of national economies, the end of the Cold War, and technological expansion and revolution in the fields of information and communication, are bringing about social and cultural transformations of enormous significance. Download the article (PDF)

Claudio Katz

El ALBA es un proyecto opuesto al ALCA e inicialmente diferenciado del
MERCOSUR. Constituye un resultado del proceso bolivariano y comparte los dilemas de esa experiencia. El intercambio cooperativo que realizan Cuba y Venezuela retrata el embrión de una asociación, sick que podría sustituir los principios de la competencia y el librecomercio por normas de
complementación y solidaridad.
>Descargar el articulo (PDF)

Whither Asian Regionalism

David Capie
This chapter addresses new patterns of multilateral cooperation in Asia, troche focusing on new sets of connections emerging between what have traditionally been distinct sub-regions. In particular, it addresses the burgeoning linkages between Southeast and Northeast Asia that have crystallized in the ASEAN + 3 (APT) process. The chapter is in three parts. The first section reviews recent developments in East Asian regionalism and examines the motivations behind this new track of institutional cooperation. The second section critically examines the prospects for success, pills particularly whether APT will be able to overcome the political and strategic obstacles that stand in the way of some of its more ambitious goals. The third section considers the extent to which new East Asian institutions will prove to be complementary to, or competitive with, the existing Asia-Pacific framework.

Amitav Acharya

Whither Asian regionalism at a time of unipolar US dominance, bilateral trade agreements, and the emerging tripolar Asian power configuration featuring China, Japan, and India?
>Download PDF

El ALBA algo diferente, novedoso

Rosalba Icaza, information pills Peter Newell and Marcelo Saguier
The latest wave of trade integration schemes promoted in the Americas since the 1990s has been subject to mounting criticism about the social and environmental costs trade liberalisation brings in its wake. Opposition to neo-liberal models of regional trade integration forms part of broader movements that define themselves in opposition to neo-liberal globalisation in general, story which register concern about the imbalance between investor rights and responsibilities and the lack of checks on rising corporate power. Amid accusations of rich clubs of economic elites crafting the terms of agreements that serve narrow economic interests, it is unsurprising that there have been calls to democratise trade policy; to open it up to plurality of participants, interests and agendas, to revisit fundamentally the question of who and what is trade for.
REad more (PDF)caza_democratisationoftrade

Gonzalo Berrón

La avanzada del “libre comercio” es global y se expresa de múltiples formas

Del 9 al 13 de noviembre pasados, en San Pablo, Brasil, más de 70 delegados de movimientos y organizaciones sociales del mundo entero, pertenecientes a la red Nuestro Mundo No Está en Venta, se reunieron para evaluar la coyuntura de las negociaciones de la Organización Mundial del Comercio (OMC) y definir sus estrategias de acción. Facilitada por la reciente suspensión, por tiempo indeterminado, de las negociaciones en éste ámbito global del comercio, el análisis realizado se centró en la constatación de algo que en nuestra región ya es conocido, pero que a nivel global parecía oculto tras las negociaciones de la OMC: el “libre comercio” se extiende de múltiples formas, a través de múltiples acuerdos y de forma similar en todas las regiones del planeta.

En las Américas, esta ola arranca en 1989 con el Acuerdo del Libre Comercio Estados Unidos- Canadá, sigue con el Tratado de Libre Comercio de América del Norte (TLCAN), que incorpora a México, y luego con la tentativa fallida del gobierno de los Estados Unidos para crear un Área de Libre Comercio de las Américas (ALCA). Ante la lentitud de las negociaciones de ésta última, se asiste a otra ola de acuerdos, que incluyeron primero a Chile (2003), pero después a los países de América Central, República Dominicana (DR-CAFTA, como se lo conoce en inglés) y Panamá; y lo más reciente, los TLCs con Colombia y Perú.

Como si esto fuera poco, dicha “ola de libre comercio” viene también de Europa, con los llamados Acuerdos de Asociación que la Unión Europea (UE) negocia con las regiones de nuestro Continente. Ya lo ha hecho con Chile y México, lo intentó con el Mercosur y, desde mayo de 2006, ha estado en negociaciones con América Central y la Comunidad Andina. Con los países, negocia acuerdos similares, en el marco de lo que ellos denominan Economic Partnership Agreements (EPAs), que no son otra cosa que una revisión de los términos de los acuerdos preexistentes entre la UE y los países de África, el Caribe y el Pacífico, de corte librecambista y ya no de tratamiento especial como los anteriores. De esta manera, así como en las Américas, la pulsión del libre cambio, empujada desde las potencias económicas del Norte, se extiende por todo el planeta con ímpetu y diversidad de formas.

Sin embargo, lo trágico de este escenario está dado ya no por la esperada agresividad de la Unión Europea y los Estados Unidos en el comercio, sino por el hecho de que el libre comercio es adoptado en muchos lugares como un credo religioso que orienta la política externa de los países en desarrollo. La hegemonía de la ideología del libre comercio ha sido tan fuertemente implantada en los años 90 que, pese a haber recibido algunos reveses, aquellos gobiernos que no confían en su credo se ven sometidos a intensas críticas y, generalmente, son acusados de “antiguos” o “anticuados”, cuando no de “aislacionistas” o “proteccionistas”. Este último término es empleado de forma despectiva, ¡cuando proteger pueblos y economías nacionales debería ser una de las obligaciones de todo buen gobernante!

Así, Asia, Japón y China, en particular, pero también otros países que ya se han incorporado “exitosamente” al mercado global, avanzan con acuerdos regionales de libre comercio. En África sucede lo mismo: los procesos de integración regional aspiran, siempre como fin último, al libre comercio. En las Américas, esta tentación, siempre presente, ha encontrado algunos obstáculos, pero sin dudas se plantea como una de las batallas más duras en el interior de los bloques regionales.

