Civil society organisations come together to criticise failings of the ASEAN Charter

The Solidarity for Asian People’s Advocacy (SAPA) Working Group on ASEAN obtained a copy of the draft ASEAN Charter when it was leaked to the media on 7 November, see prior to its signing by ASEAN leaders at their annual summit on 20 November. Subsequently, find the Working Group prepared an analysis of the Charter (summarised below), help bringing together a multiplicity of perspectives from national and regional civil society organisations, which was released to the press during the Summit and will also be passed to the ASEAN Secretariat.
The fact that a copy of the Charter was only obtained via a leak is indicative of the lack of civil society participation in the drafting of the Charter. Not surprisingly then, the Charter falls far short of what is needed to establish a “people-centred” and “people-empowered” ASEAN.
Summary of Working Group’s Analysis
The Charter focuses on how governments will interact with each other, but not about how they should interact with the people. And where the Charter is able to protect the sovereignty of governments and enshrine confidence-building through consensus, it fails to specify a role for ASEAN with regards to the behaviour of states to their own citizens.
Human rights principles are overarching and should form the basis of legitimacy for ASEAN from which all other principles flow. This would help to ensure that policy formation and implementation is guided by the interests of the people rather than the state. Instead, references to human rights are placed lower down on listings within the Charter as a separate issue and, symbolically, beneath the principles of sovereignty and non-interference. Furthermore, mentions of human rights are left too vague, with no reference to international human rights standards, making it more difficult to hold individual governments to account.
The Charter provides for the establishment of a human rights body, committing all member states to its creation. However, no further details are included regarding the setting up of the body, its roles and responsibilities, or the timeframe for its creation. Considering the more than 10 years of work that many sectors have put into the creation of an ASEAN human rights mechanism, the Charter should have had more details in it and not run the risk of making this landmark provision inconsequential in operation.
Nevertheless, references to human rights and the “rule of law, good governance and the principles of democracy and constitutional government” may still act as a good handle to demand for the implementation of these principles in every member-state, especially Burma. Furthermore, the establishment of a human rights body is something that civil society will seek to help establish as a mechanism which has a meaningful effect on the promotion and protection of human rights in Southeast Asia.
Regarding civil society engagement, there are no clear spaces created or procedures established in the Charter to institutionalise the role of citizens and civil society organisations in regional community building. In outlining the main decision making organs within ASEAN, there is barely a mention of engagement with citizens and civil society, or the means by which citizens and civil society can influence the decisions and processes of ASEAN.
In relation to the goal of economic development, the Charter’s focus is on market-led growth. However, the centrality of redistribution and economic solidarity to the goals of poverty eradication, social justice and lasting peace is not acknowledged. Economic development by itself has the potential to worsen the human rights situation of a country, such as through the economic marginalisation of certain groups, the trafficking of people, the exploitation of migrant workers and children, land grabs resulting from “development” projects, and environmental degradation. While unskilled migrant labour constitutes the bulk of labour flows in the region, when the Charter talks about free movement of labour it is referring to professionals, with no recognition of the rights of migrant labour.
The Charter fails to adequately deal with the issue of conflict resolution in the region, only covering conflicts between and among ASEAN states and failing to address the conflicts occurring within state borders. With insurgencies in member states showing regional commonalities, ASEAN cannot ignore the threats that these situations pose to regional peace and security.
Finally, the issue of non-compliance with the decisions and agreements of ASEAN fails to be adequately addressed. It is stated that serious breaches of the Charter, including serious human rights violations, can be discussed at the Summit for decision pursuant to Article 20. In practice this body would be prone to yield to political compromise and furthermore, with no explicit provision on termination or suspension of membership, relatively powerless to act.
In view of the shortcomings of the Charter and the lack of meaningful civil society participation in its drafting (which are undeniably related), the Working Group reaffirms the demands made at the second and third ASEAN Civil Society Conferences for ratification of the Charter to take place through a process of popular referendum, and supports the drawing up of a “Peoples’ Charter” in time for next year’s ASEAN Summit in Bangkok.

New Asean charter lacks vision

Southeast Asian government leaders will sign a document this week in Singapore that fails many tests
JENINA JOY CHAVEZ, visit web Bangkok Post,
When leaders of the member governments of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (Asean) meet for their 13th summit in Singapore today, the world’s attention will be focused on what they will do on the matter of Burma. The Burma question has become a yearly embarrassment and pressure point for Asean, and everyone is curious whether the collective global indignation after the September violence will prompt Asean leaders to do something different this year.
The expectation that Asean will do something different also arises from its announcement three years ago that it will embark on building a charter to formalise itself, establish the legal framework that would define the duties and responsibilities of its members, and guide its relationship with external partners. This was followed by instructions to the Eminent Persons Group, which was appointed to draw up recommendations on what the charter should contain, to be ”daring and visionary”.
The document, which will turn Asean into a rules-based legal entity like the European Union, will be signed by the bloc’s 10 leaders at the summit.
The charter carried some hope for the region at first. After leaders signed the declaration on the establishment of the Asean charter process in Kuala Lumpur in December 2005, civil society groups saw this as a chance to engage Asean on what a meaningful regionalism for the people should look like.
The initial expectation and hope, however, soon turned into concern when it became apparent that the Asean charter was not to be the subject of wide-ranging discussions, and that it was not to be made public until after it is signed by Asean leaders.
Nothing in the charter was seen until Thai independent media outfit Prachatai and the Philippine Centre for Investigative Journalism posted leaked copies of the final draft of the charter on their websites in early November.
The concern then turned into disappointment _ one fails to see the daring and vision that was hoped for in the Asean charter.
The charter does its job in terms of codifying Asean’s many previous agreements and declarations, and bestowing it legal personality. It clarifies issues on membership, and delineates functions and responsibilities of the different Asean organs.
It creates a new formal Asean bureaucracy _ from the formation of the three community councils (political-security, economic and socio-cultural) and the establishment of the Committee of Permanent Representatives, to the redefinition and strengthening of the roles of the secretary-general and the Asean secretariat.
It even gives a mandate to the much awaited Asean human rights body.
Disappointment springs not so much from things that are found in the charter, but from things that are not but should be.
The charter reaffirms a government-centric Asean, defining rules of engagement for members, and institutionalising age-old values of consensus and non-interference. However, it lacks clear mechanisms for dispute settlement, accountability and redress.
While the bodies themselves are given a mandate, the details are not to be found in the charter, raising concerns that leaving them to ministerial bodies and instruments of Asean would dilute such a mandate.
Good offices, conciliation and mediation may be resorted to, but the default for unresolved conflicts is still the Asean summit. Considering the long years that the leaders have managed to ignore or dodge urgent but controversial issues in the region, undefined dispute mechanisms that are eventually settled politically hardly provides confidence that disputes will receive speedy and proper resolution at all.
The inclusion of human rights in the charter’s preamble and statement of principles, and the creation of the human rights body is a milestone for Asean. It is regrettable that the charter leaves this article incomplete, with the body’s operation still to be defined according to the terms of reference to be determined at the Asean Foreign Ministers Meeting, which is another political gathering.
The charter talks about a people-oriented Asean, and upholds consultation and consensus as basic principles in decision-making. Yet the charter does not provide clear mechanisms for transparency and participation, and does not recognise engagement and interaction with non-state actors and civil society. The charter is also silent about how Asean’s operations can be subject to independent scrutiny, how its processes can be accessed by interested groups, and how official information should be made public.
Other missing elements include the non-mention of migrant labour which makes up a substantial portion of labour flow in the region.
The only reference to gender and women’s rights was in the selection of the secretary-general and two of the four deputies.
Finally, the charter fails to celebrate the plurality of Asean economic experiences and recognise its members’ successes based on heterodox policy mixes, by explicitly enshrining in the charter the principles of a market-driven economy.
The desire for a single market and production base should not be construed as exclusively dependent on liberalisation, but should be treated as an attempt to learn from how the more successful Asean members were able to do it without yielding everything to the market, and to build the capacities of other members in the spirit of genuine regional solidarity.
Many analysts have already written off the charter as another of Asean’s many grand declarations that never got implemented. That is, whatever may be considered positive about it will again take years to see fruition. But when leaders announced that the charter will be ”daring and visionary”, civil society was at least willing to give them a chance.
The charter is a letdown. It does not equip Asean to deal with controversial issues that hounded it in the past, and certainly does not offer anything new that could help it deal with Burma.
It is time that the initiative is wrested from the political elites and given back to the people. Let us define the Asean we need, and start the building of an Asean people’s charter.
Jenina Joy Chavez is coordinator of Focus on the Global South-Philippines Programme and an active member of the Solidarity for Asian Peoples’ Advocacies (Sapa) Working Group on Asean. She is also a trustee of Action for Economic Reforms.

The Bank of the South: New South American integration or a new instrument for domination?

Marcus Arruda and Gabriel Strautman

At the meeting held on 8 October 2007 in Rio de Janeiro, the ministers of economy and finance of Argentina, Brazil, Bolivia, Ecuador, Paraguay, Uruguay and Venezuela made further progress in negotiations leading to the founding of the Bank of the South. On this occasion the founding document of the new multilateral financial institution was signed. The bank’s headquarters will be in Caracas. So far there had been no agreement over the share of each country’s contribution, nor about the decision-making system. At this meeting the date for the launching of the Bank was fixed for 3 November, but for the third time the ceremony was postponed to 9 December in Buenos Aires.

The Bank of the South will be a development bank and will start off with a capital of approximately USD 7 billion. The institution arises as an alternative to the World Bank and the Inter American Development Bank (IDB), hence the political importance of this initiative, which reinforces South America’s sovereignty perspectives. The number of members is still under discussion. Rumour has it that as well as the seven countries who attended the Rio meeting, another five could make up the institution (Colombia petitioned for entry a few days after the meeting). The founding of the bank must be understood as a move toward creating an autonomous regional finance system which is aware of the need to prioritize above all the battle against poverty, marginalization and structural underdevelopment. The greater, then, the support the bank receives, the better it is for South America.

The agreement that were signed included three areas for negotiation: 1) the Bank of the South as a development bank; 2) functions of a South American Central Bank; and 3) monetary system. But in actual practice negotiations so far have barely focussed on the first field.

For the social movements and the organized civil society networks of the region, the Bank of the South should be part of a regional strategy, together with the creation of a stabilizing fund for the South, a common regional currency, the auditing of internal and external debt, the non-payment of illegitimate debts. This strategy should be a response that contributes to break the existing dependency in relation to the globalized capital markets, which are uncertain and highly speculative, in such a way that they may channel their own capacity for saving in order to see to the rights and needs of the people.

In an open letter to the presidents of the countries who are dealing with the founding of the Bank of the South, headed “For a Bank of the South that complies with the rights, needs, potentialities and democratic vocation of the peoples”, there appeared the following proposals made by the social movements and civil society networks of the region for inclusion in the Bank of the South project:

a) The Bank should define as its main objective the promotion of development, sovereignty and solidarity of the member countries of the entire region. Development is defined as making the most of the attributes, resources and potentialities of the individuals, communities and peoples, which cannot be reached unless they themselves are its protagonists.
b) The Bank’s shares and board of governors should be equally distributed among the member countries.

c) The Bank should make clear that its credit shares will serve to strengthen the public and social sector, and prioritize the redistribution of wealth and the protection of the environment, contributing to overcome current asymmetries, respecting the life and welfare of the people, their economic, social, cultural and environmental rights, and the right to their own self-determination and development. For this reason we explicitly reject that the Bank of the South should be used to finance megaprojects like the Initiative for the Integration of the South American Regional Infrastructure (IIRSA in Spanish), or investments involving extraction, pollution or social exclusion that are not accepted by or do not benefit the population.

d) The Bank should explicitly establish transparent and well-defined mechanisms for information and public control: the employees of the Bank of the South may not have any kind of immunity, or personal tax privileges; the bank’s accountability should be submitted to parliament and civil society for their knowledge and consideration; and all information should be considered public. All this must be understood in the context of the Quito ministerial declaration of 13 May 2007, which states that: “the people will give their governments the mandate to provide the entire region with new integration instruments for development based on principles which are democratic, transparent, participatory and responsible to the people”.

Progress in the negotiations, however, indicates that the Bank of the South may transform itself into an instrument that reproduces the asymmetries of regional power and economic domination. At the two previous meetings, in Quito and Asunción, the ministers had already signed an agreement that adopted the system of “one country, one vote”, which is definitely more democratic because it does not tie the decision-making to the size of the economy or the capital each country contributes to the bank. Yet in Rio, Guido Mantegna, Brazilian minister of Finance, and the Argentinian delegation departed from the earlier agreement. They proposed that equality among members be restricted to the Bank’s Board of Directors, which would only meet once a year. Decisions involving the daily management of the Bank of the South would be subjected to the power of the countries with the highest volume of shares in the bank. Brazil also insisted that the beneficiaries of credits from the Bank of the South should be restricted to the South American countries, thus excluding Central America and the Caribbean.

Social movements should put pressure on their governments in order to prevent the Bank of the South repeat errors (conditionalities, governance, etc.) and promote a social liberal type of development policy. However important the technical aspects related to the founding of the Bank of the South may be, the main problem is political: everything seems to indicate that Brazil and Argentina are directing discussions towards the repetition of the current “development” models (Andean Development Corporation, Brazilian National Bank for Economic and Social Development and IBD), which focus on development at all costs, IIRSA and other mammoth projects.

The only possible direction for the Bank of the South is to place itself at the service of a sovereign, supportive, sustainable and democratic South America. For this, the constant organized pressure of our countries’ society is crucial so that governments include representatives of social movements in the organization as well as in the decisions involving the Bank of the South.

This article was first published in Portuguese language on a special magazine that Rede Brasil printed for the Week of Actions against Debt and IFIs.

SAPA WG on ASEAN's Analysis of the ASEAN Charter

When the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) announced that it will embark on a process of building a Charter to formalize its agreements and establish its legal framework, sales civil society groups paid attention. While ASEAN has been generally inaccessible and non-transparent, national and regional CSOs and social movements saw the strategic value of engaging the Charter process. We saw it as a space to stake claims on ASEAN and to demand accountability for its actions. We saw the Charter building process as an anchor for discussing ASEAN and generating interest on what the Association does. By engaging the process, CSOs and social movements hoped to pry open possibilities for transforming ASEAN into a rules-based organization that would work for the mutual benefit not only of ASEAN states but of ASEAN peoples and communities as well.

The Solidarity for Asian Peoples’ Advocacies (SAPA) Working Group on ASEAN invested time and energy to engage the ASEAN Charter building process. SAPA WG on ASEAN made three formal submissions to the Eminent Persons Group (EPG) – on the Political-Security Pillar (EPG consultation, Ubud, Bali/April 2006), on the Economic Pillar (EPG consultation, Singapore/June 2006), and on the Socio-Cultural Pillar and Institutional Mechanisms (Meeting with Ambassador Rosario Manalo, Special Adviser to Mr. Fidel V. Ramos, EPG Member for the Philippines, Manila/November 2006). The WG also participated in the only regional consultation held by the High Level Task Force (HLTF) on the drafting of the ASEAN Charter in March 2007 in Manila, and reiterated the main points of its submissions. Aside from the regional consultations that the SAPA WG on ASEAN worked hard to intervene in, the different network members also initiated national processes in 2006 and 2007 to help introduce ASEAN to civil society and inform them of the Charter that was being drafted.

The Charter drafting had been kept away from public access and scrutiny,
making difficult any engagement in the process. The Charter will be signed
on November 20th during the 13th Leaders Summit, but it was only on November 7th, when a copy of the final draft adopted by the High Level Task Force on the drafting of the ASEAN Charter was leaked to the media, that the Charter finally became known to the public.

The Charter is a disappointment. It is a document that falls short of what
is needed to establish a “people-centered” and “people-empowered” ASEAN. It succeeds in codifying past ASEAN agreements, and consolidating the legal framework that would define the Association. However, it fails to put people at the center, much less empower them. The Charter is all about how Governments will interact with each other, but not about how they also should interact with the people. There are no clear spaces created or procedures established to institutionalize the role of citizens and civil society organizations in regional community-building. And where the Charter is able to protect sovereign interest of Governments, and enshrine confidence building though consensus, it lacks the necessary details for the settlement of disputes, dealing with internal conflicts, and disciplining or sanctioning Members who are remiss in their obligations.

The market-oriented language of the Charter expresses its bias for the
economic project in the region, without recognition that this may be in
conflict with the social and economic justice that the Charter is also
supposed to uphold. The centrality of redistribution and economic solidarity
to the goals of poverty eradication, social justice and lasting peace, is not acknowledged. Furthermore, the market orientation betrays the preference for a “one-size fits all” economic policy of trade and financial liberalization, failing to recognize the heterodox economic thinking that formed the basis of economic successes in the region in the past.

The Charter is gender blind and does not recognize the primacy of the
regional environment.

Finally, the landmark inclusion of human rights in the Preamble and in the
statement of Principles is belied by the lack of detail in the long-awaited
human rights body.

Following are the SAPA WG on ASEAN’s specific comments on the Charter:

Preamble

1. The opening paragraph sets the tone for the entire Charter,
highlighting the priority of the government over the individual citizen. A
truly people-centered ASEAN should establish that governments are there to
serve the needs and interests of citizens, and governments who fail in their
duties and responsibilities should not be protected by ASEAN. A braver
opening line should read, “WE, THE PEOPLES of ASEAN”, rather than “WE, THE PEOPLES of the Member States of ASEAN”.

2. Human rights are overarching and should form the basic principle of
ASEAN from which all other principles flow. In this sense, human rights
should be integral in all the work of ASEAN. Instead, human rights is
placed low down on the list as a specific issue in Articles 1 and 2), and,
symbolically, placed beneath the principles of sovereignty and
non-interference.

3. While the Preamble and Chapter 1 uphold human rights and fundamental
freedoms, the draft Charter only explicitly states adherence to the UN
Charter, International Law and international humanitarian law, but does not explicitly recognize universally accepted human rights principles, including the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and recently signed international agreements that expand on human rights, norms and standards. The reference to adherence to the “rule of law, good governance and the principles of democracy and constitutional government” in Article 2h, however, may be a good handle to demand for the implementation of these principles in every member-state, especially in the case of Burma.

4. No mention is made of the role of ASEAN in the protection of the
environment.

Chapters 1: Purposes and Principles

5. Article 1.5 and Article 2n, related to market and trade, are the
most bothersome. These provisions explicitly talk only about “facilitating
the movement of business persons and professionals”, “the free-flow of
capital”, and “the elimination of all barriers to market-driven economy”,
but do not provide at all for the promotion of redistributive justice,
poverty eradication and growth with equity – ideals equally important to
advance in a regional set-up, nor do they recognize social dialogue and core labor standards. These also fail to give importance to the role state
instruments and cooperation in achieving social goals.

6. The same paragraph mentions the movement of “business persons,
professional, talents, labour” but does not make explicit reference to
migrant workers who make up a significant part of regional labor flows.
There is also no reference to the movement of other people such as asylum
seekers.

7. Article 1.7 qualifies the promotion and protection of human rights
“with due regard to the rights and responsibilities of the Member States of
ASEAN”. This wording is dangerous, because it undermines the fundamental elements of the universality and inalienability of human rights. It is not made clear what these “rights and responsibilities” of member states are, leaving the way open for governments to violate human rights in the pursuit of their self-defined “national interest”.

8. The provision on sustainable development, protection of the region’s
environment and sustainability of natural resources in Article 1.9 was put
in the same plane as the reference to “high quality of life of its people”,
clearly reinforcing the dominance of the economic agenda of the ASEAN over environmentally sustainable development.

9. Most of the statements are mother/parenthood statements and much is
left to further interpretation and how it is going to be concretely
operationalized in the ASEAN. Does the language in Article 1.4 referring
to “just, democratic, harmonious environment” and Article 1.11 on
“.providing them with equitable access to opportunities for….justice”
translate to agrarian reform/access and control over natural resources? Will the language in Article 9 on “sustainable development” mean the upliftment of the lives of small-scale farmers, fishers, and the rest of the rural poor and the promotion of sustainable agriculture and the non-promotion of the chemical intensive, bio-technology/GMO agriculture? Does Article 1.13 on “people-oriented ASEAN” include all sectors, including organizations of the rural and urban poor, as well as semi-skilled workers, including migrant workers?

10. While Article 1.13 states that participation of all peoples is encouraged, nowhere in the Chapter does it explicitly state how this will be actualized. The Charter does not create consultative and advisory mechanisms
comprised of non-state actors and civil society groups, with adequate
representation from all sectors. Neither does it create a mechanism for
regularly engaging citizens within the region.

11. Article 1.14 needs to make specific reference to indigenous peoples,
rather than simply referring to “diverse culture” which is too general.

12. Article 2.2e needs to establish that states also have a “responsibility
to protect”, that is, the responsibility to protect people from gross
violations of human rights. All ASEAN heads of state and government
accepted this concept of the “responsibility to protect” at the UN World
Summit in September 2005.

13. Article 2.2h/i makes no mention as to what happens, such as sanctions,
if states do not adhere “to the rule of law, good governance, the principles
of democracy and constitutional government” or “respect for fundamental
freedoms, the promotion and protection of human rights, and the promotion of social justice.”

Chapter 3: Membership

14. The principle of non-interference (Preamble, Chapter 1, Article 2e/f)
that characterizes the “ASEAN Way” is further reaffirmed in the Charter.
However, we believe that exceptions must be made for clearly defined
regional standards for state behavior, particularly on human rights and
environment, serious breaches of which may carry ASEAN-imposed sanctions.

15. While on the whole we agree that there should be equality of rights and
obligations among Members, there should also be a socializing factor whereby better resourced members are able to contribute to special funds to assist other members in the spirit of solidarity, cooperation, and regional redistribution.

Chapter 4: Organs

16. The Charter provides for the establishment of a human rights body,
committing all member states to its creation. However, no further details
are included regarding the setting up of the body, its roles and
responsibilities, or the timeframe for its creation. Considering the more
than a decade of work many sectors have put into the creation of an ASEAN human rights mechanism, the Charter should have had more details in it, and not run the risk of making this landmark provision inconsequential in operation.

17. There will be more meetings (of the ASEAN Leaders and the Foreign
Ministers, and of the new organs created in the Charter), but it is unclear
how these additional meetings and new organs will bring about a
people-centered ASEAN. Almost all of the organs remain state- or
government-oriented.

18. Article 15 redefines the role of the ASEAN Foundation as a collaborator
with the different ASEAN bodies in support of “community-building’. It is
only under this article that “civil society” is mentioned. This redefinition
seems to imply that the ASEAN Foundation now becomes captured by purely official ASEAN agenda. Whereas before CSOs could apply for support without getting ASEAN accreditation or approval (and the ASEAN Secretariat sits only ex-officio in the Board), the ASEAN Foundation now becomes an internal entity to serve official ASEAN agenda.

19. In outlining the main decision making organs within ASEAN, there is not a single mention of engagement with citizens and civil society (except in the context of the ASEAN Foundation), or the means by which citizens and civil society can influence decisions and processes of the ASEAN.

20. Gender equality in the choice of officials in the ASEAN bodies is only
mentioned under the provisions on the Secretary General, but is absent
everywhere else.

Chapter 5: Entities Associated with ASEAN

21. Unfortunately we are unable to obtain a copy of the annexes, including
Annex 2 which supposedly lists the entities associated with ASEAN. The
expectation is that this is where citizens and civil society participation
is institutionalized in the ASEAN, but even this is not certain. Like a few
other bodies created in the Charter, the entities mentioned here are yet
undefined, with rules and criteria for engagement still to be determined by
the yet to be formed Committee of Permanent Representatives .

Chapter 7: Decision-Making

22. Chapter 7 still puts premium on consensus as the institutional and the
preferred mode of decision-making. The affirmation of consultation and
consensus actually encourages unanimity based on the least common
denominator, and leaves much room for recalcitrant members to sabotage any consensus building processes around democratic values and the principles of the rule of law and good governance. Furthermore, to leave it to the ASEAN Summit to decide on a specific decision making process should consensus not be achieved allows for even greater leeway for political accommodation for which the ASEAN is historically known.

23. The Charter does not specify any space for citizens and civil society
groups in policy-and decision-making, detracting from the essence of
consultation and consensus-building by not affirming the people-centered
principle of building regional identity through people’s participation.

24. Chapter 7 Article 21 leaves the prescription of each ASEAN Community Council’s rules of procedure to each council. There should be a mechanism to standardize the procedures for all councils.

Chapter 8: Settlement of Disputes

25. Disputes implied in the Charter only cover conflicts between and among ASEAN states, and do not address internal conflicts which are also
significant in the region.

26. Except for disputes concerning economic agreements, for which the ASEAN Protocol for Enhanced Dispute Settlement Mechanism shall govern, the Charter provides for the establishment of dispute settlement mechanisms but for which no process or timeframe has been prescribed.

27. The issue of compliance is not addressed organically, except for cases
to be referred to the ASEAN Summit for decision, limiting the efficacy of
the to-be-established DSMs because the Summit by practice would yield to
political exigencies.

28. The Charter does not recognize the need to establish conflict
prevention and early warning mechanisms at the regional level with the
involvement of citizens and civil society with demonstrated capacity to
assist in conflict situations.

Chapter 9: Budget and Finance

29. Aside from provisions on “internal and external audit”, the Charter
does not provide clear mechanisms for how the budget and finance of the
Association can be made transparent and accessible to the public.

Chapter 10: Administration and Procedure

30. The ASEAN Charter does not mention how Chairmanship by countries whose leadership faces legitimacy questions shall be dealt with.

31. The choice of English as the working language of ASEAN, without
reference to the use of regional languages for at least some purposes,
leaves a big gap in terms of the need to promote national languages as a
means to promote and protect the cultural heritage of the region.

