Declaración Política del Consejo de los Movimientos Sociales del ALBA-TCP

The FTAA should be buried forever!

No to “free trade” militarization and debt!
To truly end poverty unemployment and social exclusion


AN INTEGRATION FOR AND FROM THE PEOPLE IS NECESSARY AND POSSIBLE


Delegates of social organizations from all regions of the continent – from Canada to Patagonia; workers, and farmers, indigenous, young and old, of all races, women and men with dignity, have come together in Mar del Plata, Argentina, to demand that the powerful, who normally ignore us, listen to the voice of all of the peoples of our America. As we have done previously, in Santiago de Chile and in Quebec, we have come together at this Summit of the Americas, which brings together the presidents of the entire continent with the exception of Cuba, because despite the official discourse which continues to be full of words about democracy and the fight against poverty, the people continue to be excluded from the decisions that are made about our futures. We are also here in the III People’s Summit, to deepen our resistance to the neoliberal calamities orchestrated by the imperial power from the north and to continue in the construction of alternatives. We are demonstrating that it is possible to change the course of history and we commit ourselves to continue on this path.

In the year 2001, at the official Summit in Quebec when the vast majority of the governments were blindly inclined towards neo-liberal orthodoxy and the dictates of Washington, with the honorable exception of Venezuela, the US managed to establish January of 2005 as the fatal date on which their new project of domination called the Free Trade Agreement of the Americas (FTAA) would enter into effect. The Fourth Summit of the Americas, to be held in Argentina, was programmed to be the event at which the negotiations for this perverse project would be signed. However, on the first of January, 2005 we woke up without the FTAA and this official Summit has occurred with negotiations irreversibly stalled. We are here today to celebrate this!

The US has not changed

However, the US has not changed its strategy of consolidating hegemony in the continent through bilateral and regional Free Trade Agreements such as CAFTA, which was ratified by a very close margin, and AFTA which they now seek to force on the Andean countries. In addition Washington is advancing with an “Agreement for Security and Prosperity in North America” (ASPNA). Despite irrefutable evidence of the disastrous consequences of more than 10 years of NAFTA, now the FTA-plus has the objective of imposing US ‘security’ policy on the entire region.

The US is not content to simply advance with the placement of pieces in their puzzle of domination in the continent. They insist on placing the pieces into a hegemonic framework without renouncing the FTAA. Now, together with their ally governments they come to Mar del Plata with the pretension of breathing new life into the cadaver of the FTAA, when the people have clearly expressed their rejection to an integration subordinated to the US.

The US strategy to favor North American corporations has been accompanied by an increase in US military bases and militarization of the continent. Now, to finish off the genocide, George W. Bush has come to the Summit in Mar del Plata with the intention of elevating his ‘security’ policy in the continent under the pretext of combating terrorism, when the best way of achieving that goal is to end his policies of colonial intervention.

Empty words and demogogic proposals

In the final declaration which is being discussed by our governments, a real threat exists that, although nuanced, the worst intentions of the US could come to pass. The declaration is full of empty words and demagogic proposals to combat poverty and generate decent employment. The reality is that these offers only serve to perpetuate a model which as deepened the misery and injustice of our continent which possesses the worst distribution of wealth in the world.

This is a model that favors a select few, deteriorates labor conditions, accelerates migration, the destruction of indigenous communities, the deterioration of the environment, the privatization of social security and education, the implementation of laws which protect corporations rather than citizens, as in the case of intellectual property.

In addition to the FTAA, they insist on moving forward with the Doha Agenda in order to assign more power to the World Trade Organization (WTO) to impose unequal economic rules on the least developed countries and further promote the corporate agenda. Our natural resources and energy reserves continue to be exposed to plunder. The distribution and commercialization of potable water is privatized. The appropriation and privatization of our aquifers and hydro reserves is promoted, converting access to water as a human right into merchandise for transnational corporations.

No concrete solutions

In order to impose these policies, the empire and its accomplices rely on external debt as blackmail, impeding the development of our people in violation of all of our human rights. The declaration of the Presidents offers no concrete solutions such as; the cancellation of payments on this illegitimate debt, restitution of the excess which has been charged and repayment of the historical social and ecological debts to the peoples of our America.

The delegates of the different peoples of America are here not only to Denounce. We are here because we have been resisting the policies of the empire and its allies. At the same time, we are constructing popular alternatives through the solidarity and unity of our people, constructing a social fabric from below, from the autonomy and diversity of our movements with the intention of attaining a society which is inclusive, just and has dignity.

From this III People’s Summit of the America’s we declare:

  1. Negotiations for the creation of a Free Trade Agreement of the
    Americas (FTAA) should be SUSPENDED IMMEDIATELY AND DEFINITELY, as well as all bilateral and regional FTAs. We join in the resistance of the
    peoples of the Andean Region and of Costa Rica against the FTAs and with the peoples of the Caribbean so that the EPAS will not come to signify a new era of disguised colonialism and with the struggles of the people of North America, Chile and Central America to repeal the treaties which weigh so heavy on them.
  2. All agreements between countries should be based on principals of respect for human rights, the social dimension, respect for sovereignty, complementarity, cooperation, solidarity, and the consideration of economic asymmetries so that the least developed countries are favored. We therefore reject/oppose the Bilateral Investment Protection Treaty that has been signed between the US and Uruguay.
  3. We pledge to support and promote alternative projects for regional integration such as the Boliviarian Alternative for the Americas (ALBA).
  4. We affirm the conclusions and actions which have emerged from the forums, workshops and encounters of this Summit and we commit to deepen our process of constructing alternatives.
  5. All of the illegitimate, un-payable and unjust external debt of the South should be cancelled immediately and without conditions. We assume our position as creditors to collect the social, ecological and historical debt with our peoples.
  6. We support the struggle of our peoples for an equitable distribution
    of wealth, dignified work and social justice in order to eradicate poverty, unemployment and social exclusion.
  7. We agree to promote the diversification of production, the protection of native seeds which are the patrimony of the people at the service of humanity, food sovereignty of the peoples, sustainable agriculture and an integral agrarian reform.
  8. We vigorously reject the militarization of the continent which is being promoted by the empire from the North. We denounce the so-called doctrine of ‘cooperation for hemispheric security’ as a mechanism for the repression of popular struggles. We reject the presence of US troops on our continent; we do not want military bases or conclaves. We condemn the state terrorism of the Bush Administration which has as its objective to bloody the legitimate rebellions of our people. We commit to the defense of our sovereignty in the Triple Border, heart of the Guarani fresh water reserve. We demand US troops out of Paraguay. We demand an end to the foreign military intervention in Haiti.
  9. We condemn the immorality of the government of the United States, that talks about a struggle against terrorism while it protects the
    terrorist Posada Carriles and continues to detain five Cuban patriots in jail. We demand their immediate release!
  10. We repudiate the presence of George W. Bush in our dignified lands of Latin America – he is the principal promoter of war in the world and heads the neoliberal creed which even impacts the interests of his own people. We send a message of solidarity to the dignified women and men
    of the United States, who are ashamed at having a government which has
    been condemned by the humanity of the world, and who resist with all their strength.

Bury the FTAA forever

After Quebec, we constructed a huge campaign and held continent wide popular consultations against the FTAA.   We managed to stop it.   Today, in response to attempts to revive the negotiations and to attach the US military objectives – in this III People’s Summit, we commitment to doubling our resistance, strengthen our unity in diversity and to convene a new and even larger continental mobilization to bury the FTAA forever and at the same time to build a new alternative America that is just, free and rooted in solidarity.

Mar del Plata, Argentina, November 4, 2005


www.cumbredelospueblos.org

www.asc-hsa.org

www.noalalca.org

¡El ALCA debe ser enterrada para siempre! ¡NO al “libre comercio”, doctor la militarización y la deuda!

 

Para acabar verdaderamente con la pobreza, el desempleo y la exclusión social es necesario y posible una integración desde y para los pueblos

 

 


 

 

 

Delegados y delegadas de organizaciones sociales de todas las regiones del continente, desde Canadá hasta la Patagonia; trabajadores, campesinos, indígenas, jóvenes y viejos, de todas las razas, mujeres y hombres dignos nos hemos encontrado aquí en Mar del Plata, Argentina, para hacer oír la voz, excluida por los poderosos, de todos los pueblos de nuestra América.


Como antes en Santiago de Chile y en Québec, nos hemos encontrado nuevamente frente a la Cumbre de las Américas que reúne a los presidentes de todo el continente, con la exclusión de Cuba, porque aunque los discursos oficiales siguen llenándose de palabras sobre la democracia y la lucha contra la pobreza, los pueblos seguimos sin ser tomados en cuenta a la hora de decidir sobre nuestros destinos. También nos encontramos aquí, en esta III Cumbre de los Pueblos, para profundizar nuestra resistencia a las calamidades neoliberales orquestadas por el imperio del norte y seguir construyendo alternativas. Venimos demostrando que es posible cambiar el curso de la historia y nos comprometemos a continuar avanzando por ese camino.


En el año de 2001, en la cumbre oficial de Québec, cuando todavía la absoluta mayoría de los gobiernos se inclinaban ciegamente a la ortodoxia neoliberal y a los dictados de Washington, con la honrosa excepción de Venezuela, Estados Unidos logró que se fijara el primero de enero del 2005 como la fecha fatal para que entrara en vigor su nuevo proyecto de dominación llamado Área de Libre Comercio de las Américas (ALCA) y que la Cuarta Cumbre de las Américas a realizarse previamente en Argentina fuera la culminación de las negociaciones de este proyecto perverso. Pero el primero de Enero del 2005 amanecimos sin ALCA y la cumbre oficial de Argentina ha llegado finalmente con las negociaciones del ALCA estancadas. ¡Hoy estamos también aquí para celebrarlo!


Sin embargo, Estados Unidos no ceja en su estrategia de afirmar su hegemonía en el continente por medio de tratados de libre comercio bilaterales o regionales, como es el que por un margen estrecho se ha aprobado para Centroamérica y el que buscan imponer ahora a los países andinos. Además, ahora Washington esta lanzando el Acuerdo para la Seguridad y la Prosperidad de América del Norte (ASPAN). No obstante las evidencias incontestables de las desastrosas consecuencias de más de diez años de Tratado de Libre Comercio, ahora este TLC plus pretende incluso imponer la política de “seguridad” de los Estados Unidos a toda la región.


Pero el gobierno de Estados Unidos no se conforma con avanzar las piezas del rompecabezas de su dominación en el continente. Insiste en acomodarlas en un marco hegemónico único y no ha renunciado al proyecto del ALCA. Ahora, junto con sus gobiernos incondicionales, viene a Mar del Plata con la pretensión de revivir el cadáver del ALCA, cuando los pueblos han expresado claramente su rechazo a una integración subordinada a Estados Unidos.


Y si su estrategia a favor de las corporaciones norteamericanas ha venido siendo acompañada de una creciente militarización del continente y de bases militares estadounidenses, ahora para rematar el genocida George W. Bush ha venido a la cumbre de Mar del Plata para intentar elevar su política de seguridad a compromiso continental con el pretexto del combate al terrorismo, cuando la mejor forma de acabar con él sería el revertir su política intervencionista y colonialista.


En la declaración oficial que está siendo discutida por los gobiernos existe la amenaza real de que puedan pasar, aún matizadas, las peores intenciones de los Estados Unidos. La misma está llena de palabras vacías y propuestas demagógicas para combatir la pobreza y generar empleo decente; lo concreto es que sus ofrecimientos perpetúan un modelo que ha hecho cada vez más miserable e injusto a nuestro continente que posee la peor distribución de la riqueza en el mundo. Modelo que favorece a unos pocos, que deteriora las condiciones laborales, profundiza la migración, la destrucción de las comunidades indígenas, el deterioro del medio ambiente, la privatización de la seguridad social y la educación, la implementación de normas que protegen los derechos de las corporaciones y no de los ciudadanos, como es el caso de la propiedad intelectual.

Además del ALCA, se insiste en avanzar en la Ronda de Doha, que busca otorgar más poderes a la Organización Mundial del Comercio (OMC) para imponer reglas económicas inequitativas a los países menos desarrollados y hacer prevalecer la agenda corporativa. Se sigue exponiendo al saqueo nuestros bienes naturales, nuestros yacimientos energéticos; se privatiza la distribución y comercialización del agua potable; se estimula la apropiación y privatización de nuestras reservas acuíferas e hidrográficas, convirtiendo un derecho humano como es el acceso al agua en una mercancía de interés de las transnacionales.

Para imponer estas políticas, el imperio y sus cómplices cuentan con el chantaje de la deuda externa, impidiendo el desarrollo de los pueblos en violación de todos nuestros derechos humanos. La declaración de los presidentes no ofrece ninguna salida concreta, como sería la anulación y no pago de la deuda ilegítima, la restitución de lo que se ha cobrado de más y el resarcimiento de las deudas históricas, sociales y ecológicas adeudadas a los pueblos de nuestra América.


Las y los delegados de los distintos pueblos de América estamos aquí no sólo para denunciar, estamos acá porque venimos resistiendo las políticas del imperio y sus aliados. Pero también venimos construyendo alternativas populares, a partir de la solidaridad y la unidad de nuestros pueblos, construyendo tejido social desde abajo, desde la autonomía y diversidad de nuestros movimientos con el propósito de alcanzar una sociedad inclusiva, justa y digna.


Desde esta III Cumbre de los Pueblos de América declaramos:


1) Las negociaciones para crear un Área de Libre Comercio de las Américas (ALCA) deben ser SUSPENDIDAS INMEDIATA Y DEFINITIVAMENTE, lo mismo que todo tratado de libre comercio bilateral o regional. Asumimos la resistencia de los pueblos andinos y de Costa Rica contra el Tratado de Libre Comercio, la de los pueblos del Caribe porque los EPAs no signifiquen una nueva era de colonialismo disfrazado y la lucha de los pueblos de América del Norte, Chile y Centroamérica por echar atrás los tratados de esta naturaleza que ya pesan sobre ellos.


2) Todo acuerdo entre las naciones debe partir de principios basados en el respeto de los derechos humanos, la dimensión social, el respeto a la soberanía, la complementariedad, la cooperación, la solidaridad, la consideración de las asimetrías económicas favoreciendo a los países menos desarrollados. Por eso rechazamos el Tratado de Protección de Inversiones que Uruguay firmó con los Estados Unidos.


3) Nos empeñamos en favorecer e impulsar procesos alternativos de integración regional, como la Alternativa Bolivariana de las Américas (ALBA).


4) Asumimos las conclusiones y las acciones nacidas en los foros, talleres, encuentros de esta Cumbre y nos comprometemos a seguir profundizando nuestro proceso de construcción de alternativas.

5) Hay que anular toda la deuda externa ilegítima, injusta e impagable del Sur, de manera inmediata y sin condiciones. Nos asumimos como acreedores para cobrar la deuda social, ecológica e histórica con nuestros pueblos.


6) Asumimos la lucha de nuestros pueblos por la distribución equitativa de la riqueza, con trabajo digno y justicia social, para erradicar la pobreza, el desempleo y la exclusión social.

7) Acordamos promover la diversificación de la producción, la protección de las semillas criollas patrimonio de los pueblos al servicio de la humanidad, la soberanía alimentaría de los pueblos, la agricultura sostenible y una reforma agraria integral.


8 ) Rechazamos enérgicamente la militarización del continente promovida por el imperio del norte. Denunciamos la doctrina de la llamada cooperación para la seguridad hemisférica como un mecanismo para la represión de las luchas populares. Rechazamos la presencia de tropas de Estados Unidos en nuestro continente, no queremos bases ni enclaves militares. Condenamos el terrorismo de estado mundial de la Administración Bush, que pretende regar de sangre las legítimas rebeldías de nuestros pueblos. Nos comprometemos en la defensa de nuestra soberanía en la Triple Frontera, corazón del Acuífero Guaraní. Por esto, exigimos el retiro de las tropas estadounidenses de la República del Paraguay. Exigimos poner fin a la intervención militar extranjera en Haití.


9) Condenamos la inmoralidad del gobierno de Estados Unidos, que mientras habla de luchar contra el terrorismo protege al terrorista Posada Carriles y mantiene en la cárcel a cinco luchadores patriotas cubanos. Exigimos su inmediata libertad!


10) Repudiamos la presencia en estas dignas tierras latinoamericanas de George W. Bush, principal promotor de la guerra en el mundo y cabecilla del credo neoliberal que afecta incluso los intereses de su propio pueblo. Desde aquí mandamos un mensaje de solidaridad a los dignos hombres y mujeres estadounidenses que sienten vergüenza por tener un gobierno condenado por la humanidad y lo resisten contra viento y marea.


Después de Québec construimos una gran campaña y consulta popular continentales contra el ALCA y logramos frenarla. Hoy, ante la pretensión de revivir las negociaciones del ALCA y sumarle los objetivos militaristas de Estados Unidos, en esta III Cumbre de los Pueblos de América asumimos el compromiso de redoblar nuestra resistencia, fortalecer nuestra unidad en la diversidad y convocar a una nueva y más grande movilización continental para enterrar el ALCA para siempre y construir al mismo tiempo bajo su impulso, nuestra alternativa de una América justa, libre y solidaria.


¡El ALCA debe ser enterrada para siempre! ¡NO al “libre comercio”, generic la militarización y la deuda!

 

Para acabar verdaderamente con la pobreza, el desempleo y la exclusión social es necesario y posible una integración desde y para los pueblos

 

 


 

 

 

Delegados y delegadas de organizaciones sociales de todas las regiones del continente, desde Canadá hasta la Patagonia; trabajadores, campesinos, indígenas, jóvenes y viejos, de todas las razas, mujeres y hombres dignos nos hemos encontrado aquí en Mar del Plata, Argentina, para hacer oír la voz, excluida por los poderosos, de todos los pueblos de nuestra América.


Como antes en Santiago de Chile y en Québec, nos hemos encontrado nuevamente frente a la Cumbre de las Américas que reúne a los presidentes de todo el continente, con la exclusión de Cuba, porque aunque los discursos oficiales siguen llenándose de palabras sobre la democracia y la lucha contra la pobreza, los pueblos seguimos sin ser tomados en cuenta a la hora de decidir sobre nuestros destinos. También nos encontramos aquí, en esta III Cumbre de los Pueblos, para profundizar nuestra resistencia a las calamidades neoliberales orquestadas por el imperio del norte y seguir construyendo alternativas. Venimos demostrando que es posible cambiar el curso de la historia y nos comprometemos a continuar avanzando por ese camino.


En el año de 2001, en la cumbre oficial de Québec, cuando todavía la absoluta mayoría de los gobiernos se inclinaban ciegamente a la ortodoxia neoliberal y a los dictados de Washington, con la honrosa excepción de Venezuela, Estados Unidos logró que se fijara el primero de enero del 2005 como la fecha fatal para que entrara en vigor su nuevo proyecto de dominación llamado Área de Libre Comercio de las Américas (ALCA) y que la Cuarta Cumbre de las Américas a realizarse previamente en Argentina fuera la culminación de las negociaciones de este proyecto perverso. Pero el primero de Enero del 2005 amanecimos sin ALCA y la cumbre oficial de Argentina ha llegado finalmente con las negociaciones del ALCA estancadas. ¡Hoy estamos también aquí para celebrarlo!


Sin embargo, Estados Unidos no ceja en su estrategia de afirmar su hegemonía en el continente por medio de tratados de libre comercio bilaterales o regionales, como es el que por un margen estrecho se ha aprobado para Centroamérica y el que buscan imponer ahora a los países andinos. Además, ahora Washington esta lanzando el Acuerdo para la Seguridad y la Prosperidad de América del Norte (ASPAN). No obstante las evidencias incontestables de las desastrosas consecuencias de más de diez años de Tratado de Libre Comercio, ahora este TLC plus pretende incluso imponer la política de “seguridad” de los Estados Unidos a toda la región.


Pero el gobierno de Estados Unidos no se conforma con avanzar las piezas del rompecabezas de su dominación en el continente. Insiste en acomodarlas en un marco hegemónico único y no ha renunciado al proyecto del ALCA. Ahora, junto con sus gobiernos incondicionales, viene a Mar del Plata con la pretensión de revivir el cadáver del ALCA, cuando los pueblos han expresado claramente su rechazo a una integración subordinada a Estados Unidos.


Y si su estrategia a favor de las corporaciones norteamericanas ha venido siendo acompañada de una creciente militarización del continente y de bases militares estadounidenses, ahora para rematar el genocida George W. Bush ha venido a la cumbre de Mar del Plata para intentar elevar su política de seguridad a compromiso continental con el pretexto del combate al terrorismo, cuando la mejor forma de acabar con él sería el revertir su política intervencionista y colonialista.


En la declaración oficial que está siendo discutida por los gobiernos existe la amenaza real de que puedan pasar, aún matizadas, las peores intenciones de los Estados Unidos. La misma está llena de palabras vacías y propuestas demagógicas para combatir la pobreza y generar empleo decente; lo concreto es que sus ofrecimientos perpetúan un modelo que ha hecho cada vez más miserable e injusto a nuestro continente que posee la peor distribución de la riqueza en el mundo. Modelo que favorece a unos pocos, que deteriora las condiciones laborales, profundiza la migración, la destrucción de las comunidades indígenas, el deterioro del medio ambiente, la privatización de la seguridad social y la educación, la implementación de normas que protegen los derechos de las corporaciones y no de los ciudadanos, como es el caso de la propiedad intelectual.

Además del ALCA, se insiste en avanzar en la Ronda de Doha, que busca otorgar más poderes a la Organización Mundial del Comercio (OMC) para imponer reglas económicas inequitativas a los países menos desarrollados y hacer prevalecer la agenda corporativa. Se sigue exponiendo al saqueo nuestros bienes naturales, nuestros yacimientos energéticos; se privatiza la distribución y comercialización del agua potable; se estimula la apropiación y privatización de nuestras reservas acuíferas e hidrográficas, convirtiendo un derecho humano como es el acceso al agua en una mercancía de interés de las transnacionales.

Para imponer estas políticas, el imperio y sus cómplices cuentan con el chantaje de la deuda externa, impidiendo el desarrollo de los pueblos en violación de todos nuestros derechos humanos. La declaración de los presidentes no ofrece ninguna salida concreta, como sería la anulación y no pago de la deuda ilegítima, la restitución de lo que se ha cobrado de más y el resarcimiento de las deudas históricas, sociales y ecológicas adeudadas a los pueblos de nuestra América.


Las y los delegados de los distintos pueblos de América estamos aquí no sólo para denunciar, estamos acá porque venimos resistiendo las políticas del imperio y sus aliados. Pero también venimos construyendo alternativas populares, a partir de la solidaridad y la unidad de nuestros pueblos, construyendo tejido social desde abajo, desde la autonomía y diversidad de nuestros movimientos con el propósito de alcanzar una sociedad inclusiva, justa y digna.


Desde esta III Cumbre de los Pueblos de América declaramos:


1) Las negociaciones para crear un Área de Libre Comercio de las Américas (ALCA) deben ser SUSPENDIDAS INMEDIATA Y DEFINITIVAMENTE, lo mismo que todo tratado de libre comercio bilateral o regional. Asumimos la resistencia de los pueblos andinos y de Costa Rica contra el Tratado de Libre Comercio, la de los pueblos del Caribe porque los EPAs no signifiquen una nueva era de colonialismo disfrazado y la lucha de los pueblos de América del Norte, Chile y Centroamérica por echar atrás los tratados de esta naturaleza que ya pesan sobre ellos.


2) Todo acuerdo entre las naciones debe partir de principios basados en el respeto de los derechos humanos, la dimensión social, el respeto a la soberanía, la complementariedad, la cooperación, la solidaridad, la consideración de las asimetrías económicas favoreciendo a los países menos desarrollados. Por eso rechazamos el Tratado de Protección de Inversiones que Uruguay firmó con los Estados Unidos.


3) Nos empeñamos en favorecer e impulsar procesos alternativos de integración regional, como la Alternativa Bolivariana de las Américas (ALBA).


4) Asumimos las conclusiones y las acciones nacidas en los foros, talleres, encuentros de esta Cumbre y nos comprometemos a seguir profundizando nuestro proceso de construcción de alternativas.

5) Hay que anular toda la deuda externa ilegítima, injusta e impagable del Sur, de manera inmediata y sin condiciones. Nos asumimos como acreedores para cobrar la deuda social, ecológica e histórica con nuestros pueblos.


6) Asumimos la lucha de nuestros pueblos por la distribución equitativa de la riqueza, con trabajo digno y justicia social, para erradicar la pobreza, el desempleo y la exclusión social.

7) Acordamos promover la diversificación de la producción, la protección de las semillas criollas patrimonio de los pueblos al servicio de la humanidad, la soberanía alimentaría de los pueblos, la agricultura sostenible y una reforma agraria integral.


8 ) Rechazamos enérgicamente la militarización del continente promovida por el imperio del norte. Denunciamos la doctrina de la llamada cooperación para la seguridad hemisférica como un mecanismo para la represión de las luchas populares. Rechazamos la presencia de tropas de Estados Unidos en nuestro continente, no queremos bases ni enclaves militares. Condenamos el terrorismo de estado mundial de la Administración Bush, que pretende regar de sangre las legítimas rebeldías de nuestros pueblos. Nos comprometemos en la defensa de nuestra soberanía en la Triple Frontera, corazón del Acuífero Guaraní. Por esto, exigimos el retiro de las tropas estadounidenses de la República del Paraguay. Exigimos poner fin a la intervención militar extranjera en Haití.


9) Condenamos la inmoralidad del gobierno de Estados Unidos, que mientras habla de luchar contra el terrorismo protege al terrorista Posada Carriles y mantiene en la cárcel a cinco luchadores patriotas cubanos. Exigimos su inmediata libertad!


10) Repudiamos la presencia en estas dignas tierras latinoamericanas de George W. Bush, principal promotor de la guerra en el mundo y cabecilla del credo neoliberal que afecta incluso los intereses de su propio pueblo. Desde aquí mandamos un mensaje de solidaridad a los dignos hombres y mujeres estadounidenses que sienten vergüenza por tener un gobierno condenado por la humanidad y lo resisten contra viento y marea.


Después de Québec construimos una gran campaña y consulta popular continentales contra el ALCA y logramos frenarla. Hoy, ante la pretensión de revivir las negociaciones del ALCA y sumarle los objetivos militaristas de Estados Unidos, en esta III Cumbre de los Pueblos de América asumimos el compromiso de redoblar nuestra resistencia, fortalecer nuestra unidad en la diversidad y convocar a una nueva y más grande movilización continental para enterrar el ALCA para siempre y construir al mismo tiempo bajo su impulso, nuestra alternativa de una América justa, libre y solidaria.


¡El ALCA debe ser enterrada para siempre! ¡NO al “libre comercio”, la militarización y la deuda!

 

Para acabar verdaderamente con la pobreza, el desempleo y la exclusión social es necesario y posible una integración desde y para los pueblos







Delegados y delegadas de organizaciones sociales de todas las regiones del continente, desde Canadá hasta la Patagonia; trabajadores, campesinos, indígenas, jóvenes y viejos, de todas las razas, mujeres y hombres dignos nos hemos encontrado aquí en Mar del Plata, Argentina, para hacer oír la voz, excluida por los poderosos, de todos los pueblos de nuestra América.


Como antes en Santiago de Chile y en Québec, nos hemos encontrado nuevamente frente a la Cumbre de las Américas que reúne a los presidentes de todo el continente, con la exclusión de Cuba, porque aunque los discursos oficiales siguen llenándose de palabras sobre la democracia y la lucha contra la pobreza, los pueblos seguimos sin ser tomados en cuenta a la hora de decidir sobre nuestros destinos. También nos encontramos aquí, en esta III Cumbre de los Pueblos, para profundizar nuestra resistencia a las calamidades neoliberales orquestadas por el imperio del norte y seguir construyendo alternativas. Venimos demostrando que es posible cambiar el curso de la historia y nos comprometemos a continuar avanzando por ese camino.


En el año de 2001, en la cumbre oficial de Québec, cuando todavía la absoluta mayoría de los gobiernos se inclinaban ciegamente a la ortodoxia neoliberal y a los dictados de Washington, con la honrosa excepción de Venezuela, Estados Unidos logró que se fijara el primero de enero del 2005 como la fecha fatal para que entrara en vigor su nuevo proyecto de dominación llamado Área de Libre Comercio de las Américas (ALCA) y que la Cuarta Cumbre de las Américas a realizarse previamente en Argentina fuera la culminación de las negociaciones de este proyecto perverso. Pero el primero de Enero del 2005 amanecimos sin ALCA y la cumbre oficial de Argentina ha llegado finalmente con las negociaciones del ALCA estancadas. ¡Hoy estamos también aquí para celebrarlo!


Sin embargo, Estados Unidos no ceja en su estrategia de afirmar su hegemonía en el continente por medio de tratados de libre comercio bilaterales o regionales, como es el que por un margen estrecho se ha aprobado para Centroamérica y el que buscan imponer ahora a los países andinos. Además, ahora Washington esta lanzando el Acuerdo para la Seguridad y la Prosperidad de América del Norte (ASPAN). No obstante las evidencias incontestables de las desastrosas consecuencias de más de diez años de Tratado de Libre Comercio, ahora este TLC plus pretende incluso imponer la política de “seguridad” de los Estados Unidos a toda la región.


Pero el gobierno de Estados Unidos no se conforma con avanzar las piezas del rompecabezas de su dominación en el continente. Insiste en acomodarlas en un marco hegemónico único y no ha renunciado al proyecto del ALCA. Ahora, junto con sus gobiernos incondicionales, viene a Mar del Plata con la pretensión de revivir el cadáver del ALCA, cuando los pueblos han expresado claramente su rechazo a una integración subordinada a Estados Unidos.


Y si su estrategia a favor de las corporaciones norteamericanas ha venido siendo acompañada de una creciente militarización del continente y de bases militares estadounidenses, ahora para rematar el genocida George W. Bush ha venido a la cumbre de Mar del Plata para intentar elevar su política de seguridad a compromiso continental con el pretexto del combate al terrorismo, cuando la mejor forma de acabar con él sería el revertir su política intervencionista y colonialista.


En la declaración oficial que está siendo discutida por los gobiernos existe la amenaza real de que puedan pasar, aún matizadas, las peores intenciones de los Estados Unidos. La misma está llena de palabras vacías y propuestas demagógicas para combatir la pobreza y generar empleo decente; lo concreto es que sus ofrecimientos perpetúan un modelo que ha hecho cada vez más miserable e injusto a nuestro continente que posee la peor distribución de la riqueza en el mundo. Modelo que favorece a unos pocos, que deteriora las condiciones laborales, profundiza la migración, la destrucción de las comunidades indígenas, el deterioro del medio ambiente, la privatización de la seguridad social y la educación, la implementación de normas que protegen los derechos de las corporaciones y no de los ciudadanos, como es el caso de la propiedad intelectual.

Además del ALCA, se insiste en avanzar en la Ronda de Doha, que busca otorgar más poderes a la Organización Mundial del Comercio (OMC) para imponer reglas económicas inequitativas a los países menos desarrollados y hacer prevalecer la agenda corporativa. Se sigue exponiendo al saqueo nuestros bienes naturales, nuestros yacimientos energéticos; se privatiza la distribución y comercialización del agua potable; se estimula la apropiación y privatización de nuestras reservas acuíferas e hidrográficas, convirtiendo un derecho humano como es el acceso al agua en una mercancía de interés de las transnacionales.

Para imponer estas políticas, el imperio y sus cómplices cuentan con el chantaje de la deuda externa, impidiendo el desarrollo de los pueblos en violación de todos nuestros derechos humanos. La declaración de los presidentes no ofrece ninguna salida concreta, como sería la anulación y no pago de la deuda ilegítima, la restitución de lo que se ha cobrado de más y el resarcimiento de las deudas históricas, sociales y ecológicas adeudadas a los pueblos de nuestra América.


Las y los delegados de los distintos pueblos de América estamos aquí no sólo para denunciar, estamos acá porque venimos resistiendo las políticas del imperio y sus aliados. Pero también venimos construyendo alternativas populares, a partir de la solidaridad y la unidad de nuestros pueblos, construyendo tejido social desde abajo, desde la autonomía y diversidad de nuestros movimientos con el propósito de alcanzar una sociedad inclusiva, justa y digna.


Desde esta III Cumbre de los Pueblos de América declaramos:


1) Las negociaciones para crear un Área de Libre Comercio de las Américas (ALCA) deben ser SUSPENDIDAS INMEDIATA Y DEFINITIVAMENTE, lo mismo que todo tratado de libre comercio bilateral o regional. Asumimos la resistencia de los pueblos andinos y de Costa Rica contra el Tratado de Libre Comercio, la de los pueblos del Caribe porque los EPAs no signifiquen una nueva era de colonialismo disfrazado y la lucha de los pueblos de América del Norte, Chile y Centroamérica por echar atrás los tratados de esta naturaleza que ya pesan sobre ellos.


2) Todo acuerdo entre las naciones debe partir de principios basados en el respeto de los derechos humanos, la dimensión social, el respeto a la soberanía, la complementariedad, la cooperación, la solidaridad, la consideración de las asimetrías económicas favoreciendo a los países menos desarrollados. Por eso rechazamos el Tratado de Protección de Inversiones que Uruguay firmó con los Estados Unidos.


3) Nos empeñamos en favorecer e impulsar procesos alternativos de integración regional, como la Alternativa Bolivariana de las Américas (ALBA).


4) Asumimos las conclusiones y las acciones nacidas en los foros, talleres, encuentros de esta Cumbre y nos comprometemos a seguir profundizando nuestro proceso de construcción de alternativas.

5) Hay que anular toda la deuda externa ilegítima, injusta e impagable del Sur, de manera inmediata y sin condiciones. Nos asumimos como acreedores para cobrar la deuda social, ecológica e histórica con nuestros pueblos.


6) Asumimos la lucha de nuestros pueblos por la distribución equitativa de la riqueza, con trabajo digno y justicia social, para erradicar la pobreza, el desempleo y la exclusión social.

7) Acordamos promover la diversificación de la producción, la protección de las semillas criollas patrimonio de los pueblos al servicio de la humanidad, la soberanía alimentaría de los pueblos, la agricultura sostenible y una reforma agraria integral.


8 ) Rechazamos enérgicamente la militarización del continente promovida por el imperio del norte. Denunciamos la doctrina de la llamada cooperación para la seguridad hemisférica como un mecanismo para la represión de las luchas populares. Rechazamos la presencia de tropas de Estados Unidos en nuestro continente, no queremos bases ni enclaves militares. Condenamos el terrorismo de estado mundial de la Administración Bush, que pretende regar de sangre las legítimas rebeldías de nuestros pueblos. Nos comprometemos en la defensa de nuestra soberanía en la Triple Frontera, corazón del Acuífero Guaraní. Por esto, exigimos el retiro de las tropas estadounidenses de la República del Paraguay. Exigimos poner fin a la intervención militar extranjera en Haití.


9) Condenamos la inmoralidad del gobierno de Estados Unidos, que mientras habla de luchar contra el terrorismo protege al terrorista Posada Carriles y mantiene en la cárcel a cinco luchadores patriotas cubanos. Exigimos su inmediata libertad!


10) Repudiamos la presencia en estas dignas tierras latinoamericanas de George W. Bush, principal promotor de la guerra en el mundo y cabecilla del credo neoliberal que afecta incluso los intereses de su propio pueblo. Desde aquí mandamos un mensaje de solidaridad a los dignos hombres y mujeres estadounidenses que sienten vergüenza por tener un gobierno condenado por la humanidad y lo resisten contra viento y marea.


Después de Québec construimos una gran campaña y consulta popular continentales contra el ALCA y logramos frenarla. Hoy, ante la pretensión de revivir las negociaciones del ALCA y sumarle los objetivos militaristas de Estados Unidos, en esta III Cumbre de los Pueblos de América asumimos el compromiso de redoblar nuestra resistencia, fortalecer nuestra unidad en la diversidad y convocar a una nueva y más grande movilización continental para enterrar el ALCA para siempre y construir al mismo tiempo bajo su impulso, nuestra alternativa de una América justa, libre y solidaria.


¡El ALCA debe ser enterrada para siempre! ¡NO al “libre comercio”, salve la militarización y la deuda!


Para acabar verdaderamente con la pobreza, el desempleo y la exclusión social es necesario y posible una integración desde y para los pueblos







Delegados y delegadas de organizaciones sociales de todas las regiones del continente, desde Canadá hasta la Patagonia; trabajadores, campesinos, indígenas, jóvenes y viejos, de todas las razas, mujeres y hombres dignos nos hemos encontrado aquí en Mar del Plata, Argentina, para hacer oír la voz, excluida por los poderosos, de todos los pueblos de nuestra América.


Como antes en Santiago de Chile y en Québec, nos hemos encontrado nuevamente frente a la Cumbre de las Américas que reúne a los presidentes de todo el continente, con la exclusión de Cuba, porque aunque los discursos oficiales siguen llenándose de palabras sobre la democracia y la lucha contra la pobreza, los pueblos seguimos sin ser tomados en cuenta a la hora de decidir sobre nuestros destinos. También nos encontramos aquí, en esta III Cumbre de los Pueblos, para profundizar nuestra resistencia a las calamidades neoliberales orquestadas por el imperio del norte y seguir construyendo alternativas. Venimos demostrando que es posible cambiar el curso de la historia y nos comprometemos a continuar avanzando por ese camino.


En el año de 2001, en la cumbre oficial de Québec, cuando todavía la absoluta mayoría de los gobiernos se inclinaban ciegamente a la ortodoxia neoliberal y a los dictados de Washington, con la honrosa excepción de Venezuela, Estados Unidos logró que se fijara el primero de enero del 2005 como la fecha fatal para que entrara en vigor su nuevo proyecto de dominación llamado Área de Libre Comercio de las Américas (ALCA) y que la Cuarta Cumbre de las Américas a realizarse previamente en Argentina fuera la culminación de las negociaciones de este proyecto perverso. Pero el primero de Enero del 2005 amanecimos sin ALCA y la cumbre oficial de Argentina ha llegado finalmente con las negociaciones del ALCA estancadas. ¡Hoy estamos también aquí para celebrarlo!


Sin embargo, Estados Unidos no ceja en su estrategia de afirmar su hegemonía en el continente por medio de tratados de libre comercio bilaterales o regionales, como es el que por un margen estrecho se ha aprobado para Centroamérica y el que buscan imponer ahora a los países andinos. Además, ahora Washington esta lanzando el Acuerdo para la Seguridad y la Prosperidad de América del Norte (ASPAN). No obstante las evidencias incontestables de las desastrosas consecuencias de más de diez años de Tratado de Libre Comercio, ahora este TLC plus pretende incluso imponer la política de “seguridad” de los Estados Unidos a toda la región.


Pero el gobierno de Estados Unidos no se conforma con avanzar las piezas del rompecabezas de su dominación en el continente. Insiste en acomodarlas en un marco hegemónico único y no ha renunciado al proyecto del ALCA. Ahora, junto con sus gobiernos incondicionales, viene a Mar del Plata con la pretensión de revivir el cadáver del ALCA, cuando los pueblos han expresado claramente su rechazo a una integración subordinada a Estados Unidos.


Y si su estrategia a favor de las corporaciones norteamericanas ha venido siendo acompañada de una creciente militarización del continente y de bases militares estadounidenses, ahora para rematar el genocida George W. Bush ha venido a la cumbre de Mar del Plata para intentar elevar su política de seguridad a compromiso continental con el pretexto del combate al terrorismo, cuando la mejor forma de acabar con él sería el revertir su política intervencionista y colonialista.


En la declaración oficial que está siendo discutida por los gobiernos existe la amenaza real de que puedan pasar, aún matizadas, las peores intenciones de los Estados Unidos. La misma está llena de palabras vacías y propuestas demagógicas para combatir la pobreza y generar empleo decente; lo concreto es que sus ofrecimientos perpetúan un modelo que ha hecho cada vez más miserable e injusto a nuestro continente que posee la peor distribución de la riqueza en el mundo. Modelo que favorece a unos pocos, que deteriora las condiciones laborales, profundiza la migración, la destrucción de las comunidades indígenas, el deterioro del medio ambiente, la privatización de la seguridad social y la educación, la implementación de normas que protegen los derechos de las corporaciones y no de los ciudadanos, como es el caso de la propiedad intelectual.

Además del ALCA, se insiste en avanzar en la Ronda de Doha, que busca otorgar más poderes a la Organización Mundial del Comercio (OMC) para imponer reglas económicas inequitativas a los países menos desarrollados y hacer prevalecer la agenda corporativa. Se sigue exponiendo al saqueo nuestros bienes naturales, nuestros yacimientos energéticos; se privatiza la distribución y comercialización del agua potable; se estimula la apropiación y privatización de nuestras reservas acuíferas e hidrográficas, convirtiendo un derecho humano como es el acceso al agua en una mercancía de interés de las transnacionales.

Para imponer estas políticas, el imperio y sus cómplices cuentan con el chantaje de la deuda externa, impidiendo el desarrollo de los pueblos en violación de todos nuestros derechos humanos. La declaración de los presidentes no ofrece ninguna salida concreta, como sería la anulación y no pago de la deuda ilegítima, la restitución de lo que se ha cobrado de más y el resarcimiento de las deudas históricas, sociales y ecológicas adeudadas a los pueblos de nuestra América.


Las y los delegados de los distintos pueblos de América estamos aquí no sólo para denunciar, estamos acá porque venimos resistiendo las políticas del imperio y sus aliados. Pero también venimos construyendo alternativas populares, a partir de la solidaridad y la unidad de nuestros pueblos, construyendo tejido social desde abajo, desde la autonomía y diversidad de nuestros movimientos con el propósito de alcanzar una sociedad inclusiva, justa y digna.


Desde esta III Cumbre de los Pueblos de América declaramos:


1) Las negociaciones para crear un Área de Libre Comercio de las Américas (ALCA) deben ser SUSPENDIDAS INMEDIATA Y DEFINITIVAMENTE, lo mismo que todo tratado de libre comercio bilateral o regional. Asumimos la resistencia de los pueblos andinos y de Costa Rica contra el Tratado de Libre Comercio, la de los pueblos del Caribe porque los EPAs no signifiquen una nueva era de colonialismo disfrazado y la lucha de los pueblos de América del Norte, Chile y Centroamérica por echar atrás los tratados de esta naturaleza que ya pesan sobre ellos.


2) Todo acuerdo entre las naciones debe partir de principios basados en el respeto de los derechos humanos, la dimensión social, el respeto a la soberanía, la complementariedad, la cooperación, la solidaridad, la consideración de las asimetrías económicas favoreciendo a los países menos desarrollados. Por eso rechazamos el Tratado de Protección de Inversiones que Uruguay firmó con los Estados Unidos.


3) Nos empeñamos en favorecer e impulsar procesos alternativos de integración regional, como la Alternativa Bolivariana de las Américas (ALBA).


4) Asumimos las conclusiones y las acciones nacidas en los foros, talleres, encuentros de esta Cumbre y nos comprometemos a seguir profundizando nuestro proceso de construcción de alternativas.