En este punto, entramos en el tema que nos convoca: la relación entre comercio y los procesos de integración entre los países, en particular entre los países en desarrollo. Esta cuestión tiene dos posibles abordajes. El primero es el que se refiere a los acuerdos de libre comercio de la región, o de países de la región, con bloques o países de fuera de la misma (por ejemplo, en la CAN, el acuerdo de Colombia con los EEUU). El segundo abordaje es el del libre comercio al interior de la región como meta final del proceso de integración. Ambos temas son polémicos.

El libre comercio: una amenaza externa a la integración

La primera es la gran amenaza para los procesos de integración, pues representa el intento de actores extrarregionales de impedir, por la vía del comercio, el avance de alternativas regionales de desarrollo económico y social. En este sentido, la consolidación de bloques económicos de diversa escala pero que, con potencialidades para implementar estrategias de desarrollo autónomo y de ampliación de mercados regionales más vigorosos, podría redundar en el fortalecimiento geopolítico de grupos de países de las Américas, es visualizada como una amenaza estratégica que hay que detener. Así han operado en nuestras Américas los acuerdos del CAFTA, que destruyen el proceso integrador del Sistema de Integración Centroamericano, al determinar niveles diferenciados de apertura económica respecto a los Estados Unidos y poner a la región a trabajar ya no en función de la autonomía económica integral, sino sólo de aquellos nichos de producción orientados al mercado norteamericano. El caso de la Comunidad Andina de Naciones es más fuerte, pues ésta es poseedora de una institucionalidad mayor y más estricta en términos comerciales, y es, ahora, víctima de los acuerdos firmados por Colombia y Perú, que desafían esa institucionalidad, ponen en crisis todo el proceso de integración y han provocado, de hecho, la salida de uno de sus principales miembros, Venezuela. Finalmente, ésta es la misma estrategia usada en el caso de la propuesta de un TLC con Uruguay, recientemente levantada por los Estados Unidos y vista con interés por algunos miembros del Gobierno del país sudamericano –por suerte, hoy congelada-.

Entonces, si los acuerdos de “libre comercio” han significado, desde esta perspectiva, una amenaza a los procesos de integración en curso, esa amenaza es potencialmente más fuerte para los intentos de construcción de futuros proyectos de integración, o más concretamente, procesos como la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones (CSN), que, en estado germinal, están en riesgo de ni siquiera ver la luz, pues son cuestionados por los acuerdos de libre comercio preexistentes que pueden llegar a limitar su potencialidad. En este caso en particular, la voluntad de algunos países por darle vida a un bloque sudamericano los lleva a relativizar aspectos centrales como éste y empujan flexibilidades institucionales hacia dentro de la CSN, que, al permitir la “coexistencia pacífica” de países con TLC, con países sin TLC, en definitiva, están abriendo la puerta al avance de los TLC y, de hecho, levantando sobre pies de barro un proyecto ambicioso de integración regional, pues el avance de esos acuerdos pulverizará la posibilidad de estrategias conjuntas y complementarias de desarrollo económico y social.

El problema del libre comercio como meta de los procesos de integración

El otro abordaje es el del “libre comercio” al interior de los bloques de integración regional. Pero, antes de avanzar, tal vez sea necesario introducir la cuestión del comercio. Lejos de ser una amenaza en sí misma, y lejos de ser tal como lo caracterizan los neoliberales, un fin en sí mismo o un camino de una sola mano hacia el desarrollo, el comercio es una “herramienta” que puede ser utilizada para el desarrollo de los pueblos de forma integral o, por el contrario, para el enriquecimiento de algunos sectores. En el caso de los TLC, desde sus orígenes –su historia es elocuente en este sentido–, son herramientas para expandir el lucro de las grandes corporaciones transnacionales.

Con estos antecedentes, y teniendo como un supuesto que el comercio puede ser una herramienta para el desarrollo, los procesos de integración regional pueden y deben hacer uso de esta herramienta; sin embargo, hacerlo de forma indiscriminada, como lo propone la doctrina neoliberal del libre comercio, es, sin duda, una amenaza al desarrollo (es como querer cortar un alambre con un destornillador). En este sentido, procesos de integración regional como la CAN y el Mercosur son presionados desde adentro por los sectores tal vez más competitivos respecto a los vecinos que, embanderados con la consigna del “libre comercio”, aspiran a abrir indiscriminadamente las fronteras internas, cuando, en la mayoría de los casos, eso significa amenazas enormes para el desarrollo de las economías nacionales de los demás miembros del bloque.

La integración de los pueblos y el comercio

El camino hacia la integración de los pueblos, en el tema comercial, implica dar la batalla en estos dos terrenos: por un lado, continuar la resistencia a los acuerdos de libre comercio con los Estados Unidos y a los acuerdos de Asociación con la Unión Europea, y hacer permanente el impasse de la OMC; y por el otro, también cuestionar el formato de las negociaciones “Sur-Sur” si éstas se realizan bajo criterios de “libre comercio”. El comercio con China, India, Sudáfrica o los países árabes puede ser beneficioso para esos pueblos y el nuestro, pero debe estar atento y debe ser claro en respetar las asimetrías, los tiempos del desarrollo autónomo de cada una de las regiones, la soberanía alimentaria y otros criterios esenciales para la vida y la lucha contra la pobreza. Lejos de constituirse en paladines de la apertura comercial indiscriminada, nuestros bloques deben tener una política comercial externa que tenga como norte el comercio justo. En particular, en el caso del comercio multilateral, nuestros bloques podrían contribuir al debate desencadenado por la crisis de la OMC, no con intentos de salvataje de una organización -diseñada en su forma para arbitrar el comercio internacional, pero en los hechos constituida en una herramienta para su liberalización irrestricta- sino con propuestas de una arquitectura del comercio internacional alternativa, quizás realmente en el ámbito de la ONU, y con un claro objetivo de desarrollo y lucha contra la pobreza y el hambre en el mundo.