32. The Charter does not provide for clear mechanisms for transparency and access to official information, and official processes, in the ASEAN.

Chapter 12: External Relations

33. Article 41.4 states that “in the conduct of external relations of
ASEAN, Member States shall, on the basis of unity and solidarity, coordinate and Endeavour a common position and pursue joint actions”. This is a bold statement that affirms the centrality of ASEAN. Considering the less-than-unified positions espoused by individual Member Countries in multilateral fora (e.g. the WTO) in the past, it is interesting to know how
the ASEAN would go about crafting common positions after the Charter is
signed.

34. Consistent with the overall absence of the role of citizens and civil
society in ASEAN, the Charter does not say anything about their role in
helping ASEAN to develop and to determine its foreign policy, and in
determining the status of external partners of ASEAN.

35. Considering the importance of migrant workers and their families in the
conduct of ASEAN’s external relations, the absence of any mention about
labor mobility as an issue to be discussed with external partners is
glaring.

Chapter 13: General and Final Provisions

36. It is provided that the “Charter shall be subject to ratification by
all ASEAN member states in accordance with their respective internal
procedure”. This is short of what the Second and Third ASEAN Civil Society
Conference (ACSC-II and III) called for, which is ratification by popular
referendum.

37. The provision on Review (Article 50) only gives the requisite timeline
(of five years after the Charter enters into force) but no clear procedures
for its conduct, including who will be involved and how extensive such
involvement would be.

The Solidarity for Asian Peoples’ Advocacies (SAPA) is an open platform for consultation, cooperation and coordination among and between Asian social movements and civil society organizations including NGOs, people
organizations and trade unions who are engaged in action, advocacy and
lobbying at the level of inter-governmental processes and organizations.
SAPA aims to enhance cooperation among its members and partners to increase the impact and effectiveness of their engagement with inter-governmental bodies. Currently, there are four Working Groups in SAPA: Working Group on ASEAN (WG-ASEAN), Working Group on the UN Human Rights Mechanisms (WG-UNHR), Working Group on Migration and Labor (WG-ML), and Working Group on North East Asia (WG-NEA). There is also an Informal Caucus on South Asia.

The SAPA WG on ASEAN is a common platform for collective action on ASEAN advocacy. The WG-ASEAN respects and promotes the multiplicity of perspectives, strategies and forms employed by its individual members, as it strives for specific unities in ASEAN-related advocacy and action.
Presently, the SAPA WG on ASEAN has more than 100 CSOs, national and
regional organizations, as members.

Further information and documents related to SAPA and SAPA WG on ASEAN activities may be downloaded from http://www.asiasapa.org .

For more information, please contact the SAPA WG on ASEAN Focal Points:

Corinna Lopa, South East Asian Committee for Advocacy, clopa@seaca.net,
+63-928-5025685

Anselmo Lee, FORUM-ASIA, Anselmo@forum-asia.org, +66-81-8689178

For more information on the SAPA WG on ASEAN’s engagement of the ASEAN Charter process, please contact:
Jenina Joy Chavez, Focus on the Global South, j.chavez@focusweb.org,
+63-918-9016716
Alexander Chandra, Institute of Global Justice, alex@globaljust.org,
+62-817-790440


DOWNLOAD PDF

Integração Sul-Americana: UNASUL e ALBA – Processos de integração alternativos

Miguel Lora / Translation by Jason Tockman.
In the phase of capitalism we are now living through, decease large and small nations compete under unequal conditions in a fictitious free market controlled by new and influential actors—powerful transnational companies. In imperialism, pills the nation-states, especially those less developed, still do not have self-determination and their independence depends upon participation in blocs with a common foreign policy, chains of production, physical infrastructure and shared sovereignty. The Bolivarian Alternative for the Americas (ALBA in Spanish) and the People’s Trade Agreement (PTA, or TCP in Spanish) are the most recent of such experiments.
 
Almost 200 years ago, Simón “the Liberator” Bolívar warned that the states of South America would not be able to contend with the expansion of the Empire to the north if they did not establish an alliance. In the second half of the 19th Century, José Martí called for the construction of truly cooperative relations among Latin Americans, based on respect and justice, in order to make the region independent from the United States. In the 1920s, Víctor Haya de la Torre, the founder of Peru’s Alianza Popular Revolucionaria Americana, warned that one of the gravest imperialist plans was to maintain a divided Latin America.
 
In the 1960s, the discussion again centered on Latin American independence and autonomy in relation to the United States. The ex-President of the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), Felipe Herrera, called for an integration that would create a continental nationalism in Latin America, a great nation cut to pieces by external factors and the victim of centrifugal forces that opposed regional union. Rafael Caldera, former Venezuelan president, emphasized that there exists no more dignified foreign policy interest than the formation of a bloc with a common conscience so that the countries of Latin America would act as a single unit for the defense of their common interests.
 
In the middle of the past century, the region began to reclaim integration as a path for development. In 1961, this took the form of the Central American Common Market; in 1969, the Andean countries established the basis for the Andean Community of Nations (CAN); and in 1991, the Common Market of the Southern Cone (MERCOSUR) was born. These attempts at political integration were more ambitious than the commercial alliances that proliferated in the 1990s.
 
Along with the arrival of neoliberalism came new ideas and methods of linking the nation with the external in a framework of globalization that confused trade with integration and buried the dreams of Latin Americanists. One of these ideas was the “open regionalism” put forward by the Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC, or CEPAL in Spanish) in the mid-1990s. Latin American Center for Social Ecology (CLAES) researcher Eduardo Gudynas describes open regionalism as a vague and confused category that complicated the debate and perhaps has been ECLAC’s greatest conceptual disaster of that era.
 
ECLAC has since led a functionally neoliberal existence, proposing to shape commercial blocs totally oriented toward the world economy, insisting they insert themselves into a global framework and not achieve autonomy on the international stage. Open regionalism validated the commercial treaties inspired by the agreements of the World Trade Organization (WTO) and the Washington Consensus (dismantling of the state, free markets without regulation, and complete liberalization of the economy) as instruments of integration.
 
The example of ECLAC’s open regionalism was the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA, between the U.S., Canada and Mexico), and the extreme example was the Free Trade Area of the Americas (FTAA).[1]
 
Later, the commercial integration of the Washington-style Free Trade Agreements (FTAs or TLCs in Spanish) not only failed to facilitate regional unity, but rather destroyed it. The CAN and MERCOSUR accords failed precisely because they corrupted regional integration with the logic of free trade competition that favors the largest over to the smallest countries. At its base, the debacles of the CAN and MERCOSUR provided evidence of the profound crisis of a paradigm which claimed that the centerpiece of integration was liberalized trade, observed Pablo Solón, Bolivian social movement leader and trade specialist.
 
Trade is integration?
 
Neoliberal reforms severely limit processes of integration and disperse their objectives. They cut off the political aspirations of the old treaties and accentuate rigidly commercial objectives. If before treaties sought to link countries to reach liberation and autonomy, now the objective is to increase trade.
 
José Manuel Quijano, economist and member of the MERCOSUR Sectoral Commission, identifies various differences between the free trade agreements and the processes of political integration that also include a trade component. To begin with, the trade accords are static and cannot be renegotiated, while the political integration agreements are dynamic and can be modified through protocols and partial agreements.
 
Free Trade Agreements impose free competition rules in an essentially asymmetrical market. A political accord promotes an alternate course for trade that permits diversification and the development of productive connections among partners.
 
Trade agreements employ a commercial lens, while integration accords handle matters in a political sphere and with support from institutions above the national level.
 
The FTAs create subordinated states that are integrated into the global productive chain as specialists in the exportation of primary products. Integration agreements combat such a role, looking instead to create coordinated chains of production.
 
Free Trade Agreements are not mechanisms of integration, nor do they grant autonomy to the state, because they look for precisely the opposite: total autonomy for the market and a subsidiary role for the state.
 
When the globalization discourse of the 1990s matured and changed the capitalist paradigm of the state, the FTAs suffered a radical change, encompassing new areas that had not been previously seen as trade issues. The old trade agreements—such as the 1820 accord between France and England—referred to borders, tariffs and customs rules. Today’s accords include new issues, including services, intellectual property, government purchasing and special international rules to protect foreign investment.
 
These “invasive” trade agreements began to influence all spheres and rules of society. A commercial logic advanced a market society in which the laws of supply and demand reached the state itself, explained Claudio Lara, Chilean Economist and professor at the Latin American Council of Social Science (CLASCO in Spanish).
 
We must change our way of thinking
 
The most significant problem for MERCOSUR is that the economies it brings together are not linked, and they compete amongst themselves. The case of soy is illustrative. Obstacles to trade are frequently imposed upon Uruguay by Brazil and Argentina, without a care whether they are closing bike routes or importing rice from Vietnam. In the cost-benefit logic, it does not matter if these actions harm their little brother. The MERCOSUR is reduced to a political forum in which the two largest partners consolidate preferential treatment, leaving the smaller nations at the margins.
 
On the other hand, the CAN advanced significantly as an institution and now maintains a solid structure: financial councils and procedures, a Latin American Reserve Fund, an Andean Parliament, its own court, and a regional judicial arrangement. But the influence of ECLAC’s export-led growth during the 1990s pushed the bloc to the cliff’s edge.
 
Peruvian economist and ECLAC advisor Ariela Ruiz Caro stated that the change in focus in economic policies modified the strategy for integration. In any form, integration depends upon the market, on the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and the World Bank, institutions in which there is no place for politics or projects of a regional character. Andean norms modify this new design/dogma and the liberalization and deregulation of markets, converting them into central elements in the process of Andean integration.
 
Neoliberalism not only disarticulated the interlinked regional chains of production, but also the political bloc that had been formed. The countries ended up competing among themselves, as much in exports as in the incentives they offered to attract foreign capital.
 
Ruiz sees in the CAN a puppet that has lost its capacity to make proposals. The Community is informed of trade negotiations with other regions, but is not able to object to Free Trade Agreements. Civil society does not have the opportunity for input, but business owners do. The CAN is falling apart because it lost sight of its initial objectives for which it was created, that is to say the promotion of balanced and harmonious development of the Andean peoples by means of cooperation, not on the basis of competition.
 
If the region is failing to achieve independence due to Free Trade Agreements, and if the regional effort perishes—contaminated by the neoliberal philosophy that always benefits the most developed nations—what scheme will suit underdeveloped and dependent countries, linked to external markets through the sale of basic goods? The Bolivarian Alternative for the Americas (ALBA) and the People’s Trade Agreement (PTA) are the embryos of a new formula for integration set in a distinct paradigm.
 
The ALBA under construction
 
In light of the collapse of neoliberal policies and projects that deepened dependency, newly elected Bolivian President Evo Morales believes that only a true integration between Latin American countries, based upon principles of cooperation, complementation and solidarity will permit the preservation of sovereignty and successfully confront the trend towards hegemonic unilateralism.
 
Morales and his colleagues Hugo Chávez of Venezuela and Fidel Castro of Cuba agreed on April 29, 2006 to construct the Bolivarian Alternative for the Americas and put into action the People’s Trade Agreement, plans for integration that will further the exchange of goods and services.
 
The strategic plan for complementary development of chains of production—with conservation/ rationing of resources—includes the construction of bi-national public, cooperative and mixed companies; the creation of subsidiaries of publicly owned banks and reciprocal credit agreements; the extension of taxes on all state investment and mixed companies, including on private capital during the period of investment recovery; facilities for airlines; and a special fund of up to $130 million to finance infrastructure and other projects that generate domestic capacity.
 
The governments of Venezuela and Cuba recognize Bolivia’s special needs after centuries of exploitation and plundering; therefore, the larger countries concede privileges to the smallest one. Venezuela is opening its state purchasing to Bolivian suppliers, while Bolivia does not; Venezuela lowers its tariffs to zero, while not demanding the same of Bolivia. Venezuela makes available its infrastructure and land and water transport equipment and guarantees the purchase of a range of vegetable oil products, as well as other agricultural and industrial goods harmed by Free Trade Agreements. It is a treaty that truly offers special and different treatment for the smallest economy in the bloc.
 
The integration of the ALBA includes social cooperation programs without financial objectives. For example, Cuba is creating a Cuban-Bolivian institution that guarantees eye care in six centers with the capacity to tend to 100,000 people annually. It is donating 20 mobile hospitals with a range of services: surgery, intensive therapy, urgent attention for cardiovascular problems, laboratories and other medical resources, as well as increasing to 5000 the number of scholarships provided for medical students through the beginning of 2007.
 
The countries are exchanging with each other—as opposed to trading—knowledge in areas of science, technology, sports, communication, experience in energy conservation, and culture. The exportation of Cuban goods and services can be used to pay in kind.
 
The ALBA and the PTA are embryos of an alternative integration. Although there remains a lack of common policies defined at this early stage of coordination (such as a common external tariff or free movement of workers between countries), these agreements replace neoliberalism’s category of “consumer” with political citizens that make decisions according to the common good and not a cost-benefit logic.
 
Basis for a new integration scheme
 
The recovery of national autonomy as the preliminary step in the reconquest of sovereignty will come to pass through effective regional coordination (political, chains of production, macroeconomic) that strengthen the negotiating capacity on the international plane. Gudynas names this proposal “autonomous regionalism,” in contrast with ECLAC’s “open regionalism.”
 
Autonomous regionalism implies a reorientation of trade and production toward regional needs, looking for complementary and cooperative chains of production and the construction of common policies, at least in agriculture and energy.
 
If one wants to connect the region economically, it is necessary to think of another type of productive relations whose principle objective is to attack the primacy of exportation. It is obvious that this type of integration is not possible if the larger countries impose conditions on the smaller ones, and if the logic of relations goes no further than the economy. Integration attempts to revive politics and above all to agree to norms at a level higher than the nation-state.
 
This new scheme also defines “de-materialization” of the economy, which means modifying the conditions of material ownership and consumption. “Private individualism” was a consequence of the economic emphasis of the reforms of the 1980s, and today one perceives a strong individualism and a weakened collective agenda. Quality of life is associated with material consumption and well-being depends on the possession of the latest technological advances. The structure of food supplies and customs also has changed with the use of microwaves and automatic washing machines. Society in general rejects the reforms of the 1980s, but their aspirations related to quality of life are the legacy of the reforms.[2]
 
The substantial variation in people’s aspirations has implications for regional integration. For example, if a government promotes regional integration by increasing taxes on Asian technologies, it runs the risk of being repudiated by the masses.
 
The great majority of Latin American populations have a low level of consumption due to the high level of poverty, while only a small elite consumes the highest quality and quantity of natural resources. For this reason, the reordering of resource use is perhaps necessary to set a limit on the opulence and assign a true social and environmental cost of consumption (cost of solid waste disposal, of packaging, etc.). Some import sectors would be harmed, although there are many possibilities to intervene in the area of consumption that are not taken advantage of, such as the rates of sumptuous consumption.
 
It is necessary to establish a limit on the use of natural resources—on water and forests/rainforests. All countries have a level of sustainable consumption that must be maintained, according to need. If one looks to cover all necessities, sooner or later, one will exceed this level. In this case, food sovereignty depends on regional interrelation, because it is not environmentally sustainable to look for domestic self-sufficiency in the food supply. One has to negotiate with neighboring countries.
 
A departure from materialism would reduce the consumption of primary materials, produce less garbage, and generate more employment because it would enhance the production of those goods which have greater utility. That which generates more employment is not the manufacture of goods, but the maintenance of them. Such is a more austere model, but one of a higher quality.
 
For all of this, Gudynas emphasizes, one needs autonomy with respect to globalization. Countries have formal sovereignty, but under a false autonomy: they depend upon international markets to sell their basic products, credit organizations define their political economy, and foreign stock exchanges fix the price of their minerals.
 
To win autonomy and be viable, no other road exists except to coordinate with one’s neighbors, harmonize rules at the regional level, develop connections in production chains, and establish joint policies that plan for and solve disputes.
 
 
[1] For the first time, the FTAA made Latin America negotiate with external parties in clusters, such as MERCOSUR and the Central American and Andean blocs. The FTAA hemispheric project was brought down by MERCOSUR opposition.
[2]Society is more distrusting than before. Seventy-five percent believe that their neighbour might rob or hut them,while in Asia, the percentage is about 42 percent. Brazil, Ecuador and Paraguay show the lowest indices of inter-personal trust. The problem is that the distrust translates into disinterest in public affairs. Society is more materialistic, egotistic, distrustful and violent. The rates of violence in Caracas, Sao Paulo, and Rio de Janeiro look as if they were measured in the Gaza Strip. The level of poverty has not diminished and is significantly concentrated in urban areas.

Miguel Lora / Translation by Jason Tockman.

In the phase of capitalism we are now living through, buy large and small nations compete under unequal conditions in a fictitious free market controlled by new and influential actors—powerful transnational companies. In imperialism, the nation-states, ed especially those less developed, still do not have self-determination and their independence depends upon participation in blocs with a common foreign policy, chains of production, physical infrastructure and shared sovereignty. The Bolivarian Alternative for the Americas (ALBA in Spanish) and the People’s Trade Agreement (PTA, or TCP in Spanish) are the most recent of such experiments.
 
Almost 200 years ago, Simón “the Liberator” Bolívar warned that the states of South America would not be able to contend with the expansion of the Empire to the north if they did not establish an alliance. In the second half of the 19th Century, José Martí called for the construction of truly cooperative relations among Latin Americans, based on respect and justice, in order to make the region independent from the United States. In the 1920s, Víctor Haya de la Torre, the founder of Peru’s Alianza Popular Revolucionaria Americana, warned that one of the gravest imperialist plans was to maintain a divided Latin America.
 
In the 1960s, the discussion again centered on Latin American independence and autonomy in relation to the United States. The ex-President of the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), Felipe Herrera, called for an integration that would create a continental nationalism in Latin America, a great nation cut to pieces by external factors and the victim of centrifugal forces that opposed regional union. Rafael Caldera, former Venezuelan president, emphasized that there exists no more dignified foreign policy interest than the formation of a bloc with a common conscience so that the countries of Latin America would act as a single unit for the defense of their common interests.
 
In the middle of the past century, the region began to reclaim integration as a path for development. In 1961, this took the form of the Central American Common Market; in 1969, the Andean countries established the basis for the Andean Community of Nations (CAN); and in 1991, the Common Market of the Southern Cone (MERCOSUR) was born. These attempts at political integration were more ambitious than the commercial alliances that proliferated in the 1990s.
 
Along with the arrival of neoliberalism came new ideas and methods of linking the nation with the external in a framework of globalization that confused trade with integration and buried the dreams of Latin Americanists. One of these ideas was the “open regionalism” put forward by the Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC, or CEPAL in Spanish) in the mid-1990s. Latin American Center for Social Ecology (CLAES) researcher Eduardo Gudynas describes open regionalism as a vague and confused category that complicated the debate and perhaps has been ECLAC’s greatest conceptual disaster of that era.
 
ECLAC has since led a functionally neoliberal existence, proposing to shape commercial blocs totally oriented toward the world economy, insisting they insert themselves into a global framework and not achieve autonomy on the international stage. Open regionalism validated the commercial treaties inspired by the agreements of the World Trade Organization (WTO) and the Washington Consensus (dismantling of the state, free markets without regulation, and complete liberalization of the economy) as instruments of integration.
 
The example of ECLAC’s open regionalism was the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA, between the U.S., Canada and Mexico), and the extreme example was the Free Trade Area of the Americas (FTAA).[1]
 
Later, the commercial integration of the Washington-style Free Trade Agreements (FTAs or TLCs in Spanish) not only failed to facilitate regional unity, but rather destroyed it. The CAN and MERCOSUR accords failed precisely because they corrupted regional integration with the logic of free trade competition that favors the largest over to the smallest countries. At its base, the debacles of the CAN and MERCOSUR provided evidence of the profound crisis of a paradigm which claimed that the centerpiece of integration was liberalized trade, observed Pablo Solón, Bolivian social movement leader and trade specialist.
 
Trade is integration?
 
Neoliberal reforms severely limit processes of integration and disperse their objectives. They cut off the political aspirations of the old treaties and accentuate rigidly commercial objectives. If before treaties sought to link countries to reach liberation and autonomy, now the objective is to increase trade.
 
José Manuel Quijano, economist and member of the MERCOSUR Sectoral Commission, identifies various differences between the free trade agreements and the processes of political integration that also include a trade component. To begin with, the trade accords are static and cannot be renegotiated, while the political integration agreements are dynamic and can be modified through protocols and partial agreements.
 
Free Trade Agreements impose free competition rules in an essentially asymmetrical market. A political accord promotes an alternate course for trade that permits diversification and the development of productive connections among partners.
 
Trade agreements employ a commercial lens, while integration accords handle matters in a political sphere and with support from institutions above the national level.
 
The FTAs create subordinated states that are integrated into the global productive chain as specialists in the exportation of primary products. Integration agreements combat such a role, looking instead to create coordinated chains of production.
 
Free Trade Agreements are not mechanisms of integration, nor do they grant autonomy to the state, because they look for precisely the opposite: total autonomy for the market and a subsidiary role for the state.
 
When the globalization discourse of the 1990s matured and changed the capitalist paradigm of the state, the FTAs suffered a radical change, encompassing new areas that had not been previously seen as trade issues. The old trade agreements—such as the 1820 accord between France and England—referred to borders, tariffs and customs rules. Today’s accords include new issues, including services, intellectual property, government purchasing and special international rules to protect foreign investment.
 
These “invasive” trade agreements began to influence all spheres and rules of society. A commercial logic advanced a market society in which the laws of supply and demand reached the state itself, explained Claudio Lara, Chilean Economist and professor at the Latin American Council of Social Science (CLASCO in Spanish).
 
We must change our way of thinking
 
The most significant problem for MERCOSUR is that the economies it brings together are not linked, and they compete amongst themselves. The case of soy is illustrative. Obstacles to trade are frequently imposed upon Uruguay by Brazil and Argentina, without a care whether they are closing bike routes or importing rice from Vietnam. In the cost-benefit logic, it does not matter if these actions harm their little brother. The MERCOSUR is reduced to a political forum in which the two largest partners consolidate preferential treatment, leaving the smaller nations at the margins.
 
On the other hand, the CAN advanced significantly as an institution and now maintains a solid structure: financial councils and procedures, a Latin American Reserve Fund, an Andean Parliament, its own court, and a regional judicial arrangement. But the influence of ECLAC’s export-led growth during the 1990s pushed the bloc to the cliff’s edge.
 
Peruvian economist and ECLAC advisor Ariela Ruiz Caro stated that the change in focus in economic policies modified the strategy for integration. In any form, integration depends upon the market, on the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and the World Bank, institutions in which there is no place for politics or projects of a regional character. Andean norms modify this new design/dogma and the liberalization and deregulation of markets, converting them into central elements in the process of Andean integration.
 
Neoliberalism not only disarticulated the interlinked regional chains of production, but also the political bloc that had been formed. The countries ended up competing among themselves, as much in exports as in the incentives they offered to attract foreign capital.
 
Ruiz sees in the CAN a puppet that has lost its capacity to make proposals. The Community is informed of trade negotiations with other regions, but is not able to object to Free Trade Agreements. Civil society does not have the opportunity for input, but business owners do. The CAN is falling apart because it lost sight of its initial objectives for which it was created, that is to say the promotion of balanced and harmonious development of the Andean peoples by means of cooperation, not on the basis of competition.
 
If the region is failing to achieve independence due to Free Trade Agreements, and if the regional effort perishes—contaminated by the neoliberal philosophy that always benefits the most developed nations—what scheme will suit underdeveloped and dependent countries, linked to external markets through the sale of basic goods? The Bolivarian Alternative for the Americas (ALBA) and the People’s Trade Agreement (PTA) are the embryos of a new formula for integration set in a distinct paradigm.
 
The ALBA under construction
 
In light of the collapse of neoliberal policies and projects that deepened dependency, newly elected Bolivian President Evo Morales believes that only a true integration between Latin American countries, based upon principles of cooperation, complementation and solidarity will permit the preservation of sovereignty and successfully confront the trend towards hegemonic unilateralism.
 
Morales and his colleagues Hugo Chávez of Venezuela and Fidel Castro of Cuba agreed on April 29, 2006 to construct the Bolivarian Alternative for the Americas and put into action the People’s Trade Agreement, plans for integration that will further the exchange of goods and services.
 
The strategic plan for complementary development of chains of production—with conservation/ rationing of resources—includes the construction of bi-national public, cooperative and mixed companies; the creation of subsidiaries of publicly owned banks and reciprocal credit agreements; the extension of taxes on all state investment and mixed companies, including on private capital during the period of investment recovery; facilities for airlines; and a special fund of up to $130 million to finance infrastructure and other projects that generate domestic capacity.
 
The governments of Venezuela and Cuba recognize Bolivia’s special needs after centuries of exploitation and plundering; therefore, the larger countries concede privileges to the smallest one. Venezuela is opening its state purchasing to Bolivian suppliers, while Bolivia does not; Venezuela lowers its tariffs to zero, while not demanding the same of Bolivia. Venezuela makes available its infrastructure and land and water transport equipment and guarantees the purchase of a range of vegetable oil products, as well as other agricultural and industrial goods harmed by Free Trade Agreements. It is a treaty that truly offers special and different treatment for the smallest economy in the bloc.
 
The integration of the ALBA includes social cooperation programs without financial objectives. For example, Cuba is creating a Cuban-Bolivian institution that guarantees eye care in six centers with the capacity to tend to 100,000 people annually. It is donating 20 mobile hospitals with a range of services: surgery, intensive therapy, urgent attention for cardiovascular problems, laboratories and other medical resources, as well as increasing to 5000 the number of scholarships provided for medical students through the beginning of 2007.
 
The countries are exchanging with each other—as opposed to trading—knowledge in areas of science, technology, sports, communication, experience in energy conservation, and culture. The exportation of Cuban goods and services can be used to pay in kind.
 