5) Hay que anular toda la deuda externa ilegítima, injusta e impagable del Sur, de manera inmediata y sin condiciones. Nos asumimos como acreedores para cobrar la deuda social, ecológica e histórica con nuestros pueblos.


6) Asumimos la lucha de nuestros pueblos por la distribución equitativa de la riqueza, con trabajo digno y justicia social, para erradicar la pobreza, el desempleo y la exclusión social.

7) Acordamos promover la diversificación de la producción, la protección de las semillas criollas patrimonio de los pueblos al servicio de la humanidad, la soberanía alimentaría de los pueblos, la agricultura sostenible y una reforma agraria integral.


8 ) Rechazamos enérgicamente la militarización del continente promovida por el imperio del norte. Denunciamos la doctrina de la llamada cooperación para la seguridad hemisférica como un mecanismo para la represión de las luchas populares. Rechazamos la presencia de tropas de Estados Unidos en nuestro continente, no queremos bases ni enclaves militares. Condenamos el terrorismo de estado mundial de la Administración Bush, que pretende regar de sangre las legítimas rebeldías de nuestros pueblos. Nos comprometemos en la defensa de nuestra soberanía en la Triple Frontera, corazón del Acuífero Guaraní. Por esto, exigimos el retiro de las tropas estadounidenses de la República del Paraguay. Exigimos poner fin a la intervención militar extranjera en Haití.


9) Condenamos la inmoralidad del gobierno de Estados Unidos, que mientras habla de luchar contra el terrorismo protege al terrorista Posada Carriles y mantiene en la cárcel a cinco luchadores patriotas cubanos. Exigimos su inmediata libertad!


10) Repudiamos la presencia en estas dignas tierras latinoamericanas de George W. Bush, principal promotor de la guerra en el mundo y cabecilla del credo neoliberal que afecta incluso los intereses de su propio pueblo. Desde aquí mandamos un mensaje de solidaridad a los dignos hombres y mujeres estadounidenses que sienten vergüenza por tener un gobierno condenado por la humanidad y lo resisten contra viento y marea.


Después de Québec construimos una gran campaña y consulta popular continentales contra el ALCA y logramos frenarla. Hoy, ante la pretensión de revivir las negociaciones del ALCA y sumarle los objetivos militaristas de Estados Unidos, en esta III Cumbre de los Pueblos de América asumimos el compromiso de redoblar nuestra resistencia, fortalecer nuestra unidad en la diversidad y convocar a una nueva y más grande movilización continental para enterrar el ALCA para siempre y construir al mismo tiempo bajo su impulso, nuestra alternativa de una América justa, libre y solidaria.


¡El ALCA debe ser enterrada para siempre! ¡NO al “libre comercio”, online la militarización y la deuda!

 







Delegados y delegadas de organizaciones sociales de todas las regiones del continente, desde Canadá hasta la Patagonia; trabajadores, campesinos, indígenas, jóvenes y viejos, de todas las razas, mujeres y hombres dignos nos hemos encontrado aquí en Mar del Plata, Argentina, para hacer oír la voz, excluida por los poderosos, de todos los pueblos de nuestra América.


Como antes en Santiago de Chile y en Québec, nos hemos encontrado nuevamente frente a la Cumbre de las Américas que reúne a los presidentes de todo el continente, con la exclusión de Cuba, porque aunque los discursos oficiales siguen llenándose de palabras sobre la democracia y la lucha contra la pobreza, los pueblos seguimos sin ser tomados en cuenta a la hora de decidir sobre nuestros destinos. También nos encontramos aquí, en esta III Cumbre de los Pueblos, para profundizar nuestra resistencia a las calamidades neoliberales orquestadas por el imperio del norte y seguir construyendo alternativas. Venimos demostrando que es posible cambiar el curso de la historia y nos comprometemos a continuar avanzando por ese camino.


En el año de 2001, en la cumbre oficial de Québec, cuando todavía la absoluta mayoría de los gobiernos se inclinaban ciegamente a la ortodoxia neoliberal y a los dictados de Washington, con la honrosa excepción de Venezuela, Estados Unidos logró que se fijara el primero de enero del 2005 como la fecha fatal para que entrara en vigor su nuevo proyecto de dominación llamado Área de Libre Comercio de las Américas (ALCA) y que la Cuarta Cumbre de las Américas a realizarse previamente en Argentina fuera la culminación de las negociaciones de este proyecto perverso. Pero el primero de Enero del 2005 amanecimos sin ALCA y la cumbre oficial de Argentina ha llegado finalmente con las negociaciones del ALCA estancadas. ¡Hoy estamos también aquí para celebrarlo!


Sin embargo, Estados Unidos no ceja en su estrategia de afirmar su hegemonía en el continente por medio de tratados de libre comercio bilaterales o regionales, como es el que por un margen estrecho se ha aprobado para Centroamérica y el que buscan imponer ahora a los países andinos. Además, ahora Washington esta lanzando el Acuerdo para la Seguridad y la Prosperidad de América del Norte (ASPAN). No obstante las evidencias incontestables de las desastrosas consecuencias de más de diez años de Tratado de Libre Comercio, ahora este TLC plus pretende incluso imponer la política de “seguridad” de los Estados Unidos a toda la región.


Pero el gobierno de Estados Unidos no se conforma con avanzar las piezas del rompecabezas de su dominación en el continente. Insiste en acomodarlas en un marco hegemónico único y no ha renunciado al proyecto del ALCA. Ahora, junto con sus gobiernos incondicionales, viene a Mar del Plata con la pretensión de revivir el cadáver del ALCA, cuando los pueblos han expresado claramente su rechazo a una integración subordinada a Estados Unidos.


Y si su estrategia a favor de las corporaciones norteamericanas ha venido siendo acompañada de una creciente militarización del continente y de bases militares estadounidenses, ahora para rematar el genocida George W. Bush ha venido a la cumbre de Mar del Plata para intentar elevar su política de seguridad a compromiso continental con el pretexto del combate al terrorismo, cuando la mejor forma de acabar con él sería el revertir su política intervencionista y colonialista.


En la declaración oficial que está siendo discutida por los gobiernos existe la amenaza real de que puedan pasar, aún matizadas, las peores intenciones de los Estados Unidos. La misma está llena de palabras vacías y propuestas demagógicas para combatir la pobreza y generar empleo decente; lo concreto es que sus ofrecimientos perpetúan un modelo que ha hecho cada vez más miserable e injusto a nuestro continente que posee la peor distribución de la riqueza en el mundo. Modelo que favorece a unos pocos, que deteriora las condiciones laborales, profundiza la migración, la destrucción de las comunidades indígenas, el deterioro del medio ambiente, la privatización de la seguridad social y la educación, la implementación de normas que protegen los derechos de las corporaciones y no de los ciudadanos, como es el caso de la propiedad intelectual.

Además del ALCA, se insiste en avanzar en la Ronda de Doha, que busca otorgar más poderes a la Organización Mundial del Comercio (OMC) para imponer reglas económicas inequitativas a los países menos desarrollados y hacer prevalecer la agenda corporativa. Se sigue exponiendo al saqueo nuestros bienes naturales, nuestros yacimientos energéticos; se privatiza la distribución y comercialización del agua potable; se estimula la apropiación y privatización de nuestras reservas acuíferas e hidrográficas, convirtiendo un derecho humano como es el acceso al agua en una mercancía de interés de las transnacionales.

Para imponer estas políticas, el imperio y sus cómplices cuentan con el chantaje de la deuda externa, impidiendo el desarrollo de los pueblos en violación de todos nuestros derechos humanos. La declaración de los presidentes no ofrece ninguna salida concreta, como sería la anulación y no pago de la deuda ilegítima, la restitución de lo que se ha cobrado de más y el resarcimiento de las deudas históricas, sociales y ecológicas adeudadas a los pueblos de nuestra América.


Las y los delegados de los distintos pueblos de América estamos aquí no sólo para denunciar, estamos acá porque venimos resistiendo las políticas del imperio y sus aliados. Pero también venimos construyendo alternativas populares, a partir de la solidaridad y la unidad de nuestros pueblos, construyendo tejido social desde abajo, desde la autonomía y diversidad de nuestros movimientos con el propósito de alcanzar una sociedad inclusiva, justa y digna.


Desde esta III Cumbre de los Pueblos de América declaramos:


1) Las negociaciones para crear un Área de Libre Comercio de las Américas (ALCA) deben ser SUSPENDIDAS INMEDIATA Y DEFINITIVAMENTE, lo mismo que todo tratado de libre comercio bilateral o regional. Asumimos la resistencia de los pueblos andinos y de Costa Rica contra el Tratado de Libre Comercio, la de los pueblos del Caribe porque los EPAs no signifiquen una nueva era de colonialismo disfrazado y la lucha de los pueblos de América del Norte, Chile y Centroamérica por echar atrás los tratados de esta naturaleza que ya pesan sobre ellos.


2) Todo acuerdo entre las naciones debe partir de principios basados en el respeto de los derechos humanos, la dimensión social, el respeto a la soberanía, la complementariedad, la cooperación, la solidaridad, la consideración de las asimetrías económicas favoreciendo a los países menos desarrollados. Por eso rechazamos el Tratado de Protección de Inversiones que Uruguay firmó con los Estados Unidos.


3) Nos empeñamos en favorecer e impulsar procesos alternativos de integración regional, como la Alternativa Bolivariana de las Américas (ALBA).


4) Asumimos las conclusiones y las acciones nacidas en los foros, talleres, encuentros de esta Cumbre y nos comprometemos a seguir profundizando nuestro proceso de construcción de alternativas.

5) Hay que anular toda la deuda externa ilegítima, injusta e impagable del Sur, de manera inmediata y sin condiciones. Nos asumimos como acreedores para cobrar la deuda social, ecológica e histórica con nuestros pueblos.


6) Asumimos la lucha de nuestros pueblos por la distribución equitativa de la riqueza, con trabajo digno y justicia social, para erradicar la pobreza, el desempleo y la exclusión social.

7) Acordamos promover la diversificación de la producción, la protección de las semillas criollas patrimonio de los pueblos al servicio de la humanidad, la soberanía alimentaría de los pueblos, la agricultura sostenible y una reforma agraria integral.


8 ) Rechazamos enérgicamente la militarización del continente promovida por el imperio del norte. Denunciamos la doctrina de la llamada cooperación para la seguridad hemisférica como un mecanismo para la represión de las luchas populares. Rechazamos la presencia de tropas de Estados Unidos en nuestro continente, no queremos bases ni enclaves militares. Condenamos el terrorismo de estado mundial de la Administración Bush, que pretende regar de sangre las legítimas rebeldías de nuestros pueblos. Nos comprometemos en la defensa de nuestra soberanía en la Triple Frontera, corazón del Acuífero Guaraní. Por esto, exigimos el retiro de las tropas estadounidenses de la República del Paraguay. Exigimos poner fin a la intervención militar extranjera en Haití.


9) Condenamos la inmoralidad del gobierno de Estados Unidos, que mientras habla de luchar contra el terrorismo protege al terrorista Posada Carriles y mantiene en la cárcel a cinco luchadores patriotas cubanos. Exigimos su inmediata libertad!


10) Repudiamos la presencia en estas dignas tierras latinoamericanas de George W. Bush, principal promotor de la guerra en el mundo y cabecilla del credo neoliberal que afecta incluso los intereses de su propio pueblo. Desde aquí mandamos un mensaje de solidaridad a los dignos hombres y mujeres estadounidenses que sienten vergüenza por tener un gobierno condenado por la humanidad y lo resisten contra viento y marea.


Después de Québec construimos una gran campaña y consulta popular continentales contra el ALCA y logramos frenarla. Hoy, ante la pretensión de revivir las negociaciones del ALCA y sumarle los objetivos militaristas de Estados Unidos, en esta III Cumbre de los Pueblos de América asumimos el compromiso de redoblar nuestra resistencia, fortalecer nuestra unidad en la diversidad y convocar a una nueva y más grande movilización continental para enterrar el ALCA para siempre y construir al mismo tiempo bajo su impulso, nuestra alternativa de una América justa, libre y solidaria.


<!– @page { margin: 0.79in } P { margin-bottom: 0.08in; font-size: 10pt } –>

Diciembre, 2007

A los Señores Presidentes de Argentina, Bolivia, Brasil, Ecuador, Paraguay, Uruguay y Venezuela

 

De parte de los Movimientos Sociales y personalidades del mundo

Por segunda vez nos dirigimos a Uds. para expresar la enorme expectativa abierta en nuestros pueblos por la iniciativa de creación del Banco del Sur. Nos anima también la respuesta positiva de nuevos países de América del Sur, que han manifestado su deseo de participar del Banco del Sur.

 

Los firmantes somos redes, organizaciones y movimientos sociales, sindicatos y académicas/os, que venimos luchando contra el flagelo de la deuda pública ilegítima y de las políticas y prácticas perversas de las instituciones financieras internacionales existentes y del actual sistema de comercio mundial. Estamos convencidas/os de que la decisión tomada de crear el Banco del Sur puede representar un enorme paso y oportunidad no sólo para América del Sur, sino que para América Latina y el Caribe como así también, otras regiones del Hemisferio Sur.

 

Venimos de una historia reciente de lucha contra las dictaduras en casi todo el continente. Esto explica nuestro empeño en abrir e instituir nuevos espacios de participación y de democracia directa. Sin embargo, la forma poco transparente y no participativa como se desarrollan la negociaciones para la creación del Banco del Sur, sin debate público y sin consulta a nuestras sociedades, puede indicar que estamos frente a algo que puede volverse más de lo mismo.

 

Es nuestra convicción que una nueva entidad financiera Sur-Sur debe orientarse a superar tanto las experiencias negativas de apertura económica – con la secuela de siempre mayor endeudamiento y drenaje de capitales -, desregulación y privatización del patrimonio público y de los servicios básicos sufridos por la región, así como de los hoy ya ampliamente reconocidos comportamientos no-democráticos, no transparentes, regresivos y desacreditados de los organismos multilaterales, como el Banco Mundial, el CAF, el BID y el FMI. Nuestra historia reciente ha mostrado que sus opciones de política económica y socio-ambiental, impuestas a nuestros gobiernos a través de condicionalidades, han resultado en descapitalización y desindustrialización de las economías de la región, y las han aprisionado al modelo agro-mineral-exportador, que frena su desarrollo y profundiza la situación subalterna a las economías del Norte, las inequidades sociales, los daños ecológicos y las deudas ‘eternas’ – financiera, histórica, social, cultural, ecológica.

 

Conociendo la importancia de que los países comprometidos hasta ahora con la creación del Banco del Sur lleguen a un acuerdo sobre temas-clave relacionados con su naturaleza y objetivos, su estructura financiera y operativa, creemos esencial plantearles las proposiciones siguientes, que expresan las aspiraciones de amplios sectores de las sociedades de nuestros países, de acuerdo a la manifiesta expresión de sus principales agentes sociales consultados:

 

1. Que el Banco del Sur se oriente a promover una nueva matriz de desarrollo, cuyos valores fundamentales sean la soberanía de nuestros pueblos sobre su territorio y su propio desarrollo, la autodeterminación responsable de nuestras políticas económicas y socio-ambientales, la solidaridad, la sustentabilidad y la justicia ecológica; que para el Banco, el desarrollo económico y tecnológico sean concebidos como medios para el objetivo superior que es el desarrollo humano y social;

2. Que la acción del Banco del Sur sea determinada por metas concretas, como el pleno empleo con dignidad, la garantía de la alimentación, la salud y la vivienda, la universalización de la educación básica pública y gratuita, la redistribución de la riqueza superando inequidades, incluso las de género y etnia, la reducción de las emisiones de gases-invernadero, y la eliminación de sus impactos sobre las poblaciones del continente y los restantes pueblos del Sur.


3. Que el Banco del Sur sea parte integral de una nueva arquitectura financiera latino-americana y caribeña, que incluya un Fondo del Sur, con función de Banco Central continental, capaz de articular un gran sistema de pagos continental con la más avanzada plataforma telemática; capaz de ligar las políticas que promueven la estabilidad macroeconómica con las políticas de desarrollo y de reducción de las asimetrías estructurales; y contemple el desarrollo futuro de un sistema monetario común al servicio de una estrategia de fortalecimiento de lazos económico-comerciales al interior de la región, introduciendo intercambios con monedas nacionales, y trabajando por el establecimiento de una moneda regional por lo menos para los intercambios intra-regionales. La construcción de un espacio de soberanía monetaria y financiera supranacional requiere dotarse de mucha flexibilidad local, para evitar tentaciones subimperialistas y el triunfo de la ortodoxia monetarista en ciertos aspectos, como en la experiencia europea reciente.

 

4. Que el Banco del Sur sirva para recuperar valores relativos a las deudas histórica, social y ecológica, de las cuales nuestros pueblos son acreedores. Que sus financiamientos busquen superar las asimetrías y desigualdades sociales y los daños ambientales que se han perpetuado desde hace más de cinco siglos en el continente.

5. Que el Banco del Sur contemple la participación de las organizaciones ciudadanas y los movimientos sociales no sólo en la elaboración de su arquitectura original, sino también en la toma de decisiones financieras y operacionales y en el monitoreo de la utilización de los fondos adjudicados.


6. Que el Banco del Sur ejerza su dirección de forma igualitaria entre los países miembros, institucionalizando y manteniendo el principio igualitario de “un socio un voto” en todos sus niveles de decisión colegiada; y aspire a canalizar los recursos de ahorro de la misma región.

 

7. Que las subscripciones de capital del Banco del Sur sean proporcionales a la capacidad de las economías de sus países miembros; que otras fuentes de capitalización del Banco del Sur incluyan parte de las reservas internacionales y préstamos de los países miembros, impuestos globales comunes y donaciones. Deben ser excluidos los recursos financieros de las actuales instituciones financieras multilaterales y de Estados que han perpetrado el saqueo de nuestro continente. Que estos dispositivos del Banco del Sur permitan el aumento creciente de la aplicación de las reservas de los países miembros fuera del area del dólar y del euro, y alienten el retorno de los capitales nacionales depositados en el extranjero.

 

8.  Que el Banco del Sur esté comprometido con la transparencia en la gestión, rindiendo cuentas públicas de su funcionamiento y actividad, sometiéndose a la auditoría externa permanente de sus préstamos y de su funcionamiento interno con participación social.

 

9. Que, para que el Banco del Sur no sea “más de lo mismo”, se pondere en forma permanente la calidad, austeridad y eficiencia  de la administración, prohibiendo cualquier privilegio de inmunidad a sus funcionarios, afirmada en la más plena transparencia informativa en tiempo real y el control democrático y social de la gestión. Para evitar gastos excesivos y desviaciones burocráticas, se constituya un cuerpo de funcionarias/os compacto y, a la vez, diversificado, eficiente, eficaz y administrativamente polivalente.

 

10. Que los préstamos sean destinados a la promoción de una integración regional genuinamente cooperativa, basada en principios como la subsidiaridad activa, la proporcionalidad y la complementariedad; financiando proyectos de inversión pública; atendiendo al desarrollo local autogestionario e impulsando el intercambio comercial equitativo y solidario entre agricultores familiares, pequeños productores, sector cooperativo y de economía social solidaria, comunidades indígenas y tradicionales, organizaciones socioeconómicas de mujeres, de pescadores, de trabajo, de identidad, etc.

11. Que el Banco del Sur adopte como prioridad de inversión proyectos que se orientan a la soberanía alimentaria y energética; investigación y desarrollo de tecnologías apropiadas al desarrollo endógeno y sustentable de la región, incluso los software libres; la producción programada y complementaria de medicamentos genéricos; la recuperación de los saberes ancestrales de nuestros pueblos, sistematizado y aceptado como ciencia agroecológica; la promoción de la justicia ambiental; el fortalecimiento de los servicios públicos; el apoyo a las víctimas de desplazamientos forzados; el fomento de la comunicación y la cultura intra-regional; la creación de una universidad del Sur y un sistema de equivalencia de diplomas en toda la región; y la infraestructura a partir de otras lógicas de organización del espacio, que instrumenten las comunidades para el desarrollo local autogestionario y solidario. Que el Banco no reproduzca el modelo de financiamiento de las actuales instituciones financieras internacionales de construcción de mega-obras destructivas del medioambiente y la biodiversidad.

 

12. El Banco del Sur debe ser considerado como una herramienta esencial para custodiar y canalizar el ahorro, rompiendo los ciclos recurrentes de exacción del esfuerzo nacional y regional a  través de maniobras y negociados con el endeudamiento y títulos públicos, el subsidio a grupos económicos y financieros privados privilegiados y/ o corruptos locales e internacionales, y el aval permanente a movimientos especulativos de entrada y salida de capitales.

 

Todo ello lo entendemos en línea con lo destacado por la Declaración Ministerial de Quito del 3 de Mayo pasado, al señalar que: “Los pueblos dieron a sus Gobiernos los mandatos de dotar a la región de nuevos instrumentos de integración para el desarrollo que deben basarse en esquemas democráticos, transparentes, participativos y responsables ante sus mandantes”.

 

Nos preocupan las sucesivas postergaciones de la firma del acta fundacional, que pueden indicar la existencia de indefiniciones significativas. Esperamos que, en las negociaciones para superar estas indefiniciones, se tomen en consideración las proposiciones de esta carta.


La actual coyuntura económica y financiera regional e internacional sigue favorable para dar pasos concretos en este sentido, pero puede no prolongarse. Confiamos en que Uds. aprovecharán esta posibilidad histórica para crear lo que podrá volverse un verdadero Banco Solidario de los Pueblos del Sur.

 

Saludamos a Uds. con la mayor distinción.

Durante más de 500 años los pueblos de América Latina y el Caribe fuimos sometidos por la acción del colonialismo y del imperialismo. El capitalismo de las grandes metrópolis y las élites locales, expoliaron y fraccionaron a Nuestra América a tal punto, que la independencia de cada una de nuestras repúblicas pasó a tener un mero carácter formal, el sueño integrador de nuestros pueblos y nuestros libertadores fue traicionado por los vínculos estructurales de las oligarquías locales con las políticas imperialistas y de dominación.


En los últimos 100 años los movimientos y gobiernos progresistas y socialistas han tenido que chocar contra las armas del imperialismo. Los pueblos hemos resistido y estamos construyendo salidas a las crisis generadas por las políticas neoliberales e imperialistas, fundamentadas en la convivencia, cooperación, complementariedad y solidaridad. El ejemplo histórico de Cuba, resistente a los embates del imperio, ha dado fuerza para la elevación de banderas en los tiempos de adversidad, el proceso revolucionario en Venezuela, ha catalizado y catapultado la bandera de unidad bolivariana que se asume con dignidad por los pueblos de Bolivia y su revolución indígena originario y campesina, así como el resurgimiento revolucionario del Sandinismo en Nicaragua que reivindica la lucha de los pueblos progresistas de Centroamérica. Ante este escenario hoy América es otra, una América que ha cambiado para siempre y no está dispuesta a retroceder.


Hoy estamos seguros de que estamos construyendo un modelo de crecimiento sustentado en los principios de cooperación, complementariedad, solidaridad, equidad y justicia social. En la Alternativa Bolivariana para los Pueblos de Nuestra América encontramos la manera de concretar, a través de los Proyectos Grannacionales, la puesta en practica de estos principios y la creación del Consejo de los Movimientos Sociales del ALBA-TCP nos permite influir directamente en una relación pueblos-pueblos y pueblos-gobiernos, para el beneficio de una población que debe cumplir con la meta de erradicar la pobreza y aportar a la construcción de un sociedad más justa.


La derrota del neoliberalismo en Nuestra América es un acto heroico que se debe consolidar con la unidad de las fuerzas populares y los liderazgos dignos y patrióticos de Fidel Castro, Hugo Chávez, Evo Morales, Daniel Ortega y de otros gobiernos progresistas que no se doblegan ante el imperio. Los movimientos sociales somos protagonistas en esta salvación histórica de la Patria Grande, a la que le está llegando la hora de constituirse en una sola nación.


Por tanto, los movimientos sociales de Bolivia, Cuba, Nicaragua y Venezuela aquí reunidos, nos incorporamos al proceso de unidad latinoamericana y caribeña a través del Consejo de los Movimientos Sociales del ALBA-TCP, en igualdad de responsabilidad y compromiso para el impulso, despliegue, desarrollo orgánico; buscando la concreción de lo acordado en el marco de los Proyectos Grannacionales, para que no se diluya entre laberintos burocráticos, afanes protagónicos o se queden en lo declarativo. De igual forma, asumimos el compromiso de trabajar para incorporar a corto plazo al conjunto de los movimientos sociales de los países de América Latina y el Caribe que apuesten por esta alternativa humana de unidad; con el firme propósito que este esfuerzo sea una alternativa cierta, eficaz, ética y revolucionaria de unidad y liberación de los pueblos de Nuestra América.


¡Nuestra América ha entrado en su hora histórica, una nueva era se ha abierto para nuestros pueblos!

ALBA: Political Declaration of the Sixth Summit of the Bolivarian Alternative for the Peoples of our America

FOR A BANK OF THE SOUTH FOCUSED ON A MATRIX OF SOVEREIGNTY, illness buy SOLIDARITY, stuff SUSTAINABILITY AND INTEGRATION FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE CONTINENT

Dear Mr. Presidents,

We are addressing you for the second time to express the high expectations created in our peoples on the initiative to establish a Bank of the South. We are also encouraged by the positive response of other countries of South America who have manifested their wish to participate in the Bank of the South.

Signatories are from social networks, organizations and movements, labour unions and professionals who are fighting against the scourge of illegitimate public debt and the twisted policies and practices of the existing international financial institutions and the current global trade system. We are sure that the decision to establish a Bank of the South can be a significant big step and an opportunity not only for South America, but for the whole of Latin America and the Caribbean, as also other regions of the Southern Hemisphere.

We come from a recent history of struggle against dictatorships in almost the whole continent. This explains our determination to open and institute new spaces for participation and direct democracy. However, the not very transparent and non participative way in which the negotiations on the establishment of the Bank of the South are being carried forward, without public debate and without consultation with our societies, can indicate that we are facing something that could turn out to be more of the same.

It is our conviction that a new SouthSouth financial entity should be focused not only on going beyond the negative experiences of economic opening , with always the same consequence of higher indebtedness and capital drainage, deregulation and privatization of the public patrimony and basic services suffered by the region; but also beyond the well-known non-democratic, non-transparent , regressive and discredited behaviour of multilateral bodies such as the World Bank, the CAF, the IADB and the IMF. Our recent history has shown that the latter’s choice of economic, social, and environmental policies imposed on our governments through conditionalities, have ended in the decapitalization and deindustrialization of the region’s economies, and have imprisoned these in the agro-mineral-exporter model that stops their development and deepens their subordination to the North economies, while worsening social inequity, ecological damage and the “eternal” financial, historic, social, cultural, and ecological debts.

Knowing how important it is for the countries involved in the establishment of the Bank of the South to reach an agreement upon key issues related to its nature and objectives, and its financial and operational structure, we think it is essential for us to pose the following proposals that express the aspirations of ample sectors of our countries’ societies, according to what was clearly manifested by their main representatives consulted:

1. That the focus of the Bank of the South should be in promoting a new development framework whose essential values be the sovereignty of our peoples on their territory and their own development; a responsible self-determination on our economic, social, and environmental policies; on solidarity, sustainability, and ecological justice; that for the Bank economic and technological development be conceived as a means for the superior goal which is human and social development.

2. That the action of the Bank of the South be guided by concrete goals such as full employment with dignity, ensuring food, heath and housing, universalization of basic public and free education, a redistribution of riches overcoming inequity, even gender and ethnic ones, reducing greenhouse effect gases and their effects on the continent’s population and the other peoples of the south.

3. That the Bank of the South be an integral part of a new Latin-American and Caribbean financial architecture which includes a South Fund with the functions of a Continental Central Bank capable of articulating a great continental payment system with a state of the art telematics platform; capable of linking the policies which promote macroeconomic stability with development and reduction of structural asymmetries policies; and which considers a development in the future of a common monetary system at the service of a strategy which strengthens economic and commercial ties within the region, introducing trade interchange with national currencies, and working towards the establishment of a regional currency at least for intraregional interchanges. The building of a space for supranational monetary and financial sovereignty demands a lot of local flexibility to avoid sub imperialist temptations, and the victory of monetarist orthodoxy in some aspects as those in recent the European experience.

.4. That the Bank of the South be useful to recover the values related to historic, social and ecological debts of which our peoples are creditors. That its financing be oriented towards going beyond the social asymmetries and inequities, and the ecological damage perpetrated in the continent for more the five centuries.

5. That the Bank of the South consider the participation of citizen organizations and social movements, no only in the development of its original architecture but also in financial and operational decision making, and in the monitoring of the use given to the funds awarded.

6. That the Bank of the South implements its management in an egalitarian way among its member countries, instituting and keeping the egalitarian principle of “one associate one vote” in all levels of collegiate decisions, and that it aspires to channel regional savings in the region.

7. That capital subscriptions of the Bank of the South be proportional to the capability of the economy of its member countries; that other sources of capitalization may include part of international reserves and loans from member countries, global taxes and donations. Financial resources from the present multilateral financial institutions and from states that have plundered our continent should be excluded. That these dispositions of the Bank of the South may allow an increasing growth in putting member countries’ reserves out of the sphere of the dollar and the euro, and encourage the return of national capitals deposited abroad.

8. That the Bank of the South be committed to transparency in its administration, settling public account for its functioning and activities, submitting to permanent external audits of its loans and its internal functioning with social participation.

9. For the Bank of the South not to become “more of the same”, the quality, austerity and management efficiency must be permanently evaluated, forbidding any kind of immunity privileges to its officials, and based on the maximum in time transparent reporting, and the democratic and social control of its management. To avoid excessive expenditures and bureaucratic deviations a small body of simultaneously diversified, efficient, effective and managerially polyvalent officials must be designated.

.10. That the loans be destined to the promotion of a genuinely cooperative regional integration, based on principles such as active subsidiarity, proportionality and complementarities; financing of public investment projects; paying attention to self-managing local development, and promoting equitable and solidarity commercial exchanges between family farmers, small producers, the cooperative sector and social solidarity economy, indigenous and traditional communities and women’s, fishermen’s, workers’, identity etc. socioeconomic organizations.

11. That the Bank of the South adopts as investment priority those projects oriented towards food and energy sovereignty; research and development of appropriate technologies for an endogenous and sustainable development of the region, including free software; the programmed and complementary production of generic medicines; the recovery of ancestral wisdom, systematized and accepted as an agro ecologic science; the promotion of environmental justice; the improvement of public services: support to victims of forced displacements; promotion of communications and intraregional culture; the creation of a University of the South and an equivalence system for diplomas issued in all the region: infrastructure starting from other logics of space organization instrumented by communities for local solidarity and self-management development. That the bank should not reproduce the financing model of present day international financial institutions with the construction of mega-projects that damage the environment and biodiversity.

12. The Bank of the South must be considered an essential tool for the custody and channelling of savings, breaking the repeated cycles of collection of the national and regional efforts through manoeuvres and suspicious deals with indebtedness and public titles, subsidies to privileged and/or corrupted private local and international economic and financial groups, and a permanent guarantee to the speculative movements of capital entry and outflow.

We understand that all the above is in keeping with what was emphasized in the Ministerial Statement of Quito, on May 8, pointing that: “The peoples have given their governments the mandate to provide the region with new instruments of integration for development which must be based on a democratic, transparent, participative, and accountable to their citizens’ design”.

We are worried about the postponements in the signature of the founding act, which could indicate the existence of significant unresolved issues. We hope that in the negotiations to overcome these unresolved issues, the proposals presented in this setter will be taken into account.

The current regional and international economic and financial situation is still favourable to give concrete steps in this direction, but it may not last. We trust in that you will take advantage of this historic possibility to create what could turn into a real Solidarity Bank of the peoples of the South.

“The defeat of neoliberalism in America is a heroic action which needs to be
consolidated by the popular forces under the patriotic and admirable leader-
ship of Fidel Castro, Hugo Chavez, Evo Morales, Daniel Ortega, and other progressive governments who do not yield to the empire. Social movements are major figures in the historical redemption of our great homeland, which will soon become a sole nation.
Therefore, the social movements of Bolivia, Cuba, Nicaragua and Venezuela,
gathered at this meeting, express our willingness to join the process of Latin
American and Caribbean unity through the ALBA-TCP’s Council of Social
Movements, being on equal terms and committed to the promotion, deploy-
ment and development of this project; likewise, we are determined to act
within the framework of transnational projects, thus avoiding bureaucratic
labyrinths and personality cults. We declare our commitment to work to-
wards the rapid incorporation of those Latin American and Caribbean social
movements that support our alternative for human unity; with the solid pur-
pose of transforming this joint effort into a certain, efficient, ethical and revolutionary alternative of unity and liberation for the peoples of America.”

Download Full PDF

Charter of Principles for Another Europe

Another Europe is possible: this is the horizon created by the anti-neoliberal social movements, creating a new stage in constructing a Europe of peoples.

By Mark Weisbrot

“Developing nations must create their own mechanisms of finance instead of suffering under those of the IMF and the World Bank, dosage which are institutions of rich nations . . . it is time to wake up.”

That was Lula da Silva, buy information pills the president of Brazil — not Washington’s nemesis, check Hugo Chavez — speaking in the Republic of Congo just two weeks ago. Although our foreign policy establishment remains in cozy denial about it, the recognition that Washington’s economic policies and institutions have failed miserably in Latin America is broadly shared among leaders in the region. Commentators here — Foreign Affairs, Foreign Policy, the editorial boards and op-ed contributors in major newspapers — have taken pains to distinguish “good” leftist presidents (Lula of Brazil and Michele Bachelet of Chile) from the “bad” ones — Chavez of Venezuela, Rafael Correa of Ecuador, Evo Morales of Bolivia and, depending on the pundit, sometimes Nestor Kirchner of Argentina.

But the reality is that Chavez (most flamboyantly) and his Andean colleagues are just saying out loud what everyone else believes. So official Washington, and most of the media, has been somewhat surprised by the rapid consolidation of a new “Bank of the South” proposed by Chavez just last year as an alternative to the Washington-dominated International Monetary Fund (IMF), World Bank and Inter-American Development Bank.

The media has been reluctant to take the new bank seriously, and some continue to call the institution, pejoratively, “Chavez’s bank.” But it has been joined by Brazil, Argentina, Bolivia, Ecuador, Uruguay and Paraguay. And just two weeks ago, Colombia, one of the Bush administration’s few remaining allies in the region and the third-largest recipient of U.S. aid (after Israel and Egypt), announced that it wanted in. Et tu, Uribe?

The bank, which will be officially launched on Dec. 5, will make development loans to its member countries, with a focus on regional economic integration. This is important because these countries want to increase their trade, energy and commercial relationships for both economic and political reasons, just as the European Union has done over the last 50 years. The Inter-American Development Bank, which focuses entirely on Latin America, devotes only about 2 percent of its lending to regional integration.

Unlike the Washington-based international financial institutions, the new bank will not impose economic policy conditions on its borrowers. Such conditions are widely believed to have been a major cause of Latin America’s unprecedented economic failure over the last 26 years, the worst long-term growth performance in more than a century.

The bank is expected to start with capital of about $7 billion, with all member countries contributing. It will be governed primarily on a one-country, one-vote basis.

How ironic is it that such an institution would be called “Chavez’s bank,” while nobody calls the IMF or the World Bank “Bush’s bank?” The IMF and World Bank have 185 member countries but the United States calls the shots; it has a formal veto in the IMF, but its power is much greater than that, with Europe and Japan having almost never voted against Washington in the institution’s 63-year history. The rest of the world, i.e., the majority and the countries that bear the brunt of the institutions’ policies, has little to no say in decision making.

Politically, the new bank is another Declaration of Independence for South America, which as a result of epoch-making changes in the last few years is now more independent of the United States than Europe is. The most important change that has brought this about — other than the populist ballot-box revolt that elected left-of-center governments in Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Ecuador, Uruguay and Venezuela — has been the collapse of the IMF-led “creditor’s cartel” in the region. This was the main avenue of U.S. influence, and there’s not much left of it. Of course the U.S. government still has some clout in the region, but without the ability to cut off credit to disobedient governments, its power is vastly reduced.

The need for alternative regional economic institutions, for both development lending and finance, is becoming increasingly accepted by most of the world. Ten years ago, in the wake of the Asian financial crisis, there was a whole series of proposals, even books by prominent economists, on how to reform “the international financial architecture.” The current crisis triggered by the collapse of subprime-mortgage-backed securities may provoke another such discussion. But the fact is, a full decade after the Asian crisis, the rich country governments have made no significant movement toward reform. New leaders of the IMF and the World Bank were appointed in the last few months, and by tradition, these have to be a European and an American.

That tradition was honored, despite calls from a majority of the member countries and scores of NGOs and think tanks to open up the search process. For the World Bank, the Bush administration even managed to add insult to injury by appointing Robert Zoellick, a neoconservative in the mold of his intensely disliked predecessor, Paul Wolfowitz, to run the beleaguered institution. Without even the smallest symbolic changes, it is hard to imagine more substantive changes, e.g., in the voting structure, taking place in the foreseeable future.

With reform at the top blocked, positive changes will have to come at the regional, and of course, most importantly, at the national level. Latin Americans are doing their part, and the world will surely thank them for it.

Not everyone is happy to see the old order challenged. An insider at the Inter-American Development Bank told the Financial Times: “With the money of Venezuela and political will of Argentina and Brazil, this is a bank that could have lots of money and a different political approach. No one will say this publicly, but we don’t like it.”

Apparently, these institutions that preach the virtues of international competition are not so enthusiastic when it breaks into their own monopolistic market.

 

Mark Weisbrot is Co-Director of the Center for Economic and Policy Research, in Washington, D.C. (www.cepr.net).

A la par de los procesos de integración más importantes y las negociaciones multilaterales a nivel mundial de los que nuestra región participa, seek actualmente se están generando propuestas alternativas que no responden a los modelos tradicionales de integración. Es decir, todo proceso de integración contempla como primera etapa la creación de una Zona de Libre Comercio, para lograr la libre circulación de bienes y servicios. Luego se avanza hacia una profundización de las relaciones mediante la implementación de políticas macroeconómicas homogéneas, creación de un arancel externo común, aceptación de una moneda única, hasta llegar a la creación de instituciones de gobierno comunes y una constitución. Sin embargo, la Alternativa Bolivariana para las Américas (ALBA) plantea un modelo de integración que desde el comienzo pretende ir más allá de la integración tradicional y de la lógica de la liberación de barreras comerciales entre países.

El ALBA nace como respuesta al Área de Libre Comercio para las Américas (ALCA) y se plantea en sus inicios como la contrapartida regional ante los avances de Estados Unidos en materia de negociación de tratados de libre comercio. Fue presentado por primera vez en diciembre de 2001 por Hugo Chávez, durante la III Cumbre de Jefes de Estado y Gobierno de la Asociación de Estados del Caribe. Con todo, sus líneas estratégicas fueron definidas más adelante por Chávez y por Fidel Castro, en un acuerdo firmado en diciembre de 2004. A esta iniciativa, se sumaron Bolivia, en 2006, y Nicaragua, en enero de 2007. Sus bases filosóficas se encuentran en los pensamientos de Miranda y de Simón Bolívar de unidad latinoamericana, ideas que intentan plasmarse en el Primer Congreso de Panamá. En sus fundamentos, concibe a la integración como la herramienta que tienen los pueblos para lograr desarrollo endógeno que erradique la pobreza y la exclusión social, y no como el camino hacia la liberalización del comercio de bienes en inversiones, lo que responde a los intereses del capital transnacional. Este modelo alternativo de integración se basa en principios como la cooperación, la solidaridad y la complementariedad, los cuales llevarían a los países menos desarrollados a superar las asimetrías y lograr el desarrollo económico y la erradicación de la pobreza.

El 28 y 29 de abril pasados concluyó la V Cumbre del ALBA a la que asistieron los presidentes y representantes de los países miembro (Venezuela, Bolivia, Nicaragua y Cuba), además de representantes de otros países de Latinoamérica y el Caribe que presenciaron las reuniones en calidad de observadores. Allí se firmaron una serie de tratados en materia energética con financiación preferencial, además de acuerdos en las áreas educativa, cultural, financiera, seguridad alimentaria, salud, telecomunicaciones, minera e industrial. Venezuela suscribió acuerdos energéticos bilaterales con Bolivia, Nicaragua y Haití en donde, en todos los casos, Venezuela conviene suministrar petróleo financiando el 50% del mismo a 25 años a través de PDVSA, la empresa estatal venezolana, y el Fondo ALBA. A su vez, el pago de la deuda contraída podrá realizarse a través de mecanismos de compensación comercial para con Venezuela. Conjuntamente se avaló la propuesta para independizarse de los organismos financieros internacionales e instaron a la creación de organismos de este tipo regionales. En estos acuerdos también se contempla la constitución de un consejo de presidentes del ALBA, otro de ministros, y un tercer consejo de movimientos sociales.

A la luz de los avances del proceso de integración ALBA, es evidente que los acuerdos llevados a cabo hasta el momento han sido principalmente en materia energética, los cuales se basan en el postulado de la complementariedad y en la lógica de otorgar a los países de menos recursos la posibilidad de crecimiento brindándoles acceso a mayor flujo de dichos recursos. Es interesante reconocer también, cómo el fracaso de los modelos neoliberales de flexibilización y eliminación de barreras al comercio aplicado en nuestra región y la necesidad de buscar modelos alternativos, llevan a que hoy el gobierno venezolano pueda explotar su discurso y sus recursos naturales afianzando su presencia regional a través de esta iniciativa la cual se plasma concretamente en la firma de acuerdos energéticos con países como Nicaragua, Haití, Cuba y Bolivia.

Fuente :  inpade.org.ar

A la par de los procesos de integración más importantes y las negociaciones multilaterales a nivel mundial de los que nuestra región participa, nurse actualmente se están generando propuestas alternativas que no responden a los modelos tradicionales de integración. Es decir, ambulance todo proceso de integración contempla como primera etapa la creación de una Zona de Libre Comercio, seek para lograr la libre circulación de bienes y servicios. Luego se avanza hacia una profundización de las relaciones mediante la implementación de políticas macroeconómicas homogéneas, creación de un arancel externo común, aceptación de una moneda única, hasta llegar a la creación de instituciones de gobierno comunes y una constitución. Sin embargo, la Alternativa Bolivariana para las Américas (ALBA) plantea un modelo de integración que desde el comienzo pretende ir más allá de la integración tradicional y de la lógica de la liberación de barreras comerciales entre países.