En este último frente, ha habido dos iniciativas importantes de parte de gobiernos de la región que, de forma pionera, han introducido “distorsiones” que apuntan a una reversión del formato “TLC” de relaciones comerciales. La primera de estas iniciativas surge con los acuerdos ALBA/TCP (Tratado de Comercio de los Pueblos), acuerdos que haciendo referencia al comercio, no se restringen al mismo y lo tienen como una de sus partes secundarias –diferente de los acuerdos de Asociación de la UE que son amplios, pues incluyen cooperación y diálogo político, pero cuyo eje central es el comercio-. Lo central de los acuerdos ALBA/TCP es la búsqueda de la complementariedad, no sólo productiva en términos de bienes, sino de habilidades y capacidades técnicas y humanas por parte de los países involucrados.

La segunda iniciativa está constituida por la propuesta introducida en el marco de la negociación CAN-Unión Europea, elaborada en los marcos de los TCP (complementariedad, respeto a las asimetrías, y protección de industrias nacientes, recursos naturales, diversidad, entre otros). El movimiento del Gobierno Boliviano tiene sus riesgos, pues reconoce la negociación en ámbitos evaluados como sensibles por los movimientos sociales de la región –tales como los mencionados en el paréntesis anterior-, y al hacerlo siempre existe la posibilidad de caer en trampas formales que pueden tener impactos negativos para el país, o bien dejar abierta una negociación que puede ser retomada en el futuro con otro carácter. En este sentido, los movimientos deben estar vigilantes y dar seguimiento a las negociaciones para evitar estos riesgos. Pero la propuesta boliviana, si es aceptada por la UE, implica el reconocimiento de un límite al libre comercio, una alteración y, de hecho, un retroceso de esta lógica hasta ahora hegemónica. Es auspicioso este intento, como también lo sería la aceptación de una propuesta similar hecha al gobierno de los EEUU.

Por fin, en el plano intra bloque, el principal desafío respecto a lo comercial es crear estructuras que hagan un uso selectivo del comercio, me atrevería a decir, un uso pragmático del mismo, desde que ese pragmatismo sea concebido como una mirada global de desarrollo colectivo, y no sólo de algunos sectores. En este sentido, la tarea de los movimientos y organizaciones sociales es contribuir con la construcción de una visión contra-hegemónica que refuerce procesos de complementariedad y cooperación económica entre las naciones, una visión que, lejos de condenar mecanismos de regulación del comercio –como el recientemente aprobado Mecanismo de Adaptación Competitiva (MAC) en el ámbito del Mercosur–, refuercen la idea de que los mismos son necesarios para enfrentar la pobreza y avanzar hacia el desarrollo inclusivo. Los llamados mecanismos de tratamiento de las asimetrías, en definitiva, no son otra cosa que eso: regulaciones y formas consensuadas de atenuar colectivamente las distintas situaciones económicas y sociales de los países de un determinado bloque. Son estas medidas las únicas que se condicen con una integración justa y las que hacen de la integración una opción política y económica atractiva para los países en desarrollo como los nuestros, una opción que los movimientos y organizaciones sociales debemos fortalecer –y pelear para lograrlo– en el camino hacia la liberación de nuestros pueblos y la resistencia a los imperialismos y neocolonialismos variopintos que enfrentamos en este comienzo de milenio.


Gonzalo Berrón es coordinador de la Secretaría de Alianza Social Continental.