The ALBA and the PTA are embryos of an alternative integration. Although there remains a lack of common policies defined at this early stage of coordination (such as a common external tariff or free movement of workers between countries), these agreements replace neoliberalism’s category of “consumer” with political citizens that make decisions according to the common good and not a cost-benefit logic.
 
Basis for a new integration scheme
 
The recovery of national autonomy as the preliminary step in the reconquest of sovereignty will come to pass through effective regional coordination (political, chains of production, macroeconomic) that strengthen the negotiating capacity on the international plane. Gudynas names this proposal “autonomous regionalism,” in contrast with ECLAC’s “open regionalism.”
 
Autonomous regionalism implies a reorientation of trade and production toward regional needs, looking for complementary and cooperative chains of production and the construction of common policies, at least in agriculture and energy.
 
If one wants to connect the region economically, it is necessary to think of another type of productive relations whose principle objective is to attack the primacy of exportation. It is obvious that this type of integration is not possible if the larger countries impose conditions on the smaller ones, and if the logic of relations goes no further than the economy. Integration attempts to revive politics and above all to agree to norms at a level higher than the nation-state.
 
This new scheme also defines “de-materialization” of the economy, which means modifying the conditions of material ownership and consumption. “Private individualism” was a consequence of the economic emphasis of the reforms of the 1980s, and today one perceives a strong individualism and a weakened collective agenda. Quality of life is associated with material consumption and well-being depends on the possession of the latest technological advances. The structure of food supplies and customs also has changed with the use of microwaves and automatic washing machines. Society in general rejects the reforms of the 1980s, but their aspirations related to quality of life are the legacy of the reforms.[2]
 
The substantial variation in people’s aspirations has implications for regional integration. For example, if a government promotes regional integration by increasing taxes on Asian technologies, it runs the risk of being repudiated by the masses.
 
The great majority of Latin American populations have a low level of consumption due to the high level of poverty, while only a small elite consumes the highest quality and quantity of natural resources. For this reason, the reordering of resource use is perhaps necessary to set a limit on the opulence and assign a true social and environmental cost of consumption (cost of solid waste disposal, of packaging, etc.). Some import sectors would be harmed, although there are many possibilities to intervene in the area of consumption that are not taken advantage of, such as the rates of sumptuous consumption.
 
It is necessary to establish a limit on the use of natural resources—on water and forests/rainforests. All countries have a level of sustainable consumption that must be maintained, according to need. If one looks to cover all necessities, sooner or later, one will exceed this level. In this case, food sovereignty depends on regional interrelation, because it is not environmentally sustainable to look for domestic self-sufficiency in the food supply. One has to negotiate with neighboring countries.
 
A departure from materialism would reduce the consumption of primary materials, produce less garbage, and generate more employment because it would enhance the production of those goods which have greater utility. That which generates more employment is not the manufacture of goods, but the maintenance of them. Such is a more austere model, but one of a higher quality.
 
For all of this, Gudynas emphasizes, one needs autonomy with respect to globalization. Countries have formal sovereignty, but under a false autonomy: they depend upon international markets to sell their basic products, credit organizations define their political economy, and foreign stock exchanges fix the price of their minerals.
 
To win autonomy and be viable, no other road exists except to coordinate with one’s neighbors, harmonize rules at the regional level, develop connections in production chains, and establish joint policies that plan for and solve disputes.
 
 

[1] For the first time, the FTAA made Latin America negotiate with external parties in clusters, such as MERCOSUR and the Central American and Andean blocs. The FTAA hemispheric project was brought down by MERCOSUR opposition.
[2]Society is more distrusting than before. Seventy-five percent believe that their neighbour might rob or hut them,while in Asia, the percentage is about 42 percent. Brazil, Ecuador and Paraguay show the lowest indices of inter-personal trust. The problem is that the distrust translates into disinterest in public affairs. Society is more materialistic, egotistic, distrustful and violent. The rates of violence in Caracas, Sao Paulo, and Rio de Janeiro look as if they were measured in the Gaza Strip. The level of poverty has not diminished and is significantly concentrated in urban areas.

Graciela Rodriguez

O comércio internacional mudou profundamente na década atual,
especialmente depois de fracassada a IV Reunião Ministerial da Organização Mundial do Comércio – OMC, em Cancun – México, em 2003. Essa reunião terminou sem avanços devido fundamentalmente à “revolução dos pobres”, tal como foi chamada a atitude dos países que decidiram travar as negociações ao não aprovar a proposta de declaração final. Esta, pouco mudava a situação de acesso aos mercados do Norte para os países em desenvolvimento, já que permitia manter os níveis historicamente elevados de subsídios à produção agrícola, especialmente na UE e nos EUA. A partir dali muito pouco se avançou nesse âmbito e a Rodada de Doha, iniciada em 2001, continua paralisada, especialmente depois do fracasso do G4 (EUA, EU, Índia e Brasil) reunido em Postdam, em Junho de 2007, numa reunião que apesar dos apelos e esforços oficiais não conseguiu a retomada da Agenda negociadora.
>Descargar PDF

Integración Sudamericana desde la perspectiva de género: UNASUR y ALBA – Un análisis comparativo

Graciela Rodriguez

El comercio internacional ha cambiado profundamente en la década actual, no rx especialmente después de fracasada la IV Reunión Ministerial de la Organización Mundial del Comercio – OMC, ask en Cancún en 2003.. Esa reunión terminó sin avances debido fundamentalmente a la “revolución de los pobres”, medical tal como fue llamada la actitud de los países que decidieron trabar las negociaciones al no aprobar la propuesta de declaración final que poco cambiaba la situación de acceso a los mercados del Norte para los países en desarrollo, ya que permitia mantener los historicamente elevados niveles de subsidios a la producción agrícola especialmente en la UE y EUA. A partir de allí muy poco se ha avanzado en ese ámbito y la Ronda de Doha comenzada en 2001, está prácticamente paralizada.

Download PDF

South-American Integration: UNASUR and ALBA – Alternative Integration processes

albabookDurante las últimas dos décadas, drugs los procesos de liberalización e integración comercial en América Latina han perpetuado las relaciones de dependencia ecónomica de los países no industrializados respecto de los países industrializados, en base a una intensificación de la matriz exportadora basada en recursos naturales con escasa tecnologización (commodities); una apertura indiscriminada a la inversión extranjera directa y una progresiva reducción del rol regulador del Estado, configurando economías nacionales altamente desrreguladas y desprotegidas.
>descargar el libro (PDF)

Judith Valencia (ALAI)
Desde el 8 hasta al 9 de diciembre próximos se reunirán en Cochabamba, Bolivia, la II Cumbre de la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones y unos días antes la Cumbre Social por la Integración de los Pueblos (6 al 9). La profesora universitaria venezolana Judith Valencia reflexiona sobre los problemas del proceso de integración sudamericano).
Es cierto, que las decisiones que toman los presidentes en cada Cumbre, dependen [están amarradas] de un gran numero de reuniones [e intervenciones] previas y de toda una agenda de actividades.
Pero también, es cierto, que los cambios políticos por protagonismo social que se vienen dando desde el 2002, no dan razón para respetar compromisos ajenos. Ser fieles a la autodeterminación de los pueblos, respetar la pluralidad enunciando las disidencias, debe marcar la ruta a seguir.
La Unión del Sur, no puede partir anclada en las intenciones de los gobiernos que prevalecían en el 2000. Los pueblos habitantes de la América Latina, de Suramérica y el Caribe, resistieron desde siempre y vienen surgiendo, desde el grito de Chiapas en enero de 1994, sin pausa. Cada día ganan terreno en la lucha, afirmando la vigencia de la biodiversidad: cultura, fauna y flora. Confirmando el sentido de una manera de vivir que produce y reproduce con intención las relaciones humanas, como esencia sustantiva de la naturaleza y sentido de la sociedad. Los principios ancestrales, retornan cultivados en la voluntad política de cerrarle el paso a la ofensiva contrarrevolucionaria, que persiste en negociar entre gobiernos los territorios y la vida de sus pobladores.
Desde 1994 venimos acumulando fuerzas expresadas en revueltas, pero también en resultados electorales, que potencian las posibilidades de negar compromisos acordados por gobernantes anteriores. Con este espíritu, veíamos bien, que los Altos representantes de la Comisión Estratégica de Reflexión del Proceso de integración Suramericano (1) hubiesen acordado en su primera reunión en Montevideo y reafirmado en Buenos Aires (2):
“el documento final, a pesar del alto nivel de convergencia (…) no buscará llegar necesariamente a un texto consensuado. Podrá así, ofrecer a los Presidentes soluciones alternativas sobre una o más cuestiones relativas al futuro de la Comunidad Suramericana de Naciones”. (3)
De entrada, es para todos conocido, que los consensos posibles entre los 12 dejaría por fuera temas sustantivos. La Comisión Estratégica de Reflexión fue una salida a las divergencias expresadas -sobre todo por Venezuela- en la I Reunión de Presidentes en Brasilia/30 septiembre 2005. Hace más de un año. Demasiado pronto, para que sea tiempo suficiente, para olvidar y aparentar consensos. No seria para nada conveniente.
Ya en la Primera Cumbre de Legisladores y Líderes indígenas de Suramérica en el marco de la iniciativa de la Comunidad Suramericana de Naciones, reunida en Quito/11 al 13 de octubre 2005 , resolvieron:
“Rechazar el origen neoliberal de la Comunidad Suramericana de Naciones a través de la cual se pretende una integración en términos del libre mercado (…) Alertar … que el diseño de esta comunidad sudamericana tal como esta planteada, pone en grave riesgo lo derechos colectivos de los pueblos y nacionalidades indígenas como son, la autonomía, el territorio, la biodiversidad y los recursos naturales (…) Instar… que se constituya una instancia participativa, que responda a la solución de las verdaderas necesidades de nuestros pueblos (…) Exhortar a los gobiernos de Sudamérica que se tome en consideración las preocupaciones de los Presidentes de Venezuela y Uruguay expresadas en relación a la conformación de la Comunidad Sudamericana”
Era octubre 2005, 15 días después de Brasilia. Dos meses después, Bolivia eligió a Evo Morales Presidente. Las elecciones de Chile y Perú dieron resultados diferentes, a los procesos electorales anteriores, dando cuenta de nuevas fuerzas. Brasil y Venezuela confirman los liderazgos de Lula y Chávez.
Durante todo el 2006, se perfilaron dos lógicas/ dos posiciones: Alvaro Uribe por Colombia y Evo Morales/Hugo Chávez por Bolivia y Venezuela. Todos dos, junto a otros, con matices.
Así la situación, no podemos aceptar “medias tintas” y dejar que declaren solo sobre los consensos. Debemos exigirles delimitación de posiciones y coincidencias ciertas, sin retóricas.
Así las cosas, quiero referirme a algunos aspectos heredados -y arrastrados como políticas de hechos cumplidos-, desde la Reunión de Presidentes de América del Sur, Brasilia 1 septiembre de 2000, convocada por F.H. Cardoso. Es de destacar aspectos del texto de la Declaración Final:
“satisfacción de la V Reunión del ALCA/Toronto/noviembre 1999… zona de libre comercio entre el MERCOSUR y la CAN… impulso de la integración trasfronteriza… integración y desarrollo de la integración física…el papel motriz de la energía… telecomunicaciones…”
A buen entendedor pocas palabras. Malsana herencia.
No es cierto, que la Declaración Presidencial de Cusco del 8 de diciembre 2004, sea el punto de partida. La intención que trasluce el seguimiento de La Comunidad Suramericana de Naciones, presenta la herencia de resoluciones de tres encuentros anteriores y Brasil/Itamaraty, cumpliendo con la Secretaria Pro-Tempore, no deja pasar oportunidad sin recordarlo.
A mi entender, los pueblos insurgentes deben mostrarse intransigentes ante tres de los aspectos heredados. No podemos/ ni debemos dejar pasar:
– La convergencia CAN/MERCOSUR.
– Las áreas de acción prioritarias [Agenda Prioritaria].
– La Iniciativa para la Integración de la Infraestructura Regional Sudamericana (IIRSA) ( www.iirsa.org)
La Comunidad Suramericana como espacio para la integración de los Pueblos no puede partir de la convergencia CAN/MERCOSUR. Todas dos, son experiencias teñidas, por signos de acoplamiento al proyecto imperial ALCA. Queda en evidencia, solo leyendo, los Acuerdos de Complementación Económica y sabiendo de las intenciones de filtrar las negociaciones de los TLC’S de los andinos con Estados Unidos a través de la normativa andina, y de plantearse converger hacia el MERCOSUR, nos conducen a sostener que:
“la Comunidad Suramericana de Naciones debe trascender MERCOSUR, debe trascender la CAN, y estas dos instituciones deben desaparecer progresivamente en un Plan Estratégico”. (4)
La Agenda Prioritaria, no es tan prioritaria para lo social al colocar en 7º lugar, en lenguaje convencional:
“la promoción de la cohesión social, de la inclusión social y de la justicia social”.
Ya el lenguaje es una burla. La correlación de fuerzas políticas de la región debe exigirles ya a los gobernantes un Plan de Emergencia Social que de una vez por todas permita un cauce para el vivir-bien de los pueblos de estos territorios. Propuestas una y mil veces sostenidas como banderas de lucha.
A estas alturas del proceso de transformación social que vivimos día a día, vergüenza les debe dar a los gobernantes y funcionarios hablar del IIRSA/2000. Leerlo eriza la piel. Negocios que nada tienen que ver con el bien vivir de los pobladores. Basándose en una verdad, la necesidad de comunicarnos, proponen una solución absurda que lejos esta de tener que ver con la unión de los pueblos suramericanos. (5)
Concluyo con palabras claras que delatan y nos alertan sobre la intención IIRSA
“los dos ejes [caso Paraguay]… garantizan un transito expedito para mercancías, personas y por supuesto también tropas. En realidad… se observa claramente una subregionalización de América del Sur que establece nuevas fronteras… este proyecto… propiciaría agrupamientos regionales o espacios de cohesión muy distintos a los de los actuales Estados Latinoamericanos y llamaría al establecimiento de legislaciones supranacionales sobre bases diferentes a las de la defensa de las soberanías nacionales…” (6)
La Unión de los Pueblos del Sur no debe fundarse en una herencia de gobernantes. Es hora de exigir borrón y cuentas nuevas.
Debemos impedir cualquier ruta ‘hacia el ALCA’. El proyecto de Declaración Presidencial ya viene circulando y ojalá algunos gobiernos detengan la intención que recorre casi todo el proyecto. ¿Cuál es? Dejar pasar un año y al final imitar cambiar para que nada cambie. Rebautizar con el nombre Comunidad Suramericana, lo mismo: Convergencia CAN/MERCOSUR, en aspectos medulares:
“Reafirmar la estructura organizativa definida en la Declaración de Brasilia (párrafos 8 a 15)…” [Inaudito]
Dos detalles:
“Las reuniones Ministeriales Sectoriales… examinaran y promoverán proyectos y políticas especificas… salud, educación, cultura, ciencia y tecnología, seguridad, infraestructura de energía… En este sentido estas reuniones se realizaran valiéndose de los mecanismos existentes en el MERCOSUR y en la CAN (prr 11) y “… en el área de infraestructura promoverán… la agenda conversada…” (IIRSA) (prr 12)
Y como si fuera poco proponen que los Presidentes decidan:
“… establecer una Comisión de Convergencia Institucional y Coordinación, a nivel de altos funcionarios y con la participación de los secretariados de la CAN y del MERCOSUR, para asegurar [¿cinismo?] en el plano ejecutivo la implementación de las decisiones…”
Benditos secretariados. Es costumbre otorgarles representación política a los Secretarios Generales quienes terminan gobernando. Debemos tener siempre presente que la CAN y su Sistema Andino de Integración (SAI) acoplaron el Acuerdo de Cartagena a las pautas de reestructuración del Sistema Interamericano (7). Acoplamiento implementado por la acción de los protocolos de Trujillo y Sucre, 1996 y 1997, respectivamente. Y pretenden decidir la participación de las organizaciones sociales/populares, que los pueblos organizados participen, con las “formulas” instituidas por la CAN/MERCOSUR, a saber:
“seminarios y mesas redondas con la participación de segmentos representativos de la sociedad civil…” (prr 8)
Y concluyen diciendo:
“En la interacción con la sociedad civil, será tomada especialmente en consideración la experiencia adquirida con la Cumbre Social de Cochabamba”
Están tan distantes de lo que acontece en la calle, del deseo y sentir de los pueblos y pretenden, con descaro, tentar egos.

Notas:

1) Comisión Estratégica de Reflexión del Proceso de Integración Suramericano. Creada en Montevideo, 9 diciembre 2005.
2) I Reunión de la Comisión Estratégica de Reflexión del Proceso de Integración Suramericano. Montevideo, 16 junio 2006 – II Reunión de la Comisión Estratégica de Reflexión del Proceso de Integración Suramericano. Buenos Aires, 24 julio 2006.
3) Es de hacer notar que en el documento síntesis que trabajan para el 17 de noviembre este párrafo no está.
4) Hugo Chávez. Discursos Brasilia 30/9/2005. Es de hacer notar que todavía para esa fecha Venezuela era país/CAN. Denuncia 22/4/2006.
5) Principios Orientadores del IIRSA
• Regionalismo Abierto. El espacio suramericano es organizado en torno a franjas multinacionales que concentran franjas de comercio actuales y potenciales. Las Franjas o Ejes de Integración y Desarrollo buscan promover el desarrollo de negocios y cadenas productivas con grandes economías de escala.
• Este ordenamiento facilitará el acceso a zonas de alto potencial productivo. Reorientados para conformar cadenas productivas en sectores de alta competitividad global.
• La tecnología de la información acerca las economías suramericanas a los grandes motores [¿Cómo combustible?] de la economía mundial. Apoya una transformación de la organización y el funcionamiento de la sociedad incluyendo los temas educativos, servicios públicos y gobierno.
• Busca generar “la mayor cantidad posible de impactos locales de desarrollo, evitando que sean solo corredores entre los mercados principales”.
6) “Ana Esther Ceceña-Carlos Ernesto Motto. Paraguay: Eje de la Dominación del Cono Sur. Observatorio Latinoamericano de Geopolítica. 2005
7) En la I Cumbre de las Américas, Dic/Miami 1994, los gobernantes decidieron la Reestructuración del Sistema Interamericano. El ALCA es uno de los proyectos de reestructuración.
Este artículo forma parte de la edición especial de la revista América Latina en Movimiento Latina en Movimiento (Nº 414 – 415) que circulará próximamente referida al tema de la integración
Source: www.argenpress.info
Uziel Nogueira
El acompañamiento y la comprensión del proceso de integración sudamericano se tornó una tarea compleja, thumb pharm particularmente a partir de este año. Para ejemplificar esta afirmación tomemos el caso de la Primera Reunión Energética de Sudamérica a nivel presidencial, llevada a cabo el 17 de abril en la Isla Margarita, Venezuela.
En este encuentro se acordó -entre otras cosas- la creación de la Unión de Naciones Sudamericanas (UNASUR) que sustituyó a la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones (CASA) que se creó en el año 2004. Es importante mencionar aquí que la mayoría de los países que participan de la UNASUR también forman parte de otros esquemas de integración subregional, regional y/o hemisférico. Veamos:  la Comunidad Andina de Naciones (CAN) y sus antecedentes históricos en ese proceso subregional están en funcionamiento desde finales de la década de 1960; el Mercado Común del Sur (MERCOSUR) fue lanzado a comienzos de la década de 1990 y a través del tiempo incorporó como miembros asociados a países que pertenecen o pertenecieron a la CAN. Juntos, ambos bloques buscan construir un espacio de integración más profundo, que empiece a transitar el camino seguido por la Unión Europea.
Por su parte, Perú y Colombia (países miembros de la CAN, pero asociados al MERCOSUR) están aguardando la aprobación por parte del Congreso de los Estados Unidos de un Acuerdo de Libre Comercio que sigue el modelo del NAFTA (Acuerdo de Libre Comercio de América del Norte). Sin embargo, en uniones aduaneras como la CAN o el MERCOSUR, las negociaciones comerciales deben ser realizadas en bloque. Por esta razón, Ecuador, Bolivia y Venezuela no participaron de las negociaciones con los Estados Unidos.
A su vez, Chile (país asociado al MERCOSUR) tiene acuerdos de libre comercio con la mayoría de las economías globales y fue recientemente invitado a reincorporarse a la CAN, un bloque que abandonó en la década de 1970.
Venezuela abandonó la CAN en 2005 por decisión de su presidente, Hugo Chávez y en 2006 ingresó al MERCOSUR. No obstante, lanzó su propia iniciativa de integración, denominada Alternativa Bolivariana para las Américas (ALBA) con la participación de Cuba, Bolivia y, más recientemente, Nicaragua y Haití.
Para completar este cuadro -y como se mencionó al inicio de este artículo- existe la iniciativa de construir la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones (CASA) impulsada desde 2004 por Brasil que, a partir de este mes, se denomina UNASUL y tiene el propósito de integrar a todos los países de esta parte del continente, incluyendo a Suriname y Guyana. Tal proliferación de bloques e iniciativas de integración despierta, al menos, dos preguntas. (i) ¿Por qué los gobiernos buscan nuevas iniciativas en vez de perfeccionar aquéllas de las que forman parte?; y (ii)  ¿Qué modelo de integración prevalecerá en el futuro inmediato? 
En relación a la primera pregunta, la respuesta probablemente esté relacionada con la insatisfacción de los gobiernos por los resultados -políticos, económicos, sociales, etc.- obtenidos por sus países, por lo que buscan mejores oportunidades a través de otras formas de integración. Esto podría explicar la decisión de Colombia y Perú de permanecer en la CAN, a la vez que negocian un acuerdo comercial con los Estados Unidos.
En relación a la segunda pregunta, visualizo cuatro posibilidades en cuanto al modelo de integración con mejores posibilidades de prevalecer: (i) mantenimiento del status quo; esto es, la coexistencia de las iniciativas de integración arriba mencionadas; (ii) creación de un área de libre comercio sudamericana, utilizando posiblemente a UNASUR como plataforma; (iii) expansión y profundización del MERCOSUR; y (iv) expansión y profundización del ALBA.
En mi opinión, el mantenimiento del status quo  prevalecerá en el futuro inmediato porque ningún país -incluido Brasil- tiene poder y peso político, económico y comercial para imponer su propia visión y/o modelo de integración. Por lo tanto, en los próximos 4 años es de esperarse un cierto equilibrio de fuerzas entre varias iniciativas de integración existentes en este momento. Esta situación podría ser modificada en el caso de algún shock externo como, por ejemplo, una desaceleración del crecimiento global y la caída en el precio de las commodities.
Finalmente, me permito una reflexión de naturaleza más bien académica. Puede decirse que están en juego en América del Sur tres proyectos de integración: (i) el modelo europeo de unión aduanera / mercado común; (ii) el modelo norteamericano de acuerdos de libre comercio; y (iii) el modelo venezolano del ALBA. Solamente el paso del tiempo podrá mostrar cuál de los tres modelos irá a prevalecer.
INTAL Carta Mensual No. 129 – Abril 2007
V Cumbre del ALBA
Tintorero – Estado Lara, see 29 de abril de 2007
En ocasión de celebrarse la V Cumbre de la Alternativa Bolivariana para los Pueblos de Nuestra América (ALBA) y el primer aniversario del Tratado de Comercio de los Pueblos (TCP), hospital Hugo Chávez Frías, rx Presidente de la República Bolivariana de Venezuela, Evo Morales Ayma; Presidente de la República de Bolivia, Carlos Lage Dávila, Vicepresidente del Consejo de Estado de la República de Cuba; Daniel Ortega Saavedra, Presidente de la República de Nicaragua; todos representantes de los países miembros del ALBA; y contando con la presencia de René Preval, Presidente de la República de Haití; Maria Fernanda Espinosa, Canciller de la República de Ecuador; Reginald Austrie, Ministro de Energía y Obras Públicas de la Mancomunidad de Dominica; Assim Martin, Ministro de Obras Públicas, Transporte, Correos y Energía de la Federación de San Crist& oacute;bal y Nieves; Julian Francis, Ministro de la Vivienda, Asentamientos Humanos Informales, Planificación Física y Tierra de San Vicente y las Granadinas y Eduardo Bonomi, Ministro de Trabajo y Seguridad Social de la República Oriental del Uruguay, en calidad de invitados especiales y observadores de esta Cumbre, efectuada los días 28 y 29 de abril de 2007, realizaron una completa evaluación del desarrollo de los programas y proyectos aprobados en el Primer Plan Estratégico del ALBA, así como de las acciones de cooperación e integración desplegadas durante el año 2006 en la República de Bolivia y la República de Nicaragua y los hermanos países del Caribe.
En el curso del debate sostenido en un clima de fraternidad y hermandad, ratificamos la idea de que el principio rector de la Alternativa Bolivariana para los Pueblos de Nuestra América, es la solidaridad más amplia entre los pueblos de América Latina y el Caribe, sin nacionalismos egoístas ni políticas nacionales restrictivas que puedan negar el objetivo de construir la Patria Grande que soñaron los próceres y héroes de nuestras luchas emancipadoras.
La integración y unión de América Latina y el Caribe a partir de un modelo de desarrollo independiente que priorice la complementariedad económica regional, haga realidad la voluntad de promover el desarrollo de todos y fortalezca una cooperación genuina basada en el respeto mutuo y solidaridad, ya no es una simple quimera, sino una realidad tangible que se ha manifestado en estos años en los programas de alfabetización y salud, que han permitido a miles de latinoamericanos avanzar en el camino de la superación real de la pobreza; en la cooperación dada en materia energética y financiera a los países del Caribe, que está contribuyendo decisivamente al progreso de estos pueblos hermanos; en el incremento sostenido del comercio compensado y justo entre Cuba y Venezuela, y en el conjunto de empresas mixtas conformadas entre ambos en diversas ramas productivas; en el importante apoyo de financiamiento directo brindado a Bolivia para el cumplimiento de diversos programas sociales, en el conjunto de proyectos identificados para la constitución de empresas mixtas binacionales; en todo el proceso de impulso que estamos brindando al Gobierno Sandinista de Nicaragua que en tan solo escasos meses está produciendo efectos altamente positivos en las áreas de generación eléctrica, producción agrícola, suministros de insumos para la industrias, entre otras áreas.
La Alternativa Bolivariana para los Pueblos de Nuestra América que se sustenta en los principios de solidaridad, cooperación genuina y complementariedad entre nuestros países, en el aprovechamiento racional y en función del bienestar de nuestros pueblos de sus recursos naturales – incluido su potencial energético-, en la formación integral e intensiva del capital humano que requiere nuestro desarrollo y en la atención a las necesidades y aspiraciones de nuestros hombres y mujeres, ha demostrado su fuerza y viabilidad como una alternativa de justicia frente al neoliberalismo y la inequidad.
El ALBA está demostrando con estadísticas concretas que el libre comercio no es capaz de generar los cambios sociales requeridos, y que puede más la voluntad política como sustento de la definición conciente de programas de acción encaminados hacia la erradicación de los dramas sociales de millones de seres humanos en nuestro continente.
En virtud de los antes expresado los Jefes de Estado de Cuba, Venezuela, Bolivia y Nicaragua, en representación de sus respectivos pueblos, reafirmaron su determinación de seguir avanzando y profundizando la construcción del ALBA, en el entendido de que esta alternativa constituye una alianza política estratégica, cuyo propósito fundamental en el mediano plazo es producir transformaciones estructurales en las formaciones económico-sociales de las naciones que la integran, para hacer posible un desarrollo compartido, capaz de garantizar la inserción exitosa y sostenible en los procesos de producción e intercambio del mundo actual, para colocar la política y la economía al servicio de los seres humanos.
En el contexto en que toma cuerpo, el ALBA constituye el primer esfuerzo histórico de construcción de un proyecto global latinoamericano desde una posición política favorable. Desde la Revolución Cubana, las fuerzas progresistas del continente, bien desde la oposición o desde el poder, lo que habían hecho era acumular fuerzas para resistir la ofensiva del imperio (Cuba es la excepción porque no solo logró sobrevivir, sino que edificó una sociedad cualitativamente superior, desplegando al mismo tiempo una trascendente labor de apoyo internacionalista a los países más pobres, en medio de un espantoso bloqueo por parte del imperialismo norteamericano); es con el nacimiento del ALBA que las fuerzas revolucionarias hemos podido pasar a una nueva situación que bien pudiéramos def inir como de acumulación de la fuerza política necesaria para la consolidación del cambio que se ha producido en la correlación de fuerzas políticas de nuestro continente.
Ante nosotros se abren nuevas perspectivas de integración y fusión que forman parte del salto cualitativo que están promoviendo los profundos vínculos de cooperación que hemos establecido en estos años. Por tal razón estamos comprometidos a llevar adelante la construcción de espacios económicos y productivos de nuevo tipo, que produzcan mayores beneficios a nuestros pueblos, mediante la utilización racional de los recursos y activos de nuestros países, para lo cual se requiere avanzar en la conformación de empresas Grannacionales, estableciendo y consolidando los acuerdos normativos e institucionales necesarios para la cooperación; instrumentando estrategias y programas Grannacionales conjuntos de todos nuestros países en materias como: educación, salud, energí ;a, comunicación, transporte, vivienda, vialidad, alimentación, entre otros; promoviendo de manera conciente y organizada la ampliación del Tratado de Comercio de los Pueblos con intercambios justos y equilibrados; llevando adelante programas para el uso racional de los recursos energéticos renovables y no renovables, construyendo una estrategia de seguridad alimentaria común a todas nuestras naciones; ampliando la cooperación en materia de formación de recursos humanos; y fundando nuevas estructuras para el fortalecimiento de nuestra capacidad de financiamiento de los grandes proyectos Grannacionales.
Reiteraron su convicción de que solo un proceso de integración entre los pueblos de Nuestra América, que tenga en cuenta el nivel de desarrollo de cada país y garantice que todas las naciones se beneficien de este proceso, permitirá superar la espiral degradante del subdesarrollo impuesto a nuestra región.
En esta V Cumbre hemos visto con mucho regocijo el contenido de la Declaración Política firmada el 17 de febrero en San Vicente y las Granadinas por los Primeros Ministros Roosevelt Skerrit, de la Mancomunidad de Dominica; Ralph Gonsálves, de San Vicente y las Granadinas, Winston Baldwin Spencer, de Antigua y Barbuda y Hugo Chávez Frías, Presidente de la República Bolivariana de Venezuela, en la cual manifiestan su voluntad de propiciar la más profunda cooperación y unidad entre la Comunidad del Caribe (CARICOM) y los Estados signatarios de la Alternativa Bolivariana para los Pueblos de Nuestra América y el Tratado de Comercio de los Pueblos, de manera que sus beneficios sociales y las posibilidades de un desarrollo económico sustentable con independencia y soberanía sea igual para todos, to do lo cual comienza a materializarse con la presencia en esta V Cumbre de nuestros hermanos del Caribe.
Los Jefes de Estado y de Gobierno de Cuba, Venezuela, Bolivia y Nicaragua, acordaron suscribir la presente Declaración en la convicción de que la misma abre el camino hacia una nueva fase de consolidación estratégica y avance político de la Alternativa Bolivariana para los Pueblos de Nuestra América (ALBA), en la perspectiva histórica de poder realizar los sueños de nuestros Libertadores de construcción de la Patria Grande Latinoamericana y Caribeña.
Hecho en la ciudad de Barquisimeto, República Bolivariana de Venezuela, a los 29 días del mes abril de 2007.
Por la República Bolivariana de Venezuela Hugo Chávez Frías, Presidente de la República
Por el Gobierno de la República de Bolivia, Evo Morales, Presidente de la República
Por la República de Cuba, Carlos Lage, Vicepresidente de la República
Por el Gobierno de la República de Nicaragua, Daniel Ortega, Presidente de la República