El ALBA nace como respuesta al Área de Libre Comercio para las Américas (ALCA) y se plantea en sus inicios como la contrapartida regional ante los avances de Estados Unidos en materia de negociación de tratados de libre comercio. Fue presentado por primera vez en diciembre de 2001 por Hugo Chávez, durante la III Cumbre de Jefes de Estado y Gobierno de la Asociación de Estados del Caribe. Con todo, sus líneas estratégicas fueron definidas más adelante por Chávez y por Fidel Castro, en un acuerdo firmado en diciembre de 2004. A esta iniciativa, se sumaron Bolivia, en 2006, y Nicaragua, en enero de 2007. Sus bases filosóficas se encuentran en los pensamientos de Miranda y de Simón Bolívar de unidad latinoamericana, ideas que intentan plasmarse en el Primer Congreso de Panamá. En sus fundamentos, concibe a la integración como la herramienta que tienen los pueblos para lograr desarrollo endógeno que erradique la pobreza y la exclusión social, y no como el camino hacia la liberalización del comercio de bienes en inversiones, lo que responde a los intereses del capital transnacional. Este modelo alternativo de integración se basa en principios como la cooperación, la solidaridad y la complementariedad, los cuales llevarían a los países menos desarrollados a superar las asimetrías y lograr el desarrollo económico y la erradicación de la pobreza.

El 28 y 29 de abril pasados concluyó la V Cumbre del ALBA a la que asistieron los presidentes y representantes de los países miembro (Venezuela, Bolivia, Nicaragua y Cuba), además de representantes de otros países de Latinoamérica y el Caribe que presenciaron las reuniones en calidad de observadores. Allí se firmaron una serie de tratados en materia energética con financiación preferencial, además de acuerdos en las áreas educativa, cultural, financiera, seguridad alimentaria, salud, telecomunicaciones, minera e industrial. Venezuela suscribió acuerdos energéticos bilaterales con Bolivia, Nicaragua y Haití en donde, en todos los casos, Venezuela conviene suministrar petróleo financiando el 50% del mismo a 25 años a través de PDVSA, la empresa estatal venezolana, y el Fondo ALBA. A su vez, el pago de la deuda contraída podrá realizarse a través de mecanismos de compensación comercial para con Venezuela. Conjuntamente se avaló la propuesta para independizarse de los organismos financieros internacionales e instaron a la creación de organismos de este tipo regionales. En estos acuerdos también se contempla la constitución de un consejo de presidentes del ALBA, otro de ministros, y un tercer consejo de movimientos sociales.

A la luz de los avances del proceso de integración ALBA, es evidente que los acuerdos llevados a cabo hasta el momento han sido principalmente en materia energética, los cuales se basan en el postulado de la complementariedad y en la lógica de otorgar a los países de menos recursos la posibilidad de crecimiento brindándoles acceso a mayor flujo de dichos recursos. Es interesante reconocer también, cómo el fracaso de los modelos neoliberales de flexibilización y eliminación de barreras al comercio aplicado en nuestra región y la necesidad de buscar modelos alternativos, llevan a que hoy el gobierno venezolano pueda explotar su discurso y sus recursos naturales afianzando su presencia regional a través de esta iniciativa la cual se plasma concretamente en la firma de acuerdos energéticos con países como Nicaragua, Haití, Cuba y Bolivia.

Fuente :  inpade.org.ar

A la par de los procesos de integración más importantes y las negociaciones multilaterales a nivel mundial de los que nuestra región participa, actualmente se están generando propuestas alternativas que no responden a los modelos tradicionales de integración. Es decir, todo proceso de integración contempla como primera etapa la creación de una Zona de Libre Comercio, para lograr la libre circulación de bienes y servicios. Luego se avanza hacia una profundización de las relaciones mediante la implementación de políticas macroeconómicas homogéneas, creación de un arancel externo común, aceptación de una moneda única, hasta llegar a la creación de instituciones de gobierno comunes y una constitución. Sin embargo, la Alternativa Bolivariana para las Américas (ALBA) plantea un modelo de integración que desde el comienzo pretende ir más allá de la integración tradicional y de la lógica de la liberación de barreras comerciales entre países.

El ALBA nace como respuesta al Área de Libre Comercio para las Américas (ALCA) y se plantea en sus inicios como la contrapartida regional ante los avances de Estados Unidos en materia de negociación de tratados de libre comercio. Fue presentado por primera vez en diciembre de 2001 por Hugo Chávez, durante la III Cumbre de Jefes de Estado y Gobierno de la Asociación de Estados del Caribe. Con todo, sus líneas estratégicas fueron definidas más adelante por Chávez y por Fidel Castro, en un acuerdo firmado en diciembre de 2004. A esta iniciativa, se sumaron Bolivia, en 2006, y Nicaragua, en enero de 2007. Sus bases filosóficas se encuentran en los pensamientos de Miranda y de Simón Bolívar de unidad latinoamericana, ideas que intentan plasmarse en el Primer Congreso de Panamá. En sus fundamentos, concibe a la integración como la herramienta que tienen los pueblos para lograr desarrollo endógeno que erradique la pobreza y la exclusión social, y no como el camino hacia la liberalización del comercio de bienes en inversiones, lo que responde a los intereses del capital transnacional. Este modelo alternativo de integración se basa en principios como la cooperación, la solidaridad y la complementariedad, los cuales llevarían a los países menos desarrollados a superar las asimetrías y lograr el desarrollo económico y la erradicación de la pobreza.

El 28 y 29 de abril pasados concluyó la V Cumbre del ALBA a la que asistieron los presidentes y representantes de los países miembro (Venezuela, Bolivia, Nicaragua y Cuba), además de representantes de otros países de Latinoamérica y el Caribe que presenciaron las reuniones en calidad de observadores. Allí se firmaron una serie de tratados en materia energética con financiación preferencial, además de acuerdos en las áreas educativa, cultural, financiera, seguridad alimentaria, salud, telecomunicaciones, minera e industrial. Venezuela suscribió acuerdos energéticos bilaterales con Bolivia, Nicaragua y Haití en donde, en todos los casos, Venezuela conviene suministrar petróleo financiando el 50% del mismo a 25 años a través de PDVSA, la empresa estatal venezolana, y el Fondo ALBA. A su vez, el pago de la deuda contraída podrá realizarse a través de mecanismos de compensación comercial para con Venezuela. Conjuntamente se avaló la propuesta para independizarse de los organismos financieros internacionales e instaron a la creación de organismos de este tipo regionales. En estos acuerdos también se contempla la constitución de un consejo de presidentes del ALBA, otro de ministros, y un tercer consejo de movimientos sociales.

A la luz de los avances del proceso de integración ALBA, es evidente que los acuerdos llevados a cabo hasta el momento han sido principalmente en materia energética, los cuales se basan en el postulado de la complementariedad y en la lógica de otorgar a los países de menos recursos la posibilidad de crecimiento brindándoles acceso a mayor flujo de dichos recursos. Es interesante reconocer también, cómo el fracaso de los modelos neoliberales de flexibilización y eliminación de barreras al comercio aplicado en nuestra región y la necesidad de buscar modelos alternativos, llevan a que hoy el gobierno venezolano pueda explotar su discurso y sus recursos naturales afianzando su presencia regional a través de esta iniciativa la cual se plasma concretamente en la firma de acuerdos energéticos con países como Nicaragua, Haití, Cuba y Bolivia.

Fuente :  inpade.org.ar

A la par de los procesos de integración más importantes y las negociaciones multilaterales a nivel mundial de los que nuestra región participa, thumb online actualmente se están generando propuestas alternativas que no responden a los modelos tradicionales de integración. Es decir, look todo proceso de integración contempla como primera etapa la creación de una Zona de Libre Comercio, medical para lograr la libre circulación de bienes y servicios. Luego se avanza hacia una profundización de las relaciones mediante la implementación de políticas macroeconómicas homogéneas, creación de un arancel externo común, aceptación de una moneda única, hasta llegar a la creación de instituciones de gobierno comunes y una constitución. Sin embargo, la Alternativa Bolivariana para las Américas (ALBA) plantea un modelo de integración que desde el comienzo pretende ir más allá de la integración tradicional y de la lógica de la liberación de barreras comerciales entre países.

El ALBA nace como respuesta al Área de Libre Comercio para las Américas (ALCA) y se plantea en sus inicios como la contrapartida regional ante los avances de Estados Unidos en materia de negociación de tratados de libre comercio. Fue presentado por primera vez en diciembre de 2001 por Hugo Chávez, durante la III Cumbre de Jefes de Estado y Gobierno de la Asociación de Estados del Caribe. Con todo, sus líneas estratégicas fueron definidas más adelante por Chávez y por Fidel Castro, en un acuerdo firmado en diciembre de 2004. A esta iniciativa, se sumaron Bolivia, en 2006, y Nicaragua, en enero de 2007. Sus bases filosóficas se encuentran en los pensamientos de Miranda y de Simón Bolívar de unidad latinoamericana, ideas que intentan plasmarse en el Primer Congreso de Panamá. En sus fundamentos, concibe a la integración como la herramienta que tienen los pueblos para lograr desarrollo endógeno que erradique la pobreza y la exclusión social, y no como el camino hacia la liberalización del comercio de bienes en inversiones, lo que responde a los intereses del capital transnacional. Este modelo alternativo de integración se basa en principios como la cooperación, la solidaridad y la complementariedad, los cuales llevarían a los países menos desarrollados a superar las asimetrías y lograr el desarrollo económico y la erradicación de la pobreza.

El 28 y 29 de abril pasados concluyó la V Cumbre del ALBA a la que asistieron los presidentes y representantes de los países miembro (Venezuela, Bolivia, Nicaragua y Cuba), además de representantes de otros países de Latinoamérica y el Caribe que presenciaron las reuniones en calidad de observadores. Allí se firmaron una serie de tratados en materia energética con financiación preferencial, además de acuerdos en las áreas educativa, cultural, financiera, seguridad alimentaria, salud, telecomunicaciones, minera e industrial. Venezuela suscribió acuerdos energéticos bilaterales con Bolivia, Nicaragua y Haití en donde, en todos los casos, Venezuela conviene suministrar petróleo financiando el 50% del mismo a 25 años a través de PDVSA, la empresa estatal venezolana, y el Fondo ALBA. A su vez, el pago de la deuda contraída podrá realizarse a través de mecanismos de compensación comercial para con Venezuela. Conjuntamente se avaló la propuesta para independizarse de los organismos financieros internacionales e instaron a la creación de organismos de este tipo regionales. En estos acuerdos también se contempla la constitución de un consejo de presidentes del ALBA, otro de ministros, y un tercer consejo de movimientos sociales.

A la luz de los avances del proceso de integración ALBA, es evidente que los acuerdos llevados a cabo hasta el momento han sido principalmente en materia energética, los cuales se basan en el postulado de la complementariedad y en la lógica de otorgar a los países de menos recursos la posibilidad de crecimiento brindándoles acceso a mayor flujo de dichos recursos. Es interesante reconocer también, cómo el fracaso de los modelos neoliberales de flexibilización y eliminación de barreras al comercio aplicado en nuestra región y la necesidad de buscar modelos alternativos, llevan a que hoy el gobierno venezolano pueda explotar su discurso y sus recursos naturales afianzando su presencia regional a través de esta iniciativa la cual se plasma concretamente en la firma de acuerdos energéticos con países como Nicaragua, Haití, Cuba y Bolivia.

Fuente :  inpade.org.ar

A la par de los procesos de integración más importantes y las negociaciones multilaterales a nivel mundial de los que nuestra región participa, actualmente se están generando propuestas alternativas que no responden a los modelos tradicionales de integración. Es decir, todo proceso de integración contempla como primera etapa la creación de una Zona de Libre Comercio, mind para lograr la libre circulación de bienes y servicios. Luego se avanza hacia una profundización de las relaciones mediante la implementación de políticas macroeconómicas homogéneas, creación de un arancel externo común, aceptación de una moneda única, hasta llegar a la creación de instituciones de gobierno comunes y una constitución. Sin embargo, la Alternativa Bolivariana para las Américas (ALBA) plantea un modelo de integración que desde el comienzo pretende ir más allá de la integración tradicional y de la lógica de la liberación de barreras comerciales entre países.

El ALBA nace como respuesta al Área de Libre Comercio para las Américas (ALCA) y se plantea en sus inicios como la contrapartida regional ante los avances de Estados Unidos en materia de negociación de tratados de libre comercio. Fue presentado por primera vez en diciembre de 2001 por Hugo Chávez, durante la III Cumbre de Jefes de Estado y Gobierno de la Asociación de Estados del Caribe. Con todo, sus líneas estratégicas fueron definidas más adelante por Chávez y por Fidel Castro, en un acuerdo firmado en diciembre de 2004. A esta iniciativa, se sumaron Bolivia, en 2006, y Nicaragua, en enero de 2007. Sus bases filosóficas se encuentran en los pensamientos de Miranda y de Simón Bolívar de unidad latinoamericana, ideas que intentan plasmarse en el Primer Congreso de Panamá. En sus fundamentos, concibe a la integración como la herramienta que tienen los pueblos para lograr desarrollo endógeno que erradique la pobreza y la exclusión social, y no como el camino hacia la liberalización del comercio de bienes en inversiones, lo que responde a los intereses del capital transnacional. Este modelo alternativo de integración se basa en principios como la cooperación, la solidaridad y la complementariedad, los cuales llevarían a los países menos desarrollados a superar las asimetrías y lograr el desarrollo económico y la erradicación de la pobreza.

El 28 y 29 de abril pasados concluyó la V Cumbre del ALBA a la que asistieron los presidentes y representantes de los países miembro (Venezuela, Bolivia, Nicaragua y Cuba), además de representantes de otros países de Latinoamérica y el Caribe que presenciaron las reuniones en calidad de observadores. Allí se firmaron una serie de tratados en materia energética con financiación preferencial, además de acuerdos en las áreas educativa, cultural, financiera, seguridad alimentaria, salud, telecomunicaciones, minera e industrial. Venezuela suscribió acuerdos energéticos bilaterales con Bolivia, Nicaragua y Haití en donde, en todos los casos, Venezuela conviene suministrar petróleo financiando el 50% del mismo a 25 años a través de PDVSA, la empresa estatal venezolana, y el Fondo ALBA. A su vez, el pago de la deuda contraída podrá realizarse a través de mecanismos de compensación comercial para con Venezuela. Conjuntamente se avaló la propuesta para independizarse de los organismos financieros internacionales e instaron a la creación de organismos de este tipo regionales. En estos acuerdos también se contempla la constitución de un consejo de presidentes del ALBA, otro de ministros, y un tercer consejo de movimientos sociales.

A la luz de los avances del proceso de integración ALBA, es evidente que los acuerdos llevados a cabo hasta el momento han sido principalmente en materia energética, los cuales se basan en el postulado de la complementariedad y en la lógica de otorgar a los países de menos recursos la posibilidad de crecimiento brindándoles acceso a mayor flujo de dichos recursos. Es interesante reconocer también, cómo el fracaso de los modelos neoliberales de flexibilización y eliminación de barreras al comercio aplicado en nuestra región y la necesidad de buscar modelos alternativos, llevan a que hoy el gobierno venezolano pueda explotar su discurso y sus recursos naturales afianzando su presencia regional a través de esta iniciativa la cual se plasma concretamente en la firma de acuerdos energéticos con países como Nicaragua, Haití, Cuba y Bolivia.

Fuente :  inpade.org.ar

A la par de los procesos de integración más importantes y las negociaciones multilaterales a nivel mundial de los que nuestra región participa, actualmente se están generando propuestas alternativas que no responden a los modelos tradicionales de integración. Es decir, todo proceso de integración contempla como primera etapa la creación de una Zona de Libre Comercio, para lograr la libre circulación de bienes y servicios. Luego se avanza hacia una profundización de las relaciones mediante la implementación de políticas macroeconómicas homogéneas, creación de un arancel externo común, aceptación de una moneda única, hasta llegar a la creación de instituciones de gobierno comunes y una constitución. Sin embargo, la Alternativa Bolivariana para las Américas (ALBA) plantea un modelo de integración que desde el comienzo pretende ir más allá de la integración tradicional y de la lógica de la liberación de barreras comerciales entre países.

El ALBA nace como respuesta al Área de Libre Comercio para las Américas (ALCA) y se plantea en sus inicios como la contrapartida regional ante los avances de Estados Unidos en materia de negociación de tratados de libre comercio. Fue presentado por primera vez en diciembre de 2001 por Hugo Chávez, durante la III Cumbre de Jefes de Estado y Gobierno de la Asociación de Estados del Caribe. Con todo, sus líneas estratégicas fueron definidas más adelante por Chávez y por Fidel Castro, en un acuerdo firmado en diciembre de 2004. A esta iniciativa, se sumaron Bolivia, en 2006, y Nicaragua, en enero de 2007. Sus bases filosóficas se encuentran en los pensamientos de Miranda y de Simón Bolívar de unidad latinoamericana, ideas que intentan plasmarse en el Primer Congreso de Panamá. En sus fundamentos, concibe a la integración como la herramienta que tienen los pueblos para lograr desarrollo endógeno que erradique la pobreza y la exclusión social, y no como el camino hacia la liberalización del comercio de bienes en inversiones, lo que responde a los intereses del capital transnacional. Este modelo alternativo de integración se basa en principios como la cooperación, la solidaridad y la complementariedad, los cuales llevarían a los países menos desarrollados a superar las asimetrías y lograr el desarrollo económico y la erradicación de la pobreza.

El 28 y 29 de abril pasados concluyó la V Cumbre del ALBA a la que asistieron los presidentes y representantes de los países miembro (Venezuela, Bolivia, Nicaragua y Cuba), además de representantes de otros países de Latinoamérica y el Caribe que presenciaron las reuniones en calidad de observadores. Allí se firmaron una serie de tratados en materia energética con financiación preferencial, además de acuerdos en las áreas educativa, cultural, financiera, seguridad alimentaria, salud, telecomunicaciones, minera e industrial. Venezuela suscribió acuerdos energéticos bilaterales con Bolivia, Nicaragua y Haití en donde, en todos los casos, Venezuela conviene suministrar petróleo financiando el 50% del mismo a 25 años a través de PDVSA, la empresa estatal venezolana, y el Fondo ALBA. A su vez, el pago de la deuda contraída podrá realizarse a través de mecanismos de compensación comercial para con Venezuela. Conjuntamente se avaló la propuesta para independizarse de los organismos financieros internacionales e instaron a la creación de organismos de este tipo regionales. En estos acuerdos también se contempla la constitución de un consejo de presidentes del ALBA, otro de ministros, y un tercer consejo de movimientos sociales.

A la luz de los avances del proceso de integración ALBA, es evidente que los acuerdos llevados a cabo hasta el momento han sido principalmente en materia energética, los cuales se basan en el postulado de la complementariedad y en la lógica de otorgar a los países de menos recursos la posibilidad de crecimiento brindándoles acceso a mayor flujo de dichos recursos. Es interesante reconocer también, cómo el fracaso de los modelos neoliberales de flexibilización y eliminación de barreras al comercio aplicado en nuestra región y la necesidad de buscar modelos alternativos, llevan a que hoy el gobierno venezolano pueda explotar su discurso y sus recursos naturales afianzando su presencia regional a través de esta iniciativa la cual se plasma concretamente en la firma de acuerdos energéticos con países como Nicaragua, Haití, Cuba y Bolivia.

Fuente :  inpade.org.ar

by Lena Esther Hernández Hernández

Introducción.

En la historia de América Latina y el Caribe, sale encontramos la variable Integración expuesta a través del pensamiento de varios hombres previsores desde el siglo XVIII. Estos tenían ideas de lograr la unidad necesaria para obtener la independencia política.

Podemos mencionar a José Martí, cuando planteó que: “Pueblo y no pueblos, decimos de intento, por no parecernos que hay más que uno del bravo a la Patagonia. Una ha de ser, pues que lo es. América, aun cuando no quisiera serlo; y los hermanos que pelean, juntos al cabo de una colosal nación espiritual, se amarán luego. Solo hay en nuestros países una división visible, que cada pueblo, y aún cada hombre, lleva en sí, y es la división en pueblos egoístas de una parte, y de otra generosos. Pero así como de la amalgama de los dos pueblos elementos surge, triunfante y agigantando casi siempre, el ser humano bueno y cuerdo, así, para sombro de las edades y hogar amable de los hombres, de la fusión útil en que lo egoísta templa lo ilusorio, surgirá en el porvenir de la América, aunque no la divisen todavía los ojos débiles, la nación latina; ya no conquistadora, como en Roma, sino hospitalaria”.

Bolívar también fue un pensador y hombre luchador, en función de la independencia e integración latinoamericana. (…) “Bolívar soñaba con una América Latina unida en un Estado grande y poderoso, a partir de las similitudes que tenemos como ningún otro grupo de países en el mundo, de idioma, en primer lugar etnias de parecido origen. Creencias religiosas y cultura en general”.

Luego de lograr la independencia, el poder político fue asumido por élites locales, herederos del poder colonial, dominando durante el siglo XIX. No es hasta la primera mitad del siglo XX que se produce un acercamiento a la integración, perfilándose en Latinoamérica una aversión por la política panamericanista e intervencionista de EE.UU.
Después de la Segunda Guerra Mundial, los Estados Latino Caribeños, buscaron caminos para su auto desarrollo económico y político, a través de una coordinación de las políticas económicas entre nuestros países, lideradas por la Comisión Económica para América latina (CEPAL).
El Consejo Económico y Social de las Naciones Unidas creó en 1948 cinco comisiones económicas regionales con el objetivo de ayudar y colaborar con los gobiernos de la zona en la investigación y análisis de los temas económicos regionales y nacionales. Los ámbitos de actuación de las cinco comisiones son Europa, África, la región de Asia y el Pacífico, el Asia Occidental (Oriente Medio) y la América Latina. Pero ha sido precisamente esta última, la CEPAL, la más activa y la que ha alcanzado un mayor nivel de prestigio e influencia. En 1984 su campo de actuación fue ampliado para incluir la región del Caribe.

Desarrollo.
1.1 Cooperación, complemento de la Integración.

A través del desarrollo de la sociedad capitalista, se muestra cómo los países o regiones han tenido que ponerse de acuerdo en aspectos ya sean coyunturales o a largo plazo, para enfrentar las terribles consecuencias que sufren por la incidencia de la avaricia imperialista, y su afán de conquistar mercados, zonas de influencia, fuentes de materias primas, así como la obtención de mano de obra barata.

Gracias al progreso Científico Técnico, las fuerzas productivas han alcanzado un elevado nivel de desarrollo y las fronteras nacionales han quedado pequeñas para la explotación y obtención de ganancias, por lo que la exportación de capitales se muestra cada vez más vigente como un rasgo del imperialismo, y sus consecuencias para los países receptores del mismo, muchas veces son catastróficas en el sentido económico, político y social. Con esto se crean relaciones de interdependencia entre los países y se complementan sus economías y los Estados pertenecientes a una zona o región.

Al terminar la Segunda Guerra Mundial se crean organismos para reforzar las relaciones entre los países, tales como la Organización de Naciones Unidas, el Fondo Monetario Internacional, y el Banco Mundial. Es muy importante tener en cuenta que éstos van a trabajar en función de establecer relaciones en beneficio de las potencias imperialistas.

Debido a la situación de la economía mundial después de esta contienda guerrerista, los países tuvieron que buscar opciones para poder desarrollarse, y es ahí donde aparece la Cooperación, ésta tenía a su favor que había entrado en crisis el sistema colonial del imperialismo, así como el surgimiento del Campo Socialista y con él las relaciones establecidas entre sus miembros.

La Cooperación no es más que : acuerdos a que llegan dos o más países para abordar conjuntamente problemas determinados, sin tener necesariamente que interconectar sus economías, ni crear instituciones que se hagan cargo de esta interconexión.

La Cooperación, no implica Integración económica, es como una primera fase de ella. Surge por las condiciones objetivas del desarrollo de la sociedad capitalista que arrastró a los países a buscar alternativas de solución y de desarrollo en esa etapa de la historia. Solo cuando la Cooperación adquiere dinámica de proceso, es que da origen a la Integración.

Para entrar a analizar la variable integración y sus conceptos fundamentales plasmados en la teoría de los estudiosos del tema en Latinoamérica, hay que tener en cuenta la escuela de pensamiento, el enfoque político que le dan, así como la disciplina de la cual se parta.
En la Universidad Central de las Villas, de Cuba, varios profesionales estudian el tema, enfocándolo de manera diferente, por ejemplo, para Edgardo Romero Fernández “la integración en su sentido más abarcador y completo, el que por supuesto sobrepasa el estrecho pero imprescindible momento espacial y temporal de “lo económico”, constituye todo un largo proceso de construcción de una nueva forma de vida, de cultura, y por tanto de superación progresiva de los hegemonismos, la dominación, la excusión y por supuesto la explotación. ”

En este concepto no solo se trata la terminología económica, que aunque no deja de ser necesaria, no constituye para el autor el todo de la integración entre dos o más países, ya que hay que abarcar la influencia de ella en lo social, político, cultural y en la eliminación de todo lo que tenga que ver con la explotación y la dominación de terceros en sus intereses nacionales.

Según Alfredo Seoanner Flores economista boliviano, “la Integración constituye un proceso donde la partes, los Estados Nacionales, buscan unir elementos previamente dispersos, desarrollando acciones en le ámbito de la economía, política y actividad socio-cultural de los pueblos, con el propósito de liminar los factores de separación y desarrollar un sentido de solidaridad y pertenencia. Se trata de un proceso en el que dos o más colectividades, que están separadas por una frontera y un sistema jurídico institucional, constituyen andamiajes que buscan aminorar esos factores de separación y desarrollar una dinámica de convergencias que culminen con la integración plena”.
Esta autor aboga por la integración plena, constituyendo incluso coordinaciones en función de reducir los aspectos que lleven a la separación ya sea por fronteras entre países o por trabas jurídicas institucionales.
Hay autores que se centran en función de la integración económica, como Ramón Tamanes, cubano, que plantea que esta no es más que” un proceso a través del cual dos o más mercados nacionales, previamente separados, y de dimensiones unitarias consideradas poco adecuadas, se unen para formar un solo mercado (mercado común) de una dimensión más adecuada”. 6
Para Roberto Muñoz González, profesor de la UCLV, de Cuba, “la Integración es un proceso de creciente interpenetración de las estructuras, mediante un conjunto de arreglos institucionales acordados por un cierto número de países que deciden sustituir el estrecho marco de sus respectivos mercados nacionales, por uno mucho más amplio, gobernado por un conjunto de instituciones con un mayor o menor número de resortes supranacionales. “

Fidel Castro, nuestro Comandante, siempre le ha dedicado tiempo al análisis del tema Integración latinoamericana, ha planteado que:” Si bien la integración ha de ser nuestra meta, es obvio que se trata de un objetivo que requiere de un proceso gradual que no culminará, aun con la voluntad y decisión con que se emprenda, en un lapso muy inmediato (…) Es preciso, además, la instauración de mecanismos permanentes de colaboración y la implementación de proyectos y programas concretos. De lo que se trataría sería de llevar a cada país lo mejor de las experiencias y los resultados de los demás en materia de desarrollo científico y tecnológico, la producción agropecuaria e industrial, la extensión y perfeccionamiento de la atención a la salud, la educación y demás servicios sociales, la protección del medio, la promoción de la cultura y cuantos otros terrenos sean susceptibles de un trabajo organizado y decidido de cooperación. “
Fidel por su parte se enfoca en la cuestión política, prevaleciendo el carácter humanista de su pensamiento, siempre ha dejado claro que “América Latina no tiene otra alternativa digna, honrosa, de independencia, que la integración económica”

La gran mayoría de los autores consultados coinciden en que la integración es un proceso, en que dos o más partes se ponen de acuerdo para accionar ya sea en temas económicos, políticos, culturales, sociales, ecológicos, aunque haya que romper barreras institucionales que lo impidan, con el objetivo de lograr un desarrollo siempre que ambas partes salgan beneficiadas.

1.2 La Integración Latino Caribeña en la década del sesenta. Aportes de Raúl Prebish como fundador de la CEPAL.

La Comisión Económica para América Latina (CEPAL) fue establecida en 1948. Es en el 27 de julio de 1984 fue que el Consejo Económico y Social de las Naciones Unidas decidió que la Comisión pasara a llamarse Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe.

La CEPAL es una de las cinco comisiones regionales de las Naciones Unidas. Se fundó para contribuir al desarrollo económico de América Latina, coordinar las acciones encaminadas a su promoción y reforzar las relaciones económicas de los países entre sí y con las demás naciones del mundo. Posteriormente, su labor se amplió a los países del Caribe y se incorporó el objetivo de promover el desarrollo social. Gran parte de su prestigio lo debe a Raúl Prebish, el economista que dirigió la CEPAL durante sus primeros años y que enfocó el análisis del desarrollo económico de la región desde un punto de vista riguroso pero original, apartado de las corrientes económicas dominantes y muy enfocado a los problemas específicos de la región.

A partir de la segunda mitad de la década del 50, comenzaron a sistematizarse las propuestas relativas a la integración económica de América Latina, como parte de los análisis sobre los problemas del desarrollo de la región que la CEPAL venía realizando desde fines de la década anterior.

La integración Regional para la CEPAL se basaba en tres elementos interdependientes uno de ellos es alterar su política económica exterior, con el objetivo de mejorar su situación desventajosa y periférica ante la economía mundial, a través de un movimiento integrativo sub continental. Otro es que el modelo de sustitución de importaciones debería impulsar el desarrollo económico a través del proceso de industrialización, y el trecero es que el componente diplomático debería fotalecer la capacidad de negociación frente a los gremios internacionales.

La necesidad de la integración regional tenía como telón de fondo la oposición centro/periferia, o la teoría de la dependencia, así la restricción externa y la escasez de capital y de tecnología, que entonces constituían el eje central del pensamiento estructuralista latinoamericano, basado en el documento seminal de Raúl Prebisch: “El desarrollo económico de la América Latina y algunos de sus principales problemas” (CEPAL, 1962).
Es en el año 1959 que se propone para América Latina la formación del Mercado Común Latinoamericano esta propuesta encontró oposición en el Gobierno de los Estados Unidos y no contaba con pleno respaldo del Gobierno de Argentina. A pesar de varios inconvenientes para la formación de este mercado, los países andinos se mantenían los propósitos de integración. Por su parte, los gobiernos de Centroamérica trataron de avanzar en la construcción de un mercado común para la subregión.

En 1960 se crea el Mercado Común Centroamericano(MCCA), y se dieron los primeros pasos para proporcionar la base de la cooperación y el comercio interregional mediante el Tratado de Managua de 1960 para lograr la integración económica entre Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador, Nicaragua y Costa Rica, que firmó el tratado en 1962. Pretendía el total desarme arancelario entre estos países e imponer un Arancel Externo Común (AEC) frente a los países no miembros.

El comercio entre los países de Centroamérica se incrementó de manera considerable desde 1960, con el funcionamiento del MCCA, se han podido derrivar barreras que dificultaban el comercio entre las naciones de la región, y también establecer tarifas comunes de exportación para muchos productos. El Banco Centroamericano de Integración Económica -una de sus principales instituciones de crédito- concede préstamos y financia proyectos de desarrollo.

En la década del 60 se creó el Grupo Andino, forma de integración regional entre países similares en relación a su desarrollo, se creó la Asociación Latinoamericana de Libre Comercio(ALALC), logrando no solo la expansión y diversificación del comercio regional, sino también en el entrelazamiento de sus economías nacionales, especialmente de sectores industriales.

Para impulsar los procesos de integración económica en la década del 60, trataron de recoger el ejemplo de otras regiones y las ideas de la época. Los nuevos procesos eran percibidos como un instrumento que podía contribuir al desarrollo y proteger el mercado interno y a la integración nacional de cada una de las economías involucradas, pues estas economías consideras aisladamente no se encontraban en condiciones de desarrollar una industria pujante y los mercados internos nacionales con que contaban eran limitados. Por eso un mercado ampliado era opción vital de desarrollo buscado. A través de la acción conjunta podían defender en el mercado mundial, los precios de los productos producidos en la región, podían luchar contra las discriminaciones comerciales y combatir el dumping. Además una acción coordinada frente a los organismos internacionales e inversores extranjeros facilitaría la defensa de las prioridades de desarrollo nacionales. Por tanto debían estimularse las negociaciones con otras naciones que llegaran a acuerdos bilaterales o regionales, para constituir un Mercado Común Latinoamericano.
La integración económica era un objetivo de la política económica del Desarrollismo, pero subordinado al fin de alcanzar el desarrollo económico nacional. En tal sentido la integración regional debía servir para diversificar, expandir, y tecnificar las respectivas economías, a fin de que superaran la etapa de producción primaria y avanzaran en el camino del Desarrollo. Se planteaba que la integración regional no era solo un problema económico, sino de carácter nacional, pues había que desarrollar horizontal y verticalmente una economía moderna. (CEPAL, 1969).

En Europa, los países involucrados en el proceso de formación del mercado común disponían ya de una plataforma industrial relativamente avanzada, en la visión elaborada por la CEPAL para América Latina la integración económica se vinculaba directamente con el logro de un nivel más alto de industrialización y abogaba por la reducción o eliminación de derechos aduaneros que existían de acuerdo a las políticas proteccionistas que prevalecían en la época. Para lograr este propósito, la industrialización tendría que proyectarse más allá del estrecho marco del proceso de sustitución de importaciones. La industrialización sustitutiva, por las condiciones en que se venía desarrollando -altos costos, encerramiento en mercados nacionales compartimentalizados, exagerada e indiscriminada protección, etc., ya se insinuaba como un proceso de alcances limitados a largo plazo, tanto en términos de sostenimiento del crecimiento económico y del aumento de la productividad general como en lo que se refiere a la solución del problema del estrangulamiento externo.

Los países de la región carecían de poder de negociación para modificar en su favor los términos desfavorables que caracterizaban sus relaciones comerciales y financieras con los países centrales. Por consiguiente, era necesario establecer una política común frente a los países industrializados e instituciones financieras internacionales, a partir de nuevas condiciones de negociación y del aumento de la competitividad de las exportaciones resultantes de la unión económica. Con ello se pretendía replantear los términos en que se desarrollaba el comercio de productos básicos, abrir el mercado de los países industrializados a las manufacturas producidas en los países en desarrollo y tornar menos gravosas las condiciones de la cooperación técnica y financiera del exterior.

La integración económica regional era considerada, en los documentos de la CEPAL como un vector estratégico para romper con la situación prevaleciente de insuficiente dinamismo y baja productividad de la economía latinoamericana.

La CEPAL es la que propone el inicio de una nueva era desarrollista, desde estos organismos se promovió un importante intervencionismo del Estado en políticas de desarrollo económico y social a través de estrategias de planificación y de nacionalización de los principales medios de producción y del sector productivo estratégico, se llevó a cabo la reforma agraria en distintos países de la región, se incrementaron la inversiones en infraestructura para el desarrollo y se practicó una política exterior más independiente y propensa al no alineamiento.

En varios países Latino Caribeños se logró la eliminación del monopolio oligárquico, se fortaleció el sector estatal de la economía, así como se nacionalizó la minería, el cobre, se trazaron políticas estatales en función del beneficio social, gracias a la aplicación de esta estrategia de desarrollo.

Las causas generales para el fracaso de los antiguos y concretos proyectos de integración en la región latino caribeña se resumen en: la falta de diversificación de los productos regionales, los acuerdos multilaterales en especial con relación a la ALALC, dificultaban el consenso, propiciando el fracaso del plan integrativo, además este proyecto de integración no contó con el apoyo internacional y los gobiernos autoritarios latinoamericanos la vieron como una amenaza para la seguridad nacional la aproximación de economías regionales.

A pesar de que esta estrategia funcionó satisfactoriamente durante la década de los setenta pues se produjo un crecimiento generalizado del precio de las materias primas en los mercados internacionales que no agradó mucho e influyó negativamente en las economías “centrales”. En los años 1980, la contracción de la demanda internacional y el aumento de los tipos de interés desembocó la crisis de la deuda externa lo que exigió profundas modificaciones en la estrategia de desarrollo.

La variable integración en la actualidad tiene más vigencia que nunca, estamos los latino caribeños inmersos en un viejo andar, pero hoy toma aires de nuevo. Nuevos bríos ofrece la izquierda revitalizada en función de la unidad e integración latinoamericana. Cada país de acuerdo a sus características, está jugando un papel fundamental en la contienda integradora. Tratando de retomar el poder “perdido del Estado” a raíz de la aplicación de la política neoliberal en el mundo y específicamente en nuestro continente. Es muy bueno saber que nos estamos acercando en Latinoamérica y en el Caribe a la verdadera independencia.

Cuba, motor impulsor de ideas y de ejemplo de lucha, ha logrado unirse e integrarse con varios países latino caribeños, siendo esto muestra palpable de que la Integración es la mejor opción, para lograr la unidad y la Independencia.

Conclusiones.
El esfuerzo de los teóricos cepalinos por dar respuesta a los problemas económicos del continente y específicamente en la década del 60, debe tenerse en cuenta y como un gran referente en el camino de retomar el objetivo principal de desarrollo. El proceso de profundización de nuestras economías, desarrollados por estos pensadores, es el inicio de lo que sería un movimiento de discusión de las realidades latino caribeñas en busca de respuestas de los problemas de nuestros países.

A pesar de que el modelo de desarrollo de la CEPAL no cumplió sus objetivos tajantemente, varios de sus objetivos y métodos se encuentran vigentes, aunque adecuados al momento actual. Tenemos que desarrollarnos, industrializarnos por nuestros propios esfuerzos, y abogar un poco menos por la intervención de capital extranjero en nuestras economías, dándole al Estado el papel de planificador y regulador de las políticas económicas, políticas y sociales, y de principal redistribuidor de las ganancias a nivel de sociedad.

La integración latino caribeña es cada vez más necesaria, para sobrevivir al infierno capitalista, es la única vía que nos queda para poder salir del inmenso bache en que nos ha puesto el imperialismo. Desde la década del 60 hasta la actualidad los intentos de integración dan muestra de que los latino caribeños están despiertos y concientes de que la única alternativa de desarrollo viable en los momentos actuales es la Integración.

Martí José Obras completas. Editora de Ciencias Sociales. La Habana. Tomo 8.pp. 318-319.)

Periódico Granma. (La Habana. Cuba), 15 de junio de 1999, p 5. ).

El informe Equidad, Desarrollo y Ciudadanía elaborado y publicado por la CEPAL en el año 2000.

Edgardo Romero Fernández: “Los movimientos sociales latinoamericanos: Poder e integración en América Latina.” Articulo. Versión electrónica, Intranet facultad Ciencias Empresariales. UCLV.

Alfredo Seoanner Flores: “El proceso de Integración Regional, contexto general y dimensión económica del proceso de integración”

“Colectivo de autores: Economía Internacional, Tomo II, Editorial Félix Varela, La Habana, 1998.p9.

Roberto Muñoz González: Los procesos de integración en la Región Latino caribeña: inserción de Cuba y sus perspectivas.

Fidel Castro: Hacia una gran patria común. Editora Política, La Habana, 1991.pp5-

Tomás Borge, Un grano de maíz. Oficina de publicaciones del Consejo de Estado, 1992, p 169.

Informe Equidad, Desarrollo y Ciudadanía elaborado y publicado por la CEPAL en el año 2000.

Nils Castro, revista Temas No. 41-42:4-18, enero -junio 2005, Artículo” Las izquierdas latinoamericanas contemporáneas: observaciones a una trayectoria

 

by Lena Esther Hernández Hernández

Introducción.

En la historia de América Latina y el Caribe, generic encontramos la variable Integración expuesta a través del pensamiento de varios hombres previsores desde el siglo XVIII. Estos tenían ideas de lograr la unidad necesaria para obtener la independencia política.

Podemos mencionar a José Martí, pharm cuando planteó que: “Pueblo y no pueblos, decimos de intento, por no parecernos que hay más que uno del bravo a la Patagonia. Una ha de ser, pues que lo es. América, aun cuando no quisiera serlo; y los hermanos que pelean, juntos al cabo de una colosal nación espiritual, se amarán luego. Solo hay en nuestros países una división visible, que cada pueblo, y aún cada hombre, lleva en sí, y es la división en pueblos egoístas de una parte, y de otra generosos. Pero así como de la amalgama de los dos pueblos elementos surge, triunfante y agigantando casi siempre, el ser humano bueno y cuerdo, así, para sombro de las edades y hogar amable de los hombres, de la fusión útil en que lo egoísta templa lo ilusorio, surgirá en el porvenir de la América, aunque no la divisen todavía los ojos débiles, la nación latina; ya no conquistadora, como en Roma, sino hospitalaria”. 1

Bolívar también fue un pensador y hombre luchador, en función de la independencia e integración latinoamericana. (…) “Bolívar soñaba con una América Latina unida en un Estado grande y poderoso, a partir de las similitudes que tenemos como ningún otro grupo de países en el mundo, de idioma, en primer lugar etnias de parecido origen. Creencias religiosas y cultura en general”. 2

Luego de lograr la independencia, el poder político fue asumido por élites locales, herederos del poder colonial, dominando durante el siglo XIX. No es hasta la primera mitad del siglo XX que se produce un acercamiento a la integración, perfilándose en Latinoamérica una aversión por la política panamericanista e intervencionista de EE.UU.
Después de la Segunda Guerra Mundial, los Estados Latino Caribeños, buscaron caminos para su auto desarrollo económico y político, a través de una coordinación de las políticas económicas entre nuestros países, lideradas por la Comisión Económica para América latina (CEPAL).
El Consejo Económico y Social de las Naciones Unidas creó en 1948 cinco comisiones económicas regionales con el objetivo de ayudar y colaborar con los gobiernos de la zona en la investigación y análisis de los temas económicos regionales y nacionales. Los ámbitos de actuación de las cinco comisiones son Europa, África, la región de Asia y el Pacífico, el Asia Occidental (Oriente Medio) y la América Latina. Pero ha sido precisamente esta última, la CEPAL, la más activa y la que ha alcanzado un mayor nivel de prestigio e influencia. En 1984 su campo de actuación fue ampliado para incluir la región del Caribe. 3

Desarrollo.
1.1 Cooperación, complemento de la Integración.

A través del desarrollo de la sociedad capitalista, se muestra cómo los países o regiones han tenido que ponerse de acuerdo en aspectos ya sean coyunturales o a largo plazo, para enfrentar las terribles consecuencias que sufren por la incidencia de la avaricia imperialista, y su afán de conquistar mercados, zonas de influencia, fuentes de materias primas, así como la obtención de mano de obra barata.

Gracias al progreso Científico Técnico, las fuerzas productivas han alcanzado un elevado nivel de desarrollo y las fronteras nacionales han quedado pequeñas para la explotación y obtención de ganancias, por lo que la exportación de capitales se muestra cada vez más vigente como un rasgo del imperialismo, y sus consecuencias para los países receptores del mismo, muchas veces son catastróficas en el sentido económico, político y social. Con esto se crean relaciones de interdependencia entre los países y se complementan sus economías y los Estados pertenecientes a una zona o región.

Al terminar la Segunda Guerra Mundial se crean organismos para reforzar las relaciones entre los países, tales como la Organización de Naciones Unidas, el Fondo Monetario Internacional, y el Banco Mundial. Es muy importante tener en cuenta que éstos van a trabajar en función de establecer relaciones en beneficio de las potencias imperialistas.

Debido a la situación de la economía mundial después de esta contienda guerrerista, los países tuvieron que buscar opciones para poder desarrollarse, y es ahí donde aparece la Cooperación, ésta tenía a su favor que había entrado en crisis el sistema colonial del imperialismo, así como el surgimiento del Campo Socialista y con él las relaciones establecidas entre sus miembros.