http://alainet.org/active/17615

Gonzalo Berrón
La avanzada del “libre comercio” es global y se expresa de múltiples formas
Del 9 al 13 de noviembre pasados, order en San Pablo, try Brasil, web
más de 70 delegados de movimientos y organizaciones sociales del mundo entero, pertenecientes a la red Nuestro Mundo No Está en Venta, se reunieron para evaluar la coyuntura de las negociaciones de la Organización Mundial del Comercio (OMC) y definir sus estrategias de acción. Facilitada por la reciente suspensión, por tiempo indeterminado, de las negociaciones en éste ámbito global del comercio, el análisis realizado se centró en la constatación de algo que en nuestra región ya es conocido, pero que a nivel global parecía oculto tras las negociaciones de la OMC: el “libre comercio” se extiende de múltiples formas, a través de múltiples acuerdos y de forma similar en todas las regiones del planeta.
En las Américas, esta ola arranca en 1989 con el Acuerdo del Libre Comercio Estados Unidos- Canadá, sigue con el Tratado de Libre Comercio de América del Norte (TLCAN), que incorpora a México, y luego con la tentativa fallida del gobierno de los Estados Unidos para crear un Área de Libre Comercio de las Américas (ALCA). Ante la lentitud de las negociaciones de ésta última, se asiste a otra ola de acuerdos, que incluyeron primero a Chile (2003), pero después a los países de América Central, República Dominicana (DR-CAFTA, como se lo conoce en inglés) y Panamá; y lo más reciente, los TLCs con Colombia y Perú.
Como si esto fuera poco, dicha “ola de libre comercio” viene también de Europa, con los llamados Acuerdos de Asociación que la Unión Europea (UE) negocia con las regiones de nuestro Continente. Ya lo ha hecho con Chile y México, lo intentó con el Mercosur y, desde mayo de 2006, ha estado en negociaciones con América Central y la Comunidad Andina. Con los países, negocia acuerdos similares, en el marco de lo que ellos denominan Economic Partnership Agreements (EPAs), que no son otra cosa que una revisión de los términos de los acuerdos preexistentes entre la UE y los países de África, el Caribe y el Pacífico, de corte librecambista y ya no de tratamiento especial como los anteriores. De esta manera, así como en las Américas, la pulsión del libre cambio, empujada desde las potencias económicas del Norte, se extiende por todo el planeta con ímpetu y diversidad de formas.
Sin embargo, lo trágico de este escenario está dado ya no por la esperada agresividad de la Unión Europea y los Estados Unidos en el comercio, sino por el hecho de que el libre comercio es adoptado en muchos lugares como un credo religioso que orienta la política externa de los países en desarrollo. La hegemonía de la ideología del libre comercio ha sido tan fuertemente implantada en los años 90 que, pese a haber recibido algunos reveses, aquellos gobiernos que no confían en su credo se ven sometidos a intensas críticas y, generalmente, son acusados de “antiguos” o “anticuados”, cuando no de “aislacionistas” o “proteccionistas”. Este último término es empleado de forma despectiva, ¡cuando proteger pueblos y economías nacionales debería ser una de las obligaciones de todo buen gobernante!
Así, Asia, Japón y China, en particular, pero también otros países que ya se han incorporado “exitosamente” al mercado global, avanzan con acuerdos regionales de libre comercio. En África sucede lo mismo: los procesos de integración regional aspiran, siempre como fin último, al libre comercio. En las Américas, esta tentación, siempre presente, ha encontrado algunos obstáculos, pero sin dudas se plantea como una de las batallas más duras en el interior de los bloques regionales.
En este punto, entramos en el tema que nos convoca: la relación entre comercio y los procesos de integración entre los países, en particular entre los países en desarrollo. Esta cuestión tiene dos posibles abordajes. El primero es el que se refiere a los acuerdos de libre comercio de la región, o de países de la región, con bloques o países de fuera de la misma (por ejemplo, en la CAN, el acuerdo de Colombia con los EEUU). El segundo abordaje es el del libre comercio al interior de la región como meta final del proceso de integración. Ambos temas son polémicos.
El libre comercio: una amenaza externa a la integración
La primera es la gran amenaza para los procesos de integración, pues representa el intento de actores extrarregionales de impedir, por la vía del comercio, el avance de alternativas regionales de desarrollo económico y social. En este sentido, la consolidación de bloques económicos de diversa escala pero que, con potencialidades para implementar estrategias de desarrollo autónomo y de ampliación de mercados regionales más vigorosos, podría redundar en el fortalecimiento geopolítico de grupos de países de las Américas, es visualizada como una amenaza estratégica que hay que detener. Así han operado en nuestras Américas los acuerdos del CAFTA, que destruyen el proceso integrador del Sistema de Integración Centroamericano, al determinar niveles diferenciados de apertura económica respecto a los Estados Unidos y poner a la región a trabajar ya no en función de la autonomía económica integral, sino sólo de aquellos nichos de producción orientados al mercado norteamericano. El caso de la Comunidad Andina de Naciones es más fuerte, pues ésta es poseedora de una institucionalidad mayor y más estricta en términos comerciales, y es, ahora, víctima de los acuerdos firmados por Colombia y Perú, que desafían esa institucionalidad, ponen en crisis todo el proceso de integración y han provocado, de hecho, la salida de uno de sus principales miembros, Venezuela. Finalmente, ésta es la misma estrategia usada en el caso de la propuesta de un TLC con Uruguay, recientemente levantada por los Estados Unidos y vista con interés por algunos miembros del Gobierno del país sudamericano –por suerte, hoy congelada-.
Entonces, si los acuerdos de “libre comercio” han significado, desde esta perspectiva, una amenaza a los procesos de integración en curso, esa amenaza es potencialmente más fuerte para los intentos de construcción de futuros proyectos de integración, o más concretamente, procesos como la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones (CSN), que, en estado germinal, están en riesgo de ni siquiera ver la luz, pues son cuestionados por los acuerdos de libre comercio preexistentes que pueden llegar a limitar su potencialidad. En este caso en particular, la voluntad de algunos países por darle vida a un bloque sudamericano los lleva a relativizar aspectos centrales como éste y empujan flexibilidades institucionales hacia dentro de la CSN, que, al permitir la “coexistencia pacífica” de países con TLC, con países sin TLC, en definitiva, están abriendo la puerta al avance de los TLC y, de hecho, levantando sobre pies de barro un proyecto ambicioso de integración regional, pues el avance de esos acuerdos pulverizará la posibilidad de estrategias conjuntas y complementarias de desarrollo económico y social.