Uziel Nogueira

El acompañamiento y la comprensión del proceso de integración sudamericano se tornó una tarea compleja, particularmente a partir de este año. Para ejemplificar esta afirmación tomemos el caso de la Primera Reunión Energética de Sudamérica a nivel presidencial, llevada a cabo el 17 de abril en la Isla Margarita, Venezuela.

En este encuentro se acordó -entre otras cosas- la creación de la Unión de Naciones Sudamericanas (UNASUR) que sustituyó a la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones (CASA) que se creó en el año 2004. Es importante mencionar aquí que la mayoría de los países que participan de la UNASUR también forman parte de otros esquemas de integración subregional, regional y/o hemisférico. Veamos:  la Comunidad Andina de Naciones (CAN) y sus antecedentes históricos en ese proceso subregional están en funcionamiento desde finales de la década de 1960; el Mercado Común del Sur (MERCOSUR) fue lanzado a comienzos de la década de 1990 y a través del tiempo incorporó como miembros asociados a países que pertenecen o pertenecieron a la CAN. Juntos, ambos bloques buscan construir un espacio de integración más profundo, que empiece a transitar el camino seguido por la Unión Europea.

Por su parte, Perú y Colombia (países miembros de la CAN, pero asociados al MERCOSUR) están aguardando la aprobación por parte del Congreso de los Estados Unidos de un Acuerdo de Libre Comercio que sigue el modelo del NAFTA (Acuerdo de Libre Comercio de América del Norte). Sin embargo, en uniones aduaneras como la CAN o el MERCOSUR, las negociaciones comerciales deben ser realizadas en bloque. Por esta razón, Ecuador, Bolivia y Venezuela no participaron de las negociaciones con los Estados Unidos.

A su vez, Chile (país asociado al MERCOSUR) tiene acuerdos de libre comercio con la mayoría de las economías globales y fue recientemente invitado a reincorporarse a la CAN, un bloque que abandonó en la década de 1970.

Venezuela abandonó la CAN en 2005 por decisión de su presidente, Hugo Chávez y en 2006 ingresó al MERCOSUR. No obstante, lanzó su propia iniciativa de integración, denominada Alternativa Bolivariana para las Américas (ALBA) con la participación de Cuba, Bolivia y, más recientemente, Nicaragua y Haití.

Para completar este cuadro -y como se mencionó al inicio de este artículo- existe la iniciativa de construir la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones (CASA) impulsada desde 2004 por Brasil que, a partir de este mes, se denomina UNASUL y tiene el propósito de integrar a todos los países de esta parte del continente, incluyendo a Suriname y Guyana. Tal proliferación de bloques e iniciativas de integración despierta, al menos, dos preguntas. (i) ¿Por qué los gobiernos buscan nuevas iniciativas en vez de perfeccionar aquéllas de las que forman parte?; y (ii)  ¿Qué modelo de integración prevalecerá en el futuro inmediato?

En relación a la primera pregunta, la respuesta probablemente esté relacionada con la insatisfacción de los gobiernos por los resultados -políticos, económicos, sociales, etc.- obtenidos por sus países, por lo que buscan mejores oportunidades a través de otras formas de integración. Esto podría explicar la decisión de Colombia y Perú de permanecer en la CAN, a la vez que negocian un acuerdo comercial con los Estados Unidos.

En relación a la segunda pregunta, visualizo cuatro posibilidades en cuanto al modelo de integración con mejores posibilidades de prevalecer: (i) mantenimiento del status quo; esto es, la coexistencia de las iniciativas de integración arriba mencionadas; (ii) creación de un área de libre comercio sudamericana, utilizando posiblemente a UNASUR como plataforma; (iii) expansión y profundización del MERCOSUR; y (iv) expansión y profundización del ALBA.
En mi opinión, el mantenimiento del status quo  prevalecerá en el futuro inmediato porque ningún país -incluido Brasil- tiene poder y peso político, económico y comercial para imponer su propia visión y/o modelo de integración. Por lo tanto, en los próximos 4 años es de esperarse un cierto equilibrio de fuerzas entre varias iniciativas de integración existentes en este momento. Esta situación podría ser modificada en el caso de algún shock externo como, por ejemplo, una desaceleración del crecimiento global y la caída en el precio de las commodities.

Finalmente, me permito una reflexión de naturaleza más bien académica. Puede decirse que están en juego en América del Sur tres proyectos de integración: (i) el modelo europeo de unión aduanera / mercado común; (ii) el modelo norteamericano de acuerdos de libre comercio; y (iii) el modelo venezolano del ALBA. Solamente el paso del tiempo podrá mostrar cuál de los tres modelos irá a prevalecer.

INTAL Carta Mensual No. 129 – Abril 2007

Uziel Nogueira
El acompañamiento y la comprensión del proceso de integración sudamericano se tornó una tarea compleja, particularmente a partir de este año. Para ejemplificar esta afirmación tomemos el caso de la Primera Reunión Energética de Sudamérica a nivel presidencial, llevada a cabo el 17 de abril en la Isla Margarita, Venezuela.
En este encuentro se acordó -entre otras cosas- la creación de la Unión de Naciones Sudamericanas (UNASUR) que sustituyó a la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones (CASA) que se creó en el año 2004. Es importante mencionar aquí que la mayoría de los países que participan de la UNASUR también forman parte de otros esquemas de integración subregional, regional y/o hemisférico. Veamos:  la Comunidad Andina de Naciones (CAN) y sus antecedentes históricos en ese proceso subregional están en funcionamiento desde finales de la década de 1960; el Mercado Común del Sur (MERCOSUR) fue lanzado a comienzos de la década de 1990 y a través del tiempo incorporó como miembros asociados a países que pertenecen o pertenecieron a la CAN. Juntos, ambos bloques buscan construir un espacio de integración más profundo, que empiece a transitar el camino seguido por la Unión Europea.
Por su parte, Perú y Colombia (países miembros de la CAN, pero asociados al MERCOSUR) están aguardando la aprobación por parte del Congreso de los Estados Unidos de un Acuerdo de Libre Comercio que sigue el modelo del NAFTA (Acuerdo de Libre Comercio de América del Norte). Sin embargo, en uniones aduaneras como la CAN o el MERCOSUR, las negociaciones comerciales deben ser realizadas en bloque. Por esta razón, Ecuador, Bolivia y Venezuela no participaron de las negociaciones con los Estados Unidos.
A su vez, Chile (país asociado al MERCOSUR) tiene acuerdos de libre comercio con la mayoría de las economías globales y fue recientemente invitado a reincorporarse a la CAN, un bloque que abandonó en la década de 1970.
Venezuela abandonó la CAN en 2005 por decisión de su presidente, Hugo Chávez y en 2006 ingresó al MERCOSUR. No obstante, lanzó su propia iniciativa de integración, denominada Alternativa Bolivariana para las Américas (ALBA) con la participación de Cuba, Bolivia y, más recientemente, Nicaragua y Haití.
Para completar este cuadro -y como se mencionó al inicio de este artículo- existe la iniciativa de construir la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones (CASA) impulsada desde 2004 por Brasil que, a partir de este mes, se denomina UNASUL y tiene el propósito de integrar a todos los países de esta parte del continente, incluyendo a Suriname y Guyana. Tal proliferación de bloques e iniciativas de integración despierta, al menos, dos preguntas. (i) ¿Por qué los gobiernos buscan nuevas iniciativas en vez de perfeccionar aquéllas de las que forman parte?; y (ii)  ¿Qué modelo de integración prevalecerá en el futuro inmediato? 
En relación a la primera pregunta, la respuesta probablemente esté relacionada con la insatisfacción de los gobiernos por los resultados -políticos, económicos, sociales, etc.- obtenidos por sus países, por lo que buscan mejores oportunidades a través de otras formas de integración. Esto podría explicar la decisión de Colombia y Perú de permanecer en la CAN, a la vez que negocian un acuerdo comercial con los Estados Unidos.
En relación a la segunda pregunta, visualizo cuatro posibilidades en cuanto al modelo de integración con mejores posibilidades de prevalecer: (i) mantenimiento del status quo; esto es, la coexistencia de las iniciativas de integración arriba mencionadas; (ii) creación de un área de libre comercio sudamericana, utilizando posiblemente a UNASUR como plataforma; (iii) expansión y profundización del MERCOSUR; y (iv) expansión y profundización del ALBA.
En mi opinión, el mantenimiento del status quo  prevalecerá en el futuro inmediato porque ningún país -incluido Brasil- tiene poder y peso político, económico y comercial para imponer su propia visión y/o modelo de integración. Por lo tanto, en los próximos 4 años es de esperarse un cierto equilibrio de fuerzas entre varias iniciativas de integración existentes en este momento. Esta situación podría ser modificada en el caso de algún shock externo como, por ejemplo, una desaceleración del crecimiento global y la caída en el precio de las commodities.
Finalmente, me permito una reflexión de naturaleza más bien académica. Puede decirse que están en juego en América del Sur tres proyectos de integración: (i) el modelo europeo de unión aduanera / mercado común; (ii) el modelo norteamericano de acuerdos de libre comercio; y (iii) el modelo venezolano del ALBA. Solamente el paso del tiempo podrá mostrar cuál de los tres modelos irá a prevalecer.
INTAL Carta Mensual No. 129 – Abril 2007
Uziel Nogueira
El acompañamiento y la comprensión del proceso de integración sudamericano se tornó una tarea compleja, particularmente a partir de este año. Para ejemplificar esta afirmación tomemos el caso de la Primera Reunión Energética de Sudamérica a nivel presidencial, llevada a cabo el 17 de abril en la Isla Margarita, Venezuela.
En este encuentro se acordó -entre otras cosas- la creación de la Unión de Naciones Sudamericanas (UNASUR) que sustituyó a la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones (CASA) que se creó en el año 2004. Es importante mencionar aquí que la mayoría de los países que participan de la UNASUR también forman parte de otros esquemas de integración subregional, regional y/o hemisférico. Veamos:  la Comunidad Andina de Naciones (CAN) y sus antecedentes históricos en ese proceso subregional están en funcionamiento desde finales de la década de 1960; el Mercado Común del Sur (MERCOSUR) fue lanzado a comienzos de la década de 1990 y a través del tiempo incorporó como miembros asociados a países que pertenecen o pertenecieron a la CAN. Juntos, ambos bloques buscan construir un espacio de integración más profundo, que empiece a transitar el camino seguido por la Unión Europea.
Por su parte, Perú y Colombia (países miembros de la CAN, pero asociados al MERCOSUR) están aguardando la aprobación por parte del Congreso de los Estados Unidos de un Acuerdo de Libre Comercio que sigue el modelo del NAFTA (Acuerdo de Libre Comercio de América del Norte). Sin embargo, en uniones aduaneras como la CAN o el MERCOSUR, las negociaciones comerciales deben ser realizadas en bloque. Por esta razón, Ecuador, Bolivia y Venezuela no participaron de las negociaciones con los Estados Unidos.
A su vez, Chile (país asociado al MERCOSUR) tiene acuerdos de libre comercio con la mayoría de las economías globales y fue recientemente invitado a reincorporarse a la CAN, un bloque que abandonó en la década de 1970.
Venezuela abandonó la CAN en 2005 por decisión de su presidente, Hugo Chávez y en 2006 ingresó al MERCOSUR. No obstante, lanzó su propia iniciativa de integración, denominada Alternativa Bolivariana para las Américas (ALBA) con la participación de Cuba, Bolivia y, más recientemente, Nicaragua y Haití.
Para completar este cuadro -y como se mencionó al inicio de este artículo- existe la iniciativa de construir la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones (CASA) impulsada desde 2004 por Brasil que, a partir de este mes, se denomina UNASUL y tiene el propósito de integrar a todos los países de esta parte del continente, incluyendo a Suriname y Guyana. Tal proliferación de bloques e iniciativas de integración despierta, al menos, dos preguntas. (i) ¿Por qué los gobiernos buscan nuevas iniciativas en vez de perfeccionar aquéllas de las que forman parte?; y (ii)  ¿Qué modelo de integración prevalecerá en el futuro inmediato? 
En relación a la primera pregunta, la respuesta probablemente esté relacionada con la insatisfacción de los gobiernos por los resultados -políticos, económicos, sociales, etc.- obtenidos por sus países, por lo que buscan mejores oportunidades a través de otras formas de integración. Esto podría explicar la decisión de Colombia y Perú de permanecer en la CAN, a la vez que negocian un acuerdo comercial con los Estados Unidos.
En relación a la segunda pregunta, visualizo cuatro posibilidades en cuanto al modelo de integración con mejores posibilidades de prevalecer: (i) mantenimiento del status quo; esto es, la coexistencia de las iniciativas de integración arriba mencionadas; (ii) creación de un área de libre comercio sudamericana, utilizando posiblemente a UNASUR como plataforma; (iii) expansión y profundización del MERCOSUR; y (iv) expansión y profundización del ALBA.
En mi opinión, el mantenimiento del status quo  prevalecerá en el futuro inmediato porque ningún país -incluido Brasil- tiene poder y peso político, económico y comercial para imponer su propia visión y/o modelo de integración. Por lo tanto, en los próximos 4 años es de esperarse un cierto equilibrio de fuerzas entre varias iniciativas de integración existentes en este momento. Esta situación podría ser modificada en el caso de algún shock externo como, por ejemplo, una desaceleración del crecimiento global y la caída en el precio de las commodities.
Finalmente, me permito una reflexión de naturaleza más bien académica. Puede decirse que están en juego en América del Sur tres proyectos de integración: (i) el modelo europeo de unión aduanera / mercado común; (ii) el modelo norteamericano de acuerdos de libre comercio; y (iii) el modelo venezolano del ALBA. Solamente el paso del tiempo podrá mostrar cuál de los tres modelos irá a prevalecer.
INTAL Carta Mensual No. 129 – Abril 2007

Raúl Moreno

El Salvador

Las reformas neoliberales y, más recientemente, no los acuerdos de comercio e inversión han subsumido a los Derechos Humanos a una lógica mercantil, consolidando un orden planetario en el que el “valor superior de las cosas” se ubica en la ganancia. En este afán los servicios públicos, la biodiversidad, los conocimientos tradicionales de los pueblos indígenas, los recursos del subsuelo y el agua misma han sido transformados en simples mercancías, objetos de comercio.

Este “orden” no sólo resulta ser insustentable sino también inadmisible, y nos insta a renunciar al hecho de que sea el mercado –a través de la oferta y la demanda– quien dirija el destino de los pueblos y de nuestras vidas. Tiene todo el sentido del mundo plantearnos otro orden de cosas y reivindicar nuestro derecho soberano a construir el sendero que como naciones decidamos enrumbar.

La lógica de “integración” de los TLC

Las reformas neoliberales promovidas por el Banco Mundial (BM) y el Banco Interamericano de Desarrollo (BID), que han sido aplicadas al pie de la letra por los gobiernos de la región centroamericana, sentaron las bases en que se fundamenta el proceso de acumulación internacional del capital. La erosión de las funciones y competencias de los Estados, la privatización de las empresas y activos públicos, y la desregulación y liberalización de la economía, favorecieron el posicionamiento del capital transnacional en la región y la consolidación de los núcleos hegemónicos empresariales nacionales.

De manera complementaria a los programas de ajuste estructural y respondiendo a la misma lógica mercantil de maximización de ganancias, desde 1994 se viene impulsando una ola de “libre comercio” a través de los acuerdos de la Organización Mundial de Comercio (OMC), el proyecto del Área de Libre Comercio de las Américas (ALCA), los Tratados Bilaterales de Inversión (TBI) y los Tratados de Libre Comercio (TLC), apoyados por un conjunto de megaproyectos recogidos en el Plan Puebla Panamá (PPP), a través de los cuales se crea la infraestructura económica necesaria para el funcionamiento del capital transnacional en la región[1].

La superioridad jurídica de los Tratados y Acuerdos Internacionales les permite subordinar la legislación secundaria de los países a sus principios y contenidos, convirtiéndolos en un instrumento idóneo y altamente eficiente que garantiza que los privilegios de las corporaciones transnacionales se transformen en derechos. Los Tratados introducen una gama de mecanismos que conjugan prohibiciones a los gobiernos –limitando su capacidad de definir sus propias políticas públicas–, con derechos para las empresas extranjeras en materia de inversiones, tratos no discriminatorios, propiedad intelectual, acceso a la provisión de servicios públicos y licitaciones gubernamentales, así como el control de los recursos naturales.

La lógica del “libre comercio” apunta hacia una integración de los capitales y la consolidación de un bloque económico regional liderado por los Estados Unidos, a partir del cual las corporaciones de ese país pueden ejercer el control hemisférico y obtener un posicionamiento favorable frente a la Unión Europea y las economías del sureste de Asia. Se trata de una integración que ofrece libre acceso al capital corporativo, sin regulaciones, con tratamiento nacional y con tribunales supranacionales corporativos para dirimir sus controversias contra los Estados. Este tipo de integración se convierte en una pieza fundamental de la estrategia de seguridad nacional de los Estados Unidos.

La “integración” de los gobiernos centroamericanos

La integración promovida por los TLC se yuxtapone al proceso integracionista impulsado por los gobiernos de los países centroamericanos, en el cual han primado los intereses de los capitales nacionales. La preeminencia del ámbito económico en la integración regional se hace evidente en los mismos límites que observa el proceso: una primera fase del Mercado Común Centroamericano (MERCOMÚN), en la que las grandes empresas nacionales lograron posicionarse en los mercados regionales, hasta finales de la década de los sesenta en que se rompe el proceso con la guerra entre El Salvador y Honduras.

Luego, el proyecto de integración centroamericana se recompone en 1991, a partir de la suscripción del Protocolo de Tegucigalpa (PT), dando origen al Sistema de Integración Centroamericana (SICA), el cual es concebido desde una lógica sistémica y holística en la que se incluyen los ámbitos político, económico, social, cultural y ambiental; no obstante, en la realidad, el proceso de integración centroamericana se ha reducido a los planos comercial y financiero, y se expresa en la búsqueda de los gobiernos -sin lograr su concreción- de una Unión Aduanera[2].

Desde una perspectiva estrictamente formal, el SICA tiene un alcance y profundidad que trasciende de la lógica mercantil del Tratado de Libre Comercio entre Centroamérica, República Dominicana y Estados Unidos (DR-CAFTA, por sus siglas en inglés), tal como lo recoge el texto de la Alianza para el Desarrollo Sostenible (ALIDES); sin embargo, los resultados que arrojan los quince años del proceso integracionista sólo pueden dar cuenta de las ventajas comerciales para unas cuantas empresas derivadas de la supresión de barreras arancelarias y las facilidades para la integración de los capitales financieros de la región.

Vale señalar que el Protocolo de Tegucigalpa a la Carta de la Organización de Estados Centroamericanos (ODECA) señala que “el Sistema de la Integración Centroamericana es el marco institucional de la Integración regional de Centroamérica” (Art. 2) y que “la tutela, respeto y promoción de los Derechos Humanos constituyen la base fundamental del Sistema de la Integración Centroamericana” (Art. 4); con lo cual los gobiernos centroamericanos están en la obligación de abstenerse de adoptar cualquier medida que sea contraria a las disposiciones del Protocolo o que obstaculice el cumplimiento de los principios fundamentales del Sistema de la Integración Centroamericana o la consecución de sus objetivos[3].

Los instrumentos jurídicos de la integración centroamericana formalmente se anteponen a cualquier otro acuerdo relacionado con esa materia[4], por lo que con la implementación del DR-CAFTA se genera una ruptura del marco jurídico de la integración centroamericana y, en particular, la violación de la Constitución de la República de El Salvador.