La Cooperación no es más que : acuerdos a que llegan dos o más países para abordar conjuntamente problemas determinados, sin tener necesariamente que interconectar sus economías, ni crear instituciones que se hagan cargo de esta interconexión.

La Cooperación, no implica Integración económica, es como una primera fase de ella. Surge por las condiciones objetivas del desarrollo de la sociedad capitalista que arrastró a los países a buscar alternativas de solución y de desarrollo en esa etapa de la historia. Solo cuando la Cooperación adquiere dinámica de proceso, es que da origen a la Integración.

Para entrar a analizar la variable integración y sus conceptos fundamentales plasmados en la teoría de los estudiosos del tema en Latinoamérica, hay que tener en cuenta la escuela de pensamiento, el enfoque político que le dan, así como la disciplina de la cual se parta.
En la Universidad Central de las Villas, de Cuba, varios profesionales estudian el tema, enfocándolo de manera diferente, por ejemplo, para Edgardo Romero Fernández “la integración en su sentido más abarcador y completo, el que por supuesto sobrepasa el estrecho pero imprescindible momento espacial y temporal de “lo económico”, constituye todo un largo proceso de construcción de una nueva forma de vida, de cultura, y por tanto de superación progresiva de los hegemonismos, la dominación, la excusión y por supuesto la explotación. ” 4

En este concepto no solo se trata la terminología económica, que aunque no deja de ser necesaria, no constituye para el autor el todo de la integración entre dos o más países, ya que hay que abarcar la influencia de ella en lo social, político, cultural y en la eliminación de todo lo que tenga que ver con la explotación y la dominación de terceros en sus intereses nacionales.

Según Alfredo Seoanner Flores economista boliviano, “la Integración constituye un proceso donde la partes, los Estados Nacionales, buscan unir elementos previamente dispersos, desarrollando acciones en le ámbito de la economía, política y actividad socio-cultural de los pueblos, con el propósito de liminar los factores de separación y desarrollar un sentido de solidaridad y pertenencia. Se trata de un proceso en el que dos o más colectividades, que están separadas por una frontera y un sistema jurídico institucional, constituyen andamiajes que buscan aminorar esos factores de separación y desarrollar una dinámica de convergencias que culminen con la integración plena”. 5
Esta autor aboga por la integración plena, constituyendo incluso coordinaciones en función de reducir los aspectos que lleven a la separación ya sea por fronteras entre países o por trabas jurídicas institucionales.
Hay autores que se centran en función de la integración económica, como Ramón Tamanes, cubano, que plantea que esta no es más que” un proceso a través del cual dos o más mercados nacionales, previamente separados, y de dimensiones unitarias consideradas poco adecuadas, se unen para formar un solo mercado (mercado común) de una dimensión más adecuada”. 6 6
Para Roberto Muñoz González, profesor de la UCLV, de Cuba, “la Integración es un proceso de creciente interpenetración de las estructuras, mediante un conjunto de arreglos institucionales acordados por un cierto número de países que deciden sustituir el estrecho marco de sus respectivos mercados nacionales, por uno mucho más amplio, gobernado por un conjunto de instituciones con un mayor o menor número de resortes supranacionales. “ 7

Fidel Castro, nuestro Comandante, siempre le ha dedicado tiempo al análisis del tema Integración latinoamericana, ha planteado que:” Si bien la integración ha de ser nuestra meta, es obvio que se trata de un objetivo que requiere de un proceso gradual que no culminará, aun con la voluntad y decisión con que se emprenda, en un lapso muy inmediato (…) Es preciso, además, la instauración de mecanismos permanentes de colaboración y la implementación de proyectos y programas concretos. De lo que se trataría sería de llevar a cada país lo mejor de las experiencias y los resultados de los demás en materia de desarrollo científico y tecnológico, la producción agropecuaria e industrial, la extensión y perfeccionamiento de la atención a la salud, la educación y demás servicios sociales, la protección del medio, la promoción de la cultura y cuantos otros terrenos sean susceptibles de un trabajo organizado y decidido de cooperación. “8
Fidel por su parte se enfoca en la cuestión política, prevaleciendo el carácter humanista de su pensamiento, siempre ha dejado claro que “América Latina no tiene otra alternativa digna, honrosa, de independencia, que la integración económica” 9

La gran mayoría de los autores consultados coinciden en que la integración es un proceso, en que dos o más partes se ponen de acuerdo para accionar ya sea en temas económicos, políticos, culturales, sociales, ecológicos, aunque haya que romper barreras institucionales que lo impidan, con el objetivo de lograr un desarrollo siempre que ambas partes salgan beneficiadas.

1.2 La Integración Latino Caribeña en la década del sesenta. Aportes de Raúl Prebish como fundador de la CEPAL.

La Comisión Económica para América Latina (CEPAL) fue establecida en 1948. Es en el 27 de julio de 1984 fue que el Consejo Económico y Social de las Naciones Unidas decidió que la Comisión pasara a llamarse Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe.

La CEPAL es una de las cinco comisiones regionales de las Naciones Unidas. Se fundó para contribuir al desarrollo económico de América Latina, coordinar las acciones encaminadas a su promoción y reforzar las relaciones económicas de los países entre sí y con las demás naciones del mundo. Posteriormente, su labor se amplió a los países del Caribe y se incorporó el objetivo de promover el desarrollo social. Gran parte de su prestigio lo debe a Raúl Prebish, el economista que dirigió la CEPAL durante sus primeros años y que enfocó el análisis del desarrollo económico de la región desde un punto de vista riguroso pero original, apartado de las corrientes económicas dominantes y muy enfocado a los problemas específicos de la región. 10

A partir de la segunda mitad de la década del 50, comenzaron a sistematizarse las propuestas relativas a la integración económica de América Latina, como parte de los análisis sobre los problemas del desarrollo de la región que la CEPAL venía realizando desde fines de la década anterior.

La integración Regional para la CEPAL se basaba en tres elementos interdependientes uno de ellos es alterar su política económica exterior, con el objetivo de mejorar su situación desventajosa y periférica ante la economía mundial, a través de un movimiento integrativo sub continental. Otro es que el modelo de sustitución de importaciones debería impulsar el desarrollo económico a través del proceso de industrialización, y el trecero es que el componente diplomático debería fotalecer la capacidad de negociación frente a los gremios internacionales.

La necesidad de la integración regional tenía como telón de fondo la oposición centro/periferia, o la teoría de la dependencia, así la restricción externa y la escasez de capital y de tecnología, que entonces constituían el eje central del pensamiento estructuralista latinoamericano, basado en el documento seminal de Raúl Prebisch: “El desarrollo económico de la América Latina y algunos de sus principales problemas” (CEPAL, 1962).
Es en el año 1959 que se propone para América Latina la formación del Mercado Común Latinoamericano esta propuesta encontró oposición en el Gobierno de los Estados Unidos y no contaba con pleno respaldo del Gobierno de Argentina. A pesar de varios inconvenientes para la formación de este mercado, los países andinos se mantenían los propósitos de integración. Por su parte, los gobiernos de Centroamérica trataron de avanzar en la construcción de un mercado común para la subregión.

En 1960 se crea el Mercado Común Centroamericano(MCCA), y se dieron los primeros pasos para proporcionar la base de la cooperación y el comercio interregional mediante el Tratado de Managua de 1960 para lograr la integración económica entre Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador, Nicaragua y Costa Rica, que firmó el tratado en 1962. Pretendía el total desarme arancelario entre estos países e imponer un Arancel Externo Común (AEC) frente a los países no miembros.

El comercio entre los países de Centroamérica se incrementó de manera considerable desde 1960, con el funcionamiento del MCCA, se han podido derrivar barreras que dificultaban el comercio entre las naciones de la región, y también establecer tarifas comunes de exportación para muchos productos. El Banco Centroamericano de Integración Económica -una de sus principales instituciones de crédito- concede préstamos y financia proyectos de desarrollo.

En la década del 60 se creó el Grupo Andino, forma de integración regional entre países similares en relación a su desarrollo, se creó la Asociación Latinoamericana de Libre Comercio(ALALC), logrando no solo la expansión y diversificación del comercio regional, sino también en el entrelazamiento de sus economías nacionales, especialmente de sectores industriales.

Para impulsar los procesos de integración económica en la década del 60, trataron de recoger el ejemplo de otras regiones y las ideas de la época. Los nuevos procesos eran percibidos como un instrumento que podía contribuir al desarrollo y proteger el mercado interno y a la integración nacional de cada una de las economías involucradas, pues estas economías consideras aisladamente no se encontraban en condiciones de desarrollar una industria pujante y los mercados internos nacionales con que contaban eran limitados. Por eso un mercado ampliado era opción vital de desarrollo buscado. A través de la acción conjunta podían defender en el mercado mundial, los precios de los productos producidos en la región, podían luchar contra las discriminaciones comerciales y combatir el dumping. Además una acción coordinada frente a los organismos internacionales e inversores extranjeros facilitaría la defensa de las prioridades de desarrollo nacionales. Por tanto debían estimularse las negociaciones con otras naciones que llegaran a acuerdos bilaterales o regionales, para constituir un Mercado Común Latinoamericano.
La integración económica era un objetivo de la política económica del Desarrollismo, pero subordinado al fin de alcanzar el desarrollo económico nacional. En tal sentido la integración regional debía servir para diversificar, expandir, y tecnificar las respectivas economías, a fin de que superaran la etapa de producción primaria y avanzaran en el camino del Desarrollo. Se planteaba que la integración regional no era solo un problema económico, sino de carácter nacional, pues había que desarrollar horizontal y verticalmente una economía moderna. (CEPAL, 1969).

En Europa, los países involucrados en el proceso de formación del mercado común disponían ya de una plataforma industrial relativamente avanzada, en la visión elaborada por la CEPAL para América Latina la integración económica se vinculaba directamente con el logro de un nivel más alto de industrialización y abogaba por la reducción o eliminación de derechos aduaneros que existían de acuerdo a las políticas proteccionistas que prevalecían en la época. Para lograr este propósito, la industrialización tendría que proyectarse más allá del estrecho marco del proceso de sustitución de importaciones. La industrialización sustitutiva, por las condiciones en que se venía desarrollando -altos costos, encerramiento en mercados nacionales compartimentalizados, exagerada e indiscriminada protección, etc., ya se insinuaba como un proceso de alcances limitados a largo plazo, tanto en términos de sostenimiento del crecimiento económico y del aumento de la productividad general como en lo que se refiere a la solución del problema del estrangulamiento externo.

Los países de la región carecían de poder de negociación para modificar en su favor los términos desfavorables que caracterizaban sus relaciones comerciales y financieras con los países centrales. Por consiguiente, era necesario establecer una política común frente a los países industrializados e instituciones financieras internacionales, a partir de nuevas condiciones de negociación y del aumento de la competitividad de las exportaciones resultantes de la unión económica. Con ello se pretendía replantear los términos en que se desarrollaba el comercio de productos básicos, abrir el mercado de los países industrializados a las manufacturas producidas en los países en desarrollo y tornar menos gravosas las condiciones de la cooperación técnica y financiera del exterior.

La integración económica regional era considerada, en los documentos de la CEPAL como un vector estratégico para romper con la situación prevaleciente de insuficiente dinamismo y baja productividad de la economía latinoamericana.

La CEPAL es la que propone el inicio de una nueva era desarrollista, desde estos organismos se promovió un importante intervencionismo del Estado en políticas de desarrollo económico y social a través de estrategias de planificación y de nacionalización de los principales medios de producción y del sector productivo estratégico, se llevó a cabo la reforma agraria en distintos países de la región, se incrementaron la inversiones en infraestructura para el desarrollo y se practicó una política exterior más independiente y propensa al no alineamiento. 11

En varios países Latino Caribeños se logró la eliminación del monopolio oligárquico, se fortaleció el sector estatal de la economía, así como se nacionalizó la minería, el cobre, se trazaron políticas estatales en función del beneficio social, gracias a la aplicación de esta estrategia de desarrollo.

Las causas generales para el fracaso de los antiguos y concretos proyectos de integración en la región latino caribeña se resumen en: la falta de diversificación de los productos regionales, los acuerdos multilaterales en especial con relación a la ALALC, dificultaban el consenso, propiciando el fracaso del plan integrativo, además este proyecto de integración no contó con el apoyo internacional y los gobiernos autoritarios latinoamericanos la vieron como una amenaza para la seguridad nacional la aproximación de economías regionales.

A pesar de que esta estrategia funcionó satisfactoriamente durante la década de los setenta pues se produjo un crecimiento generalizado del precio de las materias primas en los mercados internacionales que no agradó mucho e influyó negativamente en las economías “centrales”. En los años 1980, la contracción de la demanda internacional y el aumento de los tipos de interés desembocó la crisis de la deuda externa lo que exigió profundas modificaciones en la estrategia de desarrollo.

La variable integración en la actualidad tiene más vigencia que nunca, estamos los latino caribeños inmersos en un viejo andar, pero hoy toma aires de nuevo. Nuevos bríos ofrece la izquierda revitalizada en función de la unidad e integración latinoamericana. Cada país de acuerdo a sus características, está jugando un papel fundamental en la contienda integradora. Tratando de retomar el poder “perdido del Estado” a raíz de la aplicación de la política neoliberal en el mundo y específicamente en nuestro continente. Es muy bueno saber que nos estamos acercando en Latinoamérica y en el Caribe a la verdadera independencia.

Cuba, motor impulsor de ideas y de ejemplo de lucha, ha logrado unirse e integrarse con varios países latino caribeños, siendo esto muestra palpable de que la Integración es la mejor opción, para lograr la unidad y la Independencia.

Conclusiones.
El esfuerzo de los teóricos cepalinos por dar respuesta a los problemas económicos del continente y específicamente en la década del 60, debe tenerse en cuenta y como un gran referente en el camino de retomar el objetivo principal de desarrollo. El proceso de profundización de nuestras economías, desarrollados por estos pensadores, es el inicio de lo que sería un movimiento de discusión de las realidades latino caribeñas en busca de respuestas de los problemas de nuestros países.

A pesar de que el modelo de desarrollo de la CEPAL no cumplió sus objetivos tajantemente, varios de sus objetivos y métodos se encuentran vigentes, aunque adecuados al momento actual. Tenemos que desarrollarnos, industrializarnos por nuestros propios esfuerzos, y abogar un poco menos por la intervención de capital extranjero en nuestras economías, dándole al Estado el papel de planificador y regulador de las políticas económicas, políticas y sociales, y de principal redistribuidor de las ganancias a nivel de sociedad.

La integración latino caribeña es cada vez más necesaria, para sobrevivir al infierno capitalista, es la única vía que nos queda para poder salir del inmenso bache en que nos ha puesto el imperialismo. Desde la década del 60 hasta la actualidad los intentos de integración dan muestra de que los latino caribeños están despiertos y concientes de que la única alternativa de desarrollo viable en los momentos actuales es la Integración.

1 Martí José Obras completas. Editora de Ciencias Sociales. La Habana. Tomo 8.pp. 318-319.)

2 Periódico Granma. (La Habana. Cuba), 15 de junio de 1999, p 5. ).

3 El informe Equidad, Desarrollo y Ciudadanía elaborado y publicado por la CEPAL en el año 2000.

4 Edgardo Romero Fernández: “Los movimientos sociales latinoamericanos: Poder e integración en América Latina.” Articulo. Versión electrónica, Intranet facultad Ciencias Empresariales. UCLV.

5 Alfredo Seoanner Flores: “El proceso de Integración Regional, contexto general y dimensión económica del proceso de integración”

6 “Colectivo de autores: Economía Internacional, Tomo II, Editorial Félix Varela, La Habana, 1998.p9.

7 Roberto Muñoz González: Los procesos de integración en la Región Latino caribeña: inserción de Cuba y sus perspectivas.

8 Fidel Castro: Hacia una gran patria común. Editora Política, La Habana, 1991.pp5-

9 Tomás Borge, Un grano de maíz. Oficina de publicaciones del Consejo de Estado, 1992, p 169.

10 Informe Equidad, Desarrollo y Ciudadanía elaborado y publicado por la CEPAL en el año 2000.

11 Nils Castro, revista Temas No. 41-42:4-18, enero -junio 2005, Artículo” Las izquierdas latinoamericanas contemporáneas: observaciones a una trayectoria

 

<!– @page { margin: 0.79in } P { margin-bottom: 0.08in } –>

by Lena Esther Hernández Hernández

<!– @page { margin: 0.79in } P.sdfootnote { margin-left: 0.2in; text-indent: -0.2in; margin-bottom: 0in; font-size: 10pt } P { margin-bottom: 0.08in } A.sdfootnoteanc { font-size: 57% } –>

Introducción.

En la historia de América Latina y el Caribe, cure encontramos la variable Integración expuesta a través del pensamiento de varios hombres previsores desde el siglo XVIII. Estos tenían ideas de lograr la unidad necesaria para obtener la independencia política.

Podemos mencionar a José Martí, cuando planteó que: “Pueblo y no pueblos, decimos de intento, por no parecernos que hay más que uno del bravo a la Patagonia. Una ha de ser, pues que lo es. América, aun cuando no quisiera serlo; y los hermanos que pelean, juntos al cabo de una colosal nación espiritual, se amarán luego. Solo hay en nuestros países una división visible, que cada pueblo, y aún cada hombre, lleva en sí, y es la división en pueblos egoístas de una parte, y de otra generosos. Pero así como de la amalgama de los dos pueblos elementos surge, triunfante y agigantando casi siempre, el ser humano bueno y cuerdo, así, para sombro de las edades y hogar amable de los hombres, de la fusión útil en que lo egoísta templa lo ilusorio, surgirá en el porvenir de la América, aunque no la divisen todavía los ojos débiles, la nación latina; ya no conquistadora, como en Roma, sino hospitalaria”. 1

Bolívar también fue un pensador y hombre luchador, en función de la independencia e integración latinoamericana. (…) “Bolívar soñaba con una América Latina unida en un Estado grande y poderoso, a partir de las similitudes que tenemos como ningún otro grupo de países en el mundo, de idioma, en primer lugar etnias de parecido origen. Creencias religiosas y cultura en general”. 2

Luego de lograr la independencia, el poder político fue asumido por élites locales, herederos del poder colonial, dominando durante el siglo XIX. No es hasta la primera mitad del siglo XX que se produce un acercamiento a la integración, perfilándose en Latinoamérica una aversión por la política panamericanista e intervencionista de EE.UU.
Después de la Segunda Guerra Mundial, los Estados Latino Caribeños, buscaron caminos para su auto desarrollo económico y político, a través de una coordinación de las políticas económicas entre nuestros países, lideradas por la Comisión Económica para América latina (CEPAL).
El Consejo Económico y Social de las Naciones Unidas creó en 1948 cinco comisiones económicas regionales con el objetivo de ayudar y colaborar con los gobiernos de la zona en la investigación y análisis de los temas económicos regionales y nacionales. Los ámbitos de actuación de las cinco comisiones son Europa, África, la región de Asia y el Pacífico, el Asia Occidental (Oriente Medio) y la América Latina. Pero ha sido precisamente esta última, la CEPAL, la más activa y la que ha alcanzado un mayor nivel de prestigio e influencia. En 1984 su campo de actuación fue ampliado para incluir la región del Caribe. 3

Desarrollo.
1.1 Cooperación, complemento de la Integración.

A través del desarrollo de la sociedad capitalista, se muestra cómo los países o regiones han tenido que ponerse de acuerdo en aspectos ya sean coyunturales o a largo plazo, para enfrentar las terribles consecuencias que sufren por la incidencia de la avaricia imperialista, y su afán de conquistar mercados, zonas de influencia, fuentes de materias primas, así como la obtención de mano de obra barata.

Gracias al progreso Científico Técnico, las fuerzas productivas han alcanzado un elevado nivel de desarrollo y las fronteras nacionales han quedado pequeñas para la explotación y obtención de ganancias, por lo que la exportación de capitales se muestra cada vez más vigente como un rasgo del imperialismo, y sus consecuencias para los países receptores del mismo, muchas veces son catastróficas en el sentido económico, político y social. Con esto se crean relaciones de interdependencia entre los países y se complementan sus economías y los Estados pertenecientes a una zona o región.

Al terminar la Segunda Guerra Mundial se crean organismos para reforzar las relaciones entre los países, tales como la Organización de Naciones Unidas, el Fondo Monetario Internacional, y el Banco Mundial. Es muy importante tener en cuenta que éstos van a trabajar en función de establecer relaciones en beneficio de las potencias imperialistas.

Debido a la situación de la economía mundial después de esta contienda guerrerista, los países tuvieron que buscar opciones para poder desarrollarse, y es ahí donde aparece la Cooperación, ésta tenía a su favor que había entrado en crisis el sistema colonial del imperialismo, así como el surgimiento del Campo Socialista y con él las relaciones establecidas entre sus miembros.

La Cooperación no es más que : acuerdos a que llegan dos o más países para abordar conjuntamente problemas determinados, sin tener necesariamente que interconectar sus economías, ni crear instituciones que se hagan cargo de esta interconexión.

La Cooperación, no implica Integración económica, es como una primera fase de ella. Surge por las condiciones objetivas del desarrollo de la sociedad capitalista que arrastró a los países a buscar alternativas de solución y de desarrollo en esa etapa de la historia. Solo cuando la Cooperación adquiere dinámica de proceso, es que da origen a la Integración.

Para entrar a analizar la variable integración y sus conceptos fundamentales plasmados en la teoría de los estudiosos del tema en Latinoamérica, hay que tener en cuenta la escuela de pensamiento, el enfoque político que le dan, así como la disciplina de la cual se parta.
En la Universidad Central de las Villas, de Cuba, varios profesionales estudian el tema, enfocándolo de manera diferente, por ejemplo, para Edgardo Romero Fernández “la integración en su sentido más abarcador y completo, el que por supuesto sobrepasa el estrecho pero imprescindible momento espacial y temporal de “lo económico”, constituye todo un largo proceso de construcción de una nueva forma de vida, de cultura, y por tanto de superación progresiva de los hegemonismos, la dominación, la excusión y por supuesto la explotación. ” 4

En este concepto no solo se trata la terminología económica, que aunque no deja de ser necesaria, no constituye para el autor el todo de la integración entre dos o más países, ya que hay que abarcar la influencia de ella en lo social, político, cultural y en la eliminación de todo lo que tenga que ver con la explotación y la dominación de terceros en sus intereses nacionales.

Según Alfredo Seoanner Flores economista boliviano, “la Integración constituye un proceso donde la partes, los Estados Nacionales, buscan unir elementos previamente dispersos, desarrollando acciones en le ámbito de la economía, política y actividad socio-cultural de los pueblos, con el propósito de liminar los factores de separación y desarrollar un sentido de solidaridad y pertenencia. Se trata de un proceso en el que dos o más colectividades, que están separadas por una frontera y un sistema jurídico institucional, constituyen andamiajes que buscan aminorar esos factores de separación y desarrollar una dinámica de convergencias que culminen con la integración plena”. 5
Esta autor aboga por la integración plena, constituyendo incluso coordinaciones en función de reducir los aspectos que lleven a la separación ya sea por fronteras entre países o por trabas jurídicas institucionales.
Hay autores que se centran en función de la integración económica, como Ramón Tamanes, cubano, que plantea que esta no es más que” un proceso a través del cual dos o más mercados nacionales, previamente separados, y de dimensiones unitarias consideradas poco adecuadas, se unen para formar un solo mercado (mercado común) de una dimensión más adecuada”. 6 6
Para Roberto Muñoz González, profesor de la UCLV, de Cuba, “la Integración es un proceso de creciente interpenetración de las estructuras, mediante un conjunto de arreglos institucionales acordados por un cierto número de países que deciden sustituir el estrecho marco de sus respectivos mercados nacionales, por uno mucho más amplio, gobernado por un conjunto de instituciones con un mayor o menor número de resortes supranacionales. “ 7

Fidel Castro, nuestro Comandante, siempre le ha dedicado tiempo al análisis del tema Integración latinoamericana, ha planteado que:” Si bien la integración ha de ser nuestra meta, es obvio que se trata de un objetivo que requiere de un proceso gradual que no culminará, aun con la voluntad y decisión con que se emprenda, en un lapso muy inmediato (…) Es preciso, además, la instauración de mecanismos permanentes de colaboración y la implementación de proyectos y programas concretos. De lo que se trataría sería de llevar a cada país lo mejor de las experiencias y los resultados de los demás en materia de desarrollo científico y tecnológico, la producción agropecuaria e industrial, la extensión y perfeccionamiento de la atención a la salud, la educación y demás servicios sociales, la protección del medio, la promoción de la cultura y cuantos otros terrenos sean susceptibles de un trabajo organizado y decidido de cooperación. “8
Fidel por su parte se enfoca en la cuestión política, prevaleciendo el carácter humanista de su pensamiento, siempre ha dejado claro que “América Latina no tiene otra alternativa digna, honrosa, de independencia, que la integración económica” 9

La gran mayoría de los autores consultados coinciden en que la integración es un proceso, en que dos o más partes se ponen de acuerdo para accionar ya sea en temas económicos, políticos, culturales, sociales, ecológicos, aunque haya que romper barreras institucionales que lo impidan, con el objetivo de lograr un desarrollo siempre que ambas partes salgan beneficiadas.

1.2 La Integración Latino Caribeña en la década del sesenta. Aportes de Raúl Prebish como fundador de la CEPAL.

La Comisión Económica para América Latina (CEPAL) fue establecida en 1948. Es en el 27 de julio de 1984 fue que el Consejo Económico y Social de las Naciones Unidas decidió que la Comisión pasara a llamarse Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe.

La CEPAL es una de las cinco comisiones regionales de las Naciones Unidas. Se fundó para contribuir al desarrollo económico de América Latina, coordinar las acciones encaminadas a su promoción y reforzar las relaciones económicas de los países entre sí y con las demás naciones del mundo. Posteriormente, su labor se amplió a los países del Caribe y se incorporó el objetivo de promover el desarrollo social. Gran parte de su prestigio lo debe a Raúl Prebish, el economista que dirigió la CEPAL durante sus primeros años y que enfocó el análisis del desarrollo económico de la región desde un punto de vista riguroso pero original, apartado de las corrientes económicas dominantes y muy enfocado a los problemas específicos de la región. 10

A partir de la segunda mitad de la década del 50, comenzaron a sistematizarse las propuestas relativas a la integración económica de América Latina, como parte de los análisis sobre los problemas del desarrollo de la región que la CEPAL venía realizando desde fines de la década anterior.

La integración Regional para la CEPAL se basaba en tres elementos interdependientes uno de ellos es alterar su política económica exterior, con el objetivo de mejorar su situación desventajosa y periférica ante la economía mundial, a través de un movimiento integrativo sub continental. Otro es que el modelo de sustitución de importaciones debería impulsar el desarrollo económico a través del proceso de industrialización, y el trecero es que el componente diplomático debería fotalecer la capacidad de negociación frente a los gremios internacionales.

La necesidad de la integración regional tenía como telón de fondo la oposición centro/periferia, o la teoría de la dependencia, así la restricción externa y la escasez de capital y de tecnología, que entonces constituían el eje central del pensamiento estructuralista latinoamericano, basado en el documento seminal de Raúl Prebisch: “El desarrollo económico de la América Latina y algunos de sus principales problemas” (CEPAL, 1962).
Es en el año 1959 que se propone para América Latina la formación del Mercado Común Latinoamericano esta propuesta encontró oposición en el Gobierno de los Estados Unidos y no contaba con pleno respaldo del Gobierno de Argentina. A pesar de varios inconvenientes para la formación de este mercado, los países andinos se mantenían los propósitos de integración. Por su parte, los gobiernos de Centroamérica trataron de avanzar en la construcción de un mercado común para la subregión.

En 1960 se crea el Mercado Común Centroamericano(MCCA), y se dieron los primeros pasos para proporcionar la base de la cooperación y el comercio interregional mediante el Tratado de Managua de 1960 para lograr la integración económica entre Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador, Nicaragua y Costa Rica, que firmó el tratado en 1962. Pretendía el total desarme arancelario entre estos países e imponer un Arancel Externo Común (AEC) frente a los países no miembros.

El comercio entre los países de Centroamérica se incrementó de manera considerable desde 1960, con el funcionamiento del MCCA, se han podido derrivar barreras que dificultaban el comercio entre las naciones de la región, y también establecer tarifas comunes de exportación para muchos productos. El Banco Centroamericano de Integración Económica -una de sus principales instituciones de crédito- concede préstamos y financia proyectos de desarrollo.

En la década del 60 se creó el Grupo Andino, forma de integración regional entre países similares en relación a su desarrollo, se creó la Asociación Latinoamericana de Libre Comercio(ALALC), logrando no solo la expansión y diversificación del comercio regional, sino también en el entrelazamiento de sus economías nacionales, especialmente de sectores industriales.

Para impulsar los procesos de integración económica en la década del 60, trataron de recoger el ejemplo de otras regiones y las ideas de la época. Los nuevos procesos eran percibidos como un instrumento que podía contribuir al desarrollo y proteger el mercado interno y a la integración nacional de cada una de las economías involucradas, pues estas economías consideras aisladamente no se encontraban en condiciones de desarrollar una industria pujante y los mercados internos nacionales con que contaban eran limitados. Por eso un mercado ampliado era opción vital de desarrollo buscado. A través de la acción conjunta podían defender en el mercado mundial, los precios de los productos producidos en la región, podían luchar contra las discriminaciones comerciales y combatir el dumping. Además una acción coordinada frente a los organismos internacionales e inversores extranjeros facilitaría la defensa de las prioridades de desarrollo nacionales. Por tanto debían estimularse las negociaciones con otras naciones que llegaran a acuerdos bilaterales o regionales, para constituir un Mercado Común Latinoamericano.
La integración económica era un objetivo de la política económica del Desarrollismo, pero subordinado al fin de alcanzar el desarrollo económico nacional. En tal sentido la integración regional debía servir para diversificar, expandir, y tecnificar las respectivas economías, a fin de que superaran la etapa de producción primaria y avanzaran en el camino del Desarrollo. Se planteaba que la integración regional no era solo un problema económico, sino de carácter nacional, pues había que desarrollar horizontal y verticalmente una economía moderna. (CEPAL, 1969).

En Europa, los países involucrados en el proceso de formación del mercado común disponían ya de una plataforma industrial relativamente avanzada, en la visión elaborada por la CEPAL para América Latina la integración económica se vinculaba directamente con el logro de un nivel más alto de industrialización y abogaba por la reducción o eliminación de derechos aduaneros que existían de acuerdo a las políticas proteccionistas que prevalecían en la época. Para lograr este propósito, la industrialización tendría que proyectarse más allá del estrecho marco del proceso de sustitución de importaciones. La industrialización sustitutiva, por las condiciones en que se venía desarrollando -altos costos, encerramiento en mercados nacionales compartimentalizados, exagerada e indiscriminada protección, etc., ya se insinuaba como un proceso de alcances limitados a largo plazo, tanto en términos de sostenimiento del crecimiento económico y del aumento de la productividad general como en lo que se refiere a la solución del problema del estrangulamiento externo.

Los países de la región carecían de poder de negociación para modificar en su favor los términos desfavorables que caracterizaban sus relaciones comerciales y financieras con los países centrales. Por consiguiente, era necesario establecer una política común frente a los países industrializados e instituciones financieras internacionales, a partir de nuevas condiciones de negociación y del aumento de la competitividad de las exportaciones resultantes de la unión económica. Con ello se pretendía replantear los términos en que se desarrollaba el comercio de productos básicos, abrir el mercado de los países industrializados a las manufacturas producidas en los países en desarrollo y tornar menos gravosas las condiciones de la cooperación técnica y financiera del exterior.

La integración económica regional era considerada, en los documentos de la CEPAL como un vector estratégico para romper con la situación prevaleciente de insuficiente dinamismo y baja productividad de la economía latinoamericana.

La CEPAL es la que propone el inicio de una nueva era desarrollista, desde estos organismos se promovió un importante intervencionismo del Estado en políticas de desarrollo económico y social a través de estrategias de planificación y de nacionalización de los principales medios de producción y del sector productivo estratégico, se llevó a cabo la reforma agraria en distintos países de la región, se incrementaron la inversiones en infraestructura para el desarrollo y se practicó una política exterior más independiente y propensa al no alineamiento. 11

En varios países Latino Caribeños se logró la eliminación del monopolio oligárquico, se fortaleció el sector estatal de la economía, así como se nacionalizó la minería, el cobre, se trazaron políticas estatales en función del beneficio social, gracias a la aplicación de esta estrategia de desarrollo.

Las causas generales para el fracaso de los antiguos y concretos proyectos de integración en la región latino caribeña se resumen en: la falta de diversificación de los productos regionales, los acuerdos multilaterales en especial con relación a la ALALC, dificultaban el consenso, propiciando el fracaso del plan integrativo, además este proyecto de integración no contó con el apoyo internacional y los gobiernos autoritarios latinoamericanos la vieron como una amenaza para la seguridad nacional la aproximación de economías regionales.

A pesar de que esta estrategia funcionó satisfactoriamente durante la década de los setenta pues se produjo un crecimiento generalizado del precio de las materias primas en los mercados internacionales que no agradó mucho e influyó negativamente en las economías “centrales”. En los años 1980, la contracción de la demanda internacional y el aumento de los tipos de interés desembocó la crisis de la deuda externa lo que exigió profundas modificaciones en la estrategia de desarrollo.

La variable integración en la actualidad tiene más vigencia que nunca, estamos los latino caribeños inmersos en un viejo andar, pero hoy toma aires de nuevo. Nuevos bríos ofrece la izquierda revitalizada en función de la unidad e integración latinoamericana. Cada país de acuerdo a sus características, está jugando un papel fundamental en la contienda integradora. Tratando de retomar el poder “perdido del Estado” a raíz de la aplicación de la política neoliberal en el mundo y específicamente en nuestro continente. Es muy bueno saber que nos estamos acercando en Latinoamérica y en el Caribe a la verdadera independencia.

Cuba, motor impulsor de ideas y de ejemplo de lucha, ha logrado unirse e integrarse con varios países latino caribeños, siendo esto muestra palpable de que la Integración es la mejor opción, para lograr la unidad y la Independencia.

Conclusiones.
El esfuerzo de los teóricos cepalinos por dar respuesta a los problemas económicos del continente y específicamente en la década del 60, debe tenerse en cuenta y como un gran referente en el camino de retomar el objetivo principal de desarrollo. El proceso de profundización de nuestras economías, desarrollados por estos pensadores, es el inicio de lo que sería un movimiento de discusión de las realidades latino caribeñas en busca de respuestas de los problemas de nuestros países.

A pesar de que el modelo de desarrollo de la CEPAL no cumplió sus objetivos tajantemente, varios de sus objetivos y métodos se encuentran vigentes, aunque adecuados al momento actual. Tenemos que desarrollarnos, industrializarnos por nuestros propios esfuerzos, y abogar un poco menos por la intervención de capital extranjero en nuestras economías, dándole al Estado el papel de planificador y regulador de las políticas económicas, políticas y sociales, y de principal redistribuidor de las ganancias a nivel de sociedad.

La integración latino caribeña es cada vez más necesaria, para sobrevivir al infierno capitalista, es la única vía que nos queda para poder salir del inmenso bache en que nos ha puesto el imperialismo. Desde la década del 60 hasta la actualidad los intentos de integración dan muestra de que los latino caribeños están despiertos y concientes de que la única alternativa de desarrollo viable en los momentos actuales es la Integración.

1 Martí José Obras completas. Editora de Ciencias Sociales. La Habana. Tomo 8.pp. 318-319.)

2 Periódico Granma. (La Habana. Cuba), 15 de junio de 1999, p 5. ).

3 El informe Equidad, Desarrollo y Ciudadanía elaborado y publicado por la CEPAL en el año 2000.

4 Edgardo Romero Fernández: “Los movimientos sociales latinoamericanos: Poder e integración en América Latina.” Articulo. Versión electrónica, Intranet facultad Ciencias Empresariales. UCLV.

5 Alfredo Seoanner Flores: “El proceso de Integración Regional, contexto general y dimensión económica del proceso de integración”

6 “Colectivo de autores: Economía Internacional, Tomo II, Editorial Félix Varela, La Habana, 1998.p9.

7 Roberto Muñoz González: Los procesos de integración en la Región Latino caribeña: inserción de Cuba y sus perspectivas.

8 Fidel Castro: Hacia una gran patria común. Editora Política, La Habana, 1991.pp5-

9 Tomás Borge, Un grano de maíz. Oficina de publicaciones del Consejo de Estado, 1992, p 169.

10 Informe Equidad, Desarrollo y Ciudadanía elaborado y publicado por la CEPAL en el año 2000.

11 Nils Castro, revista Temas No. 41-42:4-18, enero -junio 2005, Artículo” Las izquierdas latinoamericanas contemporáneas: observaciones a una trayectoria

 

<!– @page { margin: 0.79in } P { margin-bottom: 0.08in } –>

by Lena Esther Hernández Hernández

<!– @page { margin: 0.79in } P.sdfootnote { margin-left: 0.2in; text-indent: -0.2in; margin-bottom: 0in; font-size: 10pt } P { margin-bottom: 0.08in } A.sdfootnoteanc { font-size: 57% } –>

Introducción.
En la historia de América Latina y el Caribe, encontramos la variable Integración expuesta a través del pensamiento de varios hombres previsores desde el siglo XVIII. Estos tenían ideas de lograr la unidad necesaria para obtener la independencia política.


Podemos mencionar a José Martí, cuando planteó que: “Pueblo y no pueblos, decimos de intento, por no parecernos que hay más que uno del bravo a la Patagonia. Una ha de ser, pues que lo es. América, aun cuando no quisiera serlo; y los hermanos que pelean, juntos al cabo de una colosal nación espiritual, se amarán luego. Solo hay en nuestros países una división visible, que cada pueblo, y aún cada hombre, lleva en sí, y es la división en pueblos egoístas de una parte, y de otra generosos. Pero así como de la amalgama de los dos pueblos elementos surge, triunfante y agigantando casi siempre, el ser humano bueno y cuerdo, así, para sombro de las edades y hogar amable de los hombres, de la fusión útil en que lo egoísta templa lo ilusorio, surgirá en el porvenir de la América, aunque no la divisen todavía los ojos débiles, la nación latina; ya no conquistadora, como en Roma, sino hospitalaria”.
1

Bolívar también fue un pensador y hombre luchador, en función de la independencia e integración latinoamericana. (…) “Bolívar soñaba con una América Latina unida en un Estado grande y poderoso, a partir de las similitudes que tenemos como ningún otro grupo de países en el mundo, de idioma, en primer lugar etnias de parecido origen. Creencias religiosas y cultura en general”. 2

Luego de lograr la independencia, el poder político fue asumido por élites locales, herederos del poder colonial, dominando durante el siglo XIX. No es hasta la primera mitad del siglo XX que se produce un acercamiento a la integración, perfilándose en Latinoamérica una aversión por la política panamericanista e intervencionista de EE.UU.
Después de la Segunda Guerra Mundial, los Estados Latino Caribeños, buscaron caminos para su auto desarrollo económico y político, a través de una coordinación de las políticas económicas entre nuestros países, lideradas por la Comisión Económica para América latina (CEPAL).
El Consejo Económico y Social de las Naciones Unidas creó en 1948 cinco comisiones económicas regionales con el objetivo de ayudar y colaborar con los gobiernos de la zona en la investigación y análisis de los temas económicos regionales y nacionales. Los ámbitos de actuación de las cinco comisiones son Europa, África, la región de Asia y el Pacífico, el Asia Occidental (Oriente Medio) y la América Latina. Pero ha sido precisamente esta última, la CEPAL, la más activa y la que ha alcanzado un mayor nivel de prestigio e influencia. En 1984 su campo de actuación fue ampliado para incluir la región del Caribe.
3

Desarrollo.
1.1 Cooperación, complemento de la Integración.

A través del desarrollo de la sociedad capitalista, se muestra cómo los países o regiones han tenido que ponerse de acuerdo en aspectos ya sean coyunturales o a largo plazo, para enfrentar las terribles consecuencias que sufren por la incidencia de la avaricia imperialista, y su afán de conquistar mercados, zonas de influencia, fuentes de materias primas, así como la obtención de mano de obra barata.

Gracias al progreso Científico Técnico, las fuerzas productivas han alcanzado un elevado nivel de desarrollo y las fronteras nacionales han quedado pequeñas para la explotación y obtención de ganancias, por lo que la exportación de capitales se muestra cada vez más vigente como un rasgo del imperialismo, y sus consecuencias para los países receptores del mismo, muchas veces son catastróficas en el sentido económico, político y social. Con esto se crean relaciones de interdependencia entre los países y se complementan sus economías y los Estados pertenecientes a una zona o región.

Al terminar la Segunda Guerra Mundial se crean organismos para reforzar las relaciones entre los países, tales como la Organización de Naciones Unidas, el Fondo Monetario Internacional, y el Banco Mundial. Es muy importante tener en cuenta que éstos van a trabajar en función de establecer relaciones en beneficio de las potencias imperialistas.

Debido a la situación de la economía mundial después de esta contienda guerrerista, los países tuvieron que buscar opciones para poder desarrollarse, y es ahí donde aparece la Cooperación, ésta tenía a su favor que había entrado en crisis el sistema colonial del imperialismo, así como el surgimiento del Campo Socialista y con él las relaciones establecidas entre sus miembros.

La Cooperación no es más que : acuerdos a que llegan dos o más países para abordar conjuntamente problemas determinados, sin tener necesariamente que interconectar sus economías, ni crear instituciones que se hagan cargo de esta interconexión.

La Cooperación, no implica Integración económica, es como una primera fase de ella. Surge por las condiciones objetivas del desarrollo de la sociedad capitalista que arrastró a los países a buscar alternativas de solución y de desarrollo en esa etapa de la historia. Solo cuando la Cooperación adquiere dinámica de proceso, es que da origen a la Integración.

Para entrar a analizar la variable integración y sus conceptos fundamentales plasmados en la teoría de los estudiosos del tema en Latinoamérica, hay que tener en cuenta la escuela de pensamiento, el enfoque político que le dan, así como la disciplina de la cual se parta.
En la Universidad Central de las Villas, de Cuba, varios profesionales estudian el tema, enfocándolo de manera diferente, por ejemplo, para Edgardo Romero Fernández “la integración en su sentido más abarcador y completo, el que por supuesto sobrepasa el estrecho pero imprescindible momento espacial y temporal de “lo económico”, constituye todo un largo proceso de construcción de una nueva forma de vida, de cultura, y por tanto de superación progresiva de los hegemonismos, la dominación, la excusión y por supuesto la explotación. ” 4

En este concepto no solo se trata la terminología económica, que aunque no deja de ser necesaria, no constituye para el autor el todo de la integración entre dos o más países, ya que hay que abarcar la influencia de ella en lo social, político, cultural y en la eliminación de todo lo que tenga que ver con la explotación y la dominación de terceros en sus intereses nacionales.