El problema del libre comercio como meta de los procesos de integración
El otro abordaje es el del “libre comercio” al interior de los bloques de integración regional. Pero, antes de avanzar, tal vez sea necesario introducir la cuestión del comercio. Lejos de ser una amenaza en sí misma, y lejos de ser tal como lo caracterizan los neoliberales, un fin en sí mismo o un camino de una sola mano hacia el desarrollo, el comercio es una “herramienta” que puede ser utilizada para el desarrollo de los pueblos de forma integral o, por el contrario, para el enriquecimiento de algunos sectores. En el caso de los TLC, desde sus orígenes –su historia es elocuente en este sentido–, son herramientas para expandir el lucro de las grandes corporaciones transnacionales.
Con estos antecedentes, y teniendo como un supuesto que el comercio puede ser una herramienta para el desarrollo, los procesos de integración regional pueden y deben hacer uso de esta herramienta; sin embargo, hacerlo de forma indiscriminada, como lo propone la doctrina neoliberal del libre comercio, es, sin duda, una amenaza al desarrollo (es como querer cortar un alambre con un destornillador). En este sentido, procesos de integración regional como la CAN y el Mercosur son presionados desde adentro por los sectores tal vez más competitivos respecto a los vecinos que, embanderados con la consigna del “libre comercio”, aspiran a abrir indiscriminadamente las fronteras internas, cuando, en la mayoría de los casos, eso significa amenazas enormes para el desarrollo de las economías nacionales de los demás miembros del bloque.
La integración de los pueblos y el comercio
El camino hacia la integración de los pueblos, en el tema comercial, implica dar la batalla en estos dos terrenos: por un lado, continuar la resistencia a los acuerdos de libre comercio con los Estados Unidos y a los acuerdos de Asociación con la Unión Europea, y hacer permanente el impasse de la OMC; y por el otro, también cuestionar el formato de las negociaciones “Sur-Sur” si éstas se realizan bajo criterios de “libre comercio”. El comercio con China, India, Sudáfrica o los países árabes puede ser beneficioso para esos pueblos y el nuestro, pero debe estar atento y debe ser claro en respetar las asimetrías, los tiempos del desarrollo autónomo de cada una de las regiones, la soberanía alimentaria y otros criterios esenciales para la vida y la lucha contra la pobreza. Lejos de constituirse en paladines de la apertura comercial indiscriminada, nuestros bloques deben tener una política comercial externa que tenga como norte el comercio justo. En particular, en el caso del comercio multilateral, nuestros bloques podrían contribuir al debate desencadenado por la crisis de la OMC, no con intentos de salvataje de una organización -diseñada en su forma para arbitrar el comercio internacional, pero en los hechos constituida en una herramienta para su liberalización irrestricta- sino con propuestas de una arquitectura del comercio internacional alternativa, quizás realmente en el ámbito de la ONU, y con un claro objetivo de desarrollo y lucha contra la pobreza y el hambre en el mundo.
En este último frente, ha habido dos iniciativas importantes de parte de gobiernos de la región que, de forma pionera, han introducido “distorsiones” que apuntan a una reversión del formato “TLC” de relaciones comerciales. La primera de estas iniciativas surge con los acuerdos ALBA/TCP (Tratado de Comercio de los Pueblos), acuerdos que haciendo referencia al comercio, no se restringen al mismo y lo tienen como una de sus partes secundarias –diferente de los acuerdos de Asociación de la UE que son amplios, pues incluyen cooperación y diálogo político, pero cuyo eje central es el comercio-. Lo central de los acuerdos ALBA/TCP es la búsqueda de la complementariedad, no sólo productiva en términos de bienes, sino de habilidades y capacidades técnicas y humanas por parte de los países involucrados.
La segunda iniciativa está constituida por la propuesta introducida en el marco de la negociación CAN-Unión Europea, elaborada en los marcos de los TCP (complementariedad, respeto a las asimetrías, y protección de industrias nacientes, recursos naturales, diversidad, entre otros). El movimiento del Gobierno Boliviano tiene sus riesgos, pues reconoce la negociación en ámbitos evaluados como sensibles por los movimientos sociales de la región –tales como los mencionados en el paréntesis anterior-, y al hacerlo siempre existe la posibilidad de caer en trampas formales que pueden tener impactos negativos para el país, o bien dejar abierta una negociación que puede ser retomada en el futuro con otro carácter. En este sentido, los movimientos deben estar vigilantes y dar seguimiento a las negociaciones para evitar estos riesgos. Pero la propuesta boliviana, si es aceptada por la UE, implica el reconocimiento de un límite al libre comercio, una alteración y, de hecho, un retroceso de esta lógica hasta ahora hegemónica. Es auspicioso este intento, como también lo sería la aceptación de una propuesta similar hecha al gobierno de los EEUU.
Por fin, en el plano intra bloque, el principal desafío respecto a lo comercial es crear estructuras que hagan un uso selectivo del comercio, me atrevería a decir, un uso pragmático del mismo, desde que ese pragmatismo sea concebido como una mirada global de desarrollo colectivo, y no sólo de algunos sectores. En este sentido, la tarea de los movimientos y organizaciones sociales es contribuir con la construcción de una visión contra-hegemónica que refuerce procesos de complementariedad y cooperación económica entre las naciones, una visión que, lejos de condenar mecanismos de regulación del comercio –como el recientemente aprobado Mecanismo de Adaptación Competitiva (MAC) en el ámbito del Mercosur–, refuercen la idea de que los mismos son necesarios para enfrentar la pobreza y avanzar hacia el desarrollo inclusivo. Los llamados mecanismos de tratamiento de las asimetrías, en definitiva, no son otra cosa que eso: regulaciones y formas consensuadas de atenuar colectivamente las distintas situaciones económicas y sociales de los países de un determinado bloque. Son estas medidas las únicas que se condicen con una integración justa y las que hacen de la integración una opción política y económica atractiva para los países en desarrollo como los nuestros, una opción que los movimientos y organizaciones sociales debemos fortalecer –y pelear para lograrlo– en el camino hacia la liberación de nuestros pueblos y la resistencia a los imperialismos y neocolonialismos variopintos que enfrentamos en este comienzo de milenio.