En contrapunto, el DR-CAFTA limita las facultades de los Estados para perfeccionar los instrumentos de la integración, en todo aquello que pueda resultar inconsistente con el DR-CAFTA[5]. Además, los contenidos de este tratado están referidos principalmente a aspectos relacionados con el comercio e inversión, por lo que resulta contraproducente darle preeminencia sobre un marco jurídico más general como es de la integración centroamericana que formalmente regula aspectos humanos, culturales, económicos y sociales, más allá de lo comercial.

El Protocolo de Tegucigalpa reafirma algunos principios de la integración de Centroamérica (Art.3), como son la consolidación de la democracia y el fortalecimiento de sus instituciones, concretar un nuevo modelo de seguridad regional o lograr un sistema regional de bienestar y justicia económica y social para los pueblos centroamericanos[6]. Si consideramos que el DR-CAFTA conlleva impactos negativos en el ámbito laboral, medioambiente, salud, entre otros, es evidente que el tratado resulta incompatible con los objetivos formales de la integración centroamericana.

Otra integración: desde abajo, desde adentro y a la izquierda

Es evidente que la integración de las corporaciones y del capital nacional no es la integración para los pueblos. Las alternativas no se construyen a partir de modelos globales, la idea de homogeneizar realidades disímiles en un esquema único es una de las grandes limitaciones que entrañan las simplificaciones y abstracciones de la realidad, y además son fuentes de debilidad e inaplicabilidad. Las alternativas se construyen desde las experiencias locales, territoriales y sectoriales, en un esfuerzo que parte de la realidad específica y cuyas propuestas dimanan desde abajo, desde los sujetos y sujetas del proceso.

Aunque la dimensión local es la base para la construcción de propuestas alternativas y de las acciones ciudadanas, éstas deben integrarse en una dimensión nacional a efecto de que no se conviertan en intentos dispersos o expresiones aisladas; además, los esfuerzos nacionales deberían articularse con los procesos que, en los planos regionales y globales, se están llevando a cabo. Esto porque el carácter global del neoliberalismo exige respuestas globales, aunque éstas se van tejiendo desde el plano territorial o sectorial.

Avanzar en la construcción de una integración regional nos exige la definición de nuestros propios proyectos nacionales de desarrollo, estructurados en base de principios de participación democrática, sustentabilidad y reducción de las brechas de desigualdad -genérica, etárea, étnica, social y geográfica–, que conduzcan hacia el cumplimiento y prevalencia de los Derechos Humanos y de un orden fundamentados en la justicia y dignidad de los pueblos.

Estos esfuerzos exigen superar la visión cortoplacista prevalente, reivindicar el rol del Estado en la actividad económica y en la planificación del desarrollo, priorizando el desarrollo de las empresas sociales y cooperativas; recuperando la capacidad de los pueblos de producir sus propios alimentos, las formas tradicionales de cultivo y las semillas nativas; retomando el control de los recursos naturales y garantizando la provisión pública de los servicios públicos.

Profundizar en la elaboración de propuestas alternativas representa un enorme reto para todas aquellas organizaciones y personas que, desde el plano ético y técnico, reconocemos las insuperables limitaciones que el orden capitalista tiene, y que se traducen en las intolerables brechas de desigualdad, exclusión y deterioro presentes en los países de la región. De allí que una de las acciones de importancia meridiana sea el desarrollo de nuevas formas de organización económica, social y política, que propendan a la construcción del poder popular.

La construcción de una integración desde los pueblos pasa por empujar la resistencia, lo cual entraña la realización de acciones ciudadanas que contengan y/o reviertan los proyectos neoliberales, como son los TLC, el ALCA y la privatización de los servicios públicos, entre otros; pero la resistencia también implica la concreción del esfuerzo por construir las alternativas, tal como se ha planteado anteriormente.

Uno de los ejes de la resistencia lo constituyen las acciones ciudadanas para poner freno a los procesos de privatización de los servicios públicos, pues trasladar a la esfera del mercado servicios fundamentales como la salud, la educación y el agua, implica su mercantilización y la consecuente negación del acceso de los Derechos Económicos, Sociales y Culturales (DESC), en un contexto que se caracteriza por la falta de acceso a los mercados de importantes sectores de la población.

Movilización ciudadana

La intención de los gobiernos de avanzar en la privatización de un bien público como el agua[7], esencial e indispensable para la vida misma, constituye la exacerbación de la lógica de la ganancia que ve en la privatización de este recurso un negocio altamente rentable, sin importar las serias implicaciones que ello entraña sobre la existencia de los seres vivos del planeta. Esta situación podría convertirse en un vector movilizador que articule los esfuerzos locales, nacionales y regionales para evitar la mercantilización y el control corporativo de los recursos hídricos.

En este contexto, resulta indispensable avanzar en las labores de difusión y alfabetización económica y política como factor de movilización, a partir de las cuales se logre elevar la conciencia ciudadana de hombres y mujeres para que puedan asumirse como sujetos y sujetas de derechos, y luchar por su vigencia y cumplimiento. Los medios de comunicación social juegan un rol fundamental en este esfuerzo de difusión de información; para ello vale identificar los vehículos idóneos y eficientes para acercar la información hasta los actores sociales.

Las dimensiones local, territorial y sectorial constituyen la base de las acciones ciudadanas, pues las reivindicaciones por la solución de sus problemáticas particulares es la que podría generar la sinergia de movilización y acción social. La organización en los lugares de vivienda, de trabajo y estudio, o la organización por la consecución de intereses comunes, pueden marcar una vía para enfrentar la globalización neoliberal.

La movilización también es un instrumento idóneo para reivindicar el respeto a la participación ciudadana en la toma de decisiones, con ello se busca la inclusión de las organizaciones sociales en la formulación de políticas públicas, haciéndolas participes en la función de contraloría ciudadana. Las acciones ciudadanas deberían emerger desde el seno mismo de las organizaciones y apoyarse en el trabajo y reivindicaciones realizadas desde otros espacios nacionales e internacionales.

Debería buscarse la mayor creatividad posible, incursionar en fuentes inéditas de resistencia y organización que puedan combinar las denuncias ante las instancias nacionales e internacionales idóneas, con la participación en la formulación y seguimiento de las políticas públicas, el involucramiento en las labores de contraloría social, y la exigencia concreta de reivindicaciones acogidas por los sectores sociales.

La magnitud de los procesos regentados por la OMC, y los que se impulsan desde el ALCA, los TLC y el PPP, desbordan nuestras capacidades locales y nacionales para aspirar a la posibilidad de lograr su modificación en los aspectos esenciales; esto nos impone el reto de imprimirle a las acciones ciudadanas la mayor creatividad y audacia posibles, lo cual exige mantener un profundo conocimiento del fenómeno, pero también una estrecha coordinación ciudadana en los planos local, nacional e internacional.

Sólo desde una lógica que parta y se construya desde abajo, activando la movilización ciudadana desde los territorios, podremos tener alguna seguridad de que los proyectos e iniciativas podrían generar bienestar para la población. Los tratados y acuerdos internacionales sólo pueden ser beneficiosos para los pueblos en la medida en que éstos sean definidos a partir de las estrategias nacionales de desarrollo, construidas democráticamente, y antepongan el respeto a la vida por encima del beneficio económico y la prevalencia de los intereses comerciales.

Raúl Moreno, economista salvadoreño, catedrático de la Escuela de Economía de la Universidad de El Salvador y miembro de la Red de Acción Ciudadana frente al Comercio e Inversión, SINTI TECHAN.

Notas

[1] El PPP incluye ocho iniciativas financiadas con recursos públicos, entre las que prevalecen los proyectos de infraestructura: un complejo de obras de interconexión vial que favorece el traslado de las mercancías, a través de canales secos que ligan ciudades maquiladoras con los puertos y aeropuertos; la construcción de redes para la interconexión eléctrica y telecomunicaciones; la construcción de presas y represas; y un corredor biológico ligado al interés corporativo en el control de los recursos de biodiversidad. No puede omitirse el objetivo contrainsurgente del PPP en la región mesoamericana, con especial interés en el sur-sureste mexicano.

[2] En la actualidad, la armonización arancelaria aún no se ha completado, están pendientes algunos productos sensibles, entre los que figuran la mayoría de los productos agropecuarios transables. En el marco de la negociación del Acuerdo de Asociación entre Centroamérica y la Unión Europea, los gobiernos de la región han planteado su interés de completar la armonización arancelaria. www.laprensagrafica.com.sv

[3] Red de Acción Ciudadana frente al Comercio e Inversión, SINTI TECHAN (2005): análisis de la Inconstitucionalidad del DR-CAFTA, mimeo, febrero, San Salvador.

[4] El Art. 35 del Protocolo de Tegucigalpa señala que el mismo prevalece sobre cualquier Convenio, Acuerdo o Protocolo suscrito entre los Estados Miembros, bilateral o multilateralmente, sobre las materias relacionadas con la integración centroamericana.

[5] El Art. 1.1.2 del DR-CAFTA señala que nada “podrá impedir a las Partes centroamericanas mantener o adoptar medidas para fortalecer y profundizar sus instrumentos jurídicos existentes en la integración centroamericana, siempre y cuando esas medidas no sean inconsistentes con este Tratado”.

[6] Red de Acción Ciudadana frente al Comercio e Inversión, Op cít.

[7] Las empresas transnacionales están empujando a nivel planetario la privatización del agua, con el apoyo de los organismos multilaterales. Estos procesos de privatización se presentan como acciones para la modernización del sector hídrico o descentralización del mismo, y como solución para las enormes deficiencias que la producción y provisión del líquido están teniendo.

Publicado en ALAI 414-415

Raúl Moreno
El Salvador
Las reformas neoliberales y, rx más recientemente, pharmacy los acuerdos de comercio e inversión han subsumido a los Derechos Humanos a una lógica mercantil, consolidando un orden planetario en el que el “valor superior de las cosas” se ubica en la ganancia. En este afán los servicios públicos, la biodiversidad, los conocimientos tradicionales de los pueblos indígenas, los recursos del subsuelo y el agua misma han sido transformados en simples mercancías, objetos de comercio.
Este “orden” no sólo resulta ser insustentable sino también inadmisible, y nos insta a renunciar al hecho de que sea el mercado –a través de la oferta y la demanda– quien dirija el destino de los pueblos y de nuestras vidas. Tiene todo el sentido del mundo plantearnos otro orden de cosas y reivindicar nuestro derecho soberano a construir el sendero que como naciones decidamos enrumbar.
La lógica de “integración” de los TLC
Las reformas neoliberales promovidas por el Banco Mundial (BM) y el Banco Interamericano de Desarrollo (BID), que han sido aplicadas al pie de la letra por los gobiernos de la región centroamericana, sentaron las bases en que se fundamenta el proceso de acumulación internacional del capital. La erosión de las funciones y competencias de los Estados, la privatización de las empresas y activos públicos, y la desregulación y liberalización de la economía, favorecieron el posicionamiento del capital transnacional en la región y la consolidación de los núcleos hegemónicos empresariales nacionales.
De manera complementaria a los programas de ajuste estructural y respondiendo a la misma lógica mercantil de maximización de ganancias, desde 1994 se viene impulsando una ola de “libre comercio” a través de los acuerdos de la Organización Mundial de Comercio (OMC), el proyecto del Área de Libre Comercio de las Américas (ALCA), los Tratados Bilaterales de Inversión (TBI) y los Tratados de Libre Comercio (TLC), apoyados por un conjunto de megaproyectos recogidos en el Plan Puebla Panamá (PPP), a través de los cuales se crea la infraestructura económica necesaria para el funcionamiento del capital transnacional en la región[1].
La superioridad jurídica de los Tratados y Acuerdos Internacionales les permite subordinar la legislación secundaria de los países a sus principios y contenidos, convirtiéndolos en un instrumento idóneo y altamente eficiente que garantiza que los privilegios de las corporaciones transnacionales se transformen en derechos. Los Tratados introducen una gama de mecanismos que conjugan prohibiciones a los gobiernos –limitando su capacidad de definir sus propias políticas públicas–, con derechos para las empresas extranjeras en materia de inversiones, tratos no discriminatorios, propiedad intelectual, acceso a la provisión de servicios públicos y licitaciones gubernamentales, así como el control de los recursos naturales.
La lógica del “libre comercio” apunta hacia una integración de los capitales y la consolidación de un bloque económico regional liderado por los Estados Unidos, a partir del cual las corporaciones de ese país pueden ejercer el control hemisférico y obtener un posicionamiento favorable frente a la Unión Europea y las economías del sureste de Asia. Se trata de una integración que ofrece libre acceso al capital corporativo, sin regulaciones, con tratamiento nacional y con tribunales supranacionales corporativos para dirimir sus controversias contra los Estados. Este tipo de integración se convierte en una pieza fundamental de la estrategia de seguridad nacional de los Estados Unidos.
La “integración” de los gobiernos centroamericanos
La integración promovida por los TLC se yuxtapone al proceso integracionista impulsado por los gobiernos de los países centroamericanos, en el cual han primado los intereses de los capitales nacionales. La preeminencia del ámbito económico en la integración regional se hace evidente en los mismos límites que observa el proceso: una primera fase del Mercado Común Centroamericano (MERCOMÚN), en la que las grandes empresas nacionales lograron posicionarse en los mercados regionales, hasta finales de la década de los sesenta en que se rompe el proceso con la guerra entre El Salvador y Honduras.
Luego, el proyecto de integración centroamericana se recompone en 1991, a partir de la suscripción del Protocolo de Tegucigalpa (PT), dando origen al Sistema de Integración Centroamericana (SICA), el cual es concebido desde una lógica sistémica y holística en la que se incluyen los ámbitos político, económico, social, cultural y ambiental; no obstante, en la realidad, el proceso de integración centroamericana se ha reducido a los planos comercial y financiero, y se expresa en la búsqueda de los gobiernos -sin lograr su concreción- de una Unión Aduanera[2].
Desde una perspectiva estrictamente formal, el SICA tiene un alcance y profundidad que trasciende de la lógica mercantil del Tratado de Libre Comercio entre Centroamérica, República Dominicana y Estados Unidos (DR-CAFTA, por sus siglas en inglés), tal como lo recoge el texto de la Alianza para el Desarrollo Sostenible (ALIDES); sin embargo, los resultados que arrojan los quince años del proceso integracionista sólo pueden dar cuenta de las ventajas comerciales para unas cuantas empresas derivadas de la supresión de barreras arancelarias y las facilidades para la integración de los capitales financieros de la región.
Vale señalar que el Protocolo de Tegucigalpa a la Carta de la Organización de Estados Centroamericanos (ODECA) señala que “el Sistema de la Integración Centroamericana es el marco institucional de la Integración regional de Centroamérica” (Art. 2) y que “la tutela, respeto y promoción de los Derechos Humanos constituyen la base fundamental del Sistema de la Integración Centroamericana” (Art. 4); con lo cual los gobiernos centroamericanos están en la obligación de abstenerse de adoptar cualquier medida que sea contraria a las disposiciones del Protocolo o que obstaculice el cumplimiento de los principios fundamentales del Sistema de la Integración Centroamericana o la consecución de sus objetivos[3].
Los instrumentos jurídicos de la integración centroamericana formalmente se anteponen a cualquier otro acuerdo relacionado con esa materia[4], por lo que con la implementación del DR-CAFTA se genera una ruptura del marco jurídico de la integración centroamericana y, en particular, la violación de la Constitución de la República de El Salvador.
En contrapunto, el DR-CAFTA limita las facultades de los Estados para perfeccionar los instrumentos de la integración, en todo aquello que pueda resultar inconsistente con el DR-CAFTA[5]. Además, los contenidos de este tratado están referidos principalmente a aspectos relacionados con el comercio e inversión, por lo que resulta contraproducente darle preeminencia sobre un marco jurídico más general como es de la integración centroamericana que formalmente regula aspectos humanos, culturales, económicos y sociales, más allá de lo comercial.
El Protocolo de Tegucigalpa reafirma algunos principios de la integración de Centroamérica (Art.3), como son la consolidación de la democracia y el fortalecimiento de sus instituciones, concretar un nuevo modelo de seguridad regional o lograr un sistema regional de bienestar y justicia económica y social para los pueblos centroamericanos[6]. Si consideramos que el DR-CAFTA conlleva impactos negativos en el ámbito laboral, medioambiente, salud, entre otros, es evidente que el tratado resulta incompatible con los objetivos formales de la integración centroamericana.
Otra integración: desde abajo, desde adentro y a la izquierda
Es evidente que la integración de las corporaciones y del capital nacional no es la integración para los pueblos. Las alternativas no se construyen a partir de modelos globales, la idea de homogeneizar realidades disímiles en un esquema único es una de las grandes limitaciones que entrañan las simplificaciones y abstracciones de la realidad, y además son fuentes de debilidad e inaplicabilidad. Las alternativas se construyen desde las experiencias locales, territoriales y sectoriales, en un esfuerzo que parte de la realidad específica y cuyas propuestas dimanan desde abajo, desde los sujetos y sujetas del proceso.
Aunque la dimensión local es la base para la construcción de propuestas alternativas y de las acciones ciudadanas, éstas deben integrarse en una dimensión nacional a efecto de que no se conviertan en intentos dispersos o expresiones aisladas; además, los esfuerzos nacionales deberían articularse con los procesos que, en los planos regionales y globales, se están llevando a cabo. Esto porque el carácter global del neoliberalismo exige respuestas globales, aunque éstas se van tejiendo desde el plano territorial o sectorial.
Avanzar en la construcción de una integración regional nos exige la definición de nuestros propios proyectos nacionales de desarrollo, estructurados en base de principios de participación democrática, sustentabilidad y reducción de las brechas de desigualdad -genérica, etárea, étnica, social y geográfica–, que conduzcan hacia el cumplimiento y prevalencia de los Derechos Humanos y de un orden fundamentados en la justicia y dignidad de los pueblos.
Estos esfuerzos exigen superar la visión cortoplacista prevalente, reivindicar el rol del Estado en la actividad económica y en la planificación del desarrollo, priorizando el desarrollo de las empresas sociales y cooperativas; recuperando la capacidad de los pueblos de producir sus propios alimentos, las formas tradicionales de cultivo y las semillas nativas; retomando el control de los recursos naturales y garantizando la provisión pública de los servicios públicos.
Profundizar en la elaboración de propuestas alternativas representa un enorme reto para todas aquellas organizaciones y personas que, desde el plano ético y técnico, reconocemos las insuperables limitaciones que el orden capitalista tiene, y que se traducen en las intolerables brechas de desigualdad, exclusión y deterioro presentes en los países de la región. De allí que una de las acciones de importancia meridiana sea el desarrollo de nuevas formas de organización económica, social y política, que propendan a la construcción del poder popular.
La construcción de una integración desde los pueblos pasa por empujar la resistencia, lo cual entraña la realización de acciones ciudadanas que contengan y/o reviertan los proyectos neoliberales, como son los TLC, el ALCA y la privatización de los servicios públicos, entre otros; pero la resistencia también implica la concreción del esfuerzo por construir las alternativas, tal como se ha planteado anteriormente.
Uno de los ejes de la resistencia lo constituyen las acciones ciudadanas para poner freno a los procesos de privatización de los servicios públicos, pues trasladar a la esfera del mercado servicios fundamentales como la salud, la educación y el agua, implica su mercantilización y la consecuente negación del acceso de los Derechos Económicos, Sociales y Culturales (DESC), en un contexto que se caracteriza por la falta de acceso a los mercados de importantes sectores de la población.
Movilización ciudadana
La intención de los gobiernos de avanzar en la privatización de un bien público como el agua[7], esencial e indispensable para la vida misma, constituye la exacerbación de la lógica de la ganancia que ve en la privatización de este recurso un negocio altamente rentable, sin importar las serias implicaciones que ello entraña sobre la existencia de los seres vivos del planeta. Esta situación podría convertirse en un vector movilizador que articule los esfuerzos locales, nacionales y regionales para evitar la mercantilización y el control corporativo de los recursos hídricos.
En este contexto, resulta indispensable avanzar en las labores de difusión y alfabetización económica y política como factor de movilización, a partir de las cuales se logre elevar la conciencia ciudadana de hombres y mujeres para que puedan asumirse como sujetos y sujetas de derechos, y luchar por su vigencia y cumplimiento. Los medios de comunicación social juegan un rol fundamental en este esfuerzo de difusión de información; para ello vale identificar los vehículos idóneos y eficientes para acercar la información hasta los actores sociales.
Las dimensiones local, territorial y sectorial constituyen la base de las acciones ciudadanas, pues las reivindicaciones por la solución de sus problemáticas particulares es la que podría generar la sinergia de movilización y acción social. La organización en los lugares de vivienda, de trabajo y estudio, o la organización por la consecución de intereses comunes, pueden marcar una vía para enfrentar la globalización neoliberal.
La movilización también es un instrumento idóneo para reivindicar el respeto a la participación ciudadana en la toma de decisiones, con ello se busca la inclusión de las organizaciones sociales en la formulación de políticas públicas, haciéndolas participes en la función de contraloría ciudadana. Las acciones ciudadanas deberían emerger desde el seno mismo de las organizaciones y apoyarse en el trabajo y reivindicaciones realizadas desde otros espacios nacionales e internacionales.
Debería buscarse la mayor creatividad posible, incursionar en fuentes inéditas de resistencia y organización que puedan combinar las denuncias ante las instancias nacionales e internacionales idóneas, con la participación en la formulación y seguimiento de las políticas públicas, el involucramiento en las labores de contraloría social, y la exigencia concreta de reivindicaciones acogidas por los sectores sociales.
La magnitud de los procesos regentados por la OMC, y los que se impulsan desde el ALCA, los TLC y el PPP, desbordan nuestras capacidades locales y nacionales para aspirar a la posibilidad de lograr su modificación en los aspectos esenciales; esto nos impone el reto de imprimirle a las acciones ciudadanas la mayor creatividad y audacia posibles, lo cual exige mantener un profundo conocimiento del fenómeno, pero también una estrecha coordinación ciudadana en los planos local, nacional e internacional.
Sólo desde una lógica que parta y se construya desde abajo, activando la movilización ciudadana desde los territorios, podremos tener alguna seguridad de que los proyectos e iniciativas podrían generar bienestar para la población. Los tratados y acuerdos internacionales sólo pueden ser beneficiosos para los pueblos en la medida en que éstos sean definidos a partir de las estrategias nacionales de desarrollo, construidas democráticamente, y antepongan el respeto a la vida por encima del beneficio económico y la prevalencia de los intereses comerciales.
Raúl Moreno, economista salvadoreño, catedrático de la Escuela de Economía de la Universidad de El Salvador y miembro de la Red de Acción Ciudadana frente al Comercio e Inversión, SINTI TECHAN.
Notas
[1] El PPP incluye ocho iniciativas financiadas con recursos públicos, entre las que prevalecen los proyectos de infraestructura: un complejo de obras de interconexión vial que favorece el traslado de las mercancías, a través de canales secos que ligan ciudades maquiladoras con los puertos y aeropuertos; la construcción de redes para la interconexión eléctrica y telecomunicaciones; la construcción de presas y represas; y un corredor biológico ligado al interés corporativo en el control de los recursos de biodiversidad. No puede omitirse el objetivo contrainsurgente del PPP en la región mesoamericana, con especial interés en el sur-sureste mexicano.
[2] En la actualidad, la armonización arancelaria aún no se ha completado, están pendientes algunos productos sensibles, entre los que figuran la mayoría de los productos agropecuarios transables. En el marco de la negociación del Acuerdo de Asociación entre Centroamérica y la Unión Europea, los gobiernos de la región han planteado su interés de completar la armonización arancelaria. www.laprensagrafica.com.sv
[3] Red de Acción Ciudadana frente al Comercio e Inversión, SINTI TECHAN (2005): análisis de la Inconstitucionalidad del DR-CAFTA, mimeo, febrero, San Salvador.
[4] El Art. 35 del Protocolo de Tegucigalpa señala que el mismo prevalece sobre cualquier Convenio, Acuerdo o Protocolo suscrito entre los Estados Miembros, bilateral o multilateralmente, sobre las materias relacionadas con la integración centroamericana.
[5] El Art. 1.1.2 del DR-CAFTA señala que nada “podrá impedir a las Partes centroamericanas mantener o adoptar medidas para fortalecer y profundizar sus instrumentos jurídicos existentes en la integración centroamericana, siempre y cuando esas medidas no sean inconsistentes con este Tratado”.
[6] Red de Acción Ciudadana frente al Comercio e Inversión, Op cít.
[7] Las empresas transnacionales están empujando a nivel planetario la privatización del agua, con el apoyo de los organismos multilaterales. Estos procesos de privatización se presentan como acciones para la modernización del sector hídrico o descentralización del mismo, y como solución para las enormes deficiencias que la producción y provisión del líquido están teniendo.
Publicado en ALAI 414-415
Raúl Moreno
El Salvador
Las reformas neoliberales y, los acuerdos de comercio e inversión han subsumido a los Derechos Humanos a una lógica mercantil, consolidando un orden planetario en el que el “valor superior de las cosas” se ubica en la ganancia. En este afán los servicios públicos, la biodiversidad, los conocimientos tradicionales de los pueblos indígenas, los recursos del subsuelo y el agua misma han sido transformados en simples mercancías, objetos de comercio.
Este “orden” no sólo resulta ser insustentable sino también inadmisible, y nos insta a renunciar al hecho de que sea el mercado –a través de la oferta y la demanda– quien dirija el destino de los pueblos y de nuestras vidas. Tiene todo el sentido del mundo plantearnos otro orden de cosas y reivindicar nuestro derecho soberano a construir el sendero que como naciones decidamos enrumbar.
La lógica de “integración” de los TLC
Las reformas neoliberales promovidas por el Banco Mundial (BM) y el Banco Interamericano de Desarrollo (BID), que han sido aplicadas al pie de la letra por los gobiernos de la región centroamericana, sentaron las bases en que se fundamenta el proceso de acumulación internacional del capital. La erosión de las funciones y competencias de los Estados, la privatización de las empresas y activos públicos, y la desregulación y liberalización de la economía, favorecieron el posicionamiento del capital transnacional en la región y la consolidación de los núcleos hegemónicos empresariales nacionales.
De manera complementaria a los programas de ajuste estructural y respondiendo a la misma lógica mercantil de maximización de ganancias, desde 1994 se viene impulsando una ola de “libre comercio” a través de los acuerdos de la Organización Mundial de Comercio (OMC), el proyecto del Área de Libre Comercio de las Américas (ALCA), los Tratados Bilaterales de Inversión (TBI) y los Tratados de Libre Comercio (TLC), apoyados por un conjunto de megaproyectos recogidos en el Plan Puebla Panamá (PPP), a través de los cuales se crea la infraestructura económica necesaria para el funcionamiento del capital transnacional en la región[1].
La superioridad jurídica de los Tratados y Acuerdos Internacionales les permite subordinar la legislación secundaria de los países a sus principios y contenidos, convirtiéndolos en un instrumento idóneo y altamente eficiente que garantiza que los privilegios de las corporaciones transnacionales se transformen en derechos. Los Tratados introducen una gama de mecanismos que conjugan prohibiciones a los gobiernos –limitando su capacidad de definir sus propias políticas públicas–, con derechos para las empresas extranjeras en materia de inversiones, tratos no discriminatorios, propiedad intelectual, acceso a la provisión de servicios públicos y licitaciones gubernamentales, así como el control de los recursos naturales.
La lógica del “libre comercio” apunta hacia una integración de los capitales y la consolidación de un bloque económico regional liderado por los Estados Unidos, a partir del cual las corporaciones de ese país pueden ejercer el control hemisférico y obtener un posicionamiento favorable frente a la Unión Europea y las economías del sureste de Asia. Se trata de una integración que ofrece libre acceso al capital corporativo, sin regulaciones, con tratamiento nacional y con tribunales supranacionales corporativos para dirimir sus controversias contra los Estados. Este tipo de integración se convierte en una pieza fundamental de la estrategia de seguridad nacional de los Estados Unidos.
La “integración” de los gobiernos centroamericanos
La integración promovida por los TLC se yuxtapone al proceso integracionista impulsado por los gobiernos de los países centroamericanos, en el cual han primado los intereses de los capitales nacionales. La preeminencia del ámbito económico en la integración regional se hace evidente en los mismos límites que observa el proceso: una primera fase del Mercado Común Centroamericano (MERCOMÚN), en la que las grandes empresas nacionales lograron posicionarse en los mercados regionales, hasta finales de la década de los sesenta en que se rompe el proceso con la guerra entre El Salvador y Honduras.
Luego, el proyecto de integración centroamericana se recompone en 1991, a partir de la suscripción del Protocolo de Tegucigalpa (PT), dando origen al Sistema de Integración Centroamericana (SICA), el cual es concebido desde una lógica sistémica y holística en la que se incluyen los ámbitos político, económico, social, cultural y ambiental; no obstante, en la realidad, el proceso de integración centroamericana se ha reducido a los planos comercial y financiero, y se expresa en la búsqueda de los gobiernos -sin lograr su concreción- de una Unión Aduanera[2].
Desde una perspectiva estrictamente formal, el SICA tiene un alcance y profundidad que trasciende de la lógica mercantil del Tratado de Libre Comercio entre Centroamérica, República Dominicana y Estados Unidos (DR-CAFTA, por sus siglas en inglés), tal como lo recoge el texto de la Alianza para el Desarrollo Sostenible (ALIDES); sin embargo, los resultados que arrojan los quince años del proceso integracionista sólo pueden dar cuenta de las ventajas comerciales para unas cuantas empresas derivadas de la supresión de barreras arancelarias y las facilidades para la integración de los capitales financieros de la región.
Vale señalar que el Protocolo de Tegucigalpa a la Carta de la Organización de Estados Centroamericanos (ODECA) señala que “el Sistema de la Integración Centroamericana es el marco institucional de la Integración regional de Centroamérica” (Art. 2) y que “la tutela, respeto y promoción de los Derechos Humanos constituyen la base fundamental del Sistema de la Integración Centroamericana” (Art. 4); con lo cual los gobiernos centroamericanos están en la obligación de abstenerse de adoptar cualquier medida que sea contraria a las disposiciones del Protocolo o que obstaculice el cumplimiento de los principios fundamentales del Sistema de la Integración Centroamericana o la consecución de sus objetivos[3].
Los instrumentos jurídicos de la integración centroamericana formalmente se anteponen a cualquier otro acuerdo relacionado con esa materia[4], por lo que con la implementación del DR-CAFTA se genera una ruptura del marco jurídico de la integración centroamericana y, en particular, la violación de la Constitución de la República de El Salvador.
En contrapunto, el DR-CAFTA limita las facultades de los Estados para perfeccionar los instrumentos de la integración, en todo aquello que pueda resultar inconsistente con el DR-CAFTA[5]. Además, los contenidos de este tratado están referidos principalmente a aspectos relacionados con el comercio e inversión, por lo que resulta contraproducente darle preeminencia sobre un marco jurídico más general como es de la integración centroamericana que formalmente regula aspectos humanos, culturales, económicos y sociales, más allá de lo comercial.
El Protocolo de Tegucigalpa reafirma algunos principios de la integración de Centroamérica (Art.3), como son la consolidación de la democracia y el fortalecimiento de sus instituciones, concretar un nuevo modelo de seguridad regional o lograr un sistema regional de bienestar y justicia económica y social para los pueblos centroamericanos[6]. Si consideramos que el DR-CAFTA conlleva impactos negativos en el ámbito laboral, medioambiente, salud, entre otros, es evidente que el tratado resulta incompatible con los objetivos formales de la integración centroamericana.
Otra integración: desde abajo, desde adentro y a la izquierda
Es evidente que la integración de las corporaciones y del capital nacional no es la integración para los pueblos. Las alternativas no se construyen a partir de modelos globales, la idea de homogeneizar realidades disímiles en un esquema único es una de las grandes limitaciones que entrañan las simplificaciones y abstracciones de la realidad, y además son fuentes de debilidad e inaplicabilidad. Las alternativas se construyen desde las experiencias locales, territoriales y sectoriales, en un esfuerzo que parte de la realidad específica y cuyas propuestas dimanan desde abajo, desde los sujetos y sujetas del proceso.
Aunque la dimensión local es la base para la construcción de propuestas alternativas y de las acciones ciudadanas, éstas deben integrarse en una dimensión nacional a efecto de que no se conviertan en intentos dispersos o expresiones aisladas; además, los esfuerzos nacionales deberían articularse con los procesos que, en los planos regionales y globales, se están llevando a cabo. Esto porque el carácter global del neoliberalismo exige respuestas globales, aunque éstas se van tejiendo desde el plano territorial o sectorial.
Avanzar en la construcción de una integración regional nos exige la definición de nuestros propios proyectos nacionales de desarrollo, estructurados en base de principios de participación democrática, sustentabilidad y reducción de las brechas de desigualdad -genérica, etárea, étnica, social y geográfica–, que conduzcan hacia el cumplimiento y prevalencia de los Derechos Humanos y de un orden fundamentados en la justicia y dignidad de los pueblos.
Estos esfuerzos exigen superar la visión cortoplacista prevalente, reivindicar el rol del Estado en la actividad económica y en la planificación del desarrollo, priorizando el desarrollo de las empresas sociales y cooperativas; recuperando la capacidad de los pueblos de producir sus propios alimentos, las formas tradicionales de cultivo y las semillas nativas; retomando el control de los recursos naturales y garantizando la provisión pública de los servicios públicos.
Profundizar en la elaboración de propuestas alternativas representa un enorme reto para todas aquellas organizaciones y personas que, desde el plano ético y técnico, reconocemos las insuperables limitaciones que el orden capitalista tiene, y que se traducen en las intolerables brechas de desigualdad, exclusión y deterioro presentes en los países de la región. De allí que una de las acciones de importancia meridiana sea el desarrollo de nuevas formas de organización económica, social y política, que propendan a la construcción del poder popular.
La construcción de una integración desde los pueblos pasa por empujar la resistencia, lo cual entraña la realización de acciones ciudadanas que contengan y/o reviertan los proyectos neoliberales, como son los TLC, el ALCA y la privatización de los servicios públicos, entre otros; pero la resistencia también implica la concreción del esfuerzo por construir las alternativas, tal como se ha planteado anteriormente.
Uno de los ejes de la resistencia lo constituyen las acciones ciudadanas para poner freno a los procesos de privatización de los servicios públicos, pues trasladar a la esfera del mercado servicios fundamentales como la salud, la educación y el agua, implica su mercantilización y la consecuente negación del acceso de los Derechos Económicos, Sociales y Culturales (DESC), en un contexto que se caracteriza por la falta de acceso a los mercados de importantes sectores de la población.
Movilización ciudadana
La intención de los gobiernos de avanzar en la privatización de un bien público como el agua[7], esencial e indispensable para la vida misma, constituye la exacerbación de la lógica de la ganancia que ve en la privatización de este recurso un negocio altamente rentable, sin importar las serias implicaciones que ello entraña sobre la existencia de los seres vivos del planeta. Esta situación podría convertirse en un vector movilizador que articule los esfuerzos locales, nacionales y regionales para evitar la mercantilización y el control corporativo de los recursos hídricos.
En este contexto, resulta indispensable avanzar en las labores de difusión y alfabetización económica y política como factor de movilización, a partir de las cuales se logre elevar la conciencia ciudadana de hombres y mujeres para que puedan asumirse como sujetos y sujetas de derechos, y luchar por su vigencia y cumplimiento. Los medios de comunicación social juegan un rol fundamental en este esfuerzo de difusión de información; para ello vale identificar los vehículos idóneos y eficientes para acercar la información hasta los actores sociales.
Las dimensiones local, territorial y sectorial constituyen la base de las acciones ciudadanas, pues las reivindicaciones por la solución de sus problemáticas particulares es la que podría generar la sinergia de movilización y acción social. La organización en los lugares de vivienda, de trabajo y estudio, o la organización por la consecución de intereses comunes, pueden marcar una vía para enfrentar la globalización neoliberal.
La movilización también es un instrumento idóneo para reivindicar el respeto a la participación ciudadana en la toma de decisiones, con ello se busca la inclusión de las organizaciones sociales en la formulación de políticas públicas, haciéndolas participes en la función de contraloría ciudadana. Las acciones ciudadanas deberían emerger desde el seno mismo de las organizaciones y apoyarse en el trabajo y reivindicaciones realizadas desde otros espacios nacionales e internacionales.
Debería buscarse la mayor creatividad posible, incursionar en fuentes inéditas de resistencia y organización que puedan combinar las denuncias ante las instancias nacionales e internacionales idóneas, con la participación en la formulación y seguimiento de las políticas públicas, el involucramiento en las labores de contraloría social, y la exigencia concreta de reivindicaciones acogidas por los sectores sociales.
La magnitud de los procesos regentados por la OMC, y los que se impulsan desde el ALCA, los TLC y el PPP, desbordan nuestras capacidades locales y nacionales para aspirar a la posibilidad de lograr su modificación en los aspectos esenciales; esto nos impone el reto de imprimirle a las acciones ciudadanas la mayor creatividad y audacia posibles, lo cual exige mantener un profundo conocimiento del fenómeno, pero también una estrecha coordinación ciudadana en los planos local, nacional e internacional.
Sólo desde una lógica que parta y se construya desde abajo, activando la movilización ciudadana desde los territorios, podremos tener alguna seguridad de que los proyectos e iniciativas podrían generar bienestar para la población. Los tratados y acuerdos internacionales sólo pueden ser beneficiosos para los pueblos en la medida en que éstos sean definidos a partir de las estrategias nacionales de desarrollo, construidas democráticamente, y antepongan el respeto a la vida por encima del beneficio económico y la prevalencia de los intereses comerciales.
Raúl Moreno, economista salvadoreño, catedrático de la Escuela de Economía de la Universidad de El Salvador y miembro de la Red de Acción Ciudadana frente al Comercio e Inversión, SINTI TECHAN.
Notas
[1] El PPP incluye ocho iniciativas financiadas con recursos públicos, entre las que prevalecen los proyectos de infraestructura: un complejo de obras de interconexión vial que favorece el traslado de las mercancías, a través de canales secos que ligan ciudades maquiladoras con los puertos y aeropuertos; la construcción de redes para la interconexión eléctrica y telecomunicaciones; la construcción de presas y represas; y un corredor biológico ligado al interés corporativo en el control de los recursos de biodiversidad. No puede omitirse el objetivo contrainsurgente del PPP en la región mesoamericana, con especial interés en el sur-sureste mexicano.
[2] En la actualidad, la armonización arancelaria aún no se ha completado, están pendientes algunos productos sensibles, entre los que figuran la mayoría de los productos agropecuarios transables. En el marco de la negociación del Acuerdo de Asociación entre Centroamérica y la Unión Europea, los gobiernos de la región han planteado su interés de completar la armonización arancelaria. www.laprensagrafica.com.sv
[3] Red de Acción Ciudadana frente al Comercio e Inversión, SINTI TECHAN (2005): análisis de la Inconstitucionalidad del DR-CAFTA, mimeo, febrero, San Salvador.
[4] El Art. 35 del Protocolo de Tegucigalpa señala que el mismo prevalece sobre cualquier Convenio, Acuerdo o Protocolo suscrito entre los Estados Miembros, bilateral o multilateralmente, sobre las materias relacionadas con la integración centroamericana.
[5] El Art. 1.1.2 del DR-CAFTA señala que nada “podrá impedir a las Partes centroamericanas mantener o adoptar medidas para fortalecer y profundizar sus instrumentos jurídicos existentes en la integración centroamericana, siempre y cuando esas medidas no sean inconsistentes con este Tratado”.
[6] Red de Acción Ciudadana frente al Comercio e Inversión, Op cít.
[7] Las empresas transnacionales están empujando a nivel planetario la privatización del agua, con el apoyo de los organismos multilaterales. Estos procesos de privatización se presentan como acciones para la modernización del sector hídrico o descentralización del mismo, y como solución para las enormes deficiencias que la producción y provisión del líquido están teniendo.
Publicado en ALAI 414-415