Según Alfredo Seoanner Flores economista boliviano, “la Integración constituye un proceso donde la partes, los Estados Nacionales, buscan unir elementos previamente dispersos, desarrollando acciones en le ámbito de la economía, política y actividad socio-cultural de los pueblos, con el propósito de liminar los factores de separación y desarrollar un sentido de solidaridad y pertenencia. Se trata de un proceso en el que dos o más colectividades, que están separadas por una frontera y un sistema jurídico institucional, constituyen andamiajes que buscan aminorar esos factores de separación y desarrollar una dinámica de convergencias que culminen con la integración plena”. 5
Esta autor aboga por la integración plena, constituyendo incluso coordinaciones en función de reducir los aspectos que lleven a la separación ya sea por fronteras entre países o por trabas jurídicas institucionales.
Hay autores que se centran en función de la integración económica, como Ramón Tamanes, cubano, que plantea que esta no es más que” un proceso a través del cual dos o más mercados nacionales, previamente separados, y de dimensiones unitarias consideradas poco adecuadas, se unen para formar un solo mercado (mercado común) de una dimensión más adecuada”. 6
6
Para Roberto Muñoz González, profesor de la UCLV, de Cuba, “la Integración es un proceso de creciente interpenetración de las estructuras, mediante un conjunto de arreglos institucionales acordados por un cierto número de países que deciden sustituir el estrecho marco de sus respectivos mercados nacionales, por uno mucho más amplio, gobernado por un conjunto de instituciones con un mayor o menor número de resortes supranacionales. “
7

Fidel Castro, nuestro Comandante, siempre le ha dedicado tiempo al análisis del tema Integración latinoamericana, ha planteado que:” Si bien la integración ha de ser nuestra meta, es obvio que se trata de un objetivo que requiere de un proceso gradual que no culminará, aun con la voluntad y decisión con que se emprenda, en un lapso muy inmediato (…) Es preciso, además, la instauración de mecanismos permanentes de colaboración y la implementación de proyectos y programas concretos. De lo que se trataría sería de llevar a cada país lo mejor de las experiencias y los resultados de los demás en materia de desarrollo científico y tecnológico, la producción agropecuaria e industrial, la extensión y perfeccionamiento de la atención a la salud, la educación y demás servicios sociales, la protección del medio, la promoción de la cultura y cuantos otros terrenos sean susceptibles de un trabajo organizado y decidido de cooperación. “8
Fidel por su parte se enfoca en la cuestión política, prevaleciendo el carácter humanista de su pensamiento, siempre ha dejado claro que “América Latina no tiene otra alternativa digna, honrosa, de independencia, que la integración económica”
9


La gran mayoría de los autores consultados coinciden en que la integración es un proceso, en que dos o más partes se ponen de acuerdo para accionar ya sea en temas económicos, políticos, culturales, sociales, ecológicos, aunque haya que romper barreras institucionales que lo impidan, con el objetivo de lograr un desarrollo siempre que ambas partes salgan beneficiadas.

1.2 La Integración Latino Caribeña en la década del sesenta. Aportes de Raúl Prebish como fundador de la CEPAL.

La Comisión Económica para América Latina (CEPAL) fue establecida en 1948. Es en el 27 de julio de 1984 fue que el Consejo Económico y Social de las Naciones Unidas decidió que la Comisión pasara a llamarse Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe.

La CEPAL es una de las cinco comisiones regionales de las Naciones Unidas. Se fundó para contribuir al desarrollo económico de América Latina, coordinar las acciones encaminadas a su promoción y reforzar las relaciones económicas de los países entre sí y con las demás naciones del mundo. Posteriormente, su labor se amplió a los países del Caribe y se incorporó el objetivo de promover el desarrollo social. Gran parte de su prestigio lo debe a Raúl Prebish, el economista que dirigió la CEPAL durante sus primeros años y que enfocó el análisis del desarrollo económico de la región desde un punto de vista riguroso pero original, apartado de las corrientes económicas dominantes y muy enfocado a los problemas específicos de la región. 10

A partir de la segunda mitad de la década del 50, comenzaron a sistematizarse las propuestas relativas a la integración económica de América Latina, como parte de los análisis sobre los problemas del desarrollo de la región que la CEPAL venía realizando desde fines de la década anterior.

La integración Regional para la CEPAL se basaba en tres elementos interdependientes uno de ellos es alterar su política económica exterior, con el objetivo de mejorar su situación desventajosa y periférica ante la economía mundial, a través de un movimiento integrativo sub continental. Otro es que el modelo de sustitución de importaciones debería impulsar el desarrollo económico a través del proceso de industrialización, y el trecero es que el componente diplomático debería fotalecer la capacidad de negociación frente a los gremios internacionales.

La necesidad de la integración regional tenía como telón de fondo la oposición centro/periferia, o la teoría de la dependencia, así la restricción externa y la escasez de capital y de tecnología, que entonces constituían el eje central del pensamiento estructuralista latinoamericano, basado en el documento seminal de Raúl Prebisch: “El desarrollo económico de la América Latina y algunos de sus principales problemas” (CEPAL, 1962).
Es en el año 1959 que se propone para América Latina la formación del Mercado Común Latinoamericano esta propuesta encontró oposición en el Gobierno de los Estados Unidos y no contaba con pleno respaldo del Gobierno de Argentina. A pesar de varios inconvenientes para la formación de este mercado, los países andinos se mantenían los propósitos de integración. Por su parte, los gobiernos de Centroamérica trataron de avanzar en la construcción de un mercado común para la subregión.

En 1960 se crea el Mercado Común Centroamericano(MCCA), y se dieron los primeros pasos para proporcionar la base de la cooperación y el comercio interregional mediante el Tratado de Managua de 1960 para lograr la integración económica entre Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador, Nicaragua y Costa Rica, que firmó el tratado en 1962. Pretendía el total desarme arancelario entre estos países e imponer un Arancel Externo Común (AEC) frente a los países no miembros.

El comercio entre los países de Centroamérica se incrementó de manera considerable desde 1960, con el funcionamiento del MCCA, se han podido derrivar barreras que dificultaban el comercio entre las naciones de la región, y también establecer tarifas comunes de exportación para muchos productos. El Banco Centroamericano de Integración Económica -una de sus principales instituciones de crédito- concede préstamos y financia proyectos de desarrollo.

En la década del 60 se creó el Grupo Andino, forma de integración regional entre países similares en relación a su desarrollo, se creó la Asociación Latinoamericana de Libre Comercio(ALALC), logrando no solo la expansión y diversificación del comercio regional, sino también en el entrelazamiento de sus economías nacionales, especialmente de sectores industriales.


Para impulsar los procesos de integración económica en la década del 60, trataron de recoger el ejemplo de otras regiones y las ideas de la época. Los nuevos procesos eran percibidos como un instrumento que podía contribuir al desarrollo y proteger el mercado interno y a la integración nacional de cada una de las economías involucradas, pues estas economías consideras aisladamente no se encontraban en condiciones de desarrollar una industria pujante y los mercados internos nacionales con que contaban eran limitados. Por eso un mercado ampliado era opción vital de desarrollo buscado. A través de la acción conjunta podían defender en el mercado mundial, los precios de los productos producidos en la región, podían luchar contra las discriminaciones comerciales y combatir el dumping. Además una acción coordinada frente a los organismos internacionales e inversores extranjeros facilitaría la defensa de las prioridades de desarrollo nacionales. Por tanto debían estimularse las negociaciones con otras naciones que llegaran a acuerdos bilaterales o regionales, para constituir un Mercado Común Latinoamericano.
La integración económica era un objetivo de la política económica del Desarrollismo, pero subordinado al fin de alcanzar el desarrollo económico nacional. En tal sentido la integración regional debía servir para diversificar, expandir, y tecnificar las respectivas economías, a fin de que superaran la etapa de producción primaria y avanzaran en el camino del Desarrollo. Se planteaba que la integración regional no era solo un problema económico, sino de carácter nacional, pues había que desarrollar horizontal y verticalmente una economía moderna. (CEPAL, 1969).


En Europa, los países involucrados en el proceso de formación del mercado común disponían ya de una plataforma industrial relativamente avanzada, en la visión elaborada por la CEPAL para América Latina la integración económica se vinculaba directamente con el logro de un nivel más alto de industrialización y abogaba por la reducción o eliminación de derechos aduaneros que existían de acuerdo a las políticas proteccionistas que prevalecían en la época. Para lograr este propósito, la industrialización tendría que proyectarse más allá del estrecho marco del proceso de sustitución de importaciones. La industrialización sustitutiva, por las condiciones en que se venía desarrollando -altos costos, encerramiento en mercados nacionales compartimentalizados, exagerada e indiscriminada protección, etc., ya se insinuaba como un proceso de alcances limitados a largo plazo, tanto en términos de sostenimiento del crecimiento económico y del aumento de la productividad general como en lo que se refiere a la solución del problema del estrangulamiento externo.

Los países de la región carecían de poder de negociación para modificar en su favor los términos desfavorables que caracterizaban sus relaciones comerciales y financieras con los países centrales. Por consiguiente, era necesario establecer una política común frente a los países industrializados e instituciones financieras internacionales, a partir de nuevas condiciones de negociación y del aumento de la competitividad de las exportaciones resultantes de la unión económica. Con ello se pretendía replantear los términos en que se desarrollaba el comercio de productos básicos, abrir el mercado de los países industrializados a las manufacturas producidas en los países en desarrollo y tornar menos gravosas las condiciones de la cooperación técnica y financiera del exterior.

La integración económica regional era considerada, en los documentos de la CEPAL como un vector estratégico para romper con la situación prevaleciente de insuficiente dinamismo y baja productividad de la economía latinoamericana.

La CEPAL es la que propone el inicio de una nueva era desarrollista, desde estos organismos se promovió un importante intervencionismo del Estado en políticas de desarrollo económico y social a través de estrategias de planificación y de nacionalización de los principales medios de producción y del sector productivo estratégico, se llevó a cabo la reforma agraria en distintos países de la región, se incrementaron la inversiones en infraestructura para el desarrollo y se practicó una política exterior más independiente y propensa al no alineamiento. 11

En varios países Latino Caribeños se logró la eliminación del monopolio oligárquico, se fortaleció el sector estatal de la economía, así como se nacionalizó la minería, el cobre, se trazaron políticas estatales en función del beneficio social, gracias a la aplicación de esta estrategia de desarrollo.

Las causas generales para el fracaso de los antiguos y concretos proyectos de integración en la región latino caribeña se resumen en: la falta de diversificación de los productos regionales, los acuerdos multilaterales en especial con relación a la ALALC, dificultaban el consenso, propiciando el fracaso del plan integrativo, además este proyecto de integración no contó con el apoyo internacional y los gobiernos autoritarios latinoamericanos la vieron como una amenaza para la seguridad nacional la aproximación de economías regionales.

A pesar de que esta estrategia funcionó satisfactoriamente durante la década de los setenta pues se produjo un crecimiento generalizado del precio de las materias primas en los mercados internacionales que no agradó mucho e influyó negativamente en las economías “centrales”. En los años 1980, la contracción de la demanda internacional y el aumento de los tipos de interés desembocó la crisis de la deuda externa lo que exigió profundas modificaciones en la estrategia de desarrollo.

La variable integración en la actualidad tiene más vigencia que nunca, estamos los latino caribeños inmersos en un viejo andar, pero hoy toma aires de nuevo. Nuevos bríos ofrece la izquierda revitalizada en función de la unidad e integración latinoamericana. Cada país de acuerdo a sus características, está jugando un papel fundamental en la contienda integradora. Tratando de retomar el poder “perdido del Estado” a raíz de la aplicación de la política neoliberal en el mundo y específicamente en nuestro continente. Es muy bueno saber que nos estamos acercando en Latinoamérica y en el Caribe a la verdadera independencia.

Cuba, motor impulsor de ideas y de ejemplo de lucha, ha logrado unirse e integrarse con varios países latino caribeños, siendo esto muestra palpable de que la Integración es la mejor opción, para lograr la unidad y la Independencia.

Conclusiones.
El esfuerzo de los teóricos cepalinos por dar respuesta a los problemas económicos del continente y específicamente en la década del 60, debe tenerse en cuenta y como un gran referente en el camino de retomar el objetivo principal de desarrollo. El proceso de profundización de nuestras economías, desarrollados por estos pensadores, es el inicio de lo que sería un movimiento de discusión de las realidades latino caribeñas en busca de respuestas de los problemas de nuestros países.

A pesar de que el modelo de desarrollo de la CEPAL no cumplió sus objetivos tajantemente, varios de sus objetivos y métodos se encuentran vigentes, aunque adecuados al momento actual. Tenemos que desarrollarnos, industrializarnos por nuestros propios esfuerzos, y abogar un poco menos por la intervención de capital extranjero en nuestras economías, dándole al Estado el papel de planificador y regulador de las políticas económicas, políticas y sociales, y de principal redistribuidor de las ganancias a nivel de sociedad.

La integración latino caribeña es cada vez más necesaria, para sobrevivir al infierno capitalista, es la única vía que nos queda para poder salir del inmenso bache en que nos ha puesto el imperialismo. Desde la década del 60 hasta la actualidad los intentos de integración dan muestra de que los latino caribeños están despiertos y concientes de que la única alternativa de desarrollo viable en los momentos actuales es la Integración.

1 Martí José Obras completas. Editora de Ciencias Sociales. La Habana. Tomo 8.pp. 318-319.)

2 Periódico Granma. (La Habana. Cuba), 15 de junio de 1999, p 5. ).

3 El informe Equidad, Desarrollo y Ciudadanía elaborado y publicado por la CEPAL en el año 2000.

4 Edgardo Romero Fernández: “Los movimientos sociales latinoamericanos: Poder e integración en América Latina.” Articulo. Versión electrónica, Intranet facultad Ciencias Empresariales. UCLV.

5 Alfredo Seoanner Flores: “El proceso de Integración Regional, contexto general y dimensión económica del proceso de integración”

6 “Colectivo de autores: Economía Internacional, Tomo II, Editorial Félix Varela, La Habana, 1998.p9.

7 Roberto Muñoz González: Los procesos de integración en la Región Latino caribeña: inserción de Cuba y sus perspectivas.

8 Fidel Castro: Hacia una gran patria común. Editora Política, La Habana, 1991.pp5-

9 Tomás Borge, Un grano de maíz. Oficina de publicaciones del Consejo de Estado, 1992, p 169.

10 Informe Equidad, Desarrollo y Ciudadanía elaborado y publicado por la CEPAL en el año 2000.

11 Nils Castro, revista Temas No. 41-42:4-18, enero -junio 2005, Artículo” Las izquierdas latinoamericanas contemporáneas: observaciones a una trayectoria


Samuel Pinheiro Guimarães

A importância essencial da América do Sul

1.       A América do Sul se encontra, necessária e inarredavelmente, try no centro da política externa brasileira. Por sua vez, o núcleo da política brasileira na América do Sul está no Mercosul. E o cerne da política brasileira no Mercosul tem de ser, sem dúvida, a Argentina. A integração entre o Brasil e a Argentina e seu papel decisivo na América do Sul deve ser o objetivo mais certo, mais constante, mais vigoroso das estratégias políticas e econômicas tanto do Brasil quanto da Argentina. Qualquer tentativa de estabelecer diferentes prioridades para a política externa brasileira, e mesmo a atenção insuficiente a esses fundamentos, certamente provocará graves conseqüências e correrá sério risco de fracasso.

2        A África Ocidental, com seus 23 Estados ribeirinhos, inclusive os arquipélagos de Cabo Verde e São Tomé e Príncipe, é a fronteira atlântica do Brasil, continente a que estamos unidos pela história, pelo sangue, pela cultura, pelo colonialismo e pela semelhança de desafios. A Ásia é o novo centro dinâmico da economia mundial, fonte de lucros inesgotáveis para as megaempresas ocidentais e destino de uma das maiores migrações de capital e tecnologia avançada da História. A Europa e a América do Norte são para o Brasil, como para qualquer ex-colônia e para eventuais pretendentes a colônia, as áreas tradicionais de vinculação política, econômica e cultural. Porém, por mais importantes que sejam, como aliás são, os vínculos e os interesses atuais e potenciais brasileiros com todas essas áreas e por melhores que sejam com os Estados que as integram as nossas relações, a política externa não poderá ser eficaz se não estiver ancorada na política brasileira na América do Sul. As características da situação geopolítica do Brasil, isto é, seu território, sua localização geográfica, sua população, suas fronteiras, sua economia, assim como a conjuntura e a estrutura do sistema mundial, tornam a prioridade sul-americana uma realidade essencial.

3        O cenário econômico mundial se caracteriza pela simultânea globalização e gradual formação de grandes blocos de Estados na Europa, na América do Norte e na Ásia; pelo acelerado progresso científico e tecnológico, em especial nas áreas da informática e da biotecnologia, com sua vinculação às despesas e atividades militares; pela concentração do capital e oligopolização de mercados, medida pelo número de fusões e aquisições que passaram de 9 mil, no valor de US$ 850 bilhões, em 1995, para 33 mil, no valor de quase 4 trilhões de dólares, em 2006, e pela financeirização da economia, pois os ativos ( ações, títulos e depósitos) financeiros passaram de 109% da produção mundial, em 1980, para 316% em 2005; pela transformação dos mercados de trabalho e pela pressão permanente para reverter os direitos dos trabalhadores; pela acelerada degradação ambiental; pela insegurança energética e pelas migrações. O cenário político mundial se caracteriza pela concentração de poder político, militar, econômico, tecnológico e ideológico nos países altamente desenvolvidos; pelo arbítrio e pela violência das Grandes Potências; pela ameaça real, e sua utilização oportunista, do terrorismo; pelo desrespeito aos princípios de não-intervenção e de autodeterminação de parte das Grandes Potências políticas, econômicas e militares; pelo individualismo dos Estados ricos e a insuficiente e cadente cooperação internacional; pela emergência da China, como potência econômica e política, regional e mundial.

4        Os Estados no centro do sistema mundial, cada vez mais ricos e poderosos, pois a diferença de renda entre Estados ricos e pobres passou de 1 para 4 em 1914 para 1 para 7 em 2000, porém vinculados às economias periféricas quanto a recursos estratégicos e mercados e com uma população cadente, procuram, por meio de negociações internacionais, definir normas e regimes que permitam preservar e até ampliar sua situação privilegiada no centro do sistema militar, político, econômico e tecnológico que é o resultado, por um lado, da II Guerra Mundial e dos regimes coloniais e, por outro lado, do êxito de seus esforços nacionais, em especial na esfera científica e tecnológica. Nesse processo, sua capacidade de articular ideologias e de apresentar “soluções” como benéficas a toda a “comunidade internacional” é extraordinária e importantíssima pois é a base de sua estratégia de arregimentação de Estados e de elites periféricas cooptadas para alcançar seus objetivos nacionais, vestidos com a capa de objetivos da humanidade.

5        Neste cenário violento e instável de grandes blocos, multipolar, há uma tendência a que países pequenos e até médios venham a ser absorvidos, mais ou menos formalmente, pelos grandes Estados e economias aos quais ou se encontram tradicionalmente vinculados por laços de origem colonial ou estão em sua esfera de influência histórica, como no caso da América Central; ou tenham feito parte de seu território, como no caso dos países que formam a Comunidade de Estados Independentes – CEI; ou se vinculam por laços étnicos e culturais, como no caso da diáspora chinesa na Ásia.

6        Os países médios que constituem a América do Sul se encontram diante do dilema ou de se unirem e assim formarem um grande bloco de 17 milhões de Km2 e de 400 milhões de habitantes para defender seus interesses inalienáveis de aceleração do desenvolvimento econômico, de preservação de autonomia política e de identidade cultural, ou de serem absorvidos como simples periferias de outros grandes blocos, sem direito à participação efetiva na condução dos destinos econômicos e políticos desses blocos, os quais são definidos pelos países que se encontram em seu centro. A questão fundamental é que as características, a evolução histórica e os interesses dos Estados poderosos que se encontram no centro dos esquemas de integração são distintos daqueles dos países subdesenvolvidos que a eles se agregam através de tratados de livre comércio, ou que nome tenham, os quais ficam assim sujeitos às conseqüências das decisões estratégicas dos países centrais que podem ou não atender às suas necessidades históricas.

7        Os desafios sul-americanos diante desse dilema, que é decisivo, são enormes: superar os obstáculos que decorrem das grandes assimetrias que existem entre os países da região, sejam elas de natureza territorial, demográfica, de recursos naturais, de energia, de níveis de desenvolvimento político, cultural, agrícola, industrial e de serviços; enfrentar com persistência as enormes disparidades sociais que são semelhantes em todos esses países; realizar o extraordinário potencial econômico da região; dissolver os ressentimentos e as desconfianças históricas que dificultam sua integração.

8        As assimetrias territoriais são extraordinárias. Na América do Sul convivem países como o Brasil, com 8,5 milhões de quilômetros quadrados; como a Argentina, com seus 3,7 milhões de quilômetros quadrados e em seguida outros dez países, cada um com território inferior a 1,2 milhão de quilômetros quadrados. Três dos países da região se encontram voltados exclusivamente para o Pacífico, três se debruçam sobre o Oceano Atlântico, quatro são caribenhos e dois são mediterrâneos. O Brasil tem 15.735 km de fronteiras com nove Estados vizinhos, enquanto a Argentina, a Bolívia e o Peru têm fronteiras com cinco vizinhos. Devido a essas circunstâncias geográficas, os pontos de vista geopolíticos de cada país são inicialmente distintos, o que se agrava pelo fato de até recentemente – e mesmo até hoje –  terem estado separados os países da região pela Cordilheira, pela floresta, pelas distâncias e pelos imensos vazios demográficos.

9        O Brasil tem 190 milhões de habitantes, que correspondem a cerca de 50% da população da América do Sul, enquanto o segundo maior país em população, que é a Colômbia, tem 46 milhões de habitantes e o terceiro, a Argentina, tem 39 milhões. As taxas de crescimento demográfico variam de 3% no Paraguai a 0,7 % no Uruguai. A América do Sul viveu nos últimos anos um processo acelerado de urbanização, com o surgimento de megalópoles que concentram grandes parcelas da população total de cada país, e que exibem periferias paupérrimas e violentas. Há significativas populações de deslocados internos no Peru, como conseqüência da luta feroz contra a insurreição do Sendero Luminoso, e de refugiados, como no caso de colombianos na Venezuela e no Equador. No passado, as ditaduras e os regimes militares provocaram o exílio de numerosos militantes políticos, intelectuais, operários e sindicalistas, com grave prejuízo para o desenvolvimento político dos países mais afetados. Ademais, durante algumas décadas o reduzido ritmo de crescimento econômico provocou movimentos migratórios significativos dos países da região em direção aos Estados Unidos e à Europa Ocidental. Há um milhão de uruguaios vivendo fora do Uruguai enquanto três milhões se encontram no país. Há 400 mil equatorianos na Espanha e 4 milhões de brasileiros no exterior. Ao mesmo tempo, há grandes espaços despovoados na América do Sul, onde a densidade demográfica é inferior a 1 habitante por quilômetro quadrado, enquanto nas megalópoles a densidade populacional atinge mais de 10.000 habitantes por quilômetro quadrado. A América do Sul exibe índices de concentração de renda e de riqueza, de pobreza e de indigência, de opulência e luxo, contrastes espantosos entre riquíssimas mansões e palafitas miseráveis, entre excelentes hospitais privados e hospitais públicos decadentes, entre escolas de Primeiro Mundo e pardieiros escolares. Todavia, conta a América do Sul com as vantagens da ausência de conflitos raciais agudos, ainda que ocorra discriminação racial; com a presença dominante de idiomas de comum origem ibérica, ainda que em alguns países existam idiomas indígenas que conseguiram sobreviver; com a ausência de conflitos religiosos e predominância católica ao lado da rápida expansão das igrejas protestantes; com uma população grande, mas que não é excessiva, como em certos países asiáticos. O desafio que representa a emergência das populações indígenas historicamente oprimidas e seus efeitos para as relações políticas entre os países da América do Sul vão exigir, todavia, especial atenção e habilidade.

10      A América do Sul é uma região extremamente rica em recursos naturais, que se encontram distribuídos de forma muito desigual entre os diversos países. Enquanto o Brasil tem as maiores reservas mundiais de minério de ferro de excelente teor, a Argentina não as tem em volume suficiente. A Argentina dispõe de terras aráveis de extraordinária fertilidade, em contraste com o Chile. A Colômbia possui grandes reservas de carvão de boa qualidade e o Brasil as tem poucas e pobres. A Venezuela tem a sexta maior reserva de petróleo e a nona maior reserva de gás do mundo enquanto que, em todos os países do Cone Sul, inclusive no Brasil, são elas insuficientes para sustentar o ritmo de desenvolvimento, talvez de 7% a/a, necessário à absorção produtiva dos estoques históricos de mão-de-obra desempregada e subempregada e dos que chegam anualmente ao mercado. A Bolívia detém jazidas de gás que correspondem a duas vezes as brasileiras, mas tem sérias dificuldades para ampliar sua exploração. O Chile explora as maiores reservas conhecidas de minério de cobre do mundo, responsável por 40 % de suas exportações. O Paraguai ostenta um dos maiores potenciais hidrelétricos do mundo, em especial quando calculado em termos per capita, mas ainda não teve êxito em utilizá-lo para acelerar seu desenvolvimento. O Suriname tem a maior reserva de bauxita do planeta, ainda pouco explorada.

11      Encontra-se na América do Sul a maior floresta tropical do mundo, um tema central no debate político sobre o efeito estufa e suas conseqüências para o clima, e o maior estoque de biodiversidade do planeta, o qual é de grande importância para a renovação da agricultura e para a indústria farmacêutica; uma parcela importante das reservas de água doce do planeta, recurso cada vez mais estratégico e causa já de conflitos em certas regiões do globo, e o maior lençol de águas subterrâneas, o Aqüífero Guarani, que subjaz os territórios do Brasil, do Paraguai, da Argentina e do Uruguai.

 

As políticas econômicas

12      Os choques do petróleo (1973 e 1979), o endividamento excessivo e o súbito aumento das dívidas externas acarretaram crises e estagnação econômica que contribuíram para o fim dos regimes militares na América do Sul, em meados da década de 80. A vitória do neoliberalismo monetarista nos Estados Unidos e Reino Unido, a partir de Ronald Reagan (1981-1989) e Margaret Thatcher (1979-1990), e a renegociação da dívida externa (Plano Brady) forçaram aos países subdesenvolvidos a adoção de políticas de abertura comercial e financeira, desregulamentação e privatização, com base nos princípios do chamado Consenso de Washington. Essas políticas levaram a resultados desastrosos em países que nelas se envolveram mais a fundo, como foram o caso do Equador, da Bolívia e da Argentina, e deixaram seqüelas importantes em países como o Brasil, o Uruguai e a Venezuela.

13      Tais políticas neoliberais agravaram a já elevada concentração de renda e de riqueza, ampliaram o desemprego, contribuíram para a violência urbana, provocaram a fragilização do Estado e dos serviços públicos, o que levou por sua vez à gradual emergência de importantes movimentos políticos e sociais que passaram a preconizar (explícita ou implicitamente) a revisão do modelo econômico e social neoliberal.

14      Os países da América do Sul, em conseqüência das políticas neoliberais que determinaram a redução negociada e às vezes até unilateral de suas tarifas aduaneiras, a privatização de suas empresas estatais e a liberalização de seus mercados de capital, aumentaram suas importações de produtos industriais dos países desenvolvidos e o ingresso descontrolado de capitais estrangeiros. Essas políticas levaram à desindustrialização em maior ou menor grau, à maior influência do capital multinacional e à desnacionalização de importantes setores de suas economias, em especial do setor financeiro, com efeitos econômicos, e inclusive políticos, significativos.

15      Essa maior integração, porém de natureza passiva, dos países sul-americanos na economia mundial é radicalmente distinta da integração na economia global que ocorre com os países altamente desenvolvidos ou com certos países emergentes, como a Coréia. Nesses últimos casos, essa maior integração se verifica através da internacionalização das atividades de suas grandes empresas de atuação multinacional mas de capital nacional, bem como de suas exportações de alto conteúdo tecnológico enquanto que, no caso dos países sul-americanos, se verifica através da maior participação de megaempresas multinacionais em suas economias, já que não possuem esses últimos países (com raras exceções) grandes empresas capazes de se internacionalizarem, e da expansão de suas exportações de “commodities”.

16      Em decorrência, os países da América do Sul retomaram, voluntária ou involuntariamente, sua especialização histórica na exportação de produtos primários, tradicionais ou novos, com maior grau, por vezes, de elaboração, para atender à demanda dos países altamente desenvolvidos e da China. Assim, grosso modo, sua agricultura se sofisticou e passou a ser denominada de agribusiness; sua indústria foi adquirida ou cerrou suas portas em um processo de desindustrialização/desnacionalização e muitas de suas empresas de serviços, em especial as empresas modernas e aquelas do setor financeiro, foram adquiridas por megaempresas multinacionais.

17      A capacidade de utilizar tradicionais instrumentos de promoção do desenvolvimento econômico, que aliás tinham sido amplamente usados pelos países hoje desenvolvidos no início de seu processo de desenvolvimento (i.e. de seu processo de industrialização), foi abandonada pelos países da América do Sul na Rodada Uruguai, quando aceitaram normas sobre disciplina do capital estrangeiro as quais proíbem políticas tais como a nacionalização de insumos, o estabelecimento de metas de exportação e o reinvestimento de parte dos lucros; ou que estabelecem normas sobre propriedade intelectual que ampliaram os prazos de patentes e estabelecem patentes sobre fármacos, dificultando de fato o desenvolvimento tecnológico e gerando enormes remessas financeiras. Este abandono dos instrumentos econômicos tradicionais de uso do Estado, assim como a confiança excessiva desses países no livre jogo das forças de mercado contribuíram para que viessem a ter seu ritmo de crescimento reduzido ou estagnado. Por outro lado, a derrocada ideológica do Welfare State nos países desenvolvidos fez com que os países sul-americanos também contraíssem ou desarticulassem os seus programas sociais, o que contribuiu para agravar a concentração de renda e de propriedade e para a pequena expansão de seu mercado interno.

18      Assim, em grande parte se explicam as baixas taxas de crescimento na América do Sul, das décadas de 80 e 90, quando comparadas às de alguns países da Ásia, e a eventual derrocada dos governos neoliberais na Argentina, no Brasil, no Chile, na Bolívia, no Equador e na Venezuela. Nos últimos anos, surgiram na América do Sul governos que procuram manter as políticas de austeridade fiscal e de controle inflacionário enquanto tentam ressuscitar o Estado como agente suplementar do desenvolvimento econômico e como agente de redução da desigualdade social, diante das enormes injustiças e das pressões dos segmentos historicamente oprimidos em suas sociedades.

O bloco sul-americano

19      A atual experiência de integração sul-americana tem distintas origens, motivações e paralelos históricos. Em primeiro lugar, o trauma da desintegração dos Vice-Reinados do Império espanhol a partir de 1810, a desintegração posterior da Grã Colômbia em 1830, e a sobrevivência da utopia de unidade latino-americana, preconizada pelo Libertador Simon Bolívar. Segundo, a tentativa do notável economista argentino, Raul Prebisch, de explicar as razões do desenvolvimento na América do Norte em confronto com o atraso sul-americano levou à formulação da teoria estruturalista pela Comissão Econômica para a América Latina – CEPAL. Prebisch encontrou essas razões nas características das economias primário-exportadoras sul-americanas e na natureza de seu processo de incorporação do progresso tecnológico; na reduzida dimensão e no isolamento de cada mercado nacional; na deterioração secular dos termos de intercâmbio; na importância da industrialização como estratégia para a transformação econômica. Em terceiro lugar, a percepção de êxito da experiência de planejamento econômico e de industrialização acelerada vivida pela União Soviética, da experiência keynesiana e da planificação de guerra norte-americana e, finalmente, as políticas de economia mista e de planejamento indicativo dos governos socialistas europeus após a II Guerra Mundial. Quarto, na experiência de construção da Comunidade Econômica Européia, fundada na integração de mercados, na elaboração de políticas comuns e no financiamento pelos países mais ricos do esforço de redução de assimetrias entre as economias participantes.

20      Este conjunto de experiências inspirou os programas de desenvolvimento econômico com base na industrialização, em especial no Brasil durante o Governo Juscelino Kubitschek, as propostas da CEPAL de constituição de um mercado comum latino-americano, as propostas argentinas de criação de uma área de livre comércio que reunificasse economicamente as partes do antigo Vice-Reinado do Prata, e estimulou à constituição em 1960 da Associação Latino-Americana de Livre Comércio – ALALC.

21      Naturalmente, ao processo de integração da América do Sul e do Cone Sul subjazia a latente rivalidade entre Brasil e Argentina por influência política na região do Rio da Prata, os resquícios de um passado de lutas e a lembrança da inicial predominância industrial argentina. E outros ressentimentos decorrentes de conflitos e quase-conflitos passados, como entre Chile e Argentina; entre Bolívia, Chile e Peru; entre Peru e Equador; entre Colômbia e Venezuela, entre a Bolívia e o Paraguai, entre Brasil e Paraguai e entre Brasil e Bolívia.

22      A Associação Latino Americana de Livre Comércio, criada em 1960, e cuja meta era eliminar todas as barreiras ao comércio entre os Estados membros até 1980, encontrou obstáculos causados pelas políticas nacionais de substituição de importações e de industrialização e, mais tarde, pelas políticas de controle de importações para enfrentar as súbitas crises do petróleo que acarretaram inéditos déficits comerciais que atingiram os países importadores de energia, em especial o Brasil.

23      A partir de 1965, o Convênio de Créditos Recíprocos (CCR) entre os países da ALALC, e mais a República Dominicana, passa a permitir o comércio sem o uso imediato de divisas fortes, através de um sistema quadrimestral de compensação multilateral de créditos que funcionou com grande êxito sem que ocorresse nenhum caso de “default” até a década de 1980, quando foi progressivamente desativado pelos novos tecnocratas que vieram a ocupar os Bancos Centrais dos países da região, na esteira do período de governos neoliberais.

24      Em 1969, os países andinos celebraram o Pacto Andino (mais tarde CAN) como um projeto mais audacioso de integração e de planejamento do desenvolvimento, prevendo inclusive a alocação espacial de indústrias entre os Estados membros e a elaboração de políticas comuns, inclusive no campo do investimento estrangeiro.

25      Em 1980, a estagnação das negociações comerciais levou a substituição da ALALC pela Associação Latino Americana de Integração (ALADI). O Tratado de Montevidéu (80) incorporou o “patrimônio” de reduções tarifárias bilaterais, permitiu a negociação de acordos bilaterais de preferências, com a perspectiva de sua eventual convergência, e tornou possível a concessão de preferências bilaterais ao abrigo da “enabling clause” do então GATT.

26      Em 1985, Brasil e Argentina decidiram lançar um processo de integração bilateral gradual, com o objetivo central de promover o desenvolvimento econômico, a que se juntaram, em 1991, Paraguai e Uruguai, formando-se assim o Mercosul. Este último surgiu como um projeto enquadrado na concepção do Consenso de Washington do livre comércio como instrumento único e suficiente para a promoção do desenvolvimento, redução das desigualdades sociais e geração de empregos, na melhor tradição das Escolas de Manchester e de Chicago.

27      Após a conclusão do NAFTA em 1994, em que o México na prática abandonou a ALADI, os Estados Unidos, no contexto da Cúpula das Américas, lançaram um projeto ambicioso de negociação de uma Área de Livre Comércio das Américas (ALCA). Esse projeto, na realidade, mais do que uma área de livre comércio de bens, criaria um território econômico único nas Américas, com a livre movimentação de bens, serviços e capital (mas não de mão-de-obra ou tecnologia) e estabeleceria regras uniformes ainda mais restritivas à execução de políticas nacionais ou regionais de desenvolvimento econômico, já que as propostas originais eram OMC-Plus e NAFTA-plus (e parecem continuar a ser tais como revelam os textos dos tratados bilaterais de livre comércio, celebrados pelos Estados Unidos).

28      Apesar das declarações diplomáticas feitas na ocasião, e reiteradas posteriormente, de que a ALCA não afetaria os projetos de integração regional como a Comunidade Andina e o Mercosul, estava claro que a eventual concretização da ALCA eliminaria de fato a possibilidade de formação de um bloco econômico e político sul-americano.

29      Após o início das negociações da ALCA, e diante da extrema desigualdade de forças políticas e econômicas entre os países participantes, a negociação se interrompeu em 2004, após os Estados Unidos terem retirado os temas agrícolas e de defesa comercial (antidumping e subsídios) levando-os para o âmbito da OMC sob o pretexto de ser necessária uma negociação mais abrangente, inclusive com a União Européia. Em conseqüência e para equilibrar as negociações, o Mercosul considerou que os temas de investimento, compras governamentais e serviços deveriam também passar para o âmbito da Rodada de Doha na OMC e propôs aos Estados Unidos a negociação de um acordo do tipo 4+1, no campo do comércio de bens, proposta até hoje sem resposta, ou melhor, cuja resposta prática tem sido a firme atividade norte-americana de negociação de acordos bilaterais de livre comércio (na realidade com escopos muito mais amplos) com os países da América Central, a Colômbia, o Peru e (quase) com o Equador.

30      Paralelamente, o Mercosul empreendeu a negociação e celebrou acordos de livre comércio com o Chile (1995), com a Bolívia (1996), com a Venezuela, Equador e Colômbia (2004), e com o Peru (2005), que se referem exclusivamente ao comércio de bens e não incluem o comércio de serviços, compras governamentais, regras sobre investimentos, propriedade intelectual, etc.

31      Em 2002, o Congresso dos Estados Unidos tinha aprovado o ATPDEA (Andean Trade Promotion and Drug Eradication Act) pelo qual concederiam unilateralmente preferências comerciais, sem reciprocidade de parte dos beneficiários, para listas de produtos de países andinos em troca da execução de programas de erradicação das plantações de coca. O resultado da aplicação durante cinco anos dessa lei foi, de um lado, expandir as exportações de tais produtos desses países para os Estados Unidos e, de outro, ensejar o surgimento nesses países de grupos de interesses empresariais locais favoráveis à negociação de acordos de livre comércio com os Estados Unidos quando se encerrasse o prazo de vigência daquele Ato.

32      Posteriormente, foi lançada em 2004, em Cuzco, o projeto de formação de uma Comunidade Sul-Americana de Nações, hoje denominada UNASUL, organização que se pretenderia semelhante à União Africana, na África; à União Européia na Europa; à ASEAN, na Ásia; e ao MCCA, na América Central. As negociações para concretizar a UNASUL têm encontrado três distintas resistências: primeiro, a de países que celebraram acordos de livre comércio com os Estados Unidos; segundo, a de países que dão prioridade ao fortalecimento do Mercosul e que acreditam que o Brasil estaria “trocando” o Mercosul pela UNASUL; terceiro, a de países que consideram ser necessário uma organização mais audaciosa, com base na solidariedade e na cooperação e não naquilo que consideram ser o individualismo “mercantilista” das preferências comerciais, dos projetos de investimento e do livre comércio.

A Argentina e a estratégia de integração brasileira

33      Não há a menor possibilidade de construção de um espaço econômico e político sul-americano (economicista ou solidarista, não importa) sem um amplo programa de construção e de integração da infra-estrutura de transportes, de energia e de comunicações dos países da América do Sul. O comércio entre os seis países fundadores da Comunidade Econômica Européia correspondia em 1958 a cerca de 40% do seu comércio total e hoje supera 80%. Em contraste, o comércio entre os países da América do Sul correspondia em 1960, data de começo da ALALC, a cerca de 10% e ainda em 2006 não superou 17% do total do comércio exterior da região. Esse reduzido comércio tinha sua causa na pequena diversificação industrial das economias sul-americanas (hoje também um obstáculo, pois quanto mais diversificadas as economias maior o seu comércio recíproco), mas também na pequena densidade dos sistemas de transportes naquela época e até hoje. Há um interesse vital em conectar os sistemas de transportes nacionais e as duas costas do subcontinente, superando os obstáculos da Floresta e da Cordilheira, como se está fazendo ao norte entre Brasil e Peru, e se procurará fazer ao sul, entre Brasil, Argentina e Chile. A Iniciativa para a Integração da Regional Sul-Americana (IIRSA), em 2000, foi um passo de grande importância neste esforço de planejamento, que necessita para se concretizar da alavanca regional do financiamento.

34      Uma das maiores dificuldades dos países da América do Sul é o acesso a crédito para investimentos em infra-estrutura devido a limites ao endividamento externo e à falta de acesso a instrumentos de garantia. Este acesso ao mercado internacional de capitais é tanto mais importante quanto maior for a dificuldade desses países em elevar sua poupança interna, devido à prioridade concedida ao serviço da dívida interna e externa. O Brasil tem contribuído para o fortalecimento da Cooperação Andina de Fomento – CAF, entidade financeira classificada como AA no mercado internacional e voltada para investimentos em infra-estrutura, e tem participado, de forma positiva e prudente, do processo de construção de um Banco do Sul que se deseja eficiente. O Brasil é um dos poucos, senão o único país da região, que dispõe de um forte banco de desenvolvimento, cujos ativos são de US$ 87 bilhões, maiores que os do Banco Interamericano de Desenvolvimento – BID ( US 66 bilhões), que pode emprestar recursos para a execução de obras de infra-estrutura em condições competitivas com as do mercado internacional e sem condicionar tais empréstimos a “compromissos” de política externa ou à execução de “reformas” econômicas internas. É parte essencial da estratégia brasileira de integração fornecer crédito aos países vizinhos para a execução de obras de infra-estrutura e, no futuro, vir a fornecer créditos a empresas desses países em condições normais semelhantes às que se exigem de empresas brasileiras, tendo em vista o interesse vital brasileiro no crescimento e no desenvolvimento dos países vizinhos até mesmo por razões de interesse próprio, devido à grande importância de seus mercados para as exportações brasileiras e, em conseqüência, para o nível de atividade econômica geral e de suas empresas.

35      Além da integração da infra-estrutura física em termos de rodovias, pontes, ferrovias e de energia é essencial a integração das comunicações aéreas, pela sua importância para a economia e a política, assim como da mídia em especial a televisão, essencial à formação do imaginário sul-americano, através do conhecimento da vida política, econômica e social dos países da região, hoje desconhecida do grande público e, portanto, fonte de toda  sorte de preconceitos e manipulações que envenenam a opinião pública e afetam os discursos, as atividades e as decisões políticas. A TV Brasil – Canal Integración e a TELESUR são experiências não-hegemônicas de integração de comunicações, assim como a iniciativa brasileira de procurar estabelecer um padrão regional de TV Digital, com a participação dos Estados do Mercosul, inclusive no processo industrial.