Gonzalo Berrón es coordinador de la Secretaría de Alianza Social Continental.

Judith Valencia

Es ocasión para presiciones.

Venezuela en Québec, nurse
III Cumbre de las Américas, Abril 2001 deja una reserva razonada en lo precipitado de la negociación, poco tiempo para dilucidar contenidos y debatir, para someter el Área de Libre Comercio para las Américas (ALCA) a referéndum. Como testigo con responsabilidad política quiero enunciar con mi versión de los hechos. Los mexicanos, canadienses y estadounidenses anti-tratados de libre comercio, venían enviando señales de alerta sobre los efectos TLCAN. Una vez develadas las intenciones del (Acuerdo Multilateral de Inversiones) AMI en 1998 las denuncias toman fuerzas con hechos ciertos y mostrables.

El Acuerdo Multilateral de Inversiones, fue un tratado internacional para la protección de las inversiones extrajeras que estuvo siendo negociado por los países pertenecientes a la OCDE. El tratado partía de una definición extremadamente amplia del concepto de inversión.

“Se refiere a todo bien sobre el cual ejerce propiedad o control, directa o indirectamente una inversionista” “Un inversionista es definido como una persona legal de una parte contratante… un inversionista puede ser cualquiera… va mas allá de los conceptos tradicionales de inversión extranjera directa” establece “Prohibición de todo requisito de desempeño a los inversionistas y aun mas los mecanismos de solución de disputa, los inversionistas pueden demandar al Estado… las empresas y los Estados tiene un status jurídico similar” (1).
Una vez puesto al descubierto en AMI, las intenciones siguen insistentes. Por eso coincidimos en quienes sostienen que:

“Tanto el TLCAN como el borrador del AMI y del ALCA… Todos los acuerdos de inversión están sesgados hacia el incremento de la capacidad de los inversionistas transnacionales para moverse libremente por todo el mundo con una interferencia mínima de los gobiernos nacionales y de los cuerpos regulativos internacionales” Así escribe la Alianza Social Continental. (2)

Estas denuncias las confirma con descaro un informe BID/INTAL/ITED:

“El tema de inversión es una prioridad de EEUU, especialmente en discusiones con países en desarrollo… es el pías con mayores flujos de inversión hacia el exterior. Esta situación ha obligado a este país a desarrollar una ambiciosa agenda de protección de la inversión. El TLCAN incluyo por primera ocasión disciplinas de amplio alcance en materia de inversión…”(3)

A pocos meses de Québec, Venezuela propuso el ALBA y a los pocos días, el 20 y el 21 de diciembre de 2001, Argentina fue noticia. El proceso argentino lanza un alarido. Desde el 2000 veníamos escuchando a Bolivia.

El 2002 es un año denso en situaciones políticas aleccionadoras. En Venezuela, golpe y sabotaje, entre abril y diciembre, para octubre Ecuador y Brasil eligieron Presidentes. Justo cuando tenia lugar en Quito la primera gran jornada continental contra el ALCA.

Razones para que en el 2003 se tejan las redes y fluyan las acciones de NO al ALCA, llegando en noviembre a la Ministerial de Miami. La lucha golpeo al ALCA, pero los EEUU evaluaron los acontecimientos y fragmentaron la ofensiva. Las luchas hicieron que pusieran sobre el tablero partidas de juegos variados. De TLC en TLC´s cuadrando la partida final del ALCA. A pesar de que la ofensiva imperial no ha sido derrotada, podemos decir que las luchas de 2003 fertilizaron el terreno político/social para el ALBA.

Que decir del ALCA

El ALCA nombra una intención. El ALCA es área, territorio. El ALCA es parte de un proyecto continental de reestructuración del sistema interamericano. La intención se corresponde con la ofensiva contrarrevolucionaria, con la que desde los 70´s limpian el continente de adversarios: desaparecidos, guerras preventivas, escaramuzas de cada día y de todo tipo. A la misma vez que endeudan, ajustan y acoplan gobiernos socios.

Los TLC y el ALCA pretenden enmallar el territorio de America. Los hilos de la malla son las exportaciones e importaciones ejecutadas por y entre las empresas transnacionales que invierten asegurándose condiciones optimas de rentabilidad. Obligando a los pobladores de los territorios anexados a cambiar su cultura de vivir. A decir del Presidente Uribe(4) :

“este gobierno ha hecho un gran esfuerzo en expansión de la Fuerza Publica, un gran avance en la pensión de sobrevivencia, en la pensión por incapacidad… la prima de orden publico para nuestros soldados profesionales. Todo eso se hace sostenible con una política económica creciente de inversión que la facilita el TLC… hay mercado pero también hay seguridad…”

“No pudimos excluir el arroz, … la avicultura… se pactó, que nuestros productores de arroz, en asociación con los productores norteamericanos, sean los que administren el mecanismo de subasta y puedan apropiar las utilidades de ese mecanismo de subasta. Yo creo que eso va a ayudar”.

“A los avicultores se les va abaratar la compra del maíz. En efecto, el maíz importado le va a reducir mucho el precio a favor de estos productores… se favorezcan los consumidores colombianos”.

“Estamos dispuestos a estudiar un mecanismo… vamos a proponer… darle a los agricultores la oportunidad en la reconversión de sus sectores”

La formula es: Mas empleo. Empleo que no es trabajo.
Empleos para facilitar el comercio de las cuotas de importación negociadas. Nichos de prestación de servicios de distribución de los bienes importados. Correajes de entre los puertos y aeropuertos a los caseríos.

Pero no hay que olvidar que empleo no es trabajo: el trabajo vivo es una facultad humana fundamental, la capacidad para intervenir activamente en el mundo y para crear la vida social. El sentido de la vida creadora. Y es sobre esta cualidad siempre humana que crece el ALBA.

Un ALBA rico en los sujetos que estuvieron ausentes: de haceres y pueblos ancestrales.

Dijimos que las luchas de 2003, fertilizaron el terreno político [social]. Venezuela dio su contribución y trazo cauces para el contagio de los fundamentos del ALBA.

El 2003 fue año de siembra ¿Cuál fue el abono de la siembra? La movilización social.

El proceso constituyente se asombro en el 2002 y reacciono ante el golpe y el sabotaje. Los Planes de gobierno se convirtieron en Misiones desbordando las instituciones. Desde el 2000, a pesar de las leyes habilitantes del 13 de noviembre 2001, los programas sociales [que pretendían refundar/reconstituir la Republica] estaban enquistados en las instituciones del Estado. Puede haber mucha voluntad de legislar, pero definitivamente no son las leyes las que empujan. Solo si la multitud deshecha y desechada, el gentío, la poblada: los pueblos, campesinos, indígenas, citadinos, trabajadores, todos por el porvenir asumen lo suyo es como la constitución se encarna en hechos. La acción política de movilización en defensa del proceso constituyente encarno en Misiones, que no fue siendo otra cosa que darle sentido a la vida. Producir y reproducir las condiciones del sentido de vivir colectivo, en sociedad.

Ver, leer, reconocer y dimensionar lo sabido, mirarse mirando al mundo potenciando las maravillosas capacidades del trabajo creador colectivo.
Todo y todos a la misma vez, sin límites de edad, sexo, raza. Ancestros e identidades, presente y por-venir.

Respetando los ritmos culturales, pero todos pulsando a una misma vez.
Ese cultivo lo vienen nombrando: Desarrollo Endógeno, pretendido núcleo/espacio/cauce del ALBA.