El lanzamiento formal de la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones deja más interrogantes que certezas. Los hechos hablan de un reacomodamiento neoliberal, see señala Víctor Ego Ducrot de la Agencia Periodística del Mercosur.

Las sonrisas estampadas en la foto de los firmantes de la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones contrasta con las preocupaciones y los interrogantes que necesariamente quedaron abiertos después de tanta retórica y protocolo.

¿Qué significa en realidad la aparición de la nueva Comunidad regional? ¿Estamos a las puertas de un proceso independiente, site que busca un lugar propio en el mundo del siglo XXI, ed o ante la adecuación de nuestros países al nuevo modelo de reparto hegemónico, caracterizado por el avance desmesurado de la grandes corporaciones transnacionalizadas como nuevos agentes directos de poder político y por la creciente limitación del Estado nacional como regulador social?

¿Estamos frente al inicio de un proceso de integración para el conjunto de la sociedad sudamericana o la región marcha hacia la consolidación de un modelo sólo aplicable a las minorías integradas al modelo neoliberal?

Según datos de la Comisión Económica para América Latina (Cepal), la Unión Sudamericana comprende a 12 países, con 17.300.000 de kilómetro cuadrados (casi el doble de la superficie de Estados Unidos) y en ella viven 380.000.000 de personas (unos 100 millones más que en Estados Unidos). Esta región es la primera exportadora mundial de alimentos, contiene la mayor reserva ecológica del planeta (agua, biodiversiad) y se encuentra entre las más grandes cuencas energéticas y de reservas minerales.

Sin embargo, y según la misma fuente, el 50 por ciento de su población es pobre y el 25 por ciento vive en le indigencia. Sólo un 40 por ciento está integrado al sistema productivo, como proveedor de mano de obra calificada y agente activo del mercado, es decir como sujetos incluidos o tenidos en cuenta por la ideología huracanada de los acuerdos de libre comercio, que así, por sí mismos, se presentan como panaceas del progreso mundial.

Entre 1990 -pleno auge fundamentalista del Consenso de Washington- y 2002, la participación de empresas extranjeras en las actividades de servicio pasó del 10 al 38 por ciento. En el sector manufacturero esa presencia es del 55 por ciento. Las corporaciones tienen en sus manos la mitad de la producción industrial latinoamericana.

En el mismo período, la participación de las grandes transnacionales entre las principales 200 exportadoras pasó del 25 al 41 por ciento. De los 100 mayores bancos, los privados extranjeros pasaron a controlar del 5 al 35 por ciento de los depósitos. En Argentina, por ejemplo, pasaron del 15 al 52 por ciento y en México, como consecuencias del NAFTA (Acuerdo de Libre Comercio para América del Norte) ese control llega hasta el 80 por ciento.

Según la Organización Internacional del Trabajo (OIT), el empleo informal pasó del 44 al 48 por ciento entre la Población Económicamente Activa (PEA). 76.000.000 de latinoamericanos viven con menos de un dólar por día mientras que 175.000.000 lo hacen con memos de dos dólares.

Argentina, que para Estados Unidos, el Fondo Monetario Internacional (FMI) y el Banco Mundial (BM) durante casi una década fue “el país modelo”, ofrece índices escalofriantes: entre 1974 y 2004, los sectores de mayores recursos incrementaron sus ingresos en un 41,1 por ciento, mientras que los más bajos de la pirámide los vieron disminuir en un 47 por ciento, según el organismo estatal de encuestas y censos (INDEC).

Este país, miembro destacado junto a Brasil del Mercado Común del Sur (MERCOSUR), produce alimentos para casi 400 millones de personas (70 millones anuales de toneladas de cereales y oleaginosas y 90 millones de toneladas de productos agropecuarios de todo tipo). Sin embargo, un reciente estudio de la Cruz Roja y de la Oficina de Asuntos Humanos de la Unión Europea (UE) indica que el 70 por ciento de los pobres (casi la mitad de la población) sufre hambre. El 43 por ciento padece hambre severa, el 25,8 hambre moderada y el 49,3 por ciento vive en condiciones de hacinamiento. El 45,3 por ciento de esos pobres no goza de agua potable y el 60 por ciento habita en áreas sin sistema de cloacas.
Estas cifras y estadísticas, elaboradas por los mismos centros de estudios y de poder que saludan con entusiasmo a toda iniciativa tendiente a desembocar en alguna forma de “libre comercio” nos obligan a seguir con los interrogantes.

¿Qué modelo de comunidad sudamericana se proponen los mandatarios y representantes de los 12 países que se dieron cita en Cuzco: una unión para consolidar a aquél 40 por ciento de la población que pertenece al mundo, al mercado, o una unión para los 380.000.000 de habitantes, que implicaría, para comenzar, un programa estratégico, agresivo y consensuado de lucha contra la pobreza, a partir de una operación de cirugía mayor en materia distributiva?.
Recordemos que el citado cuadro regresivo del mapa distributivo de Argentina de los últimos 30 años se reproduce en formas más o menos similares en el resto de la región.

Salvo la honrosa, y a esta altura de los acontecimientos heroica excepción de Venezuela, los procesos domésticos de casi todos los países suscriptores del acta Fundacional de la Unión Sudamericana indican que en ninguno de ellos se han tomado medidas serias, reales, contra la pobreza y a favor de un mundo para todos.

Será por eso que en la cumbre de Cuzco fue el presidente venezolano, Hugo Chávez, el encargado de poner ciertos puntos sobre las íes. En ocasión del debate entre jefes de Estado, Chávez dijo “en 200 años de historia no hemos hecho nada para la integración. Es hora de que definamos si realmente queremos unirnos y enfrentar los desafíos sociales”.

El brasileño Luiz Inacio Lula Da Silva, destacaron algunos presentes en la reunión, le respondió airado con un “es mentira que no hicimos nada. En los últimos tres años hemos avanzado muchísimo y este acuerdo es la prueba”.

Las palabras de Chávez deben ser entendidas en su justa dimensión. Está claro que el líder venezolano no desconoce el complicado camino que los países del área vienen transitando en materia de integración. El mismo está a punto de convertir al suyo en estado asociado al Mercado Común del Sur (MERCOSUR), foro al que le ha presentado iniciativas tales como la creación de una empresa energética propia, y es animador principal de la Comunidad Andina de Naciones (CAN), con el MERCOSUR principal protagonista e de la cumbre de Cuzco.

Lo que Chávez sí hizo fue poner el dedo en la llaga respecto de qué tipo de Comunidad Sudamericana se pretende, si una abarcativa del conjunto de nuestras sociedad o la otra, la pretendida por las corporaciones transnacionales, Estados Unidos y su proyecto ALCA (Acuerdo de Libre Comercio para las Américas), como mecanismo de inserción en el mercado “globalizado” a la medida de esas mismas corporaciones y de su división internacional del trabajo.

El proceso bolivariano, encabezado por Chávez en su país implica una adecuación histórica del programa de Simón Bolívar y de otros líderes de la independencia sudamericana del siglo XIX.

Ese proceso de historicidad programática se apoya sobre tres ejes: Sudamérica como polo autonómico dentro del complejo tablero internacional de rediseño del poder capitalista. Sudamérica como bloque integrado, para equiparar potencialidades territoriales y de recursos estratégicos frente a al bloque hegemónico en sus distintas facciones, y Sudamérica como espacio económico y político con amplia base social y con representación democrática efectiva, lo cual hace que la lucha contra la pobreza y la exclusión tengan carácter prioritario.

Más allá de ciertas confrontaciones con Estados Unidos y con el bloque de poder, tanto Brasil como Argentina, por mencionar a los socios mayoritarios del MERCOSUR, mantienen los lineamientos centrales del programa impuesto al calor del Consenso de Washington.

El congelamiento del programa Hambre Cero con el que Lula comenzó su esperanzador mandato, hace dos años, es un claro ejemplo de lo afirmado hasta aquí. En ese mismo sentido es útil recordar que por encima de los ásperos discursos del presidente Néstor Kirchner contra el FMI y los organismos financieros internacionales, nunca antes Argentina fue tan puntual en el pago de su deuda con esos organismos.

Además, el gobierno de Kirchner “no tuvo mejor idea” que convocar a bancos como el JP Morgan y otros involucrados en el pasivo externo de ese país, para operar en el plan de canje de la deuda en “default” con los tenedores privados de bonos. Fue el propio JP Morgan el encargado de recordarle a Buenos Aires con qué clase de “asesores” cuenta: en un informe escrito por los economistas Stuart Sclater-Booth y Vladimir Werning ese banco sostiene que es imposible recomendar a los bonistas que acepten o rechacen la propuesta de quita (no se sabe cuál es la real dimensión de la misma) y le recomienda al gobierno de Kirchner que mejore el diálogo con los inversores privados y con el FMI.

Volviendo al llamado de atención formulado por Chávez se puede decir que las suyas son observaciones compartidas por varios analistas, no necesariamente comprometidos con el proceso bolivariano.

El académico argentino Juan Gabriel Tokatlián sostiene que “el estado de la unidad política económica y diplomática en América Latina, en general, y en América del Sur, en particular, ha sido, y es, lamentable”.

En ese mismo sentido, Tokatlián recuerda que la Comisión Especial de Coordinación Latinoamericana, un mecanismo regional de articulación diplomática, “tuvo vida efímera”, que la Asociación Latinoamericana de Libre Comercio (ALALC) y la Asociación Latinoamericana de Integración (ALADI) “están difuntos de facto” y que el Sistema Económico Latinoamericano (SELA) “colapsó”.
Asimismo, el especialista argentino afirma que “la CAN se encuentra en su peor momento de fragmentación (…), con Colombia, Ecuador y Perú intentando negociar, en forma tripartita, un acuerdo comercial con Estados Unidos (…). Paralelamente, el MERCOSUR vive su hora más inmóvil, sin avanzar hacia una unión aduanera perfecta ni procurar una mínima institucionalización”.

No nos olvidemos que Chile (estado asociado al MERCOSUR y fundador de la flamante Comunidad Sudamericana) ya firmó un tratado de libre comercio con Estados Unidos y que, además de insistir en su agresión diplomática contra Bolivia respecto de los reclamos marítimos de La Paz, permite que sus empresarios viajen a las Islas Malvinas con la intención de explorar allí oportunidades de buenos negocios. Esa actitud de Santiago no sólo resulta inaceptable para Argentina, sino que avala, en términos generales, la existencia de un enclave colonialista rechazado por Naciones Unidas (ONU).

Entonces, una vez más nuestros interrogantes del principio: ¿qué tipo de Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones acaba de nacer en Cuzco?

La presencia del ex presidente argentino y actual secretario-coordinador del MERCOSUR, Eduardo Duhalde, en la gran foto protocolar de Cuzco, podría hablar por sí sola: se trata de un personaje central de la tragedia argentina de la pasada década del ´90, al frente de la ola neoliberal del Consenso de Washington, y jefe indiscutido de una de las facciones del bloque de poder vernáculo.

Pero revisemos otros hecho concretos. En plena Cumbre, los diplomáticos de primer nivel de Argentina y Brasil debieron ocuparse de aclarar sin mucha claridad y desmentir sin mucha convicción la existencia de severas diferencias entre los gobiernos de ambos países frente a las reivindicaciones de sus respectivos empresariados en torno a recíprocos reclamos de proteccionismo en materia de productos, inversiones y cuotas de mercados.