36      A questão da segurança energética é central nos dias de hoje e no futuro previsível. A integração energética e a autonomia regional em energia para garantir a segurança de abastecimento energético é prioridade absoluta da política externa brasileira na América do Sul. Não há possibilidade de crescer a 7% a/a na média durante um período longo sem um suprimento suficiente, seguro e crescente de energia. Este suprimento depende de investimentos de prazo mais ou menos longo de maturação, tais como a prospecção de jazidas de petróleo, gás e urânio, a construção de barragens, a construção de usinas hidro e termoelétricas, assim como nucleares . A América do Sul, como região, tem um excedente global de energia, porém com grandes superávites atuais e potenciais em certos países e com severos déficits em outros. No primeiro caso, se encontram a Venezuela, o Equador e a Bolívia para o gás e o petróleo. No caso de energia hidrelétrica, há excedentes extraordinários no Brasil, no Paraguai e na Venezuela. De outro lado, se encontram países com déficit estrutural de energia como o Chile e o Uruguai e casos intermediários como são o Peru, a Colômbia e a Argentina. Assim, a integração energética da região permitirá reduzir as importações extra-regionais e fortalecer a economia da América do Sul. No esforço de fortalecer e de integrar o sistema energético da região, o Brasil tem financiado a construção de gasodutos na Argentina e tem se empenhado na concretização do projeto do Grande Gasoduto do Sul que deverá vincular os maiores centros produtores de energia (a Venezuela e a Bolívia) aos maiores mercados consumidores (o Brasil, a Argentina e o Chile). O Brasil está disposto a compartilhar a tecnologia que desenvolveu na área dos biocombustíveis, acreditando que a crise energética e ambiental somente poderá ser enfrentada com eficiência a partir de uma modificação gradual da matriz energética mundial, de uma redução do consumo e do desperdício nos países altamente desenvolvidos, principais responsáveis pela emissão de gases de efeito estufa.

37      A redução das assimetrias é o segundo elemento essencial da estratégia brasileira de integração. Em um processo de integração em que as assimetrias entre as partes são significativas tornam-se indispensáveis programas específicos e ambiciosos para promover sua redução. É óbvio que não se trata aqui das assimetrias de território e de população mas sim daquelas assimetrias de natureza econômica e social. É indispensável a existência de um processo de transferência de renda sob a forma de investimentos entre os Estados participantes do esquema de integração como ocorreu e ocorre ainda hoje na União Européia. Esse processo é ainda embrionário no Mercosul, sendo o Fundo para Convergência Estrutural e o Fortalecimento Institucional do Mercosul – FOCEM, apenas um modesto início.

38      A generosidade dos países maiores e mais desenvolvidos é sempre mencionada pelo Presidente Lula como um terceiro elemento essencial para o êxito do processo de integração do Mercosul e da América do Sul. Esta generosidade deve se traduzir pelo tratamento diferencial, sem exigência de reciprocidade, em relação a todos os países da América do Sul que estejam engajados no processo de integração regional, nas áreas do comércio de bens, de serviços, de compras governamentais, de propriedade intelectual etc. Isto é, o Brasil deve estar disposto a conceder tratamento mais vantajoso sem reciprocidade a todos os seus vizinhos, em especial àqueles de menor desenvolvimento relativo, aos países mediterrâneos e aos países de menor PIB per capita.         O Brasil, apesar de ser o maior país da região, não acredita ser possível desenvolver-se isoladamente sem que toda a região se desenvolva econômica e socialmente e se assegure razoável grau de estabilidade política e segurança. Assim, a solidariedade nos esforços de desenvolvimento e de integração é uma idéia central na estratégia brasileira na América do Sul, assim como a idéia de que este processo é um processo entre parceiros iguais e soberanos, sem hegemonias nem lideranças.

39      A integração econômica da América do Sul tem passado por um processo acelerado de expansão, impulsionado pela redução das tarifas propiciada pelos acordos comerciais preferenciais. O comércio de bens intra-América do Sul que era de 10 bilhões de dólares em 1980 passou para 68 bilhões em 2005. O comércio de serviços, que era praticamente inexistente na década de 1960, também se expandiu, ainda que em menor escala. Os exemplos mais relevantes de expansão poderiam ser dados pelo setor financeiro, com o estabelecimento de filiais de bancos, pelo setor dos transportes aéreos e mesmo terrestres, e pelo turismo intra-regional. Os investimentos de empresas da região em terceiros países da própria região se tornaram expressivos, como demonstra a expansão das empresas chilenas e brasileiras, em especial na Argentina. Finalmente, houve considerável expansão das populações de imigrantes intra-regionais. Todos esses fatores contribuem para a formação de um mercado único sul-americano, já que, implementados os acordos comerciais bilaterais entre países da região, cerca de 95% do comércio intra-regional será livre de tarifas, em 2019. A reativação do CCR e o estabelecimento de uma moeda comum para transações entre Brasil e Argentina muito contribuirão para a expansão do comércio bilateral e regional.

40      A estratégia brasileira no campo comercial tem sido procurar consolidar o Mercosul e promover a formação de uma área de livre comércio na América do Sul, levando em devida conta as assimetrias entre os países da região . A compreensão brasileira com as necessidades de recuperação e fortalecimento industrial de seus   vizinhos nos levou à negociação do Mecanismo de Adaptação Competitiva com a Argentina, aos esforços de estabelecimento de cadeias produtivas regionais e à execução do Programa de Substituição Competitiva de Importações, cujo objetivo é tentar contribuir para a redução dos extremos e crônicos déficits comerciais bilaterais, quase todos favoráveis ao Brasil. No campo externo, a estratégia brasileira visa a ampliar os mercados para as exportações do Mercosul através da negociação de acordos de livre comércio ou de preferências comerciais com países desenvolvidos, como no caso da União Européia; e com países em desenvolvimento tais como a Índia e a África do Sul, em busca da abertura de mercados e visa a prestigiar e fortalecer o processo de negociação em conjunto, que não só favorece  os parceiros maiores, mas também os parceiros menores do Mercosul, na medida em que obtêm eles condições de acesso que possivelmente não alcançariam caso negociassem isoladamente.

41.     Em um sistema mundial cujo centro acumula cada vez mais poder econômico, político, militar, tecnológico e ideológico; em que cada vez mais aumenta o hiato entre os países desenvolvidos e subdesenvolvidos; em que o risco ambiental e energético se agrava; e em que este centro procura tecer uma rede de acordos e de normas internacionais que assegurem o gozo dos privilégios que os países centrais adquiriram no processo histórico e em que dessas negociações participam grandes blocos de países, a atuação individual, isolada, nessas negociações não é vantajosa, nem mesmo para um país com as dimensões de território, população e PIB que tem o Brasil. Assim, para o Brasil é de indispensável importância poder contar com os Estados vizinhos da América do Sul nas complexas negociações internacionais de que participa. Mas talvez ainda seja de maior importância para os Estados vizinhos a articulação de alianças entre si e com o Brasil para atuar com maior eficiência na defesa de seus interesses nessas negociações.

42      Apesar das assimetrias de toda ordem que caracterizam os países da região, somos todos subdesenvolvidos e as características centrais do subdesenvolvimento são as disparidades sociais, as vulnerabilidades externas e o potencial não- explorado de nossas sociedades. No caso das desigualdades sociais, a América do Sul se caracteriza como uma das regiões do mundo onde há a maior concentração de renda e de riqueza e onde há ativos enormes aplicados no exterior, resultado de “fugas” históricas de capital. Por outro lado, o Brasil tem procurado estabelecer programas de combate à fome e à pobreza, e de natureza social em geral, que podem ser objeto de útil intercâmbio de experiências. Uma das características da região é o crescente número de imigrantes ( legais e ilegais) de refugiados e de deslocados cuja situação necessita ser regularizada de forma solidária e humanitária, a exemplo do que têm feito a Argentina e a Venezuela. O Brasil tem como prioridade a cooperação nas áreas de fronteira, cada vez mais vivas, a promoção de eliminação de vistos e de exigências burocráticas que dificultam a circulação de mão de obra e a negociação da concessão de direitos políticos aos cidadãos sul-americanos em todos os países da região, a começar pelo Brasil. A decisão brasileira de tornar obrigatório o espanhol no ensino médio no Brasil contribuirá para o processo de integração social e cultural da América do Sul.

43      No campo da política, os mecanismos de integração devem propiciar e estimular a cooperação entre os Estados sul-americanos nos foros, nas disputas e nas negociações internacionais, encorajar a solução pacífica de controvérsias, sem interferência de potências extra-regionais, o respeito absoluto e estrito aos princípios de não-intervenção e de autodeterminação, i.e. não deve nenhum Estado e muito menos o Brasil imiscuir-se nos processos domésticos dos países vizinhos nem procurar exportar modelos políticos por mais que os apreciemos para uso interno. O Brasil tem, como princípio, manter-se sempre imparcial diante de disputas que surgem periodicamente entre países vizinhos, bastando lembrar a ressurreição da questão da mediterraneidade entre Bolívia, Chile e Peru; da fumigação na fronteira entre o Equador e Colômbia; das divergências ocasionais entre Colômbia e Venezuela; da questão das papeleiras entre Argentina e Uruguai. E o Brasil tem procurado tratar com generosidade e lucidez política, e não com o rigor do economicismo míope, apesar das resistências internas e dos preconceitos de setores conservadores da sociedade brasileira, as reivindicações econômicas, em relação ao Brasil, que fazem por vezes Bolívia, Paraguai e Uruguai. O Parlamento do Mercosul será o foro para o conhecimento mais íntimo dos políticos e dos estadistas dos países da América do Sul, contribuindo para o indispensável ambiente político a um processo de integração.

44      No processo de integração do Mercosul e da América do Sul e nas relações políticas com o mundo multipolar violento e “absorvedor” em que vivemos, Brasil e Argentina se encontram unidos pelos objetivos comuns de transformar o sistema internacional no sentido de que as normas que regem as relações entre os Estados e as economias sejam de tal natureza que os países em desenvolvimento como o Brasil e a Argentina preservem o espaço necessário para a elaboração e a execução de políticas de desenvolvimento que permitam superar as desigualdades, vencer as vulnerabilidades e realizar o potencial de suas sociedades.

45      No mundo arbitrário e violento em que vivem o Brasil, e a América do Sul, é indispensável ter forças armadas proporcionais a seu território e à sua população. A estratégia brasileira de defesa vê o continente sul –americano de forma integrada e considera a cooperação militar entre as Forças Armadas, inclusive em termos de indústria bélica, como um fator de estabilidade e de equilíbrio regional através da construção de confiança. A inexistência de bases estrangeiras no continente sul-americano, à exceção de Manta, é um importante fator político e militar para o desenvolvimento e a autonomia regional. Por outro lado, o Brasil rejeita qualquer intervenção política, e ainda mais militar, de origem extra-regional nos assuntos da América do Sul. Os programas de intercâmbio militar exercem importante papel no processo de construção da confiança, assim como a participação de efetivos militares de países da região em operações de paz das Nações Unidas, em especial na Minustah.

46.     Finalmente, como mencionou o Ministro Celso Amorim, é necessário promover a integração e o desenvolvimento econômico e social de nossos países antes que o crime organizado o faça em suas diversas facetas: o narcotráfico, o contrabando, o tráfico de armas.

47.     A integração entre o Brasil e a Argentina e seu papel decisivo na América do Sul deve ser o objetivo mais certo, mais constante, mais vigoroso das estratégias políticas e econômicas tanto do Brasil quanto da Argentina . Foram nossos dois países aqueles que, na região, lograram alcançar o mais elevado nível de desenvolvimento industrial, agrícola, de serviços, científico e tecnológico; aqueles que, considerados como um conjunto, detêm as terras mais férteis e o subsolo mais rico da região; aqueles cuja população permite o desenvolvimento de mercados internos significativos, base necessária para a atuação firme no mercado externo sempre sujeito às medidas arbitrárias do protecionismo agrícola e industrial; somos aqueles países que, por seu grande potencial e interesses comuns, são os mais capazes de resistir à voragem absorvedora dos interesses comerciais, econômicos, financeiros e políticos dos países mais desenvolvidos, sempre mais preocupados em  concentrar poder e preservar privilégios econômicos e políticos, ainda que pela força, do que em contribuir para a construção de uma ordem econômica, ambiental e política necessária ao desenvolvimento da comunidade internacional  como um todo e à preservação do planeta. A coordenação política  que ocorre entre a Argentina e o Brasil na defesa de seus interesses nos foros, nas negociações, nos conflitos e nas crises internacionais  atingiu extraordinária intensidade e eficiência e foi isto que nos permitiu agir no âmbito do Conselho de Segurança, das negociações ambientais, das negociações hemisféricas desiguais e das negociações multilaterais econômicas da Rodada Doha, através do G-20, de modo a impedir o desequilíbrio de seus resultados e a garantir o espaço necessário às nossas políticas de desenvolvimento econômico.

48.     Falta muito a fazer, em especial nos campos avançados do desenvolvimento científico e tecnológico que plasmarão a sociedade do futuro, tais como as atividades espaciais, aeronáuticas, nucleares, de defesa, de informática e de biotecnologia. É necessário e indispensável que todos os organismos da estrutura burocrática dos Estados brasileiro e argentino, ainda muitas vezes envolvidos em rivalidades, ressentimentos e desconfianças históricas, compreendam o desafio que a Nação argentina e a Nação brasileira enfrentam neste início do Século XXI, compreendam a visão estratégica dos presidentes Nestor Kirchner e Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva e contribuam, assim, para que se realize a faceta gloriosa da profecia de Juan Domingo Perón: “O Século XXI nos encontrará unidos ou dominados”.

Lourdes Pérez Navarro

Ante la pretensión de Estados Unidos de establecer el Área de Libre Comercio de las Américas (ALCA), shop a partir de los Tratados de Libre Comercio, treatment Bolivia plantea la necesidad de suscribir acuerdos bilaterales alternativos bajo el formato del Tratado de Comercio de los Pueblos. Con ello iremos consolidando paso a paso la Alternativa Bolivariana para las Américas (ALBA), aseguró a Granma Pablo Solón, miembro del Movimiento Boliviano por la Soberanía y la Integración Solidaria de los Pueblos.

Entrevistado en los salones del Palacio de las Convenciones, donde se desarrolla el V Encuentro Hemisférico de movimientos sociales, redes y organizaciones que luchan contra el ALCA, Solón explicó que el Tratado de Comercio de los Pueblos (TCP), propuesto por el presidente Evo Morales, va encaminado a lograr una verdadera integración que priorice el bienestar de la gente, el respeto a su historia y a su cultura.

Subrayó que a diferencia de los Tratados de Libre Comercio, basados en la competencia, la privatización y la apertura indiscriminada de los mercados, la propuesta boliviana introduce en el debate sobre la integración comercial temas como la complementación, cooperación, solidaridad, reciprocidad, prosperi-dad y el respeto a la soberanía de los países.

Otro contraste, precisó, está en la actitud frente a la inversión extranjera. “Queremos socios y no patrones; es decir, las reglas comerciales no pueden ser establecidas para subordinar nuestras economías a los intereses de las trasnacionales. EL TCP plantea que los mecanismos para que los inversores extranjeros transfieran tecnología han de estar condicionados a la contratación de mano de obra nacional, a la utilización de materias primas del país y a la reinversión de sus utilidades. Queremos mayor regulación sobre la inversión extranjera, que garantice una situación que realmente traiga beneficios a los pueblos”.

Como país, aseguró Solón, vamos a plantear a Venezuela la suscripción de un TCP a partir de los acuerdos ya avanzados. “Creemos que esa es la forma concreta en que vamos a ir construyendo proyectos como el ALBA”.

Recordó que con Cuba “estamos desarrollando la Operación Milagro y la Campaña de Alfabetización. Tenemos una relación que no es un mero intercambio comercial, sino un intercambio en función de las necesidades de la población, que es precisamente el espíritu del Tratado de Comercio de los Pueblos”.

<!– @page { margin: 0.79in } P { margin-bottom: 0.08in } A:link { color: #0000ff } –>

Lourdes Pérez Navarro

Ante la pretensión de Estados Unidos de establecer el Área de Libre Comercio de las Américas (ALCA), seek a partir de los Tratados de Libre Comercio, Bolivia plantea la necesidad de suscribir acuerdos bilaterales alternativos bajo el formato del Tratado de Comercio de los Pueblos. Con ello iremos consolidando paso a paso la Alternativa Bolivariana para las Américas (ALBA), aseguró a Granma Pablo Solón, miembro del Movimiento Boliviano por la Soberanía y la Integración Solidaria de los Pueblos.

Entrevistado en los salones del Palacio de las Convenciones, donde se desarrolla el V Encuentro Hemisférico de movimientos sociales, redes y organizaciones que luchan contra el ALCA, Solón explicó que el Tratado de Comercio de los Pueblos (TCP), propuesto por el presidente Evo Morales, va encaminado a lograr una verdadera integración que priorice el bienestar de la gente, el respeto a su historia y a su cultura.

Subrayó que a diferencia de los Tratados de Libre Comercio, basados en la competencia, la privatización y la apertura indiscriminada de los mercados, la propuesta boliviana introduce en el debate sobre la integración comercial temas como la complementación, cooperación, solidaridad, reciprocidad, prosperi-dad y el respeto a la soberanía de los países.

Otro contraste, precisó, está en la actitud frente a la inversión extranjera. “Queremos socios y no patrones; es decir, las reglas comerciales no pueden ser establecidas para subordinar nuestras economías a los intereses de las trasnacionales. EL TCP plantea que los mecanismos para que los inversores extranjeros transfieran tecnología han de estar condicionados a la contratación de mano de obra nacional, a la utilización de materias primas del país y a la reinversión de sus utilidades. Queremos mayor regulación sobre la inversión extranjera, que garantice una situación que realmente traiga beneficios a los pueblos”.

Como país, aseguró Solón, vamos a plantear a Venezuela la suscripción de un TCP a partir de los acuerdos ya avanzados. “Creemos que esa es la forma concreta en que vamos a ir construyendo proyectos como el ALBA”.

Recordó que con Cuba “estamos desarrollando la Operación Milagro y la Campaña de Alfabetización. Tenemos una relación que no es un mero intercambio comercial, sino un intercambio en función de las necesidades de la población, que es precisamente el espíritu del Tratado de Comercio de los Pueblos”.

Lourdes Pérez Navarro

Ante la pretensión de Estados Unidos de establecer el Área de Libre Comercio de las Américas (ALCA), prescription mind a partir de los Tratados de Libre Comercio, Bolivia plantea la necesidad de suscribir acuerdos bilaterales alternativos bajo el formato del Tratado de Comercio de los Pueblos. Con ello iremos consolidando paso a paso la Alternativa Bolivariana para las Américas (ALBA), illness aseguró a Granma Pablo Solón, miembro del Movimiento Boliviano por la Soberanía y la Integración Solidaria de los Pueblos.

Entrevistado en los salones del Palacio de las Convenciones, donde se desarrolla el V Encuentro Hemisférico de movimientos sociales, redes y organizaciones que luchan contra el ALCA, Solón explicó que el Tratado de Comercio de los Pueblos (TCP), propuesto por el presidente Evo Morales, va encaminado a lograr una verdadera integración que priorice el bienestar de la gente, el respeto a su historia y a su cultura.

Subrayó que a diferencia de los Tratados de Libre Comercio, basados en la competencia, la privatización y la apertura indiscriminada de los mercados, la propuesta boliviana introduce en el debate sobre la integración comercial temas como la complementación, cooperación, solidaridad, reciprocidad, prosperi-dad y el respeto a la soberanía de los países.

Otro contraste, precisó, está en la actitud frente a la inversión extranjera. “Queremos socios y no patrones; es decir, las reglas comerciales no pueden ser establecidas para subordinar nuestras economías a los intereses de las trasnacionales. EL TCP plantea que los mecanismos para que los inversores extranjeros transfieran tecnología han de estar condicionados a la contratación de mano de obra nacional, a la utilización de materias primas del país y a la reinversión de sus utilidades. Queremos mayor regulación sobre la inversión extranjera, que garantice una situación que realmente traiga beneficios a los pueblos”.

Como país, aseguró Solón, vamos a plantear a Venezuela la suscripción de un TCP a partir de los acuerdos ya avanzados. “Creemos que esa es la forma concreta en que vamos a ir construyendo proyectos como el ALBA”.

Recordó que con Cuba “estamos desarrollando la Operación Milagro y la Campaña de Alfabetización. Tenemos una relación que no es un mero intercambio comercial, sino un intercambio en función de las necesidades de la población, que es precisamente el espíritu del Tratado de Comercio de los Pueblos”.

<!– @page { margin: 0.79in } P { margin-bottom: 0.08in } A:link { color: #0000ff } –>

Lourdes Pérez Navarro

Ante la pretensión de Estados Unidos de establecer el Área de Libre Comercio de las Américas (ALCA), a partir de los Tratados de Libre Comercio, click Bolivia plantea la necesidad de suscribir acuerdos bilaterales alternativos bajo el formato del Tratado de Comercio de los Pueblos. Con ello iremos consolidando paso a paso la Alternativa Bolivariana para las Américas (ALBA), aseguró a Granma Pablo Solón, miembro del Movimiento Boliviano por la Soberanía y la Integración Solidaria de los Pueblos.

Entrevistado en los salones del Palacio de las Convenciones, donde se desarrolla el V Encuentro Hemisférico de movimientos sociales, redes y organizaciones que luchan contra el ALCA, Solón explicó que el Tratado de Comercio de los Pueblos (TCP), propuesto por el presidente Evo Morales, va encaminado a lograr una verdadera integración que priorice el bienestar de la gente, el respeto a su historia y a su cultura.

Subrayó que a diferencia de los Tratados de Libre Comercio, basados en la competencia, la privatización y la apertura indiscriminada de los mercados, la propuesta boliviana introduce en el debate sobre la integración comercial temas como la complementación, cooperación, solidaridad, reciprocidad, prosperi-dad y el respeto a la soberanía de los países.

Otro contraste, precisó, está en la actitud frente a la inversión extranjera. “Queremos socios y no patrones; es decir, las reglas comerciales no pueden ser establecidas para subordinar nuestras economías a los intereses de las trasnacionales. EL TCP plantea que los mecanismos para que los inversores extranjeros transfieran tecnología han de estar condicionados a la contratación de mano de obra nacional, a la utilización de materias primas del país y a la reinversión de sus utilidades. Queremos mayor regulación sobre la inversión extranjera, que garantice una situación que realmente traiga beneficios a los pueblos”.

Como país, aseguró Solón, vamos a plantear a Venezuela la suscripción de un TCP a partir de los acuerdos ya avanzados. “Creemos que esa es la forma concreta en que vamos a ir construyendo proyectos como el ALBA”.

Recordó que con Cuba “estamos desarrollando la Operación Milagro y la Campaña de Alfabetización. Tenemos una relación que no es un mero intercambio comercial, sino un intercambio en función de las necesidades de la población, que es precisamente el espíritu del Tratado de Comercio de los Pueblos”.

Lourdes Pérez Navarro

Ante la pretensión de Estados Unidos de establecer el Área de Libre Comercio de las Américas (ALCA), a partir de los Tratados de Libre Comercio, Bolivia plantea la necesidad de suscribir acuerdos bilaterales alternativos bajo el formato del Tratado de Comercio de los Pueblos. Con ello iremos consolidando paso a paso la Alternativa Bolivariana para las Américas (ALBA), aseguró a Granma Pablo Solón, miembro del Movimiento Boliviano por la Soberanía y la Integración Solidaria de los Pueblos.

Entrevistado en los salones del Palacio de las Convenciones, donde se desarrolla el V Encuentro Hemisférico de movimientos sociales, redes y organizaciones que luchan contra el ALCA, Solón explicó que el Tratado de Comercio de los Pueblos (TCP), propuesto por el presidente Evo Morales, va encaminado a lograr una verdadera integración que priorice el bienestar de la gente, el respeto a su historia y a su cultura.

Subrayó que a diferencia de los Tratados de Libre Comercio, basados en la competencia, la privatización y la apertura indiscriminada de los mercados, la propuesta boliviana introduce en el debate sobre la integración comercial temas como la complementación, cooperación, solidaridad, reciprocidad, prosperi-dad y el respeto a la soberanía de los países.

Otro contraste, precisó, está en la actitud frente a la inversión extranjera. “Queremos socios y no patrones; es decir, las reglas comerciales no pueden ser establecidas para subordinar nuestras economías a los intereses de las trasnacionales. EL TCP plantea que los mecanismos para que los inversores extranjeros transfieran tecnología han de estar condicionados a la contratación de mano de obra nacional, a la utilización de materias primas del país y a la reinversión de sus utilidades. Queremos mayor regulación sobre la inversión extranjera, que garantice una situación que realmente traiga beneficios a los pueblos”.

Como país, aseguró Solón, vamos a plantear a Venezuela la suscripción de un TCP a partir de los acuerdos ya avanzados. “Creemos que esa es la forma concreta en que vamos a ir construyendo proyectos como el ALBA”.

Recordó que con Cuba “estamos desarrollando la Operación Milagro y la Campaña de Alfabetización. Tenemos una relación que no es un mero intercambio comercial, sino un intercambio en función de las necesidades de la población, que es precisamente el espíritu del Tratado de Comercio de los Pueblos”.

Samuel Pinheiro Guimarães

A importância essencial da América do Sul

1.       A América do Sul se encontra, case necessária e inarredavelmente, no centro da política externa brasileira. Por sua vez, o núcleo da política brasileira na América do Sul está no Mercosul. E o cerne da política brasileira no Mercosul tem de ser, sem dúvida, a Argentina. A integração entre o Brasil e a Argentina e seu papel decisivo na América do Sul deve ser o objetivo mais certo, mais constante, mais vigoroso das estratégias políticas e econômicas tanto do Brasil quanto da Argentina. Qualquer tentativa de estabelecer diferentes prioridades para a política externa brasileira, e mesmo a atenção insuficiente a esses fundamentos, certamente provocará graves conseqüências e correrá sério risco de fracasso.

2        A África Ocidental, com seus 23 Estados ribeirinhos, inclusive os arquipélagos de Cabo Verde e São Tomé e Príncipe, é a fronteira atlântica do Brasil, continente a que estamos unidos pela história, pelo sangue, pela cultura, pelo colonialismo e pela semelhança de desafios. A Ásia é o novo centro dinâmico da economia mundial, fonte de lucros inesgotáveis para as megaempresas ocidentais e destino de uma das maiores migrações de capital e tecnologia avançada da História. A Europa e a América do Norte são para o Brasil, como para qualquer ex-colônia e para eventuais pretendentes a colônia, as áreas tradicionais de vinculação política, econômica e cultural. Porém, por mais importantes que sejam, como aliás são, os vínculos e os interesses atuais e potenciais brasileiros com todas essas áreas e por melhores que sejam com os Estados que as integram as nossas relações, a política externa não poderá ser eficaz se não estiver ancorada na política brasileira na América do Sul. As características da situação geopolítica do Brasil, isto é, seu território, sua localização geográfica, sua população, suas fronteiras, sua economia, assim como a conjuntura e a estrutura do sistema mundial, tornam a prioridade sul-americana uma realidade essencial.

3        O cenário econômico mundial se caracteriza pela simultânea globalização e gradual formação de grandes blocos de Estados na Europa, na América do Norte e na Ásia; pelo acelerado progresso científico e tecnológico, em especial nas áreas da informática e da biotecnologia, com sua vinculação às despesas e atividades militares; pela concentração do capital e oligopolização de mercados, medida pelo número de fusões e aquisições que passaram de 9 mil, no valor de US$ 850 bilhões, em 1995, para 33 mil, no valor de quase 4 trilhões de dólares, em 2006, e pela financeirização da economia, pois os ativos ( ações, títulos e depósitos) financeiros passaram de 109% da produção mundial, em 1980, para 316% em 2005; pela transformação dos mercados de trabalho e pela pressão permanente para reverter os direitos dos trabalhadores; pela acelerada degradação ambiental; pela insegurança energética e pelas migrações. O cenário político mundial se caracteriza pela concentração de poder político, militar, econômico, tecnológico e ideológico nos países altamente desenvolvidos; pelo arbítrio e pela violência das Grandes Potências; pela ameaça real, e sua utilização oportunista, do terrorismo; pelo desrespeito aos princípios de não-intervenção e de autodeterminação de parte das Grandes Potências políticas, econômicas e militares; pelo individualismo dos Estados ricos e a insuficiente e cadente cooperação internacional; pela emergência da China, como potência econômica e política, regional e mundial.

4        Os Estados no centro do sistema mundial, cada vez mais ricos e poderosos, pois a diferença de renda entre Estados ricos e pobres passou de 1 para 4 em 1914 para 1 para 7 em 2000, porém vinculados às economias periféricas quanto a recursos estratégicos e mercados e com uma população cadente, procuram, por meio de negociações internacionais, definir normas e regimes que permitam preservar e até ampliar sua situação privilegiada no centro do sistema militar, político, econômico e tecnológico que é o resultado, por um lado, da II Guerra Mundial e dos regimes coloniais e, por outro lado, do êxito de seus esforços nacionais, em especial na esfera científica e tecnológica. Nesse processo, sua capacidade de articular ideologias e de apresentar “soluções” como benéficas a toda a “comunidade internacional” é extraordinária e importantíssima pois é a base de sua estratégia de arregimentação de Estados e de elites periféricas cooptadas para alcançar seus objetivos nacionais, vestidos com a capa de objetivos da humanidade.

5        Neste cenário violento e instável de grandes blocos, multipolar, há uma tendência a que países pequenos e até médios venham a ser absorvidos, mais ou menos formalmente, pelos grandes Estados e economias aos quais ou se encontram tradicionalmente vinculados por laços de origem colonial ou estão em sua esfera de influência histórica, como no caso da América Central; ou tenham feito parte de seu território, como no caso dos países que formam a Comunidade de Estados Independentes – CEI; ou se vinculam por laços étnicos e culturais, como no caso da diáspora chinesa na Ásia.

6        Os países médios que constituem a América do Sul se encontram diante do dilema ou de se unirem e assim formarem um grande bloco de 17 milhões de Km2 e de 400 milhões de habitantes para defender seus interesses inalienáveis de aceleração do desenvolvimento econômico, de preservação de autonomia política e de identidade cultural, ou de serem absorvidos como simples periferias de outros grandes blocos, sem direito à participação efetiva na condução dos destinos econômicos e políticos desses blocos, os quais são definidos pelos países que se encontram em seu centro. A questão fundamental é que as características, a evolução histórica e os interesses dos Estados poderosos que se encontram no centro dos esquemas de integração são distintos daqueles dos países subdesenvolvidos que a eles se agregam através de tratados de livre comércio, ou que nome tenham, os quais ficam assim sujeitos às conseqüências das decisões estratégicas dos países centrais que podem ou não atender às suas necessidades históricas.

7        Os desafios sul-americanos diante desse dilema, que é decisivo, são enormes: superar os obstáculos que decorrem das grandes assimetrias que existem entre os países da região, sejam elas de natureza territorial, demográfica, de recursos naturais, de energia, de níveis de desenvolvimento político, cultural, agrícola, industrial e de serviços; enfrentar com persistência as enormes disparidades sociais que são semelhantes em todos esses países; realizar o extraordinário potencial econômico da região; dissolver os ressentimentos e as desconfianças históricas que dificultam sua integração.

8        As assimetrias territoriais são extraordinárias. Na América do Sul convivem países como o Brasil, com 8,5 milhões de quilômetros quadrados; como a Argentina, com seus 3,7 milhões de quilômetros quadrados e em seguida outros dez países, cada um com território inferior a 1,2 milhão de quilômetros quadrados. Três dos países da região se encontram voltados exclusivamente para o Pacífico, três se debruçam sobre o Oceano Atlântico, quatro são caribenhos e dois são mediterrâneos. O Brasil tem 15.735 km de fronteiras com nove Estados vizinhos, enquanto a Argentina, a Bolívia e o Peru têm fronteiras com cinco vizinhos. Devido a essas circunstâncias geográficas, os pontos de vista geopolíticos de cada país são inicialmente distintos, o que se agrava pelo fato de até recentemente – e mesmo até hoje –  terem estado separados os países da região pela Cordilheira, pela floresta, pelas distâncias e pelos imensos vazios demográficos.

9        O Brasil tem 190 milhões de habitantes, que correspondem a cerca de 50% da população da América do Sul, enquanto o segundo maior país em população, que é a Colômbia, tem 46 milhões de habitantes e o terceiro, a Argentina, tem 39 milhões. As taxas de crescimento demográfico variam de 3% no Paraguai a 0,7 % no Uruguai. A América do Sul viveu nos últimos anos um processo acelerado de urbanização, com o surgimento de megalópoles que concentram grandes parcelas da população total de cada país, e que exibem periferias paupérrimas e violentas. Há significativas populações de deslocados internos no Peru, como conseqüência da luta feroz contra a insurreição do Sendero Luminoso, e de refugiados, como no caso de colombianos na Venezuela e no Equador. No passado, as ditaduras e os regimes militares provocaram o exílio de numerosos militantes políticos, intelectuais, operários e sindicalistas, com grave prejuízo para o desenvolvimento político dos países mais afetados. Ademais, durante algumas décadas o reduzido ritmo de crescimento econômico provocou movimentos migratórios significativos dos países da região em direção aos Estados Unidos e à Europa Ocidental. Há um milhão de uruguaios vivendo fora do Uruguai enquanto três milhões se encontram no país. Há 400 mil equatorianos na Espanha e 4 milhões de brasileiros no exterior. Ao mesmo tempo, há grandes espaços despovoados na América do Sul, onde a densidade demográfica é inferior a 1 habitante por quilômetro quadrado, enquanto nas megalópoles a densidade populacional atinge mais de 10.000 habitantes por quilômetro quadrado. A América do Sul exibe índices de concentração de renda e de riqueza, de pobreza e de indigência, de opulência e luxo, contrastes espantosos entre riquíssimas mansões e palafitas miseráveis, entre excelentes hospitais privados e hospitais públicos decadentes, entre escolas de Primeiro Mundo e pardieiros escolares. Todavia, conta a América do Sul com as vantagens da ausência de conflitos raciais agudos, ainda que ocorra discriminação racial; com a presença dominante de idiomas de comum origem ibérica, ainda que em alguns países existam idiomas indígenas que conseguiram sobreviver; com a ausência de conflitos religiosos e predominância católica ao lado da rápida expansão das igrejas protestantes; com uma população grande, mas que não é excessiva, como em certos países asiáticos. O desafio que representa a emergência das populações indígenas historicamente oprimidas e seus efeitos para as relações políticas entre os países da América do Sul vão exigir, todavia, especial atenção e habilidade.

10      A América do Sul é uma região extremamente rica em recursos naturais, que se encontram distribuídos de forma muito desigual entre os diversos países. Enquanto o Brasil tem as maiores reservas mundiais de minério de ferro de excelente teor, a Argentina não as tem em volume suficiente. A Argentina dispõe de terras aráveis de extraordinária fertilidade, em contraste com o Chile. A Colômbia possui grandes reservas de carvão de boa qualidade e o Brasil as tem poucas e pobres. A Venezuela tem a sexta maior reserva de petróleo e a nona maior reserva de gás do mundo enquanto que, em todos os países do Cone Sul, inclusive no Brasil, são elas insuficientes para sustentar o ritmo de desenvolvimento, talvez de 7% a/a, necessário à absorção produtiva dos estoques históricos de mão-de-obra desempregada e subempregada e dos que chegam anualmente ao mercado. A Bolívia detém jazidas de gás que correspondem a duas vezes as brasileiras, mas tem sérias dificuldades para ampliar sua exploração. O Chile explora as maiores reservas conhecidas de minério de cobre do mundo, responsável por 40 % de suas exportações. O Paraguai ostenta um dos maiores potenciais hidrelétricos do mundo, em especial quando calculado em termos per capita, mas ainda não teve êxito em utilizá-lo para acelerar seu desenvolvimento. O Suriname tem a maior reserva de bauxita do planeta, ainda pouco explorada.

11      Encontra-se na América do Sul a maior floresta tropical do mundo, um tema central no debate político sobre o efeito estufa e suas conseqüências para o clima, e o maior estoque de biodiversidade do planeta, o qual é de grande importância para a renovação da agricultura e para a indústria farmacêutica; uma parcela importante das reservas de água doce do planeta, recurso cada vez mais estratégico e causa já de conflitos em certas regiões do globo, e o maior lençol de águas subterrâneas, o Aqüífero Guarani, que subjaz os territórios do Brasil, do Paraguai, da Argentina e do Uruguai.

 

As políticas econômicas

12      Os choques do petróleo (1973 e 1979), o endividamento excessivo e o súbito aumento das dívidas externas acarretaram crises e estagnação econômica que contribuíram para o fim dos regimes militares na América do Sul, em meados da década de 80. A vitória do neoliberalismo monetarista nos Estados Unidos e Reino Unido, a partir de Ronald Reagan (1981-1989) e Margaret Thatcher (1979-1990), e a renegociação da dívida externa (Plano Brady) forçaram aos países subdesenvolvidos a adoção de políticas de abertura comercial e financeira, desregulamentação e privatização, com base nos princípios do chamado Consenso de Washington. Essas políticas levaram a resultados desastrosos em países que nelas se envolveram mais a fundo, como foram o caso do Equador, da Bolívia e da Argentina, e deixaram seqüelas importantes em países como o Brasil, o Uruguai e a Venezuela.

13      Tais políticas neoliberais agravaram a já elevada concentração de renda e de riqueza, ampliaram o desemprego, contribuíram para a violência urbana, provocaram a fragilização do Estado e dos serviços públicos, o que levou por sua vez à gradual emergência de importantes movimentos políticos e sociais que passaram a preconizar (explícita ou implicitamente) a revisão do modelo econômico e social neoliberal.

14      Os países da América do Sul, em conseqüência das políticas neoliberais que determinaram a redução negociada e às vezes até unilateral de suas tarifas aduaneiras, a privatização de suas empresas estatais e a liberalização de seus mercados de capital, aumentaram suas importações de produtos industriais dos países desenvolvidos e o ingresso descontrolado de capitais estrangeiros. Essas políticas levaram à desindustrialização em maior ou menor grau, à maior influência do capital multinacional e à desnacionalização de importantes setores de suas economias, em especial do setor financeiro, com efeitos econômicos, e inclusive políticos, significativos.

15      Essa maior integração, porém de natureza passiva, dos países sul-americanos na economia mundial é radicalmente distinta da integração na economia global que ocorre com os países altamente desenvolvidos ou com certos países emergentes, como a Coréia. Nesses últimos casos, essa maior integração se verifica através da internacionalização das atividades de suas grandes empresas de atuação multinacional mas de capital nacional, bem como de suas exportações de alto conteúdo tecnológico enquanto que, no caso dos países sul-americanos, se verifica através da maior participação de megaempresas multinacionais em suas economias, já que não possuem esses últimos países (com raras exceções) grandes empresas capazes de se internacionalizarem, e da expansão de suas exportações de “commodities”.

16      Em decorrência, os países da América do Sul retomaram, voluntária ou involuntariamente, sua especialização histórica na exportação de produtos primários, tradicionais ou novos, com maior grau, por vezes, de elaboração, para atender à demanda dos países altamente desenvolvidos e da China. Assim, grosso modo, sua agricultura se sofisticou e passou a ser denominada de agribusiness; sua indústria foi adquirida ou cerrou suas portas em um processo de desindustrialização/desnacionalização e muitas de suas empresas de serviços, em especial as empresas modernas e aquelas do setor financeiro, foram adquiridas por megaempresas multinacionais.

17      A capacidade de utilizar tradicionais instrumentos de promoção do desenvolvimento econômico, que aliás tinham sido amplamente usados pelos países hoje desenvolvidos no início de seu processo de desenvolvimento (i.e. de seu processo de industrialização), foi abandonada pelos países da América do Sul na Rodada Uruguai, quando aceitaram normas sobre disciplina do capital estrangeiro as quais proíbem políticas tais como a nacionalização de insumos, o estabelecimento de metas de exportação e o reinvestimento de parte dos lucros; ou que estabelecem normas sobre propriedade intelectual que ampliaram os prazos de patentes e estabelecem patentes sobre fármacos, dificultando de fato o desenvolvimento tecnológico e gerando enormes remessas financeiras. Este abandono dos instrumentos econômicos tradicionais de uso do Estado, assim como a confiança excessiva desses países no livre jogo das forças de mercado contribuíram para que viessem a ter seu ritmo de crescimento reduzido ou estagnado. Por outro lado, a derrocada ideológica do Welfare State nos países desenvolvidos fez com que os países sul-americanos também contraíssem ou desarticulassem os seus programas sociais, o que contribuiu para agravar a concentração de renda e de propriedade e para a pequena expansão de seu mercado interno.

18      Assim, em grande parte se explicam as baixas taxas de crescimento na América do Sul, das décadas de 80 e 90, quando comparadas às de alguns países da Ásia, e a eventual derrocada dos governos neoliberais na Argentina, no Brasil, no Chile, na Bolívia, no Equador e na Venezuela. Nos últimos anos, surgiram na América do Sul governos que procuram manter as políticas de austeridade fiscal e de controle inflacionário enquanto tentam ressuscitar o Estado como agente suplementar do desenvolvimento econômico e como agente de redução da desigualdade social, diante das enormes injustiças e das pressões dos segmentos historicamente oprimidos em suas sociedades.

O bloco sul-americano

19      A atual experiência de integração sul-americana tem distintas origens, motivações e paralelos históricos. Em primeiro lugar, o trauma da desintegração dos Vice-Reinados do Império espanhol a partir de 1810, a desintegração posterior da Grã Colômbia em 1830, e a sobrevivência da utopia de unidade latino-americana, preconizada pelo Libertador Simon Bolívar. Segundo, a tentativa do notável economista argentino, Raul Prebisch, de explicar as razões do desenvolvimento na América do Norte em confronto com o atraso sul-americano levou à formulação da teoria estruturalista pela Comissão Econômica para a América Latina – CEPAL. Prebisch encontrou essas razões nas características das economias primário-exportadoras sul-americanas e na natureza de seu processo de incorporação do progresso tecnológico; na reduzida dimensão e no isolamento de cada mercado nacional; na deterioração secular dos termos de intercâmbio; na importância da industrialização como estratégia para a transformação econômica. Em terceiro lugar, a percepção de êxito da experiência de planejamento econômico e de industrialização acelerada vivida pela União Soviética, da experiência keynesiana e da planificação de guerra norte-americana e, finalmente, as políticas de economia mista e de planejamento indicativo dos governos socialistas europeus após a II Guerra Mundial. Quarto, na experiência de construção da Comunidade Econômica Européia, fundada na integração de mercados, na elaboração de políticas comuns e no financiamento pelos países mais ricos do esforço de redução de assimetrias entre as economias participantes.

20      Este conjunto de experiências inspirou os programas de desenvolvimento econômico com base na industrialização, em especial no Brasil durante o Governo Juscelino Kubitschek, as propostas da CEPAL de constituição de um mercado comum latino-americano, as propostas argentinas de criação de uma área de livre comércio que reunificasse economicamente as partes do antigo Vice-Reinado do Prata, e estimulou à constituição em 1960 da Associação Latino-Americana de Livre Comércio – ALALC.

21      Naturalmente, ao processo de integração da América do Sul e do Cone Sul subjazia a latente rivalidade entre Brasil e Argentina por influência política na região do Rio da Prata, os resquícios de um passado de lutas e a lembrança da inicial predominância industrial argentina. E outros ressentimentos decorrentes de conflitos e quase-conflitos passados, como entre Chile e Argentina; entre Bolívia, Chile e Peru; entre Peru e Equador; entre Colômbia e Venezuela, entre a Bolívia e o Paraguai, entre Brasil e Paraguai e entre Brasil e Bolívia.