El ALBA es hacia adentro de lo humano y de la geografía, celebrando un proceso social en el que los pobladores laboran su propio destino soberano, ocupando territorios para hacerse de la vida.
Digo los pueblos: indígenas, campesinos, citadinos. Todos, los más diversos sujetos planteando lo suyo, sin sujetar a los otros. Con la intención manifiesta de cerrarle el paso, a las tácticas emanadas del Estado de gobierno mundial, que instrumentaliza la anexión de territorios mutilando a sus pueblos pobladores.

Con el ALBA, proponemos integrar las capacidades humanas junto a las riquezas territoriales, para satisfacer necedades y necesidades culturales. Necedades y necesidades de alimento del cuerpo y del espíritu, de abrigo, de ocio, de los deseos por-venir. El ALBA respeta el hecho cierto de que la felicidad es una construcción cultural.

Todos en el ALBA, cada cultura con su perfil.
Los pueblos citadinos tienen costumbres de la ciudad, pero según su región originaria y/o su raza, son citadinos culturalmente diversos.

Los pueblos indígenas según su geografía, su cosmovisión, labores, ritos y mitos.

Así como los campesinos, indígenas o afrodescendientes, andinos o isleños. Cultivadores de la tierra y/o del mar o del rió.

Cada cual tiene lo suyo no transferible.

El ALBA reconoce los ritmos y los respeta en desacuerdo práctico con los criterios de la competencia que deshecha multitudes. El ALBA se funda en el respeto de los ritmos de otros. Renacen las culturas milenarias.

Pero, el imaginario colectivo es también depositario de otras visiones construidas en los cruces mestizos de los haceres mercantiles. En la segunda mitad del siglo XX, la naturaleza artificial creada en torno a la tecnología capitalista, subsumió costumbres y tradiciones. Formuló maneras de producir y patrones de consumo. El citadino, el profesional libre, las pautas del comercio interinstitucional e internacional están presentes y asimilables en muchos años por-venir.

Esta verdad tiene sitio en el ALBA por ello, inscribimos en la filosofía del ALBA, los Convenios Comerciales Compensados y las Alianzas Estratégicas circunstanciales. Como variantes culturales contemporáneas y especificas.

Es el caso de las Alianzas Estratégicas circunstanciales que tienen al petróleo como centro. El gobierno bolivariano utiliza su recurso abundante, escaso en territorios de pueblos hermanos, negociando intercambios complementarios, sin exigir compensaciones que vulneren la soberanía, dando condiciones de comercialización solidarias, sustituyendo las exigencias de las transnacionales privadas. Estas alianzas estratégicas que tienen como centro el petróleo y el gas son políticas comerciales fundadas en la conservación y soberanía sobre los recursos, impulsando la solidaridad compartida y la corresponsabilidad social entre pueblos. Asegurando condiciones para el acceso democrático a la energía a precio razonable. Se concibe como un acuerdo entre gobiernos, se propone concretar esfuerzos en la complementariedad de las capacidades de nuestras empresas estatales de energía.

De lo dicho podemos derivar que el ALBA tiene un amplio trecho por andar. Lento pero sin pausa. Cierto que hacer historia y escuchar un concierto con varios ritmos no es tarea sencilla.

Lo que en otro tiempo aconteció – por conocido no debe desviar al ALBA de su cauce. El desarrollismo postulo el desarrollo endógeno y las fuerzas del capital multinacional [de la época] lo cultivo para la dominación.

Podemos decir que en dos décadas, de 1947 a 1967, fueron suficientes para consolidar relaciones de poder multinacionales, buscando y consiguiendo, practicando el Plan Marshall –y a la misma vez-, impulsando la acción instrumental de los organismos internacionales.

Fueron esos tiempos los años dorados de las Teorías del Desarrollo, del Desarrollismo y de los debates sobre el atraso y/o subdesarrollo. En América Latina la CEPAL (5) levantaba diagnósticos para fundamentar Planes de Desarrollo e Industrialización, cumpliendo el Mandato de Naciones Unidas. Las principales fuerzas económicas y políticas en la región, postulaban la diversificación industrial como base del desarrollo económico y social, apoyando la intervención de los gobiernos en la conducción económica. Vale decir, que al esquema clásico del industrialismo ingles, le suman elementos políticos del buen vecino/New Deal.

La ofensiva estratégica usamericana estaba levantando vuelo, apoyándose: en la resolución anticomunista aprobada en la X Conferencia Interamericana/ Panamericana – 1954.(6) Anticomunista, vale decir en Latinoamérica antinacionalista [pro-imperialista], estando en eso entra en la escena latinoamericana la política independiente y soberana del Movimiento 26 de julio cubano.(7)

Cabe detenerse y precisar. Es en ese contexto de ofensiva Yanqui y rebelión latina, en el que los gobiernos latinoamericanos, acogen la propuesta cepalina y suscriben asumir, como políticas de gobierno de Estado, las iniciativas de Integración, como uno de los dispositivos desarrollistas.

Podemos recapitular, diciendo que, a la postura industrial – desarrollista de las principales fuerzas económicas y políticas mundiales y regionales, se les suman las fuerzas políticas de quienes luchaban por lograr una economía nacional independiente.

Esta convergencia entre desiguales planificara un desarrollo – ideal, que más temprano que tarde, entrara en choque con la lógica expansionista del capitalismo mundial, en el que los monopolios multinacionales actuaban ceñidos a las pautas de maximizar la ganancia en cada inversión. Ese desarrollo – ideal, en cada territorio nacional pretendía producir un-poco-de-todo [complaciendo peticiones]. Decisión dilemática para el desarrollo del capitalismo mundial.