Cuando el diario O Estado, de San Pablo, Brasil, informó que el gobierno de Lula había rechazado una solicitud de Argentina de autolimitación de exportaciones y ayudas para la reconstrucción de su propio parque industrial, el jefe de la diplomacia de Brasilia, Celso Amorim, dijo “en la negociaciones no se dice no, se dice a vamos a ver. Estamos dispuestos a discutir fórmulas creativas de pensar de una forma que se tengan en cuenta los problemas que Argentina está viviendo”.
Por su parte, Luiz Felipe de Macedo Soares, el encargado en Itamarati de comandar las relaciones con Argentina, dijo “Brasil no puede responsabilizarse por la economía de sus vecinos”. Luego, como para suavizar, agregó, “la relación de Brasil con Argentina no es un deseo exótico (…). Si hay una realidad concreta, ésa es la relación Brasil-Argentina. No estamos dispuestos a retroceder en eso”.
Sin embargo, esas diferencias recurrentes, resurgidas a pocos días de la Cumbre Ouro Preto II, en la cual los presidentes de Brasil, Argentina, Paraguay y Uruguay, se proponen “relanzar” el MERCOSUR, parecen más vinculadas a la integración como repartija de mercados entre los capitales concentrados vernáculos y las grandes corporaciones transnacionalizadas que a un proceso vinculado al legado bolivariano, para los pueblos, contra la pobreza y la exclusión, y por el desarrollo y la democracia participativa.

En otras palabras, todo huele a ALCA maquillado, Según la revista británica “The Economist”, en su edición abril de 2001, los estrategas estadounidenses contemplan la posibilidad de que un tratado de libre comercio a la medida de sus intereses -abarcativo de todo el hemisferio- se alcance via sumatoria de acuerdos bilaterales y subregionales.

Tanto Samuel Pinheiro Guimaraes, en su artículo articulo “El rol político del MERCOSUR”, como el también brasileño Luiz Alberto Moniz Bandeira, en el libro “Argentina, Brasil y Estados Unidos…” (Norma, Buenos Aires, 2004) plantean con claridad la necesidad estratégica que tiene Sudamérica de inscribirse como bloque en el complejo escenario internacional abierto a principios del siglo XXI.
Pinheiro Guimaraes, por ejemplo, sostiene “si bien a nivel estratégico-militar Estados Unidos es hegemónico, a nivel económico-comercial comparte su predominio con la UE, Japón, China e India. Así, la prioridad del MERCOSUR es definir cuál será su rol en la evolución de un sistema mundial orientado a una configuración multipolar”.

En su libro “Bush & ben Laden S.A.” (Norma, Buenos Aires, 2001), quien esto escribe plantea que el actual escenario internacional se caracteriza por un nivel de enfrentamiento creciente entre las distintas facciones que componen el bloque hegemónico (fundamentalmente entre Estados Unidos, la UE y la cuenca Asiática), aunque ese enfrentamiento ofrece un nuevo perfil: el aumento de la presencia política activa de las grandes corporaciones, que están dejando de ser factores de presión y de poder para convertirse en sujetos directos del poder político, a través de un proceso de privatización de la gestión pública comenzado a principios de la pasada década del ´80 y perfeccionado durante la actual administración de George Bush en Estados Unidos.

Estas reflexiones fueron retomadas en el libro “La invasión a Irak…”, de Stella Calloni y Víctor Ego Ducrot (Desde la gente, Buenos Aires, 2003) y sobre todo en “Recolonización o Independencia: América Latina en el siglo XXI, de los mismos autores (Norma, Buenos Aires, 2004).

En este último se sostiene que “el principal desafío para América Latina en los comienzos del siglo XXI sigue siendo el proyecto hegemónico de Estados Unidos, ahora agravado por la abierta decisión de ahondar la ofensiva hacia un dominio colonial”. Se trata de un diseño en el que “Estados Unidos busca asegurarse el control absoluto de las reservas de recursos naturales básicos e indispensables para la reproducción sustentable de la llamada economía real.

Mientras el acta fundacional de la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones promete “impulsar la concertación y coordinación política” (…), “profundizar la convergencia” (…) y declara su “compromiso esencial” con la lucha contra la pobreza, una vez más los sudamericanos de carne y hueso parecen atrapados entre las plurivalencias de los símbolos, casi obligados a desentrañar los verdaderos significados que se esconden en el misterio de los iconos. Después de la grandilocuencia de Cuzco surge la necesidad de entender los hechos en su cruda realidad y determinar sobre qué mundo y sobre qué escenario internacional, esos hechos se entretejen.

Aporrea.org

El lanzamiento formal de la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones deja más interrogantes que certezas. Los hechos hablan de un reacomodamiento neoliberal, try señala Víctor Ego Ducrot de la Agencia Periodística del Mercosur.
Las sonrisas estampadas en la foto de los firmantes de la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones contrasta con las preocupaciones y los interrogantes que necesariamente quedaron abiertos después de tanta retórica y protocolo.
¿Qué significa en realidad la aparición de la nueva Comunidad regional? ¿Estamos a las puertas de un proceso independiente, click que busca un lugar propio en el mundo del siglo XXI, view o ante la adecuación de nuestros países al nuevo modelo de reparto hegemónico, caracterizado por el avance desmesurado de la grandes corporaciones transnacionalizadas como nuevos agentes directos de poder político y por la creciente limitación del Estado nacional como regulador social?
¿Estamos frente al inicio de un proceso de integración para el conjunto de la sociedad sudamericana o la región marcha hacia la consolidación de un modelo sólo aplicable a las minorías integradas al modelo neoliberal?
Según datos de la Comisión Económica para América Latina (Cepal), la Unión Sudamericana comprende a 12 países, con 17.300.000 de kilómetro cuadrados (casi el doble de la superficie de Estados Unidos) y en ella viven 380.000.000 de personas (unos 100 millones más que en Estados Unidos). Esta región es la primera exportadora mundial de alimentos, contiene la mayor reserva ecológica del planeta (agua, biodiversiad) y se encuentra entre las más grandes cuencas energéticas y de reservas minerales.
Sin embargo, y según la misma fuente, el 50 por ciento de su población es pobre y el 25 por ciento vive en le indigencia. Sólo un 40 por ciento está integrado al sistema productivo, como proveedor de mano de obra calificada y agente activo del mercado, es decir como sujetos incluidos o tenidos en cuenta por la ideología huracanada de los acuerdos de libre comercio, que así, por sí mismos, se presentan como panaceas del progreso mundial.
Entre 1990 -pleno auge fundamentalista del Consenso de Washington- y 2002, la participación de empresas extranjeras en las actividades de servicio pasó del 10 al 38 por ciento. En el sector manufacturero esa presencia es del 55 por ciento. Las corporaciones tienen en sus manos la mitad de la producción industrial latinoamericana.
En el mismo período, la participación de las grandes transnacionales entre las principales 200 exportadoras pasó del 25 al 41 por ciento. De los 100 mayores bancos, los privados extranjeros pasaron a controlar del 5 al 35 por ciento de los depósitos. En Argentina, por ejemplo, pasaron del 15 al 52 por ciento y en México, como consecuencias del NAFTA (Acuerdo de Libre Comercio para América del Norte) ese control llega hasta el 80 por ciento.
Según la Organización Internacional del Trabajo (OIT), el empleo informal pasó del 44 al 48 por ciento entre la Población Económicamente Activa (PEA). 76.000.000 de latinoamericanos viven con menos de un dólar por día mientras que 175.000.000 lo hacen con memos de dos dólares.
Argentina, que para Estados Unidos, el Fondo Monetario Internacional (FMI) y el Banco Mundial (BM) durante casi una década fue “el país modelo”, ofrece índices escalofriantes: entre 1974 y 2004, los sectores de mayores recursos incrementaron sus ingresos en un 41,1 por ciento, mientras que los más bajos de la pirámide los vieron disminuir en un 47 por ciento, según el organismo estatal de encuestas y censos (INDEC).
Este país, miembro destacado junto a Brasil del Mercado Común del Sur (MERCOSUR), produce alimentos para casi 400 millones de personas (70 millones anuales de toneladas de cereales y oleaginosas y 90 millones de toneladas de productos agropecuarios de todo tipo). Sin embargo, un reciente estudio de la Cruz Roja y de la Oficina de Asuntos Humanos de la Unión Europea (UE) indica que el 70 por ciento de los pobres (casi la mitad de la población) sufre hambre. El 43 por ciento padece hambre severa, el 25,8 hambre moderada y el 49,3 por ciento vive en condiciones de hacinamiento. El 45,3 por ciento de esos pobres no goza de agua potable y el 60 por ciento habita en áreas sin sistema de cloacas.
Estas cifras y estadísticas, elaboradas por los mismos centros de estudios y de poder que saludan con entusiasmo a toda iniciativa tendiente a desembocar en alguna forma de “libre comercio” nos obligan a seguir con los interrogantes.
¿Qué modelo de comunidad sudamericana se proponen los mandatarios y representantes de los 12 países que se dieron cita en Cuzco: una unión para consolidar a aquél 40 por ciento de la población que pertenece al mundo, al mercado, o una unión para los 380.000.000 de habitantes, que implicaría, para comenzar, un programa estratégico, agresivo y consensuado de lucha contra la pobreza, a partir de una operación de cirugía mayor en materia distributiva?.
Recordemos que el citado cuadro regresivo del mapa distributivo de Argentina de los últimos 30 años se reproduce en formas más o menos similares en el resto de la región.
Salvo la honrosa, y a esta altura de los acontecimientos heroica excepción de Venezuela, los procesos domésticos de casi todos los países suscriptores del acta Fundacional de la Unión Sudamericana indican que en ninguno de ellos se han tomado medidas serias, reales, contra la pobreza y a favor de un mundo para todos.
Será por eso que en la cumbre de Cuzco fue el presidente venezolano, Hugo Chávez, el encargado de poner ciertos puntos sobre las íes. En ocasión del debate entre jefes de Estado, Chávez dijo “en 200 años de historia no hemos hecho nada para la integración. Es hora de que definamos si realmente queremos unirnos y enfrentar los desafíos sociales”.
El brasileño Luiz Inacio Lula Da Silva, destacaron algunos presentes en la reunión, le respondió airado con un “es mentira que no hicimos nada. En los últimos tres años hemos avanzado muchísimo y este acuerdo es la prueba”.
Las palabras de Chávez deben ser entendidas en su justa dimensión. Está claro que el líder venezolano no desconoce el complicado camino que los países del área vienen transitando en materia de integración. El mismo está a punto de convertir al suyo en estado asociado al Mercado Común del Sur (MERCOSUR), foro al que le ha presentado iniciativas tales como la creación de una empresa energética propia, y es animador principal de la Comunidad Andina de Naciones (CAN), con el MERCOSUR principal protagonista e de la cumbre de Cuzco.
Lo que Chávez sí hizo fue poner el dedo en la llaga respecto de qué tipo de Comunidad Sudamericana se pretende, si una abarcativa del conjunto de nuestras sociedad o la otra, la pretendida por las corporaciones transnacionales, Estados Unidos y su proyecto ALCA (Acuerdo de Libre Comercio para las Américas), como mecanismo de inserción en el mercado “globalizado” a la medida de esas mismas corporaciones y de su división internacional del trabajo.
El proceso bolivariano, encabezado por Chávez en su país implica una adecuación histórica del programa de Simón Bolívar y de otros líderes de la independencia sudamericana del siglo XIX.
Ese proceso de historicidad programática se apoya sobre tres ejes: Sudamérica como polo autonómico dentro del complejo tablero internacional de rediseño del poder capitalista. Sudamérica como bloque integrado, para equiparar potencialidades territoriales y de recursos estratégicos frente a al bloque hegemónico en sus distintas facciones, y Sudamérica como espacio económico y político con amplia base social y con representación democrática efectiva, lo cual hace que la lucha contra la pobreza y la exclusión tengan carácter prioritario.
Más allá de ciertas confrontaciones con Estados Unidos y con el bloque de poder, tanto Brasil como Argentina, por mencionar a los socios mayoritarios del MERCOSUR, mantienen los lineamientos centrales del programa impuesto al calor del Consenso de Washington.
El congelamiento del programa Hambre Cero con el que Lula comenzó su esperanzador mandato, hace dos años, es un claro ejemplo de lo afirmado hasta aquí. En ese mismo sentido es útil recordar que por encima de los ásperos discursos del presidente Néstor Kirchner contra el FMI y los organismos financieros internacionales, nunca antes Argentina fue tan puntual en el pago de su deuda con esos organismos.
Además, el gobierno de Kirchner “no tuvo mejor idea” que convocar a bancos como el JP Morgan y otros involucrados en el pasivo externo de ese país, para operar en el plan de canje de la deuda en “default” con los tenedores privados de bonos. Fue el propio JP Morgan el encargado de recordarle a Buenos Aires con qué clase de “asesores” cuenta: en un informe escrito por los economistas Stuart Sclater-Booth y Vladimir Werning ese banco sostiene que es imposible recomendar a los bonistas que acepten o rechacen la propuesta de quita (no se sabe cuál es la real dimensión de la misma) y le recomienda al gobierno de Kirchner que mejore el diálogo con los inversores privados y con el FMI.
Volviendo al llamado de atención formulado por Chávez se puede decir que las suyas son observaciones compartidas por varios analistas, no necesariamente comprometidos con el proceso bolivariano.
El académico argentino Juan Gabriel Tokatlián sostiene que “el estado de la unidad política económica y diplomática en América Latina, en general, y en América del Sur, en particular, ha sido, y es, lamentable”.
En ese mismo sentido, Tokatlián recuerda que la Comisión Especial de Coordinación Latinoamericana, un mecanismo regional de articulación diplomática, “tuvo vida efímera”, que la Asociación Latinoamericana de Libre Comercio (ALALC) y la Asociación Latinoamericana de Integración (ALADI) “están difuntos de facto” y que el Sistema Económico Latinoamericano (SELA) “colapsó”.
Asimismo, el especialista argentino afirma que “la CAN se encuentra en su peor momento de fragmentación (…), con Colombia, Ecuador y Perú intentando negociar, en forma tripartita, un acuerdo comercial con Estados Unidos (…). Paralelamente, el MERCOSUR vive su hora más inmóvil, sin avanzar hacia una unión aduanera perfecta ni procurar una mínima institucionalización”.
No nos olvidemos que Chile (estado asociado al MERCOSUR y fundador de la flamante Comunidad Sudamericana) ya firmó un tratado de libre comercio con Estados Unidos y que, además de insistir en su agresión diplomática contra Bolivia respecto de los reclamos marítimos de La Paz, permite que sus empresarios viajen a las Islas Malvinas con la intención de explorar allí oportunidades de buenos negocios. Esa actitud de Santiago no sólo resulta inaceptable para Argentina, sino que avala, en términos generales, la existencia de un enclave colonialista rechazado por Naciones Unidas (ONU).
Entonces, una vez más nuestros interrogantes del principio: ¿qué tipo de Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones acaba de nacer en Cuzco?
La presencia del ex presidente argentino y actual secretario-coordinador del MERCOSUR, Eduardo Duhalde, en la gran foto protocolar de Cuzco, podría hablar por sí sola: se trata de un personaje central de la tragedia argentina de la pasada década del ´90, al frente de la ola neoliberal del Consenso de Washington, y jefe indiscutido de una de las facciones del bloque de poder vernáculo.
Pero revisemos otros hecho concretos. En plena Cumbre, los diplomáticos de primer nivel de Argentina y Brasil debieron ocuparse de aclarar sin mucha claridad y desmentir sin mucha convicción la existencia de severas diferencias entre los gobiernos de ambos países frente a las reivindicaciones de sus respectivos empresariados en torno a recíprocos reclamos de proteccionismo en materia de productos, inversiones y cuotas de mercados.
Cuando el diario O Estado, de San Pablo, Brasil, informó que el gobierno de Lula había rechazado una solicitud de Argentina de autolimitación de exportaciones y ayudas para la reconstrucción de su propio parque industrial, el jefe de la diplomacia de Brasilia, Celso Amorim, dijo “en la negociaciones no se dice no, se dice a vamos a ver. Estamos dispuestos a discutir fórmulas creativas de pensar de una forma que se tengan en cuenta los problemas que Argentina está viviendo”.
Por su parte, Luiz Felipe de Macedo Soares, el encargado en Itamarati de comandar las relaciones con Argentina, dijo “Brasil no puede responsabilizarse por la economía de sus vecinos”. Luego, como para suavizar, agregó, “la relación de Brasil con Argentina no es un deseo exótico (…). Si hay una realidad concreta, ésa es la relación Brasil-Argentina. No estamos dispuestos a retroceder en eso”.
Sin embargo, esas diferencias recurrentes, resurgidas a pocos días de la Cumbre Ouro Preto II, en la cual los presidentes de Brasil, Argentina, Paraguay y Uruguay, se proponen “relanzar” el MERCOSUR, parecen más vinculadas a la integración como repartija de mercados entre los capitales concentrados vernáculos y las grandes corporaciones transnacionalizadas que a un proceso vinculado al legado bolivariano, para los pueblos, contra la pobreza y la exclusión, y por el desarrollo y la democracia participativa.
En otras palabras, todo huele a ALCA maquillado, Según la revista británica “The Economist”, en su edición abril de 2001, los estrategas estadounidenses contemplan la posibilidad de que un tratado de libre comercio a la medida de sus intereses -abarcativo de todo el hemisferio- se alcance via sumatoria de acuerdos bilaterales y subregionales.
Tanto Samuel Pinheiro Guimaraes, en su artículo articulo “El rol político del MERCOSUR”, como el también brasileño Luiz Alberto Moniz Bandeira, en el libro “Argentina, Brasil y Estados Unidos…” (Norma, Buenos Aires, 2004) plantean con claridad la necesidad estratégica que tiene Sudamérica de inscribirse como bloque en el complejo escenario internacional abierto a principios del siglo XXI.
Pinheiro Guimaraes, por ejemplo, sostiene “si bien a nivel estratégico-militar Estados Unidos es hegemónico, a nivel económico-comercial comparte su predominio con la UE, Japón, China e India. Así, la prioridad del MERCOSUR es definir cuál será su rol en la evolución de un sistema mundial orientado a una configuración multipolar”.
En su libro “Bush & ben Laden S.A.” (Norma, Buenos Aires, 2001), quien esto escribe plantea que el actual escenario internacional se caracteriza por un nivel de enfrentamiento creciente entre las distintas facciones que componen el bloque hegemónico (fundamentalmente entre Estados Unidos, la UE y la cuenca Asiática), aunque ese enfrentamiento ofrece un nuevo perfil: el aumento de la presencia política activa de las grandes corporaciones, que están dejando de ser factores de presión y de poder para convertirse en sujetos directos del poder político, a través de un proceso de privatización de la gestión pública comenzado a principios de la pasada década del ´80 y perfeccionado durante la actual administración de George Bush en Estados Unidos.
Estas reflexiones fueron retomadas en el libro “La invasión a Irak…”, de Stella Calloni y Víctor Ego Ducrot (Desde la gente, Buenos Aires, 2003) y sobre todo en “Recolonización o Independencia: América Latina en el siglo XXI, de los mismos autores (Norma, Buenos Aires, 2004).
En este último se sostiene que “el principal desafío para América Latina en los comienzos del siglo XXI sigue siendo el proyecto hegemónico de Estados Unidos, ahora agravado por la abierta decisión de ahondar la ofensiva hacia un dominio colonial”. Se trata de un diseño en el que “Estados Unidos busca asegurarse el control absoluto de las reservas de recursos naturales básicos e indispensables para la reproducción sustentable de la llamada economía real.
Mientras el acta fundacional de la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones promete “impulsar la concertación y coordinación política” (…), “profundizar la convergencia” (…) y declara su “compromiso esencial” con la lucha contra la pobreza, una vez más los sudamericanos de carne y hueso parecen atrapados entre las plurivalencias de los símbolos, casi obligados a desentrañar los verdaderos significados que se esconden en el misterio de los iconos. Después de la grandilocuencia de Cuzco surge la necesidad de entender los hechos en su cruda realidad y determinar sobre qué mundo y sobre qué escenario internacional, esos hechos se entretejen.
Aporrea.org

Graciela Rodriguez

International trade has changed profoundly during the current decade, purchase especially after the failure of the 4th Ministerial Meeting of the World Trade Organization – WTO, held in Cancun – Mexico in 2003. The meeting ended with no real progress, fundamentally due to the “revolution of the poor”, as it was named the attitude of countries that decide to bring negotiations to a halt by not approving the final declaration proposal which in little changed the situation of Northern market access for developing countries, since it maintained the historical high levels of agricultural subsidies specially for the European Union and the United States. From then on there has been very little progress in this area
and the Doha Round, which started in 2001, is still paralysed, specially after the G4 failure (USA, EU, India and Brazil) gathered in Potsdam, June 2007, in a meeting that despite all official efforts and appeal did not manage to re-gear the negotiating agenda.


Download PDF

Third ASEAN Civil Society Conference (ACSC-III)

2-4 November 2007

The 3rd ASEAN Civil Society Conference (ACSC) was held in Singapore on 2-4 November 2007, prior to the holding of the 13th ASEAN Summit of Leaders in the same city on the third week of November 2007. The ACSC was hosted by the Union Network International-Asia Pacific Regional Office (UNI-APRO) and co-organized by the Singapore Local Organizing Committee led by Think Centre. Regional networks of civil society organizations coming together under the SAPA (Solidarity for Asian People’s Advocacies), as well as participants to the 1st ACSC (Shah Alam, Malaysia in 2005) and 2nd ACSC (Cebu City, Philippines in 2006) are also co-organizers of the 3rd ACSC.

The Conference brought together some 50 representatives from all ASEAN Member Countries. Some observers from ASEAN governments and international organizations also attended.  The representatives of the ASEAN Secretariat included the Secretary-General of ASEAN, HE Ong Keng Yong, who delivered a keynote address and agreed to bring this statement to the attention of the ASEAN Summit

ABOUT THE ACSC

The 1st ASEAN Civil Society Conference was an initiative of the Malaysian government together with the Center for ASEAN Studies of the Universiti I Technologi Mara (UiTM) in December 2005 just before the 11th ASEAN Summit of Leaders held in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The main purpose of the ACSC is to provide a venue for civil society in the region to come together and to engage the ASEAN heads of state during their yearly Summit of Leaders. The first ACSC had the first ever feature of a 15-minute interface between civil society leaders and ASEAN heads of state.

The 2nd ACSC, organized solely by civil society, was held in Cebu City in December 2006 as the culmination of ACSC national consultation processes held from September to November 2006 in seven ASEAN member countries-the Burma-Thai border, Cambodia, Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Thailand and Vietnam–where national civil society groups gathered to consider various proposals and views on issues confronting the ASEAN, especially the idea of ASEAN integration and the ASEAN Charter.

The 3rd ACSC, again organized by South East Asian civil society organizations, was held in Singapore in November 2007.

ACSC-3 had plenaries, concurrent workshops, cultural and multi-media events, a Quiz, a solidarity night and spaces for independent interactions and caucuses.