22      A Associação Latino Americana de Livre Comércio, criada em 1960, e cuja meta era eliminar todas as barreiras ao comércio entre os Estados membros até 1980, encontrou obstáculos causados pelas políticas nacionais de substituição de importações e de industrialização e, mais tarde, pelas políticas de controle de importações para enfrentar as súbitas crises do petróleo que acarretaram inéditos déficits comerciais que atingiram os países importadores de energia, em especial o Brasil.

23      A partir de 1965, o Convênio de Créditos Recíprocos (CCR) entre os países da ALALC, e mais a República Dominicana, passa a permitir o comércio sem o uso imediato de divisas fortes, através de um sistema quadrimestral de compensação multilateral de créditos que funcionou com grande êxito sem que ocorresse nenhum caso de “default” até a década de 1980, quando foi progressivamente desativado pelos novos tecnocratas que vieram a ocupar os Bancos Centrais dos países da região, na esteira do período de governos neoliberais.

24      Em 1969, os países andinos celebraram o Pacto Andino (mais tarde CAN) como um projeto mais audacioso de integração e de planejamento do desenvolvimento, prevendo inclusive a alocação espacial de indústrias entre os Estados membros e a elaboração de políticas comuns, inclusive no campo do investimento estrangeiro.

25      Em 1980, a estagnação das negociações comerciais levou a substituição da ALALC pela Associação Latino Americana de Integração (ALADI). O Tratado de Montevidéu (80) incorporou o “patrimônio” de reduções tarifárias bilaterais, permitiu a negociação de acordos bilaterais de preferências, com a perspectiva de sua eventual convergência, e tornou possível a concessão de preferências bilaterais ao abrigo da “enabling clause” do então GATT.

26      Em 1985, Brasil e Argentina decidiram lançar um processo de integração bilateral gradual, com o objetivo central de promover o desenvolvimento econômico, a que se juntaram, em 1991, Paraguai e Uruguai, formando-se assim o Mercosul. Este último surgiu como um projeto enquadrado na concepção do Consenso de Washington do livre comércio como instrumento único e suficiente para a promoção do desenvolvimento, redução das desigualdades sociais e geração de empregos, na melhor tradição das Escolas de Manchester e de Chicago.

27      Após a conclusão do NAFTA em 1994, em que o México na prática abandonou a ALADI, os Estados Unidos, no contexto da Cúpula das Américas, lançaram um projeto ambicioso de negociação de uma Área de Livre Comércio das Américas (ALCA). Esse projeto, na realidade, mais do que uma área de livre comércio de bens, criaria um território econômico único nas Américas, com a livre movimentação de bens, serviços e capital (mas não de mão-de-obra ou tecnologia) e estabeleceria regras uniformes ainda mais restritivas à execução de políticas nacionais ou regionais de desenvolvimento econômico, já que as propostas originais eram OMC-Plus e NAFTA-plus (e parecem continuar a ser tais como revelam os textos dos tratados bilaterais de livre comércio, celebrados pelos Estados Unidos).

28      Apesar das declarações diplomáticas feitas na ocasião, e reiteradas posteriormente, de que a ALCA não afetaria os projetos de integração regional como a Comunidade Andina e o Mercosul, estava claro que a eventual concretização da ALCA eliminaria de fato a possibilidade de formação de um bloco econômico e político sul-americano.

29      Após o início das negociações da ALCA, e diante da extrema desigualdade de forças políticas e econômicas entre os países participantes, a negociação se interrompeu em 2004, após os Estados Unidos terem retirado os temas agrícolas e de defesa comercial (antidumping e subsídios) levando-os para o âmbito da OMC sob o pretexto de ser necessária uma negociação mais abrangente, inclusive com a União Européia. Em conseqüência e para equilibrar as negociações, o Mercosul considerou que os temas de investimento, compras governamentais e serviços deveriam também passar para o âmbito da Rodada de Doha na OMC e propôs aos Estados Unidos a negociação de um acordo do tipo 4+1, no campo do comércio de bens, proposta até hoje sem resposta, ou melhor, cuja resposta prática tem sido a firme atividade norte-americana de negociação de acordos bilaterais de livre comércio (na realidade com escopos muito mais amplos) com os países da América Central, a Colômbia, o Peru e (quase) com o Equador.

30      Paralelamente, o Mercosul empreendeu a negociação e celebrou acordos de livre comércio com o Chile (1995), com a Bolívia (1996), com a Venezuela, Equador e Colômbia (2004), e com o Peru (2005), que se referem exclusivamente ao comércio de bens e não incluem o comércio de serviços, compras governamentais, regras sobre investimentos, propriedade intelectual, etc.

31      Em 2002, o Congresso dos Estados Unidos tinha aprovado o ATPDEA (Andean Trade Promotion and Drug Eradication Act) pelo qual concederiam unilateralmente preferências comerciais, sem reciprocidade de parte dos beneficiários, para listas de produtos de países andinos em troca da execução de programas de erradicação das plantações de coca. O resultado da aplicação durante cinco anos dessa lei foi, de um lado, expandir as exportações de tais produtos desses países para os Estados Unidos e, de outro, ensejar o surgimento nesses países de grupos de interesses empresariais locais favoráveis à negociação de acordos de livre comércio com os Estados Unidos quando se encerrasse o prazo de vigência daquele Ato.

32      Posteriormente, foi lançada em 2004, em Cuzco, o projeto de formação de uma Comunidade Sul-Americana de Nações, hoje denominada UNASUL, organização que se pretenderia semelhante à União Africana, na África; à União Européia na Europa; à ASEAN, na Ásia; e ao MCCA, na América Central. As negociações para concretizar a UNASUL têm encontrado três distintas resistências: primeiro, a de países que celebraram acordos de livre comércio com os Estados Unidos; segundo, a de países que dão prioridade ao fortalecimento do Mercosul e que acreditam que o Brasil estaria “trocando” o Mercosul pela UNASUL; terceiro, a de países que consideram ser necessário uma organização mais audaciosa, com base na solidariedade e na cooperação e não naquilo que consideram ser o individualismo “mercantilista” das preferências comerciais, dos projetos de investimento e do livre comércio.

A Argentina e a estratégia de integração brasileira

33      Não há a menor possibilidade de construção de um espaço econômico e político sul-americano (economicista ou solidarista, não importa) sem um amplo programa de construção e de integração da infra-estrutura de transportes, de energia e de comunicações dos países da América do Sul. O comércio entre os seis países fundadores da Comunidade Econômica Européia correspondia em 1958 a cerca de 40% do seu comércio total e hoje supera 80%. Em contraste, o comércio entre os países da América do Sul correspondia em 1960, data de começo da ALALC, a cerca de 10% e ainda em 2006 não superou 17% do total do comércio exterior da região. Esse reduzido comércio tinha sua causa na pequena diversificação industrial das economias sul-americanas (hoje também um obstáculo, pois quanto mais diversificadas as economias maior o seu comércio recíproco), mas também na pequena densidade dos sistemas de transportes naquela época e até hoje. Há um interesse vital em conectar os sistemas de transportes nacionais e as duas costas do subcontinente, superando os obstáculos da Floresta e da Cordilheira, como se está fazendo ao norte entre Brasil e Peru, e se procurará fazer ao sul, entre Brasil, Argentina e Chile. A Iniciativa para a Integração da Regional Sul-Americana (IIRSA), em 2000, foi um passo de grande importância neste esforço de planejamento, que necessita para se concretizar da alavanca regional do financiamento.

34      Uma das maiores dificuldades dos países da América do Sul é o acesso a crédito para investimentos em infra-estrutura devido a limites ao endividamento externo e à falta de acesso a instrumentos de garantia. Este acesso ao mercado internacional de capitais é tanto mais importante quanto maior for a dificuldade desses países em elevar sua poupança interna, devido à prioridade concedida ao serviço da dívida interna e externa. O Brasil tem contribuído para o fortalecimento da Cooperação Andina de Fomento – CAF, entidade financeira classificada como AA no mercado internacional e voltada para investimentos em infra-estrutura, e tem participado, de forma positiva e prudente, do processo de construção de um Banco do Sul que se deseja eficiente. O Brasil é um dos poucos, senão o único país da região, que dispõe de um forte banco de desenvolvimento, cujos ativos são de US$ 87 bilhões, maiores que os do Banco Interamericano de Desenvolvimento – BID ( US 66 bilhões), que pode emprestar recursos para a execução de obras de infra-estrutura em condições competitivas com as do mercado internacional e sem condicionar tais empréstimos a “compromissos” de política externa ou à execução de “reformas” econômicas internas. É parte essencial da estratégia brasileira de integração fornecer crédito aos países vizinhos para a execução de obras de infra-estrutura e, no futuro, vir a fornecer créditos a empresas desses países em condições normais semelhantes às que se exigem de empresas brasileiras, tendo em vista o interesse vital brasileiro no crescimento e no desenvolvimento dos países vizinhos até mesmo por razões de interesse próprio, devido à grande importância de seus mercados para as exportações brasileiras e, em conseqüência, para o nível de atividade econômica geral e de suas empresas.

35      Além da integração da infra-estrutura física em termos de rodovias, pontes, ferrovias e de energia é essencial a integração das comunicações aéreas, pela sua importância para a economia e a política, assim como da mídia em especial a televisão, essencial à formação do imaginário sul-americano, através do conhecimento da vida política, econômica e social dos países da região, hoje desconhecida do grande público e, portanto, fonte de toda  sorte de preconceitos e manipulações que envenenam a opinião pública e afetam os discursos, as atividades e as decisões políticas. A TV Brasil – Canal Integración e a TELESUR são experiências não-hegemônicas de integração de comunicações, assim como a iniciativa brasileira de procurar estabelecer um padrão regional de TV Digital, com a participação dos Estados do Mercosul, inclusive no processo industrial.

36      A questão da segurança energética é central nos dias de hoje e no futuro previsível. A integração energética e a autonomia regional em energia para garantir a segurança de abastecimento energético é prioridade absoluta da política externa brasileira na América do Sul. Não há possibilidade de crescer a 7% a/a na média durante um período longo sem um suprimento suficiente, seguro e crescente de energia. Este suprimento depende de investimentos de prazo mais ou menos longo de maturação, tais como a prospecção de jazidas de petróleo, gás e urânio, a construção de barragens, a construção de usinas hidro e termoelétricas, assim como nucleares . A América do Sul, como região, tem um excedente global de energia, porém com grandes superávites atuais e potenciais em certos países e com severos déficits em outros. No primeiro caso, se encontram a Venezuela, o Equador e a Bolívia para o gás e o petróleo. No caso de energia hidrelétrica, há excedentes extraordinários no Brasil, no Paraguai e na Venezuela. De outro lado, se encontram países com déficit estrutural de energia como o Chile e o Uruguai e casos intermediários como são o Peru, a Colômbia e a Argentina. Assim, a integração energética da região permitirá reduzir as importações extra-regionais e fortalecer a economia da América do Sul. No esforço de fortalecer e de integrar o sistema energético da região, o Brasil tem financiado a construção de gasodutos na Argentina e tem se empenhado na concretização do projeto do Grande Gasoduto do Sul que deverá vincular os maiores centros produtores de energia (a Venezuela e a Bolívia) aos maiores mercados consumidores (o Brasil, a Argentina e o Chile). O Brasil está disposto a compartilhar a tecnologia que desenvolveu na área dos biocombustíveis, acreditando que a crise energética e ambiental somente poderá ser enfrentada com eficiência a partir de uma modificação gradual da matriz energética mundial, de uma redução do consumo e do desperdício nos países altamente desenvolvidos, principais responsáveis pela emissão de gases de efeito estufa.

37      A redução das assimetrias é o segundo elemento essencial da estratégia brasileira de integração. Em um processo de integração em que as assimetrias entre as partes são significativas tornam-se indispensáveis programas específicos e ambiciosos para promover sua redução. É óbvio que não se trata aqui das assimetrias de território e de população mas sim daquelas assimetrias de natureza econômica e social. É indispensável a existência de um processo de transferência de renda sob a forma de investimentos entre os Estados participantes do esquema de integração como ocorreu e ocorre ainda hoje na União Européia. Esse processo é ainda embrionário no Mercosul, sendo o Fundo para Convergência Estrutural e o Fortalecimento Institucional do Mercosul – FOCEM, apenas um modesto início.

38      A generosidade dos países maiores e mais desenvolvidos é sempre mencionada pelo Presidente Lula como um terceiro elemento essencial para o êxito do processo de integração do Mercosul e da América do Sul. Esta generosidade deve se traduzir pelo tratamento diferencial, sem exigência de reciprocidade, em relação a todos os países da América do Sul que estejam engajados no processo de integração regional, nas áreas do comércio de bens, de serviços, de compras governamentais, de propriedade intelectual etc. Isto é, o Brasil deve estar disposto a conceder tratamento mais vantajoso sem reciprocidade a todos os seus vizinhos, em especial àqueles de menor desenvolvimento relativo, aos países mediterrâneos e aos países de menor PIB per capita.         O Brasil, apesar de ser o maior país da região, não acredita ser possível desenvolver-se isoladamente sem que toda a região se desenvolva econômica e socialmente e se assegure razoável grau de estabilidade política e segurança. Assim, a solidariedade nos esforços de desenvolvimento e de integração é uma idéia central na estratégia brasileira na América do Sul, assim como a idéia de que este processo é um processo entre parceiros iguais e soberanos, sem hegemonias nem lideranças.

39      A integração econômica da América do Sul tem passado por um processo acelerado de expansão, impulsionado pela redução das tarifas propiciada pelos acordos comerciais preferenciais. O comércio de bens intra-América do Sul que era de 10 bilhões de dólares em 1980 passou para 68 bilhões em 2005. O comércio de serviços, que era praticamente inexistente na década de 1960, também se expandiu, ainda que em menor escala. Os exemplos mais relevantes de expansão poderiam ser dados pelo setor financeiro, com o estabelecimento de filiais de bancos, pelo setor dos transportes aéreos e mesmo terrestres, e pelo turismo intra-regional. Os investimentos de empresas da região em terceiros países da própria região se tornaram expressivos, como demonstra a expansão das empresas chilenas e brasileiras, em especial na Argentina. Finalmente, houve considerável expansão das populações de imigrantes intra-regionais. Todos esses fatores contribuem para a formação de um mercado único sul-americano, já que, implementados os acordos comerciais bilaterais entre países da região, cerca de 95% do comércio intra-regional será livre de tarifas, em 2019. A reativação do CCR e o estabelecimento de uma moeda comum para transações entre Brasil e Argentina muito contribuirão para a expansão do comércio bilateral e regional.

40      A estratégia brasileira no campo comercial tem sido procurar consolidar o Mercosul e promover a formação de uma área de livre comércio na América do Sul, levando em devida conta as assimetrias entre os países da região . A compreensão brasileira com as necessidades de recuperação e fortalecimento industrial de seus   vizinhos nos levou à negociação do Mecanismo de Adaptação Competitiva com a Argentina, aos esforços de estabelecimento de cadeias produtivas regionais e à execução do Programa de Substituição Competitiva de Importações, cujo objetivo é tentar contribuir para a redução dos extremos e crônicos déficits comerciais bilaterais, quase todos favoráveis ao Brasil. No campo externo, a estratégia brasileira visa a ampliar os mercados para as exportações do Mercosul através da negociação de acordos de livre comércio ou de preferências comerciais com países desenvolvidos, como no caso da União Européia; e com países em desenvolvimento tais como a Índia e a África do Sul, em busca da abertura de mercados e visa a prestigiar e fortalecer o processo de negociação em conjunto, que não só favorece  os parceiros maiores, mas também os parceiros menores do Mercosul, na medida em que obtêm eles condições de acesso que possivelmente não alcançariam caso negociassem isoladamente.

41.     Em um sistema mundial cujo centro acumula cada vez mais poder econômico, político, militar, tecnológico e ideológico; em que cada vez mais aumenta o hiato entre os países desenvolvidos e subdesenvolvidos; em que o risco ambiental e energético se agrava; e em que este centro procura tecer uma rede de acordos e de normas internacionais que assegurem o gozo dos privilégios que os países centrais adquiriram no processo histórico e em que dessas negociações participam grandes blocos de países, a atuação individual, isolada, nessas negociações não é vantajosa, nem mesmo para um país com as dimensões de território, população e PIB que tem o Brasil. Assim, para o Brasil é de indispensável importância poder contar com os Estados vizinhos da América do Sul nas complexas negociações internacionais de que participa. Mas talvez ainda seja de maior importância para os Estados vizinhos a articulação de alianças entre si e com o Brasil para atuar com maior eficiência na defesa de seus interesses nessas negociações.

42      Apesar das assimetrias de toda ordem que caracterizam os países da região, somos todos subdesenvolvidos e as características centrais do subdesenvolvimento são as disparidades sociais, as vulnerabilidades externas e o potencial não- explorado de nossas sociedades. No caso das desigualdades sociais, a América do Sul se caracteriza como uma das regiões do mundo onde há a maior concentração de renda e de riqueza e onde há ativos enormes aplicados no exterior, resultado de “fugas” históricas de capital. Por outro lado, o Brasil tem procurado estabelecer programas de combate à fome e à pobreza, e de natureza social em geral, que podem ser objeto de útil intercâmbio de experiências. Uma das características da região é o crescente número de imigrantes ( legais e ilegais) de refugiados e de deslocados cuja situação necessita ser regularizada de forma solidária e humanitária, a exemplo do que têm feito a Argentina e a Venezuela. O Brasil tem como prioridade a cooperação nas áreas de fronteira, cada vez mais vivas, a promoção de eliminação de vistos e de exigências burocráticas que dificultam a circulação de mão de obra e a negociação da concessão de direitos políticos aos cidadãos sul-americanos em todos os países da região, a começar pelo Brasil. A decisão brasileira de tornar obrigatório o espanhol no ensino médio no Brasil contribuirá para o processo de integração social e cultural da América do Sul.

43      No campo da política, os mecanismos de integração devem propiciar e estimular a cooperação entre os Estados sul-americanos nos foros, nas disputas e nas negociações internacionais, encorajar a solução pacífica de controvérsias, sem interferência de potências extra-regionais, o respeito absoluto e estrito aos princípios de não-intervenção e de autodeterminação, i.e. não deve nenhum Estado e muito menos o Brasil imiscuir-se nos processos domésticos dos países vizinhos nem procurar exportar modelos políticos por mais que os apreciemos para uso interno. O Brasil tem, como princípio, manter-se sempre imparcial diante de disputas que surgem periodicamente entre países vizinhos, bastando lembrar a ressurreição da questão da mediterraneidade entre Bolívia, Chile e Peru; da fumigação na fronteira entre o Equador e Colômbia; das divergências ocasionais entre Colômbia e Venezuela; da questão das papeleiras entre Argentina e Uruguai. E o Brasil tem procurado tratar com generosidade e lucidez política, e não com o rigor do economicismo míope, apesar das resistências internas e dos preconceitos de setores conservadores da sociedade brasileira, as reivindicações econômicas, em relação ao Brasil, que fazem por vezes Bolívia, Paraguai e Uruguai. O Parlamento do Mercosul será o foro para o conhecimento mais íntimo dos políticos e dos estadistas dos países da América do Sul, contribuindo para o indispensável ambiente político a um processo de integração.

44      No processo de integração do Mercosul e da América do Sul e nas relações políticas com o mundo multipolar violento e “absorvedor” em que vivemos, Brasil e Argentina se encontram unidos pelos objetivos comuns de transformar o sistema internacional no sentido de que as normas que regem as relações entre os Estados e as economias sejam de tal natureza que os países em desenvolvimento como o Brasil e a Argentina preservem o espaço necessário para a elaboração e a execução de políticas de desenvolvimento que permitam superar as desigualdades, vencer as vulnerabilidades e realizar o potencial de suas sociedades.

45      No mundo arbitrário e violento em que vivem o Brasil, e a América do Sul, é indispensável ter forças armadas proporcionais a seu território e à sua população. A estratégia brasileira de defesa vê o continente sul –americano de forma integrada e considera a cooperação militar entre as Forças Armadas, inclusive em termos de indústria bélica, como um fator de estabilidade e de equilíbrio regional através da construção de confiança. A inexistência de bases estrangeiras no continente sul-americano, à exceção de Manta, é um importante fator político e militar para o desenvolvimento e a autonomia regional. Por outro lado, o Brasil rejeita qualquer intervenção política, e ainda mais militar, de origem extra-regional nos assuntos da América do Sul. Os programas de intercâmbio militar exercem importante papel no processo de construção da confiança, assim como a participação de efetivos militares de países da região em operações de paz das Nações Unidas, em especial na Minustah.

46.     Finalmente, como mencionou o Ministro Celso Amorim, é necessário promover a integração e o desenvolvimento econômico e social de nossos países antes que o crime organizado o faça em suas diversas facetas: o narcotráfico, o contrabando, o tráfico de armas.

47.     A integração entre o Brasil e a Argentina e seu papel decisivo na América do Sul deve ser o objetivo mais certo, mais constante, mais vigoroso das estratégias políticas e econômicas tanto do Brasil quanto da Argentina . Foram nossos dois países aqueles que, na região, lograram alcançar o mais elevado nível de desenvolvimento industrial, agrícola, de serviços, científico e tecnológico; aqueles que, considerados como um conjunto, detêm as terras mais férteis e o subsolo mais rico da região; aqueles cuja população permite o desenvolvimento de mercados internos significativos, base necessária para a atuação firme no mercado externo sempre sujeito às medidas arbitrárias do protecionismo agrícola e industrial; somos aqueles países que, por seu grande potencial e interesses comuns, são os mais capazes de resistir à voragem absorvedora dos interesses comerciais, econômicos, financeiros e políticos dos países mais desenvolvidos, sempre mais preocupados em  concentrar poder e preservar privilégios econômicos e políticos, ainda que pela força, do que em contribuir para a construção de uma ordem econômica, ambiental e política necessária ao desenvolvimento da comunidade internacional  como um todo e à preservação do planeta. A coordenação política  que ocorre entre a Argentina e o Brasil na defesa de seus interesses nos foros, nas negociações, nos conflitos e nas crises internacionais  atingiu extraordinária intensidade e eficiência e foi isto que nos permitiu agir no âmbito do Conselho de Segurança, das negociações ambientais, das negociações hemisféricas desiguais e das negociações multilaterais econômicas da Rodada Doha, através do G-20, de modo a impedir o desequilíbrio de seus resultados e a garantir o espaço necessário às nossas políticas de desenvolvimento econômico.

48.     Falta muito a fazer, em especial nos campos avançados do desenvolvimento científico e tecnológico que plasmarão a sociedade do futuro, tais como as atividades espaciais, aeronáuticas, nucleares, de defesa, de informática e de biotecnologia. É necessário e indispensável que todos os organismos da estrutura burocrática dos Estados brasileiro e argentino, ainda muitas vezes envolvidos em rivalidades, ressentimentos e desconfianças históricas, compreendam o desafio que a Nação argentina e a Nação brasileira enfrentam neste início do Século XXI, compreendam a visão estratégica dos presidentes Nestor Kirchner e Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva e contribuam, assim, para que se realize a faceta gloriosa da profecia de Juan Domingo Perón: “O Século XXI nos encontrará unidos ou dominados”.

José Seoane*, Emilio Taddei** & Clara Algranati***

The 1990s opened the way to a renewed capitalist globalization in its neoliberal form, buy whose impact on Latin America has been glaringly noticeable and profound. Extending a process begun in previous decades, treatment promoted now by the so-called “Washington Consensus”, the adoption of neoliberal policies was to become generalized all over the region, taking on a newly radical form. The governments of Carlos Menem (Argentina), Alberto Fujimori (Peru), Salinas de Gortari (Mexico), Collor de Melo and later Fernando H. Cardoso (Brazil), became some of its best-known presidential incarnations. The profound and regressive consequences in social and democratic terms entailed by the application of these policies (mass pauperization being one their most tragic expressions) were the result of the acute structural transformations that modified the societal geography of Latin American capitalisms in the framework of the new order that appeared to be imposed by so-called “neoliberal globalization”2.

The application of these policies certainly faced numerous forms of resistance and protests in the region. In the first half of the 1990s two Latin American presidents (Collor de Melo in Brazil and Carlos Andrés Pérez in Venezuela) had to leave their posts in an “unexpected” manner as the result, among other issues, of rising unease and social repudiation. Nevertheless, in the regional context, the acts of resistance in those years to the application of the neoliberal recipes exhibited a configuration much more fragmented in social terms and more localized in sectorial and territorial terms than those that preceded them, while being unable in most cases to hinder the implementation of those policies. In the terrain of the social disciplines, this process, mediated by the hegemony wrested by the dominant thinking and its formulations regarding the “end of history”, meant the displacement of the problématique of conflict and of social movements from the relatively central space it had filled in the preceding decades –although from different perspectives– to an almost marginal and impoverished position.

Nevertheless, toward the end of that decade Latin America’s social reality again appeared marked by a sustained increase in social conflictivity. The continuing nature of this process may be appreciated in the survey carried by the Latin American Social Observatory (in Spanish, OSAL-CLACSO) for the nineteen countries of the Latin American region (see Chart 1), which for the period ranging from May-August 2000 to the same quarter of 2002 shows a rise in the number of the episodes of conflict surveyed of more than 180%. Because of the regional magnitude it attains (beyond exceptions and national differences), because of the characteristics it exhibits, and because of its perdurability, this increase in social conflictivity accounts for the appearance of a new cycle of social protest, which, being inscribed in the force field resulting from the regressive structural transformations forged by the implanting of neoliberalism in our countries, emerges to contest the latter.

In some cases, the Zapatist uprising of early 1994 has been pointed out as the emblematic event of the awakening of this cycle. This reference turns out to be significant insofar as, from diverse points of view, the revolt of the Chiapas indigenous exhibits some of the elements that distinguish the social movements that were to characterize the political and social realities of the region in recent years. In this regard, the national and international impact of the Zapatist uprising renders account of the emergence of movements of rural origin constituted on the basis of their indigenous identity; of the democratic demand for the collective rights of these peoples –which, in its claim for autonomy, questions the constitutive foundations of the nation-state; of the demand for a radical democratization of the political management of the state; and of the summoning of continental and global convergences. Beyond the specificity of the references that accompany and characterize Zapatism, its emergence sheds light, in a wider sense, on some of the particular aspects that appear to mark the majority of the popular movements that fill the ever more intense setting of social conflictivity in the region because of their organizational characteristics and of their forms of struggle, the inscriptions that give them an identity, their conceptualizations of collective action, and their understandings in relation to power, politics and the state. Therefore, it is not just a case of the beginning of a new cycle of social protests, but also of these appearing as incarnated in collective parties with particular features and that are different from those that had occupied the public scene in the past. At the same time, these experiences and the increase in social protest in Latin America were to develop in an almost simultaneous manner to the increase in conflict in other regions of the planet in a process that would mark the constitution of a space for international convergence in opposition to neoliberal globalization –what the mass media have named as the “antiglobalization” or “globaliphobe” movement and which, to be more precise, may be called an “alterglobalist” movement.

Lastly it may be pointed out that this rise in social protest and the emergence and consolidation of new social and popular movements converged into diverse social confrontation processes that, attaining major national significance, in some cases in recent years entailed the toppling of governments, the creation of deep political crises, or the failure of undertakings of a neoliberal character. In this regard, the “Gas War” (2003) in Bolivia, which ended with the resignation of the government of president Sánchez de Lozada and the opening of a transition that is still underway, emerges as inscribed within this process of mobilization of society that began with the “Water War” in Cochabamba (2000), also being expressed in the struggles of the coca-growing movement in the Chapare region and of the indigenous movement in the Altiplano plateau. Likewise, the indigenous uprising in Ecuador (2000), culminating in the fall of the government of Jamil Mahuad, marked the consolidation of the Confederation of the Indigenous Nations of Ecuador (in Spanish, CONAIE) in the context of social response to neoliberal policies in that country.

At the same time, the emergence and spread of the movement of unemployed workers in Argentina and the protests of the workers of the public sector in the second half of the 1990s converged with the mobilization of broad urban sectors of the middle classes to trigger the resignation of the government of president De la Rúa in late 2001. In the case of Brazil, one may stress the setting up of the Workers’ Unified Center (in Portuguese, CUT, in 1983) and of the Movement of Landless Rural Workers (MST, 1984), which starred in the opposition to neoliberal policies and were at the basis of the election victory of the presidential candidacy of Lula Da Silva (2002). In the same sense, the peasant mobilizations in Paraguay, which were to play an important role in the fall of president Cubas Grau (1999), will prolong themselves in the confrontation with the neoliberal policies promoted by succeeding governments; and the intense social protests in Peru (particularly the experience of the regional Civic Fronts) that were to mark the fall of the Fujimori regime (2000) were to continue in the resistance to the privatist policies promoted by the government of president Toledo (2002-2003).

It was precisely on the basis of the importance of these processes that, in early 2000, the Latin American Council of Social Sciences (CLACSO) decided to create the Latin American Social Observatory (OSAL) program with the aim of promoting a monitoring of social conflictivity and studies on social movements as well as regional exchanges and debate about these subjects. Over this period of more than four years, the work performed by OSAL led to the development of a chronology of the events of social conflict in nineteen countries of the continent, as well as the preparation of a publication, three times a year, which –with the participation of numerous Latin American researchers– has broached an analysis and collective reflection regarding the main acts of protest and the outstanding social movements on the regional scene over the course of these recent years. The main conclusions and pointers emerging from this extended endeavor nourish the present contribution.

In this regard, the initial goal of this article will consist in offering an approximation of the particular configuration that characterizes this cycle of protests and the popular movements that take part in it. In its first part we attempt to deal with this question on the basis of a general description that presents the recent social conflictivity in the region, its most outstanding features, and the parties that participate in it, to conclude by pointing out some elements that appear to distinguish the experience and actions of the most relevant social movements. The second part of the present contribution is centered on a more thorough analysis of the latter.

 

The contemporary scene of social protest in Latin America

We have already pointed out that the new cycle of protests that acquires momentum towards the end of the 1990s and the social movements that star in it offer distinctive features that differentiate them from those of the 1960s and 70s. The first evident fact tells us that the majority of the social organizations that promote these protests have emerged or been refounded in the last two decades. However, it is not only a matter of remitting exclusively to the organizational life or history of these movements, but particularly of the configuration they assume and that distinguishes them even within the map of the social conflictivity that characterized the 1980s and early 90s.

In this regard, if through the end of the 1980s, at least, the wage-earning Keynesian-Fordist conflict (and particularly the industrial conflict) constituted one of the main hubs of social conflictivity in the region, union organization additionally being the model that –in one way or another– marked the organizational nerve system of the majority of urban and rural social movements as well as fulfilling an outstanding role in the political and social articulation of the particular demands of collective participants, the structural transformations imposed by neoliberalism in all orders of social life (and in particular in the economy and the labor market under the de-industrialization and economic financiarization processes) were to sink that matrix of collective action into crisis, and weaken (albeit not eliminate) the weight of wage-earners’ unions as the starring parties in the conflict. In counterpart, as a result of the process of concentration of income, wealth and natural resources that marks neoliberal policies, new social movements with a territorial basis both in the rural world and in the urban space have emerged on the Latin American stage, constituting themselves on the basis of their ethnic-cultural identity (the indigenous movements), in reference to what they lack (the so-called “-less movements”, like the landless, roofless or jobless) or in relation to their shared life habitat (for example the movements of settlers).

Thus, the model of a return in the economy to raw materials, and the central role taken on in this context by agrarian restructuring processes, witness the emergence, in counterpart, of notable movements of rural origin. Also acting in the same direction is the privatization and intensive exploitation of natural resources that affects and upsets the life of numerous rural communities. This is undoubtedly one of the distinctive elements of the new phase that we analyze, and which crystallizes particularly in the major role of the indigenous movements, especially in Ecuador, Mexico and Bolivia. These movements attain an important influence at a national and international level that transcends sectorial claims, reaching the point of questioning both neoliberal economic policy and the political legitimacy of the governments that promote them as well as the constitutive form of the nation-state in Latin America. In this regard, for example, in the Ecuadorian case, the indigenous movement has striven for recognition for a political project which, reflected in the demand for a pluri-national state, seeks to guarantee self-government for the diverse indigenous nations. Under an even more radical claim of autonomy, the experience of the Zapatist movement demanded constitutional recognition for the rights of the indigenous peoples, which, partially crystallized in the so-called San Andrés Agreements (1995), would inspire the “caravan for dignity” that traveled through much of Mexico in the first months of 2001 to demand that they be complied with. To this brief listing one should add the activity of the indigenous movements of the Bolivian Altiplano (and also, although to a lesser degree, on the Peruvian side) and of the so-called “coca-growing movements” of Aymara peasants in the Chapare and the Yunga region in Bolivia and southern Peru, against the policy of eradication of coca crops demanded by the United States government. The prolonged activity of the Mapuche peoples of southern Chile (particularly embodied in the so-called Arauco-Malleco Coordination) against the appropriation of their lands and the over-exploitation of natural resources, as well as in Colombia’s Cauca Valley, are other outstanding examples of this type of struggle that seems to be carried out in the entire Latin American region. One may also point to the momentum acquired as of 2002 by the opposition of the original peoples of Central America against the Puebla Panama Plan, aimed at accelerating the penetration of transnational capital and investment in that region.

The appearance and consolidation of these indigenous movements on the political and social stage of the region is also accompanied by the emergence of numerous peasant movements that reach a significant presence at both national and regional levels. Standing out in this sense is the experience of the Brazilian Movement of the Landless Rural Workers (MST). The sustained takeovers of land and of public buildings to demand a progressive and comprehensive land reform, its actions against the spread of the model of genetically modified farming, and the development of the so-called “settlements”, have turned the MST into one of the social movements with the greatest political significance in the region. Its experience exemplifies a process of increasing mobilization and organization of the rural sectors at a regional level, embodied in the dissemination of landless movements in other Latin American countries (for example in Bolivia and Paraguay) and in the intensification of the peasant struggles in Mexico, Paraguay and Central America, and in their ability to likewise convoke the small-scale producers hit hard by the policies of liberalization of the agricultural sector carried forward under the promotion of free trade agreements. In the same direction, one may point to the growth of the protests and of the convergence processes experienced in the countryside against the economic and social consequences caused in those sectors by the fall in the international prices of numerous farm products, draconian credit policies and the tariff barriers against that type of products erected in the industrialized countries.

At the same time, in the urban arena, the structural effects of unemployment generated by neoliberal policies have –especially in countries of the Southern Cone– entailed the appearance and consolidation of movements of jobless workers. Argentina appears in this sense as the most emblematic case of this phenomenon, in which these movements, which receive the name of piqueteros3, occupy a central position –particularly as of 1999– on the stage of antineoliberal protest and in the acceleration of the political and social crisis that led to the resignation of president Fernando De la Rúa in December 2001.

Meanwhile, Latin American cities have been subjected to deep processes of spatial and social reconfiguration through the impact of liberal policies. The processes of “municipal decentralization” instrumented under the aegis of the fiscal adjustments (with the aim of “alleviating” the responsibility of the central governments to transfer resources to local administrations) have had enormous consequences on the daily life of the inhabitants of the cities. The processes of fragmentation and dualization of the urban space, abandonment of public spaces, deterioration in services and spread of violence have been only some of the most visible consequences of this profound social and spatial transformation that took place in the cities of the region. Recent urban conflicts seem to prove this multiplicity of troubles emanating from the social polarization promoted by neoliberalism. The struggles for access to housing (roofless movements), for the improvement of public services and against the rise in the rates of these, for the defense of public schooling, and against decentralization policies, also witness, in many cases, the confluence of diverse social sectors. The scourges caused by natural catastrophes (earthquakes, cyclones, floods) worsened by the increasing ecological impact of current capitalist development, as well as the abandonment of rural populations in the face of the need for governmental assistance and investment, explain the numerous mobilizations in demand of assistance by local and national governments.

The importance attained by these movements with a territorial basis that we have briefly summarized is far, however, from entailing the disappearance of the conflict involving urban wage-earning workers. Not only because in many of these movements one can make out the presence of workers in the diffuse and heterogeneous forms that this category assumes under a neoliberalism that leads to processes of “reidentification in terms not linked to the relation between capital and labor, but in other, very different ones, among which the criteria of ‘poverty’ and ‘ethnicity’, of occupations and of ‘informal’ activities and of primary communities are, probably, the most frequent” (Quijano, 2004). The verification that emerges from the monitoring of social conflicts in Latin America carried out by OSAL is that the world of labor, particularly in the urban space, far from being a secondary matter in the practice of defending claims, occupies an outstanding spot in the map of social protest, representing over a third of the conflicts surveyed over the course of the period extending from May 2000 to December 2003. Nevertheless, this quantitative weight in the register of protests contrasts with the difficulties which these (and the union organizations that promote them) face in transcending their sectorial nature and reaching a national dimension, and point to a redefinition in favor of a significant stellar role for civil servants, who account for around three quarters of the total of such protests4.

These struggles by government-employed wage earners are undertaken in the face of the insistent reform and privatization efforts encouraged by neoliberal policies, in particular as a result of the launching of fiscal adjustment packets demanded and negotiated by governments with the international organizations. Of particular significance in this sector are the dynamics of teachers and professors whose claims refer fundamentally to wage increases, the payment of wages in arrears, increases in the education budget, and the rejection of education reform proposals (particularly the flexibilization of working conditions). In some countries, the actions that ensue from the opposition to the privatization of public education allow a convergence with student sectors (in the university arena) as well as with other sectors (pupils’ parents, for example) which, backing the teachers’ demands and participating in the defense of public education, seem to point to the appearance of the “education community” form in the development of these conflicts (OSAL, 2003).

Attention may also be drawn to the intense practice in defense of their claims by administrative employees who mobilize against dismissals, for wage increases or wages in arrears, and against the reform of the state. Within the government sector, one may also underline the conflicts in many countries involving health workers, over wage claims, in favor of increases in the budget allocated to public hospitals and to the sanitary system in general, and for the improvement of working conditions. It is interesting to stress that the form of protest in this sector recurrently adopts the modality of extended stoppages –including strikes for an indeterminate period– and are articulated both under the form of national and regional strikes called by labor federations (these are recurrently recorded in almost all countries) and with street mobilization processes. In the same sense, one may also stress the conflicts against the privatization of government-owned enterprises.

But if the “first generation” privatization wave undertaken at the beginning of the 1990s by some governments in the region was characterized by social resistance fundamentally led by unions and by the workers of the sectors affected, the struggles against the “second generation” privatizations in some cases appear as a moment of social aggregation of protest which becomes manifest through the emergence of spaces of political and social convergence of a wide-ranging character. In the first of these cases, where these protests remained restricted to the workers and were unable to constitute wider social fronts that would transcend particular demands, they were, in general, defeated. The conflict being circumscribed to the employees at the enterprises in question, after the privatization a large part of them were laid off and went on to swell the ranks of the unemployed. The new cycle of social protest that we are analyzing, on the contrary, seems to exhibit a change in relation to this question. Some recent examples, such as the protests promoted by the Civic Front of Arequipa in southern Peru against the sale of the government-run power utilities (2002), and by the Democratic Congress of the People in Paraguay for the repeal of the law that allowed the privatization of state-owned companies (2002), serve to illustrate the broad convergence against the privatizations of social sectors (peasant federations, unions, students, NGOs and political parties) whose struggles are provisionally successful and force the governments to backtrack on their privatizing intentions5. This type of protests often takes on a markedly radical form (urban uprisings, lengthy highway blockades, takeover and occupation of company facilities) which appears to accompany a confrontational trend in its activities that characterizes the current cycle of protests that the region is undergoing. At the same time, the denunciation of corruption and the demand for greater democratic participation and transparency in local political life have prompted city dwellers to express their dissatisfaction, also promoting sectorial convergence processes under the form of popular uprising (puebladas) or of community mobilizations.

If in previous decades youthful participation and mobilization in Latin America was to a great extent channeled through the strong presence of the university student movement, youth protests now seem to adopt new forms and channels of expression. The decrease in the levels of school attendance resulting from the combined effects of the process of privatization of education and of the concentration of income and rise in poverty may perhaps explain, among other causes, the loss of relative weight of students’ movements. Although students still constitute a dynamic sector in the context of social conflictivity, even being involved in multisectorial protests that go beyond educational demands, the expression of youthful discontent is also channeled through an active participation in the movements of the jobless, of young favela dwellers in Brazil, in alternative currents and collective cultural phenomena of diverse types, in human rights movements, in indigenous and peasant protests and union-related groupings of young, impoverished workers. Younger generations have had an active and outstanding participation in the mass protests of a political nature that led to the resignation of presidents or that radically put into question the implementation of adjustment policies and privatizations, thus nuancing the stereotyped views of reality that speak of a marked youthful disenchantment with political participation in a wide sense. In the same context, it is necessary to underline the major importance and role filled by women in the social movements referred to. Feminine figures also stand out in the constitution of these territorial movements (Zibechi, 2003), being reflected both in the notable role displayed by piqueteras, Zapatist and indigenous women, and in the revitalization and reformulation of the feminist currents of previous decades, which crystallized, among other experiences, in the so-called “world march of women” and in the reference to the “feminization of poverty” (Matte and Guay, 2001).

Lastly, in the current setting of Latin American social protest, particular significance is exhibited by the processes of regional and international convergence that have acquired a strong momentum in recent years and that, by virtue of their scope and geographical insertion and the number of movements and social groupings they are capable of attracting, constitute an unprecedented experience in this continent. In the past, the experiences of international coordination of social movements found their most conspicuous expressions in the areas of labor organizations or of university student sectors. These convergences centered fundamentally on the defense of sectorial or professional interests, a fact that entailed great difficulties in transcending the arena of their specific demands. The impact and consequences of the “neoliberal globalization”, and consequently the irruption into national political settings of processes of continental scope (among others, for example, the so-called free trade agreements), in many cases linked to the penetration of transnational –particularly US– capital, have led to the appearance and reaffirmation of hemispheric coordination experiences with the confluence of labor, women’s and students’ movements, NGOs, political parties, and antimilitarist and environmental groupings in which a decisive role falls to peasant organizations (particularly through the Latin American Coordination of Peasant Organizations, CLOC, and its international articulation, Vía Campesina [Peasant Path]). The Continental Campaign against the Free Trade Area of the Americas (FTAA), promoted by the Continental Social Alliance and other networks and groupings (as well as the constitution of the Social Movements International Network), constitutes perhaps the most outstanding example, to which the innumerable amount of regional and continental gatherings (which also include movements from North America) against the Puebla Panama Plan and regional militarization and foreign interventions (particularly in reference to the so-called Colombia Plan and Andean Initiative) is added. In this process, the constitution of the World Social Forum (WSF, 2001-2004) appears as the most prominent experience of these convergences, not only at an international but also at a continental and regional level.