Después de la Chile de Allende, la prueba del endeudamiento brasilero, juega dupleta con los desaparecidos de los 70’s. Se reagrupan y fortalecen las fuerzas a favor de la apertura total a los capitales nacionales o extranjeros en formato de internacional. El proceso lo inicia Brasil con el Acuerdo de Garantías de Inversiones. Pasos firmes en ruta hacia el Consenso de Washington y la Guerra Preventiva.
Con el dispositivo de la deuda, los gobiernos latinoamericanos quedaron anulados política y socialmente y anudados a la estrategia económica del capitalismo mundial. Sin soberanía para diseñar proyectos productivos e impedidos de dictar políticas publicas redistribuidoras de la riqueza.

Al correr de los años, la Reserva Federal [USA] manejando la fluctuación de las tasas de interés sobre los prestamos en $ y jugando con el poder del $ sobre las tasas de cambio (8) y, las empresas transnacionales haciendo uso de la dolarización de los precios de las patentes tecnológicas, multiplicaron los montos adeudados, encarecieron las importaciones y establecieron normas tecnológicas de competitividad comercial. Acciones que mermaron las reservas internaciones [divisas], los recursos monetarios disponibles los represo el pago de la deuda y los gobiernos, quedaron –de-hecho sin autonomía financiera. Vale decir, sin soberanía en la formulación de planes de producción, de cambio, de consumo, de distribución de la riqueza de la nación entre sus pobladores.

Durante ese cuando y con el como de la Deuda, como dispositivo eje del recetario del Fondo Monetario Internacional (FMI), los gobiernos firmantes [¿y por venir?], asumieron el papel de ejecutores obedientes de las políticas económicas imperialistas. A tiempo, quedó el terreno acondicionado, para que las políticas de ajuste estructural reproyectaran a las economías latinoamericanas, desmantelando y/o privatizando las empresas productivas instaladas en los tiempos de la diversificación industrial desarrollista.

Ese ajuste económico hemisférico desmonto alianzas económicas y políticas anteriores, la reestructuraciones las apuntalaron con normativas legales e instituciones convenidas entre gobernantes y capitalistas. Mientras avanzaba el ajuste productivo hemisférico, mundialmente negociaban en la Ronda de Uruguay [1986-1994] las normas de creación de la Organización Mundial del Comercio [OMC 1995]. A una misma vez, cada caso nacional, lo acoplaron a su propio ritmo. Cambiaron y/o reformularon funciones de los organismos de desarrollo y financieros multilaterales [FMI, BM, OCDE, GATT/OMC] y de instituciones políticas regionales [OEA, TIAR, BID, CAN/CAF, MERCOSUR, SICA, OTCA, AEC]. A partir de 1990 aceleraron el ritmo y profundizaron la ofensiva contrarrevolucionaria.

Desde Venezuela caminamos mostrando una práctica

Desde Venezuela caminamos mostrando una práctica que viene brindando condiciones para salirnos del juego estratégico de acoplamiento interamericano al proyecto imperial, practica que le gana tiempo-al-tiempo para que los pueblos cultiven plenamente el territorio soberano: El desarrollo endógeno hacia adentro, por los pobladores y sobre el territorio. Múltiples son las misiones rumbo al ALBA.(9)

Sin embargo, Brasilia y Mar del Plata abren una brecha entre el antes y el después del devenir de la política internacional continental.

Para Venezuela, se trata de dos frentes en una misma lucha.
Un frente, el entre los gobernantes negociando a los territorios con pobladores y todo. Allí, Venezuela debelando los dispositivos, las disidencias y sus contenidos para que los pueblos reconozcan las decisiones de sus gobernantes. Y pueden trazar políticas emancipadoras.

El otro frente, actuando como sujetos, responsables y comprometidos construyendo culturalmente la felicidad, facilitando puntos de encuentro entre campesinos y/o indígenas [entre los pueblos y los pobladores], hasta promover ruedas de negocio donde participen pueblos citadinos empresarios.

Intencionalmente conjugando a la creación de espacios de libertad para superar la actual sumisión del individuo soberano, permitiendo que las grandes multitudes le den sentido a la energía vital del pasado cultural que los anima.

Notas

(1) Edgardo Lander. Revista Venezolana de economía y ciencias sociales. FACES/UCV. Caracas, abril-septiembre 2-3/1998. “El Acuerdo Multilateral de Inversiones (AMI). El Capital diseña una constitución universal”.

(2) Alianza Social Continental. http://www.asc-hsa.org

(3) Estudio BID/INTAL/ITED.

(4) Presidente Álvaro Uribe. Alocución del 27 de Febrero de 2006. Bogota DC, Cundinamarca

(5) Celso Furtado. “La Fantasía Organizada”. Ediciones Endeba y Tercer Mundo Editores 1985. Debemos tener presente que la Comisión Económica para América Latina es un Órgano de Naciones Unidas, así como que la OEA constituida en la IX Conferencia Interamericana en Bogota entre sus miembros no están las islas del Caribe para ese entonces colonias europeas.

(6) X Conferencia Interamericana. Caracas 10 de Marzo de 1954. Darío Samper. “La X Conferencia Interamericana. Bogota 1954. W.W.Rostow “Estrategia para el Mundo Libre” Troquel 1966.

(7) Hermosa síntesis en “Cuba en Punta del Este” Ernesto Che Guevara. 8 de agosto de 1961.

(8) Harry Magdoff. “La era del imperialismo”. Edición especial Monthly Reveiew/selección en castellano. Enero-Febrero 1969. En el subtitulo: El control a través del FMI, da elementos sustanciales para esta interpretación.

(9) Judith Valencia. “Venezuela Rompe el Cerco”. La Habana, Febrero 2005.
“El ALBA elabora filosofía”. Barquisimeto, Septiembre 2005.
“El ALBA un cauce para la integración de nuestra América” Quito, Noviembre 2005.


Judith Valencia. Profesora Titular de la Universidad Central de Venezuela, adscrita al Departamento de Economía Teórica de la Escuela de Economía. FACES/UCV