Objectives of the 3rd ACSC included:

1. To enrich and deepen civil society understanding of ASEAN and regional processes
2. To take stock of civil society advocacy and engagement in ASEAN and regional processes
3. To provide a platform to discuss issues of common interest and ways to respond to those issues
4. To provide a space for common strategizing on broadly engaging common issues
5. To get a mandate for the ACSC to be a live process and not just a conference or parallel event to the ASEAN Summit
6. To adopt a common declaration and agenda of action for the ACSC that includes research, advocacy and action
7. To get a mandate for the 4th ACSC Thailand Host Committee for 2008

ABOUT THE ORGANIZERS
The organizers of the 3rd ACSC are:
AsiaDHRRA/ Asian Partnership for the Development of Human Resources in Rural Areas
Focus on the Global South
Forum-Asia
Human Rights Working Group-Indonesia
MFA/ Migrant Forum in Asia
SEACA/ South East Asian Committee for Advocacy
Think Center-Singapore
Third World Network


3rd ACSC PROGRAMME

Arrivals: November 1, 2007

DAY 1: November 2, 2007
Opening Ceremonies
Keynote Speeches
Plenary 1: Regionalism for the People: Building a Social ASEAN
Plenary 2: Where do we want to go and what do we want to achieve?
Cultural Events

DAY 2: November 3, 2007
Plenary 3: Reclaiming Spaces: Experiences with advocacy in ASEAN
First Set of Concurrent Workshops
Plenary 4: Understanding Singapore, its Place and Role in the ASEAN Region, and the Role for Civil Society
The ACSC ASEAN Quiz

DAY 3: November 4, 2007
Plenary 5: Where to with the ASEAN Charter Building Process?
Second Set of Concurrent Workshops
Plenary 6: Moving Forward with the ACSC Process
Closing Ceremonies
Solidarity Night


Read the ACSC-3: Singapore Declaration


Declaración de la Cumbre por la amistad e integración de los pueblos iberoamericanos: Manifiesto de Santiago

Asunción – Paraguay, recipe 28 y 29 de junio de 2007
Montevideo – Uruguay
Todos los pueblos, check toda la esperanza
Desde Montevideo, República Oriental del Uruguay, capital del MERCOSUR, donde nos hemos reunido el día 17 de Diciembre de 2007, en la Cumbre de los Pueblos del Sur, con el lema “Todos los Pueblos, Toda la Esperanza”, ratificamos firmemente nuestra convicción y apuesta política en la integración de los Pueblos de América, como medio para profundizar la democracia y cambiar el modelo de desarrollo para la plena vigencia de los derechos humanos. En este sentido, declaramos:
Reconociendo los obstáculos que las élites tradicionales imponen a los procesos de transformación de la realidad social, económica, política y cultural que están siendo impulsados en la región, y en particular en la hermana Republica de Bolivia, levantamos enérgicamente nuestra voz de protesta para condenar los intentos de desestabilización de la democracia. Desde las organizaciones y movimientos sociales queremos expresar nuestra profunda solidaridad al pueblo y al gobierno de Bolivia en esta hora de difíciles definiciones en favor del pueblo.
Ratificando nuestra posición en contra de los tratados de libre comercio e inversiones, repudiamos de forma vehemente la firma del tratado entre el Mercosur e Israel, negociado a espaldas de la ciudadanía, que significa la claudicación del bloque frente a las presiones internacionales de liberalización y al mismo tiempo, con un gobierno que en alianza con el poder imperial de EUA impulsa la agresión permanente sobre pueblos vecinos. Este acuerdo viene a consolidar y profundizar un camino de resguardo de los intereses de los capitales internacionales frente a los cuales el Mercosur representó un freno con la derrota impuesta al ALCA.
Al mismo tiempo, rechazamos todas las propuestas surgidas en el propio seno del Mercosur, que estén destinadas a promover la firma de tratados bilaterales de comercio o de protección de inversiones.
Este tipo de acuerdos irán en el sentido de agravar el modelo de desarrollo que las políticas neoliberales han venido implementando en la región, que continua promoviendo la degradación ambiental, profundizando la exclusión social al interior de los países y las desigualdades entre los mismos. En el marco del modelo agroexportador, la expansión de los monocultivos está provocando la destrucción masiva de la naturaleza. El auge de los agrocombustibles que ahora se fomenta para sostener el patrón de consumo de los países industrializados, profundizará las consecuencias devastadoras en el medio ambiente, provocando cambios climáticos y riesgos de catástrofes naturales. El desarrollismo que impulsa mega obras de infraestructura, como las incluidas en la Iniciativa para la Integración de la Infraestructura Regional de Sudamérica (IIRSA) cuya ejecución responde a los intereses de las grandes corporaciones trasnacionales y de sus socios nacionales y locales traerá graves consecuencias para nuestros pueblos y la integración continental basada en la equidad, la inclusión, la diversidad, la soberanía local, la democracia, la justicia social y ambiental y la paz.
Consideramos que la creación del Banco del Sur abre en este momento una oportunidad de cambio en la lógica económica actual. Para incidir sobre estos cambios de rumbos exigimos de los gobiernos que se garantice el acceso público a la información y la participación social en las decisiones del Banco.
En este sentido, asumimos desde los movimientos y organizaciones sociales el desafío y la tarea de hacer que esta herramienta esté al servicio de las necesidades de nuestros pueblos.
Asimismo, saludamos el proceso de auditoría integral iniciado en el Ecuador, que constituye una posibilidad para fortalecer nuestro reclamo que en cada uno de nuestros países se implemente una auditoría participativa de todas las deudas.
Nos oponemos a la creación de las mega represas destinadas fundamentalmente a reforzar el modelo exportador de recursos naturales en forma de productos electro-intensivos. El proceso de integración energética en curso debe ser desarrollado a partir de la recuperación de la soberanía sobre los recursos energéticos de la región. Este proceso debe basarse en el fortalecimiento de las empresas estatales de energía, la nacionalización de los recursos estratégicos y la utilización de la renta así conseguida en la construcción de un desarrollo sustentable con políticas de redistribución de la riqueza y la construcción de nuevas matrices a partir de fuentes renovables de energía, donde la prioridad sea garantizar el acceso digno de todos los habitantes del continente a los bienes energéticos.
Demandamos la urgente renegociación de los Tratados de Itaipu y Yacyreta así como la necesidad de una auditoria de la ilegitima deuda paraguaya, producto de los injustos términos de los tratados firmados por los gobiernos dictatoriales del Paraguay, Brasil y Argentina.
Alertamos y repudiamos la promulgación de leyes denominadas “antiterroristas” destinadas a criminalizar la lucha social, a los movimientos sociales y a sus líderes.
En este sentido, la Cumbre de los Pueblos del Sur exige la urgente libertad de los 6 ciudadanos paraguayos presos en Argentina, por tratarse de una persecución política y una violación de los derechos humanos fundamentales, solicitando el respeto a los acuerdos referentes al asilo político.
Reafirmamos la necesidad de la inmediata retirada de la Misión Militar de NN.UU. (MINUSTAH) de Haití.
Asimismo, expresamos el apoyo y solidaridad a la campaña popular por la nulidad de la Ley de Caducidad de la pretensión punitiva del Estado, desarrollada por los movimientos sociales en Uruguay.
En contrapartida, defendemos la soberanía alimentaria, cuyos principios articulan políticas de autonomía productiva en base a las necesidades de los pueblos, y no supeditadas a las demandas del mercado mundial. Es urgente implementar reformas agrarias basadas en los principios de la soberanía alimentaria y territorial de los pueblos campesinos e indígenas.
La integración de los pueblos implica, para nosotros, considerar las diferencias entre los mismos como una expresión de la diversidad cultural, a la vez que un desafío para que a través de la complementariedad y la solidaridad mutua se conquisten mejores condiciones de vida para todos. El combate a las asimetrías no puede agotarse en medidas compensatorias y desarticuladas, sino que debe contribuir a resolver los problemas estructurales que impiden la autonomía y el bienestar de nuestros pueblos.
Los procesos de integración deben asegurar la libre circulación de trabajadores y trabajadoras, la recuperación y ampliación de los derechos laborales al mismo tiempo que garantizar el derecho de las personas a no migrar como también todos los derechos de los y las migrantes.
Una vez más, rechazamos todas las formas de discriminación, basadas en el género, las razas y etnias, la orientación sexual, las creencias o religiones, las ideologías, el origen, o cualquier otra distinción que menoscabe los derechos de las personas y limite el ejercicio de la ciudadanía.
La integración que queremos requiere la inclusión de la diversidad de los sujetos sociales y culturales basada en el reconocimiento de los territorios de los pueblos y naciones indígenas, que inclusive muchas veces sobrepasan las fronteras de los Estados nacionales.
Exigimos también políticas públicas universales que respondan efectivamente a las necesidades de hombres y mujeres de acceso a la educación, a la salud, a servicios públicos esenciales, y al ejercicio pleno de los derechos económicos, sociales, políticos, culturales y ambientales.
Exhortamos a los gobernantes a garantizar la transparencia y el acceso a las informaciones substanciales en las negociaciones del Mercosur y fortalecer los espacios de diálogo e interacción entre pueblos y gobiernos, estimulando los mecanismos de democracia participativa y control social.
Consideramos que el fortalecimiento de los procesos de integración en la región debe profundizarse y en este sentido, apoyamos la plena inclusión de Venezuela como también de Bolivia y Ecuador al bloque.
Las organizaciones y movimientos sociales de América del Sur reunidos en Montevideo ratificamos nuestra voluntad de seguir impulsando la integración de los pueblos.
Por una verdadera integración que nos permita construir la soberanía desde y para los pueblos del Sur.
Montevideo – Uruguay
Todos los pueblos, ailment toda la esperanza
Desde Montevideo, República Oriental del Uruguay, capital del MERCOSUR, donde nos hemos reunido el día 17 de Diciembre de 2007, en la Cumbre de los Pueblos del Sur, con el lema “Todos los Pueblos, Toda la Esperanza”, ratificamos firmemente nuestra convicción y apuesta política en la integración de los Pueblos de América, como medio para profundizar la democracia y cambiar el modelo de desarrollo para la plena vigencia de los derechos humanos. En este sentido, declaramos:
Reconociendo los obstáculos que las élites tradicionales imponen a los procesos de transformación de la realidad social, económica, política y cultural que están siendo impulsados en la región, y en particular en la hermana Republica de Bolivia, levantamos enérgicamente nuestra voz de protesta para condenar los intentos de desestabilización de la democracia. Desde las organizaciones y movimientos sociales queremos expresar nuestra profunda solidaridad al pueblo y al gobierno de Bolivia en esta hora de difíciles definiciones en favor del pueblo.
Ratificando nuestra posición en contra de los tratados de libre comercio e inversiones, repudiamos de forma vehemente la firma del tratado entre el Mercosur e Israel, negociado a espaldas de la ciudadanía, que significa la claudicación del bloque frente a las presiones internacionales de liberalización y al mismo tiempo, con un gobierno que en alianza con el poder imperial de EUA impulsa la agresión permanente sobre pueblos vecinos. Este acuerdo viene a consolidar y profundizar un camino de resguardo de los intereses de los capitales internacionales frente a los cuales el Mercosur representó un freno con la derrota impuesta al ALCA.
Al mismo tiempo, rechazamos todas las propuestas surgidas en el propio seno del Mercosur, que estén destinadas a promover la firma de tratados bilaterales de comercio o de protección de inversiones.
Este tipo de acuerdos irán en el sentido de agravar el modelo de desarrollo que las políticas neoliberales han venido implementando en la región, que continua promoviendo la degradación ambiental, profundizando la exclusión social al interior de los países y las desigualdades entre los mismos. En el marco del modelo agroexportador, la expansión de los monocultivos está provocando la destrucción masiva de la naturaleza. El auge de los agrocombustibles que ahora se fomenta para sostener el patrón de consumo de los países industrializados, profundizará las consecuencias devastadoras en el medio ambiente, provocando cambios climáticos y riesgos de catástrofes naturales. El desarrollismo que impulsa mega obras de infraestructura, como las incluidas en la Iniciativa para la Integración de la Infraestructura Regional de Sudamérica (IIRSA) cuya ejecución responde a los intereses de las grandes corporaciones trasnacionales y de sus socios nacionales y locales traerá graves consecuencias para nuestros pueblos y la integración continental basada en la equidad, la inclusión, la diversidad, la soberanía local, la democracia, la justicia social y ambiental y la paz.
Consideramos que la creación del Banco del Sur abre en este momento una oportunidad de cambio en la lógica económica actual. Para incidir sobre estos cambios de rumbos exigimos de los gobiernos que se garantice el acceso público a la información y la participación social en las decisiones del Banco.
En este sentido, asumimos desde los movimientos y organizaciones sociales el desafío y la tarea de hacer que esta herramienta esté al servicio de las necesidades de nuestros pueblos.
Asimismo, saludamos el proceso de auditoría integral iniciado en el Ecuador, que constituye una posibilidad para fortalecer nuestro reclamo que en cada uno de nuestros países se implemente una auditoría participativa de todas las deudas.
Nos oponemos a la creación de las mega represas destinadas fundamentalmente a reforzar el modelo exportador de recursos naturales en forma de productos electro-intensivos. El proceso de integración energética en curso debe ser desarrollado a partir de la recuperación de la soberanía sobre los recursos energéticos de la región. Este proceso debe basarse en el fortalecimiento de las empresas estatales de energía, la nacionalización de los recursos estratégicos y la utilización de la renta así conseguida en la construcción de un desarrollo sustentable con políticas de redistribución de la riqueza y la construcción de nuevas matrices a partir de fuentes renovables de energía, donde la prioridad sea garantizar el acceso digno de todos los habitantes del continente a los bienes energéticos.
Demandamos la urgente renegociación de los Tratados de Itaipu y Yacyreta así como la necesidad de una auditoria de la ilegitima deuda paraguaya, producto de los injustos términos de los tratados firmados por los gobiernos dictatoriales del Paraguay, Brasil y Argentina.
Alertamos y repudiamos la promulgación de leyes denominadas “antiterroristas” destinadas a criminalizar la lucha social, a los movimientos sociales y a sus líderes.
En este sentido, la Cumbre de los Pueblos del Sur exige la urgente libertad de los 6 ciudadanos paraguayos presos en Argentina, por tratarse de una persecución política y una violación de los derechos humanos fundamentales, solicitando el respeto a los acuerdos referentes al asilo político.
Reafirmamos la necesidad de la inmediata retirada de la Misión Militar de NN.UU. (MINUSTAH) de Haití.
Asimismo, expresamos el apoyo y solidaridad a la campaña popular por la nulidad de la Ley de Caducidad de la pretensión punitiva del Estado, desarrollada por los movimientos sociales en Uruguay.
En contrapartida, defendemos la soberanía alimentaria, cuyos principios articulan políticas de autonomía productiva en base a las necesidades de los pueblos, y no supeditadas a las demandas del mercado mundial. Es urgente implementar reformas agrarias basadas en los principios de la soberanía alimentaria y territorial de los pueblos campesinos e indígenas.
La integración de los pueblos implica, para nosotros, considerar las diferencias entre los mismos como una expresión de la diversidad cultural, a la vez que un desafío para que a través de la complementariedad y la solidaridad mutua se conquisten mejores condiciones de vida para todos. El combate a las asimetrías no puede agotarse en medidas compensatorias y desarticuladas, sino que debe contribuir a resolver los problemas estructurales que impiden la autonomía y el bienestar de nuestros pueblos.
Los procesos de integración deben asegurar la libre circulación de trabajadores y trabajadoras, la recuperación y ampliación de los derechos laborales al mismo tiempo que garantizar el derecho de las personas a no migrar como también todos los derechos de los y las migrantes.
Una vez más, rechazamos todas las formas de discriminación, basadas en el género, las razas y etnias, la orientación sexual, las creencias o religiones, las ideologías, el origen, o cualquier otra distinción que menoscabe los derechos de las personas y limite el ejercicio de la ciudadanía.
La integración que queremos requiere la inclusión de la diversidad de los sujetos sociales y culturales basada en el reconocimiento de los territorios de los pueblos y naciones indígenas, que inclusive muchas veces sobrepasan las fronteras de los Estados nacionales.
Exigimos también políticas públicas universales que respondan efectivamente a las necesidades de hombres y mujeres de acceso a la educación, a la salud, a servicios públicos esenciales, y al ejercicio pleno de los derechos económicos, sociales, políticos, culturales y ambientales.
Exhortamos a los gobernantes a garantizar la transparencia y el acceso a las informaciones substanciales en las negociaciones del Mercosur y fortalecer los espacios de diálogo e interacción entre pueblos y gobiernos, estimulando los mecanismos de democracia participativa y control social.
Consideramos que el fortalecimiento de los procesos de integración en la región debe profundizarse y en este sentido, apoyamos la plena inclusión de Venezuela como también de Bolivia y Ecuador al bloque.
Las organizaciones y movimientos sociales de América del Sur reunidos en Montevideo ratificamos nuestra voluntad de seguir impulsando la integración de los pueblos.
Por una verdadera integración que nos permita construir la soberanía desde y para los pueblos del Sur.
Santiago – Chile, for sale
8 y 9 de noviembre de 2007

Reunidos en Santiago de Chile, los días 8 y 9 de noviembre de 2007, en el marco de la Cumbre por la amistad e integración de los pueblos iberoamericanos, los representantes de organizaciones sociales, políticas y culturales, de pueblos originarios, entidades académicas, artísticas y ciudadanos en general, hemos debatido, en un marco de pluralismo y respeto, las contradictorias realidades de nuestra región y concordado acciones que permitan avanzar hacia la democratización, unidad, soberanía y autodeterminación de nuestros pueblos y naciones.
EL NUEVO PROTAGONISMO SOCIAL
Constatamos, esperanzados, el resurgimiento de un extendido protagonismo de los movimientos sociales, y fuerzas políticas progresistas cuyas luchas articuladas, cada vez más amplias y persistentes, han influido decisivamente en la elección –en diversos países– de gobernantes afines y sensibles al gran ideario de emancipación, unidad e integración latinoamericana, impulsando procesos de cambio en la región, que valoramos como un avance de gran proyección histórica.
Ya podemos hablar de futuro y diseñar estrategias basadas en la solidaridad y la cooperación de nuestros pueblos, porque tenemos presente y evocamos, hoy, a líderes y movimientos que ayer derrocharon heroísmo y tenacidad inconmensurables. Lo decimos desde Chile, donde la codicia entró con la espada y la cruz para aplastar, después de 300 años, la resistencia ejemplar del pueblo mapuche; a 100 años de la masacre de trabajadores chilenos, peruanos, bolivianos, argentinos y españoles en la Escuela Santa María de Iquique. En este país, donde las empresas transnacionales activaron la maquinaria militar y financiera del imperio para derrocar al Presidente Constitucional Salvador Allende e impedir su proyecto de transformaciones sociales y de unidad latinoamericana; donde las bayonetas sirvieron a la plutocracia y al capital extranjero para entronizar un modelo neoliberal que se traduce en la extrema concentración de la riqueza, la exclusión social y política de las grandes mayorías, donde los poderes fácticos y el gran capital han pasado a controlar la política, los medios de comunicación y la institucionalidad.
La nueva realidad política del continente y sus promisorias perspectivas reconoce una multiplicidad de vertientes sociales, culturales e ideológicas que adoptan originales métodos y estructuras, diversos lenguajes, formas de lucha y propuestas programáticas. En esa diversidad, antitesis del dogmatismo, sectarismo y hegemonismo, radica su fuerza y su legitimidad histórica.
A partir de las demandas por la protección del eco sistema, la defensa de la tierra, los territorios y los derechos de los pueblos originarios, el rechazo a la expoliación y enajenación de nuestros recursos naturales, las reivindicaciones de los trabajadores, el rechazo a la expropiación de los ahorros previsionales, la denuncia de las bases militares estadounidenses en sectores estratégicos del continente, la defensa de los derechos humanos, el fortalecimiento del rol del Estado en los emprendimientos productivos y para garantizar el derecho ciudadano a la Salud, Educación y Vivienda, Trabajo y Previsión, contra la discriminación de la mujer y los adultos mayores, por los derechos de la juventud y otros sectores avasallados por las políticas neoliberales,los movimientos sociales avanzan hacia propuestas políticas unitarias ante los grandes problemas nacionales y contribuyen a levantar una nueva alternativa que permita a Latinoamérica y el Caribe intervenir con fuerza propia en los candentes problemas que afronta la humanidad.
Por lo mismo es que rechazamos aquellas prácticas que buscan atomizar a las organizaciones sociales subordinándolas como insumo de políticas estatales funcionales que apuntan a perpetuar el modelo económico e institucional.
Los movimientos sociales ya no se conforman con cambios cosméticos sino plantean un rechazo total al actual modelo de dominación económica, política y cultural que implica la comercialización de todos los ámbitos de la vida pública y personal y el ánimo de lucro como supremo valor de una sociedad que percibe a cada individuo como rival del otro.
Lo anterior, en consonancia con la crítica que hacen los pueblos, a nivel mundial, a la globalización depredadora y a la guerra como solución a los problemas de la humanidad.
Por su parte, las fuerzas políticas que buscan alternativas al sistema imperante, tienen el desafío de encontrar nuevas formas de interlocución y complementación con las luchas sociales, en el entendido que ambas esferas se retroalimentan y se necesitan.
UNA INTEGRACIÓN DESDE LOS PUEBLOS Y PARA LOS PUEBLOS
Entendemos la integración regional como un proceso de enriquecimiento mutuo, de potenciamiento de nuestras fortalezas, de nuestra capacidad de intercomunicación con el mundo, partiendo del reconocimiento del ser humano a cuyo bienestar y felicidad deben subordinarse todas las políticas públicas.
En la forja del futuro de América Latina y el Caribe, podemos construir ciudadanía con lo mejor de cada pueblo y cultura que la compone. Su integración debe darse desde la misma base social, partiendo de las siguientes premisas esenciales:
• La recuperación de los recursos naturales, mineros, hídricos, pesqueros, forestales y energéticos; la reforma agraria y la soberanía alimentaria como procesos que salvaguarden la participación y los intereses de los pueblos y naciones.
• La integración energética en armonía con el medio ambiente.
• Los acuerdos de integración económica deben poner el acento en las múltiples formas de economía solidaria, protegiendo el rol de la micro, pequeña y mediana empresa.
• Este proceso admite múltiples modalidades institucionales en el ámbito sectorial y territorial, con diversos grados según la realidad de cada región. En tal sentido, apoyamos el surgimiento de instrumentos tales como el ALBA, Banco del Sur y otros, que son expresión de la voluntad integradora de nuestros pueblos.
• La lucha democrática debe fortalecer los procesos constituyentes y la creación de una nueva institucionalidad que considere el rol protagónico del movimiento sindical, de los trabajadores de la ciudad y del campo, de los pueblos indígenas originarios y del conjunto de las fuerzas sociales. En ese contexto, saludamos la aprobación, por parte de las Naciones Unidas, de la Declaración Internacional sobre los derechos de los pueblos indígenas.
• El desmantelamiento de los mecanismos de opresión que conjugan edad, clase, sexo, género y etnia
• La activa solidaridad con los pueblos y gobiernos que construyen caminos alternativos al capitalismo neoliberal. En este sentido, denunciamos al gobierno de Estados Unidos por su constante satanización y criminalización de las luchas sociales y sus actividades de agresión y hostigamiento a los gobiernos que adoptan el rumbo de la emancipación popular.
• El respeto y reconocimiento a las culturas y autonomías de las comunidades originarias.
• La resolución de los conflictos históricos entre las naciones, la reducción de los presupuestos bélicos, el desarme proporcional y progresivo en todos los países de la región para reorientar estos recursos a las necesidades de salud y educación.
• El libre tránsito de las personas y sus derechos migratorios. Nuestros pueblos están en capacidad de unirse a pesar de la diversidad geográfica, étnica, cultural y política, para imaginar y construir otras soluciones para este único mundo. Sabemos que esta lucha se enfrenta a enemigos carentes de escrúpulos, cuya voracidad y hegemonismo han significado enormes tragedias para nuestros pueblos. Aún así, tenemos fe en la justicia de nuestros postulados y nos hacemos cargo de las grandes epopeyas que a lo largo de cinco siglos nos han permitido avanzar hacia la condición de pueblos dignos, sujetos de nuestra propia historia.

ACSC-3: Singapore Declaration

Third ASEAN+ Civil Society Conference (ACSC-III)
2-4 November 2007, side effects Singapore

1. We, about 200 participants from civil society organizations and trade unions across Southeast Asia gathered at the Third ASEAN+ Civil Society Conference (ACSC-III) in Singapore on 2-4 November 2007 to discuss issues of common concerns to people’s lives in the context of the upcoming 13th ASEAN (Association of South East Asian Nations) Summit which is scheduled to take action on the adoption of an ASEAN Charter.
2. Based on our deliberations during the ACSC-III under the theme “Moving Forward – Building an ASEAN+ People’s Agenda” III as well as in line with the statements adopted at the ACSC-I (Kuala Lumpur, Dec. 2005) and ACSC-II (Cebu in Dec. 2006) and submission of proposals to Eminent People’s Group (EPG) and High-level Task Force for the ASEAN Charter by SAPA (Solidarity for Asian People’s Advocacy) Working Group on ASEAN, we strongly urge the ASEAN and its member-states to consider our proposals and demands in their deliberations of the proposed draft Charter at the Summit.
a) Universally recognized values, principles and normative standards should be fully enshrined, in all standard-setting processes within the ASEAN, in particular, human rights, social and economic justice, participatory democracy and rule of law, right to development, ecologically sustainable development, cultural diversity, gender equality, peace and people’s security and peaceful transformation of conflicts.
b) People-centered regional cooperation and solidarity in accordance with the above-mentioned values and principle should be a key guiding principle for regional integration process in ASEAN.
c) A holistic approach should be adopted that reflects the universality, indivisibility, interdependence and interrelatedness of human rights.
d) All key international legal instruments including human rights, humanitarian law and core labour and environmental standards should be ratified and fully implemented.
e) Effective mechanism should be established for accountability and participation of civil society organizations, trade unions, social movements, rural sector and other affected communities in all processes and deliberations of ASEAN and its bodies.
f) Effective measures to eliminate all forms of direct and indirect discriminations and promote substantive equality for the full development and advancement of all disempowered and marginalized sectors, in particular women.
g) Effective measures should be established to prevent conflicts and systematic and gross human rights violations within the ASEAN and within countries in the region including strict imposition of sanctions on violators.
h) Effective measures should be developed and implemented to address the adverse impact of globalization and regional integration.
i) An ASEAN Environment Community should be established to promote and protect ASEAN’s environmental integrity and sustainability in line with the other three pillars (Economic, Security and Socio-Cultural).
j) An effective and accountable human rights mechanism for ASEAN in accordance with international standards should be established.
3. We also strongly support the Statement of the Singapore Civil Society issued by the Singapore Working Group for ASEAN (SWGA) for the ACSC-III which echoes most of our calls in this Declaration, particularly on the need for ASEAN member-states to ratify key human rights Conventions and prioritize human rights education; guarantee decent work; enable the people to exercise their freedoms of expression, organization and collective bargaining; providing social protection and social security; recognition of the right to self-determination of cultural identity and the rights of indigenous peoples; and ensure the participation of women in politics at all levels.
4. We call on the ASEAN and its member-states to ensure that these fundamental principles and demands are enshrined in the ASEAN Charter towards the realization of a caring and sharing ASEAN Community.
5. Heads of States should ensure that the following requirements are met before the signing of the ASEAN Charter:
a) Ensure transparency through the disclosure of the draft ASEAN Charter for meaningful public consultations and discussions, and guarantee substantive peoples participation at the national and regional levels in the adoption of the ASEAN Charter
b) End and prevent all serious breaches of principles that should be fundamental to the ASEAN, including undemocratic change of government and systematic and gross violations of human rights
6. We reaffirm our call for the ASEAN to require democratic referendum process at the national level to allow the peoples in each country to give direct mandate to the ASEAN Charter.
7. We urge the ASEAN to create effective mechanisms for transparency, accountability, people’s participation, and Social Dialogue.
8. We reaffirm our strong commitment to work for the creation of a just, people-centered, caring and sharing ASEAN Community that shall be enshrined in an ASEAN Peoples’ Charter.
9. Through this Declaration, we are launching the process of drafting the ASEAN Peoples’ Charter that will embody the shared values and collective aspirations of the peoples of the region. We commit to drafting an ASEAN Peoples’ Charter by the ACSC-IV to be held in Thailand in 2008.