 

The new configuration of popular movements

Within this overview, which we have briefly summarized in relation to the features exhibited by social conflictivity in Latin America in recent years, some of the particular aspects that distinguish the actions and constitution of contemporary social and popular movements in our region already stand out. The analysis of these experiences and, particularly, the understanding and conceptualization of the novel aspects posed by those movements in the historical course of collective action and social contestation, constitute one of the centers of attention of the shaping and revitalization of current Latin American social thinking. The renewed generation of studies and publications about these subjects has also entailed the constitution of a new field of problématiques as well as an enrichment of the theoretical and methodological frameworks related to the study of social movements. One of the manifestations of these processes and of the debates posed is, for example, the position recently taken up within critical thinking by the discussion on the conceptualization of power and the role pertaining to the nation-state in reference to the views of social emancipation promoted by those movements6. It is not however our intention to present the problématiques orienting the debates and the reflections of social scientists –and of the movements themselves7. We are interested in underlining and going deeper into some of the features that distinguish the configuration of social movements at this time.

In relation to this, and with regard to the “repertories of protest”, it is important to point out a trend toward a greater radicalness in the forms of struggle, which is manifested in the duration of protests (actions over prolonged or indeterminate periods); in the generalization of confrontational forms of struggle to the detriment of demonstrational measures; in the regional spread of certain modalities such as the blockading of roads (characteristic, for example, of the protests of both the movements of jobless workers in Argentina and of the indigenous and coca-growing movements in the Andean Area) and the takeover of land (promoted by the peasant movements) or of public or private buildings. At the same time, the recurrence of lengthy marches and demonstrations that traverse regional and national spaces over the course of days and weeks seems to want to counteract the dynamics of territorial segmentation promoted by neoliberalism. Likewise, the puebladas and urban uprisings appear to be strategies aimed at the collective re-appropriation of the community space and at the recovery of a social visibility denied by the mechanisms of power (Seoane and Taddei, 2003).

In relation to the social actors that seem to take part in this new cycle of protests analyzed, we may stress two features that we have already singled out previously. The first is the displacement of the wage earners’ conflict to the public sector, to the detriment of the impact and importance of those promoted by workers in the private sector. This fact, in turn, implies a particular configuration that runs through the actions of labor organizations, while the dynamics of the posing of demands by the public sector calls on the participation and convergence of other social sectors in the defense of access to, and the quality of, education and health as human rights. In this sense, it is important to underline that in many cases the struggles against these policies of dismantlement and privatization, and the boosting of the convergence processes –which adopt the forms of coordinating units and civic fronts– don’t necessarily rest on wage-earning labor dynamics. The role played by other organizations (peasant and indigenous movements, the unemployed, students, urban movements, among others) in the shaping of these “expanded social coalitions” is of major importance. The second characteristic refers to the consolidation of movements of rural origin –indigenous and peasants–, which reach national and regional significance and influence. These develop a notable capacity of interpellation and articulation with urban social sectors, in many cases successfully being able to link the dynamics of the struggle against neoliberalism (agrarian policy, privatizations, fiscal adjustment) to a wider questioning of the bases of legitimacy of the political systems in the region.

These two brief pointers –as well as the description of the setting of social conflictivity presented earlier– therefore allow us to go deeper into the characterization of the particular configuration that appears to distinguish the experimentation of contemporary social movements in the region. Without seeking to exhaust this issue, it is necessary, in our understanding, to emphasize three elements that under different forms and with diverse intensities seem to run through the constitutive practice of the majority of the most significant Latin American social movements.

In the first place, a dynamics of territorial appropriation that characterizes the collective practice of what we have earlier referred to as rural and urban territorial movements. Presented as “the strategic response of the poor to the crisis of the old territoriality of the factory and the farm… [and to] the de-territorialization of production… [promoted by] neoliberal reforms” (Zibechi, 2003), as well as to the process of privatization of the public sphere and of politics (Boron, 2003a), this trend to re-appropriation by the community of the living space in which those movements are located remits to the expansion of the experiences of productive self-management (Sousa Santos, 2002b), the collective solution of social needs (for example in the field of education and of health), and autonomous forms of handling of public affairs. This diversified continuum encompasses the cooperative settlements of the Brazilian MST, the indigenous communities in Ecuador and Bolivia, the autonomous Zapatist town governments in Mexico, the productive undertakings of the various jobless movements and movement of recovered factories both in Argentina, as well as the puebladas and urban uprisings that implied the emergence of practices of management of the public space (such is the case for example of the “Water War” in Cochabamba, Bolivia, and of the experience of the popular assemblies that emerged in the main urban centers of Argentina after December 2001). In this sense, this rising “territorialization” of social movements is the result both of the extension of “forms of reciprocity, that is to say, of the exchange of labor force and of products without passing through the market, albeit with an inevitable, but ambiguous and tangential, relationship with it… [as well as of] new forms of political authority, of a communal character, that operate with and without the state” (Quijano, 2004). In permanent tension with the market and the state, extended in time or unstable and temporary, settling around practices of “production and reproduction of life” (Zibechi, 2003) or simply operating in the terrain of the management of public and political affairs, this dynamics of collective re-appropriation of the social territory appears to guide the experience not only of the indigenous and peasant movements, but also in the urban space (Seoane, 2003a). In this sense, we might state that “antineoliberal politics would appear to head towards an action of […] reproduction and production of society beyond the expanded and dislocated production of transnational capital” (Tapia, 2000).

In consonance with this experience, the practice and discursiveness of the majority of the social movements described appears imbued with the revaluing of democratic mechanisms of participation and decision which, inspired in references to direct or semi-direct democracy, orient both their organizational models and their programmatics and demands vis-à-vis the state. In this regard, on one hand, the promotion of more horizontal and open forms of participation is seen as reinsurance in the face of the danger of “disconnection” between the different organizational levels and of bureaucratization and manipulation. On the other hand, the confrontation with the neoliberal hegemony in the terrain of public policies has been translated into a growing questioning of the political system, of the model of representative democracy, and of the form that the constitution of the nation-state adopted in Latin America, promoting a diversity of demands that ranges from those for consultations and referendums to claims for autonomy and self-government, boosted particularly by the indigenous movements. The experiences of social self-organization linked to assembly-like forms of organization were a feature of the emergence of many of these movements (for example of the organizations of jobless workers and of the popular assemblies in Argentina or the urban uprisings of the “Water War” and the “Gas War” in Bolivia). Additionally, the traditional experiences of community management that characterized indigenous communities, reformulated under the impact of neoliberal policies, have served to pose a critical and alternative view of delegational and representative forms. In this terrain, the Zapatist experimentation crystallized in the watchword of “commanding while obeying” (Ceceña, 2001) is perhaps the clearest and most suggestive example, although not the only one. At the same time, the utilization and presence in the programmatics of many of these movements of instruments of semi-direct democracy can be verified, for example, in the demand for the gas referendum and the summoning to a Constitutional Assembly in the events of October in Bolivia (2003), in the referendums against the privatizations in Uruguay, or in the demand for binding plebiscites on the FTAA promoted by the social coalitions constituted in opposition to that trade agreement at a continental level. In the same direction, be it under the form of the demand for a plurinational state in the case of the Ecuadorian indigenous movements, or of the demand and construction of self-government in the autonomous Zapatist town governments, the claim of autonomy for indigenous peoples encompasses, in its projection on society, the broaching of a radical democratization of the forms of the nation-state, particularly in the “coloniality of power” that characterized its constitution (Lander, 2000). Lastly, access to local governments by representatives of those movements (especially in the experience of the Ecuadorian hills and in the Cauca valley in Colombia) has entailed the launching of mechanisms of popular participation and control in their handling (Larrea, 2004). In the diversity of the experiences described above, one many thus point to the emergence of a democratizing trend that traverses the collective practice of these social movements both in their spaces of autonomy and in the terrain of the state (Seoane, 2004; Bartra, 2003a), and expresses the extent to which “participatory democracy has taken on a new dynamics enacted by subordinate social communities and groups struggling against social exclusion and the trivialization of citizenship” (Sousa Santos, 2002a).

Lastly, it may be pointed out that, as from the protests against the Multilateral Agreement on Investment (MIA, 1997/98), the “battle of Seattle” that impeded the so-called Millennium Round of the World Trade Organization (1999), the creation and deepening of the experience of the World Social Forum (WSF, 2001 through 2004) and the “global days of action” against the military intervention in Iraq (2003/2004), the backbone of a “new internationalism” has left a deep and singular imprint on the experimentation of social movements in the world arena. The eminently social character of the actors involved (albeit not unlinked, should it be necessary to make this clear, to ideological and political inscriptions), their heterogeneity and scope, the truly international extension of the convergences, the organizational forms and the characteristics taken on by these articulations point to the novelty of this internationalism (Seoane and Taddei, 2001). As we have already shown, the Latin American region has not remained outside this process. On the contrary: the holding in 1996 of the 1st Encounter for Humanity and Against Neoliberalism organized by Zapatism in the depths of the Chiapas forest –which may be considered one of the first international summons located at the origin of this process–, as well as the fact that the birth of the WSF took place in the Brazilian city of Porto Alegre, point to the profound imbrication between the growth of protest and social movements in Latin America, and the emergence of the global convergences against neoliberal globalization. In this region, over the course of recent years, these experiences have been particularly marked by the evolution of the so-called agreements on trade liberalization, and especially of the United States’ initiative of subsuming the countries of the region within a Free Trade Area of the Americas (FTAA). These resistance processes, that implied both the constitution of spaces of coordination at a regional level (which group a wide array of movements, social organizations and NGOs) and the emergence of similar convergence experiences at a national level (for example, the national campaigns against the FTAA), turn out to be, within the continental framework and along with the experience of the Social Forums and of the mobilizations against the war, an expression and extension of the alterglobalist movement that emerged and was consolidated in the last decade. In relation to this process of convergences against “free trade”, the regional experience hails back to the protests triggered by the negotiation and launching (1994) of NAFTA (North American Free Trade Agreement), the creation of the Continental Social Alliance (1997), the organization of the 1st Summit of the Peoples of the Americas (1998) in opposition to the 2nd Summit of presidents of the 34 American countries that participate in the negotiation over the FTAA, and the organization of the Hemispheric Meetings of Struggle Against the FTAA (Havana, Cuba; 2002 to 2004). Nevertheless, particularly in relation to the dynamics and characteristics taken on by these negotiations as of 2003 –marked by the proximity of the date foreseen for their conclusion (2005), the difficulties and resistance it faces and the acceleration of the plurilateral Free Trade Agreements–, these convergence and protest processes are intensified at a regional level8. In Central America, the fruit of these experiences has been the creation and development of the Mesoamerican Forums and of the so-called Central American Popular Block. In the case of the countries forming part of MERCOSUR, the so-called “National Campaigns against the FTAA” have promoted diverse and massive popular consultations and have evolved toward the increasing questioning of “free trade” in the face of the different trade negotiations undertaken by governments. Lastly, in the Andean Area the articulation between the rejection of these treaties with massive protests in the national spaces (for example, the “Gas War” in Bolivia, 2003) and the emergence of regional coordination processes (for example, in April 2004, the first Andean Day of Mobilization Against the FTAA) point to the wealth of such processes. In this direction, the forthcoming holding of the 1st Americas Social Forum in Ecuador (July 2004) will constitute an arrival point of these experiences as well as an event that will prove the maturity, depth, features and challenges faced by internationalism in the Latin American and continental arena.

 

“Neoliberalism of war” and social convergences

The process opened in Latin America in recent years –in the face of the exhaustion of the neoliberal model in the form in which the latter tragically crystallized in the 1990s in our region– is increasingly expressed in the intensification of the disputes regarding the direction to be adopted by a transition whose outcome remains uncertain. In this sense, the social and political realities of the various countries is seen to be marked, as we pointed out earlier, by renewed social protest –which at a regional level has grown in recent years– and by the activity of social and popular movements with features different from those that had occupied stage center in the immediate past. This process, in the framework of the economic crisis undergone by most of the region and in the face of the attempts to deepen neoliberal policies, has in some cases been translated into “popular uprisings” (that in most cases ended in the collapse of governments), in the constitution of “electoral majorities” critical of neoliberalism, and even in the reappearance of a political discursiveness that differentiates itself from the latter. In their diversity, these processes point to the growing crisis of legitimacy that puts into question the cultural, economic and political forms that underpinned the application of neoliberalism in the past.

Nevertheless, in the face of this process, the attempts to deepen neoliberal policies have tended to a rising militarization of social relations in a process that has been given the name of “neoliberalism of war” (González Casanova, 2002; Taddei, 2002). This refers not only to the policy of war and of military intervention wielded as an international prerogative by president Bush –particularly a posteriori of the attacks of September 11, 2001– but also to the deepening of a repressive social diagram that encompasses legal reforms that slash democratic rights and freedoms and award greater power and immunity to the actions of police forces, and the criminalization of poverty and social movements, the so-called “judicialization” of protest, the increase in state and para-state repression, and the rising intervention of the armed forces in domestic social conflict. Justified by the alleged fight against the drug traffic, terrorism or crime, the ideology of “security” thus seeks the reconstitution of the challenged “neoliberal governability”. One of its most tragic expressions has been the increase of the United States military presence in the entire Latin American region (Quijano, 2004; Algranati, Seoane and Taddei, 2004). Additionally, in the terrain of domestic policies, the Colombian case emerges as one of the main laboratories for the implanting of these repressive diagrams, particularly under the administration of president Álvaro Uribe, who opened a process that seeks not only to deepen the military confrontation with the guerrillas –after the peace agreements of the previous period were broken– but also the deployment of a policy of “social militarization” in the attempt to affirm an authoritarian legitimacy, particularly among middle-class urban sectors (Zuluaga Nieto, 2003). The face of the “neoliberalism of war” thus accompanies the promotion of a radical and even more regressive reconfiguration of the political, social and economic geography of the region as a result of the acceleration of the so-called “free trade agreements” that find their maximum expression in the FTAA.

We have attempted up to this point to give an account of the paths taken and features adopted by the process of social and political disputation opened by the crisis of the neoliberal model forged in the 1990s and of the characteristics that appear to distinguish the configuration of contemporary social movements. As we have pointed out, this process is not homogeneous, and is expressed in a differentiated manner in each of the regions into which the continent may be subdivided and even within these. In this regard, the evolution of the northern region (Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean) seems to evince a marked consolidation of trade liberalization processes, which constitute the cornerstone of Washington’s strategic plans. At the same time, the convulsive political situation in a major part of the Andean region is a manifestation of the strong social tensions resulting from the attempts to deepen these “news” neoliberal recipe books, which are translated into the difficulty in the stabilization of the new political regimes that promote these policies. Expressions of this are the increasing popular discredit of the governments of Peru and of Ecuador; the setting opened with the “Bolivian October” that projects new confrontations and possible changes on the horizon, and the Venezuelan case, where the battle around the presidential recall referendum this coming August will undoubtedly acquire a regional dimension. The outcome of this process will be fundamental in Latin America with regard to the hegemonic aspirations of the White House to hinder the consolidation of democratic-popular political processes that challenge the neoliberal model. In the southern region, social movements face the great challenge of taking advantage of the chinks opened by the loss of legitimacy of neoliberalism to fight for the direction of the processes underway, maintaining and strengthening their autonomy in relation to governments.

Beyond the particular aspects exhibited by the processes at a subregional level, the generalization of free trade appears in all countries (with the exception of the Venezuelan case) as an axis emphasized by the political and economic elites to refound the neoliberal order and its legitimacy. In the face of this, the processes of regional convergence that on a national scale challenge the hegemonic economic model, and the emancipatory horizons that ensue from the practices and discourses that characterize social movements at the beginning of the twenty-first century, cast light on the outlines of those “other possible Americas” that our peoples so strongly call for.


Notes

 

* Coordinator of the Latin American Social Observatory (OSAL) of the Latin American Council of Social Sciences (CLACSO) and Professor at the Faculty of Social Sciences of the University of Buenos Aires (UBA).

** Academic Coordinator of the Latin American Council of Social Sciences (CLACSO).

*** Member of the Coordinating Team of OSAL-CLACSO.

1 We are particularly grateful for the comments of Ivana Brighenti and Miguel Ángel Djanikian in the revision of the text.

2 We find it impossible to develop this issue here. Regarding the evolution of poverty and unemployment in Latin America, reference may be made to the reports on Human Development of the UNDP (2002) and of ECLAC (2002). With regard to the consequences in relation to democracy see Boron (2003a). Regarding the structural transformations of Latin American capitalism, see among others Quijano (2004) and Fiori (2001).

3 Road or highway blockade, generally for an extended period.

4 For example, for the year 2003, the conflicts involving workers of the public sector represent, according to the records supplied by OSAL (Latin American Social Observatory, CLACSO), 76% of the total number of protests by employed workers.

5 The most important among this type of protests undoubtedly turns out to be the so-called “Water War” in Cochabamba, Bolivia (2000), which frustrated the attempt to award a concession for, and privatize, the drinking water service in that city to an international consortium headed by the Bechtel company.

6 Regarding this debate one may consult, among other texts, the diverse dossiers published in numbers 12 and 13 of Chiapas magazine, as well as those included in numbers 4 and 7 of CLACSO’s OSAL magazine.

7 We have broached that question in the course “Neoliberalism and Social Movements in Latin America: the Configuration of Social Protest”, taught in the framework of the distance education courses under the platform of CLACSO’s Virtual Campus, 2003.

8 An evaluation of this process may be consulted in OSAL (2004).

 

<!– @page { margin: 0.79in } H2 { margin-top: 0.19in; margin-bottom: 0.19in; page-break-after: auto } H2.western { font-family: “Arial Unicode MS”, physician sans-serif; so-language: en-GB } H2.cjk { font-family: “Arial Unicode MS”, sans-serif } H2.ctl { font-family: “Arial Unicode MS”, sans-serif } P { margin-bottom: 0.08in } H3 { margin-top: 0.19in; margin-bottom: 0.19in; page-break-after: auto } H3.western { font-family: “Arial Unicode MS”, sans-serif; font-size: 13pt; so-language: en-GB } H3.cjk { font-family: “Arial Unicode MS”, sans-serif; font-size: 13pt } H3.ctl { font-family: “Arial Unicode MS”, sans-serif; font-size: 13pt } –>

Samuel Pinheiro Guimarães

A importância essencial da América do Sul

1.       A América do Sul se encontra, necessária e inarredavelmente, no centro da política externa brasileira. Por sua vez, o núcleo da política brasileira na América do Sul está no Mercosul. E o cerne da política brasileira no Mercosul tem de ser, sem dúvida, a Argentina. A integração entre o Brasil e a Argentina e seu papel decisivo na América do Sul deve ser o objetivo mais certo, mais constante, mais vigoroso das estratégias políticas e econômicas tanto do Brasil quanto da Argentina. Qualquer tentativa de estabelecer diferentes prioridades para a política externa brasileira, e mesmo a atenção insuficiente a esses fundamentos, certamente provocará graves conseqüências e correrá sério risco de fracasso.

2        A África Ocidental, com seus 23 Estados ribeirinhos, inclusive os arquipélagos de Cabo Verde e São Tomé e Príncipe, é a fronteira atlântica do Brasil, continente a que estamos unidos pela história, pelo sangue, pela cultura, pelo colonialismo e pela semelhança de desafios. A Ásia é o novo centro dinâmico da economia mundial, fonte de lucros inesgotáveis para as megaempresas ocidentais e destino de uma das maiores migrações de capital e tecnologia avançada da História. A Europa e a América do Norte são para o Brasil, como para qualquer ex-colônia e para eventuais pretendentes a colônia, as áreas tradicionais de vinculação política, econômica e cultural. Porém, por mais importantes que sejam, como aliás são, os vínculos e os interesses atuais e potenciais brasileiros com todas essas áreas e por melhores que sejam com os Estados que as integram as nossas relações, a política externa não poderá ser eficaz se não estiver ancorada na política brasileira na América do Sul. As características da situação geopolítica do Brasil, isto é, seu território, sua localização geográfica, sua população, suas fronteiras, sua economia, assim como a conjuntura e a estrutura do sistema mundial, tornam a prioridade sul-americana uma realidade essencial.

3        O cenário econômico mundial se caracteriza pela simultânea globalização e gradual formação de grandes blocos de Estados na Europa, na América do Norte e na Ásia; pelo acelerado progresso científico e tecnológico, em especial nas áreas da informática e da biotecnologia, com sua vinculação às despesas e atividades militares; pela concentração do capital e oligopolização de mercados, medida pelo número de fusões e aquisições que passaram de 9 mil, no valor de US$ 850 bilhões, em 1995, para 33 mil, no valor de quase 4 trilhões de dólares, em 2006, e pela financeirização da economia, pois os ativos ( ações, títulos e depósitos) financeiros passaram de 109% da produção mundial, em 1980, para 316% em 2005; pela transformação dos mercados de trabalho e pela pressão permanente para reverter os direitos dos trabalhadores; pela acelerada degradação ambiental; pela insegurança energética e pelas migrações. O cenário político mundial se caracteriza pela concentração de poder político, militar, econômico, tecnológico e ideológico nos países altamente desenvolvidos; pelo arbítrio e pela violência das Grandes Potências; pela ameaça real, e sua utilização oportunista, do terrorismo; pelo desrespeito aos princípios de não-intervenção e de autodeterminação de parte das Grandes Potências políticas, econômicas e militares; pelo individualismo dos Estados ricos e a insuficiente e cadente cooperação internacional; pela emergência da China, como potência econômica e política, regional e mundial.

4        Os Estados no centro do sistema mundial, cada vez mais ricos e poderosos, pois a diferença de renda entre Estados ricos e pobres passou de 1 para 4 em 1914 para 1 para 7 em 2000, porém vinculados às economias periféricas quanto a recursos estratégicos e mercados e com uma população cadente, procuram, por meio de negociações internacionais, definir normas e regimes que permitam preservar e até ampliar sua situação privilegiada no centro do sistema militar, político, econômico e tecnológico que é o resultado, por um lado, da II Guerra Mundial e dos regimes coloniais e, por outro lado, do êxito de seus esforços nacionais, em especial na esfera científica e tecnológica. Nesse processo, sua capacidade de articular ideologias e de apresentar “soluções” como benéficas a toda a “comunidade internacional” é extraordinária e importantíssima pois é a base de sua estratégia de arregimentação de Estados e de elites periféricas cooptadas para alcançar seus objetivos nacionais, vestidos com a capa de objetivos da humanidade.

5        Neste cenário violento e instável de grandes blocos, multipolar, há uma tendência a que países pequenos e até médios venham a ser absorvidos, mais ou menos formalmente, pelos grandes Estados e economias aos quais ou se encontram tradicionalmente vinculados por laços de origem colonial ou estão em sua esfera de influência histórica, como no caso da América Central; ou tenham feito parte de seu território, como no caso dos países que formam a Comunidade de Estados Independentes – CEI; ou se vinculam por laços étnicos e culturais, como no caso da diáspora chinesa na Ásia.

6        Os países médios que constituem a América do Sul se encontram diante do dilema ou de se unirem e assim formarem um grande bloco de 17 milhões de Km2 e de 400 milhões de habitantes para defender seus interesses inalienáveis de aceleração do desenvolvimento econômico, de preservação de autonomia política e de identidade cultural, ou de serem absorvidos como simples periferias de outros grandes blocos, sem direito à participação efetiva na condução dos destinos econômicos e políticos desses blocos, os quais são definidos pelos países que se encontram em seu centro. A questão fundamental é que as características, a evolução histórica e os interesses dos Estados poderosos que se encontram no centro dos esquemas de integração são distintos daqueles dos países subdesenvolvidos que a eles se agregam através de tratados de livre comércio, ou que nome tenham, os quais ficam assim sujeitos às conseqüências das decisões estratégicas dos países centrais que podem ou não atender às suas necessidades históricas.

7        Os desafios sul-americanos diante desse dilema, que é decisivo, são enormes: superar os obstáculos que decorrem das grandes assimetrias que existem entre os países da região, sejam elas de natureza territorial, demográfica, de recursos naturais, de energia, de níveis de desenvolvimento político, cultural, agrícola, industrial e de serviços; enfrentar com persistência as enormes disparidades sociais que são semelhantes em todos esses países; realizar o extraordinário potencial econômico da região; dissolver os ressentimentos e as desconfianças históricas que dificultam sua integração.

8        As assimetrias territoriais são extraordinárias. Na América do Sul convivem países como o Brasil, com 8,5 milhões de quilômetros quadrados; como a Argentina, com seus 3,7 milhões de quilômetros quadrados e em seguida outros dez países, cada um com território inferior a 1,2 milhão de quilômetros quadrados. Três dos países da região se encontram voltados exclusivamente para o Pacífico, três se debruçam sobre o Oceano Atlântico, quatro são caribenhos e dois são mediterrâneos. O Brasil tem 15.735 km de fronteiras com nove Estados vizinhos, enquanto a Argentina, a Bolívia e o Peru têm fronteiras com cinco vizinhos. Devido a essas circunstâncias geográficas, os pontos de vista geopolíticos de cada país são inicialmente distintos, o que se agrava pelo fato de até recentemente – e mesmo até hoje –  terem estado separados os países da região pela Cordilheira, pela floresta, pelas distâncias e pelos imensos vazios demográficos.

9        O Brasil tem 190 milhões de habitantes, que correspondem a cerca de 50% da população da América do Sul, enquanto o segundo maior país em população, que é a Colômbia, tem 46 milhões de habitantes e o terceiro, a Argentina, tem 39 milhões. As taxas de crescimento demográfico variam de 3% no Paraguai a 0,7 % no Uruguai. A América do Sul viveu nos últimos anos um processo acelerado de urbanização, com o surgimento de megalópoles que concentram grandes parcelas da população total de cada país, e que exibem periferias paupérrimas e violentas. Há significativas populações de deslocados internos no Peru, como conseqüência da luta feroz contra a insurreição do Sendero Luminoso, e de refugiados, como no caso de colombianos na Venezuela e no Equador. No passado, as ditaduras e os regimes militares provocaram o exílio de numerosos militantes políticos, intelectuais, operários e sindicalistas, com grave prejuízo para o desenvolvimento político dos países mais afetados. Ademais, durante algumas décadas o reduzido ritmo de crescimento econômico provocou movimentos migratórios significativos dos países da região em direção aos Estados Unidos e à Europa Ocidental. Há um milhão de uruguaios vivendo fora do Uruguai enquanto três milhões se encontram no país. Há 400 mil equatorianos na Espanha e 4 milhões de brasileiros no exterior. Ao mesmo tempo, há grandes espaços despovoados na América do Sul, onde a densidade demográfica é inferior a 1 habitante por quilômetro quadrado, enquanto nas megalópoles a densidade populacional atinge mais de 10.000 habitantes por quilômetro quadrado. A América do Sul exibe índices de concentração de renda e de riqueza, de pobreza e de indigência, de opulência e luxo, contrastes espantosos entre riquíssimas mansões e palafitas miseráveis, entre excelentes hospitais privados e hospitais públicos decadentes, entre escolas de Primeiro Mundo e pardieiros escolares. Todavia, conta a América do Sul com as vantagens da ausência de conflitos raciais agudos, ainda que ocorra discriminação racial; com a presença dominante de idiomas de comum origem ibérica, ainda que em alguns países existam idiomas indígenas que conseguiram sobreviver; com a ausência de conflitos religiosos e predominância católica ao lado da rápida expansão das igrejas protestantes; com uma população grande, mas que não é excessiva, como em certos países asiáticos. O desafio que representa a emergência das populações indígenas historicamente oprimidas e seus efeitos para as relações políticas entre os países da América do Sul vão exigir, todavia, especial atenção e habilidade.

10      A América do Sul é uma região extremamente rica em recursos naturais, que se encontram distribuídos de forma muito desigual entre os diversos países. Enquanto o Brasil tem as maiores reservas mundiais de minério de ferro de excelente teor, a Argentina não as tem em volume suficiente. A Argentina dispõe de terras aráveis de extraordinária fertilidade, em contraste com o Chile. A Colômbia possui grandes reservas de carvão de boa qualidade e o Brasil as tem poucas e pobres. A Venezuela tem a sexta maior reserva de petróleo e a nona maior reserva de gás do mundo enquanto que, em todos os países do Cone Sul, inclusive no Brasil, são elas insuficientes para sustentar o ritmo de desenvolvimento, talvez de 7% a/a, necessário à absorção produtiva dos estoques históricos de mão-de-obra desempregada e subempregada e dos que chegam anualmente ao mercado. A Bolívia detém jazidas de gás que correspondem a duas vezes as brasileiras, mas tem sérias dificuldades para ampliar sua exploração. O Chile explora as maiores reservas conhecidas de minério de cobre do mundo, responsável por 40 % de suas exportações. O Paraguai ostenta um dos maiores potenciais hidrelétricos do mundo, em especial quando calculado em termos per capita, mas ainda não teve êxito em utilizá-lo para acelerar seu desenvolvimento. O Suriname tem a maior reserva de bauxita do planeta, ainda pouco explorada.

11      Encontra-se na América do Sul a maior floresta tropical do mundo, um tema central no debate político sobre o efeito estufa e suas conseqüências para o clima, e o maior estoque de biodiversidade do planeta, o qual é de grande importância para a renovação da agricultura e para a indústria farmacêutica; uma parcela importante das reservas de água doce do planeta, recurso cada vez mais estratégico e causa já de conflitos em certas regiões do globo, e o maior lençol de águas subterrâneas, o Aqüífero Guarani, que subjaz os territórios do Brasil, do Paraguai, da Argentina e do Uruguai.

 

As políticas econômicas

12      Os choques do petróleo (1973 e 1979), o endividamento excessivo e o súbito aumento das dívidas externas acarretaram crises e estagnação econômica que contribuíram para o fim dos regimes militares na América do Sul, em meados da década de 80. A vitória do neoliberalismo monetarista nos Estados Unidos e Reino Unido, a partir de Ronald Reagan (1981-1989) e Margaret Thatcher (1979-1990), e a renegociação da dívida externa (Plano Brady) forçaram aos países subdesenvolvidos a adoção de políticas de abertura comercial e financeira, desregulamentação e privatização, com base nos princípios do chamado Consenso de Washington. Essas políticas levaram a resultados desastrosos em países que nelas se envolveram mais a fundo, como foram o caso do Equador, da Bolívia e da Argentina, e deixaram seqüelas importantes em países como o Brasil, o Uruguai e a Venezuela.

13      Tais políticas neoliberais agravaram a já elevada concentração de renda e de riqueza, ampliaram o desemprego, contribuíram para a violência urbana, provocaram a fragilização do Estado e dos serviços públicos, o que levou por sua vez à gradual emergência de importantes movimentos políticos e sociais que passaram a preconizar (explícita ou implicitamente) a revisão do modelo econômico e social neoliberal.

14      Os países da América do Sul, em conseqüência das políticas neoliberais que determinaram a redução negociada e às vezes até unilateral de suas tarifas aduaneiras, a privatização de suas empresas estatais e a liberalização de seus mercados de capital, aumentaram suas importações de produtos industriais dos países desenvolvidos e o ingresso descontrolado de capitais estrangeiros. Essas políticas levaram à desindustrialização em maior ou menor grau, à maior influência do capital multinacional e à desnacionalização de importantes setores de suas economias, em especial do setor financeiro, com efeitos econômicos, e inclusive políticos, significativos.

15      Essa maior integração, porém de natureza passiva, dos países sul-americanos na economia mundial é radicalmente distinta da integração na economia global que ocorre com os países altamente desenvolvidos ou com certos países emergentes, como a Coréia. Nesses últimos casos, essa maior integração se verifica através da internacionalização das atividades de suas grandes empresas de atuação multinacional mas de capital nacional, bem como de suas exportações de alto conteúdo tecnológico enquanto que, no caso dos países sul-americanos, se verifica através da maior participação de megaempresas multinacionais em suas economias, já que não possuem esses últimos países (com raras exceções) grandes empresas capazes de se internacionalizarem, e da expansão de suas exportações de “commodities”.

16      Em decorrência, os países da América do Sul retomaram, voluntária ou involuntariamente, sua especialização histórica na exportação de produtos primários, tradicionais ou novos, com maior grau, por vezes, de elaboração, para atender à demanda dos países altamente desenvolvidos e da China. Assim, grosso modo, sua agricultura se sofisticou e passou a ser denominada de agribusiness; sua indústria foi adquirida ou cerrou suas portas em um processo de desindustrialização/desnacionalização e muitas de suas empresas de serviços, em especial as empresas modernas e aquelas do setor financeiro, foram adquiridas por megaempresas multinacionais.

17      A capacidade de utilizar tradicionais instrumentos de promoção do desenvolvimento econômico, que aliás tinham sido amplamente usados pelos países hoje desenvolvidos no início de seu processo de desenvolvimento (i.e. de seu processo de industrialização), foi abandonada pelos países da América do Sul na Rodada Uruguai, quando aceitaram normas sobre disciplina do capital estrangeiro as quais proíbem políticas tais como a nacionalização de insumos, o estabelecimento de metas de exportação e o reinvestimento de parte dos lucros; ou que estabelecem normas sobre propriedade intelectual que ampliaram os prazos de patentes e estabelecem patentes sobre fármacos, dificultando de fato o desenvolvimento tecnológico e gerando enormes remessas financeiras. Este abandono dos instrumentos econômicos tradicionais de uso do Estado, assim como a confiança excessiva desses países no livre jogo das forças de mercado contribuíram para que viessem a ter seu ritmo de crescimento reduzido ou estagnado. Por outro lado, a derrocada ideológica do Welfare State nos países desenvolvidos fez com que os países sul-americanos também contraíssem ou desarticulassem os seus programas sociais, o que contribuiu para agravar a concentração de renda e de propriedade e para a pequena expansão de seu mercado interno.

18      Assim, em grande parte se explicam as baixas taxas de crescimento na América do Sul, das décadas de 80 e 90, quando comparadas às de alguns países da Ásia, e a eventual derrocada dos governos neoliberais na Argentina, no Brasil, no Chile, na Bolívia, no Equador e na Venezuela. Nos últimos anos, surgiram na América do Sul governos que procuram manter as políticas de austeridade fiscal e de controle inflacionário enquanto tentam ressuscitar o Estado como agente suplementar do desenvolvimento econômico e como agente de redução da desigualdade social, diante das enormes injustiças e das pressões dos segmentos historicamente oprimidos em suas sociedades.

O bloco sul-americano

19      A atual experiência de integração sul-americana tem distintas origens, motivações e paralelos históricos. Em primeiro lugar, o trauma da desintegração dos Vice-Reinados do Império espanhol a partir de 1810, a desintegração posterior da Grã Colômbia em 1830, e a sobrevivência da utopia de unidade latino-americana, preconizada pelo Libertador Simon Bolívar. Segundo, a tentativa do notável economista argentino, Raul Prebisch, de explicar as razões do desenvolvimento na América do Norte em confronto com o atraso sul-americano levou à formulação da teoria estruturalista pela Comissão Econômica para a América Latina – CEPAL. Prebisch encontrou essas razões nas características das economias primário-exportadoras sul-americanas e na natureza de seu processo de incorporação do progresso tecnológico; na reduzida dimensão e no isolamento de cada mercado nacional; na deterioração secular dos termos de intercâmbio; na importância da industrialização como estratégia para a transformação econômica. Em terceiro lugar, a percepção de êxito da experiência de planejamento econômico e de industrialização acelerada vivida pela União Soviética, da experiência keynesiana e da planificação de guerra norte-americana e, finalmente, as políticas de economia mista e de planejamento indicativo dos governos socialistas europeus após a II Guerra Mundial. Quarto, na experiência de construção da Comunidade Econômica Européia, fundada na integração de mercados, na elaboração de políticas comuns e no financiamento pelos países mais ricos do esforço de redução de assimetrias entre as economias participantes.

20      Este conjunto de experiências inspirou os programas de desenvolvimento econômico com base na industrialização, em especial no Brasil durante o Governo Juscelino Kubitschek, as propostas da CEPAL de constituição de um mercado comum latino-americano, as propostas argentinas de criação de uma área de livre comércio que reunificasse economicamente as partes do antigo Vice-Reinado do Prata, e estimulou à constituição em 1960 da Associação Latino-Americana de Livre Comércio – ALALC.

21      Naturalmente, ao processo de integração da América do Sul e do Cone Sul subjazia a latente rivalidade entre Brasil e Argentina por influência política na região do Rio da Prata, os resquícios de um passado de lutas e a lembrança da inicial predominância industrial argentina. E outros ressentimentos decorrentes de conflitos e quase-conflitos passados, como entre Chile e Argentina; entre Bolívia, Chile e Peru; entre Peru e Equador; entre Colômbia e Venezuela, entre a Bolívia e o Paraguai, entre Brasil e Paraguai e entre Brasil e Bolívia.

22      A Associação Latino Americana de Livre Comércio, criada em 1960, e cuja meta era eliminar todas as barreiras ao comércio entre os Estados membros até 1980, encontrou obstáculos causados pelas políticas nacionais de substituição de importações e de industrialização e, mais tarde, pelas políticas de controle de importações para enfrentar as súbitas crises do petróleo que acarretaram inéditos déficits comerciais que atingiram os países importadores de energia, em especial o Brasil.

23      A partir de 1965, o Convênio de Créditos Recíprocos (CCR) entre os países da ALALC, e mais a República Dominicana, passa a permitir o comércio sem o uso imediato de divisas fortes, através de um sistema quadrimestral de compensação multilateral de créditos que funcionou com grande êxito sem que ocorresse nenhum caso de “default” até a década de 1980, quando foi progressivamente desativado pelos novos tecnocratas que vieram a ocupar os Bancos Centrais dos países da região, na esteira do período de governos neoliberais.

24      Em 1969, os países andinos celebraram o Pacto Andino (mais tarde CAN) como um projeto mais audacioso de integração e de planejamento do desenvolvimento, prevendo inclusive a alocação espacial de indústrias entre os Estados membros e a elaboração de políticas comuns, inclusive no campo do investimento estrangeiro.

25      Em 1980, a estagnação das negociações comerciais levou a substituição da ALALC pela Associação Latino Americana de Integração (ALADI). O Tratado de Montevidéu (80) incorporou o “patrimônio” de reduções tarifárias bilaterais, permitiu a negociação de acordos bilaterais de preferências, com a perspectiva de sua eventual convergência, e tornou possível a concessão de preferências bilaterais ao abrigo da “enabling clause” do então GATT.

26      Em 1985, Brasil e Argentina decidiram lançar um processo de integração bilateral gradual, com o objetivo central de promover o desenvolvimento econômico, a que se juntaram, em 1991, Paraguai e Uruguai, formando-se assim o Mercosul. Este último surgiu como um projeto enquadrado na concepção do Consenso de Washington do livre comércio como instrumento único e suficiente para a promoção do desenvolvimento, redução das desigualdades sociais e geração de empregos, na melhor tradição das Escolas de Manchester e de Chicago.

27      Após a conclusão do NAFTA em 1994, em que o México na prática abandonou a ALADI, os Estados Unidos, no contexto da Cúpula das Américas, lançaram um projeto ambicioso de negociação de uma Área de Livre Comércio das Américas (ALCA). Esse projeto, na realidade, mais do que uma área de livre comércio de bens, criaria um território econômico único nas Américas, com a livre movimentação de bens, serviços e capital (mas não de mão-de-obra ou tecnologia) e estabeleceria regras uniformes ainda mais restritivas à execução de políticas nacionais ou regionais de desenvolvimento econômico, já que as propostas originais eram OMC-Plus e NAFTA-plus (e parecem continuar a ser tais como revelam os textos dos tratados bilaterais de livre comércio, celebrados pelos Estados Unidos).

28      Apesar das declarações diplomáticas feitas na ocasião, e reiteradas posteriormente, de que a ALCA não afetaria os projetos de integração regional como a Comunidade Andina e o Mercosul, estava claro que a eventual concretização da ALCA eliminaria de fato a possibilidade de formação de um bloco econômico e político sul-americano.

29      Após o início das negociações da ALCA, e diante da extrema desigualdade de forças políticas e econômicas entre os países participantes, a negociação se interrompeu em 2004, após os Estados Unidos terem retirado os temas agrícolas e de defesa comercial (antidumping e subsídios) levando-os para o âmbito da OMC sob o pretexto de ser necessária uma negociação mais abrangente, inclusive com a União Européia. Em conseqüência e para equilibrar as negociações, o Mercosul considerou que os temas de investimento, compras governamentais e serviços deveriam também passar para o âmbito da Rodada de Doha na OMC e propôs aos Estados Unidos a negociação de um acordo do tipo 4+1, no campo do comércio de bens, proposta até hoje sem resposta, ou melhor, cuja resposta prática tem sido a firme atividade norte-americana de negociação de acordos bilaterais de livre comércio (na realidade com escopos muito mais amplos) com os países da América Central, a Colômbia, o Peru e (quase) com o Equador.

30      Paralelamente, o Mercosul empreendeu a negociação e celebrou acordos de livre comércio com o Chile (1995), com a Bolívia (1996), com a Venezuela, Equador e Colômbia (2004), e com o Peru (2005), que se referem exclusivamente ao comércio de bens e não incluem o comércio de serviços, compras governamentais, regras sobre investimentos, propriedade intelectual, etc.

31      Em 2002, o Congresso dos Estados Unidos tinha aprovado o ATPDEA (Andean Trade Promotion and Drug Eradication Act) pelo qual concederiam unilateralmente preferências comerciais, sem reciprocidade de parte dos beneficiários, para listas de produtos de países andinos em troca da execução de programas de erradicação das plantações de coca. O resultado da aplicação durante cinco anos dessa lei foi, de um lado, expandir as exportações de tais produtos desses países para os Estados Unidos e, de outro, ensejar o surgimento nesses países de grupos de interesses empresariais locais favoráveis à negociação de acordos de livre comércio com os Estados Unidos quando se encerrasse o prazo de vigência daquele Ato.

32      Posteriormente, foi lançada em 2004, em Cuzco, o projeto de formação de uma Comunidade Sul-Americana de Nações, hoje denominada UNASUL, organização que se pretenderia semelhante à União Africana, na África; à União Européia na Europa; à ASEAN, na Ásia; e ao MCCA, na América Central. As negociações para concretizar a UNASUL têm encontrado três distintas resistências: primeiro, a de países que celebraram acordos de livre comércio com os Estados Unidos; segundo, a de países que dão prioridade ao fortalecimento do Mercosul e que acreditam que o Brasil estaria “trocando” o Mercosul pela UNASUL; terceiro, a de países que consideram ser necessário uma organização mais audaciosa, com base na solidariedade e na cooperação e não naquilo que consideram ser o individualismo “mercantilista” das preferências comerciais, dos projetos de investimento e do livre comércio.

A Argentina e a estratégia de integração brasileira

33      Não há a menor possibilidade de construção de um espaço econômico e político sul-americano (economicista ou solidarista, não importa) sem um amplo programa de construção e de integração da infra-estrutura de transportes, de energia e de comunicações dos países da América do Sul. O comércio entre os seis países fundadores da Comunidade Econômica Européia correspondia em 1958 a cerca de 40% do seu comércio total e hoje supera 80%. Em contraste, o comércio entre os países da América do Sul correspondia em 1960, data de começo da ALALC, a cerca de 10% e ainda em 2006 não superou 17% do total do comércio exterior da região. Esse reduzido comércio tinha sua causa na pequena diversificação industrial das economias sul-americanas (hoje também um obstáculo, pois quanto mais diversificadas as economias maior o seu comércio recíproco), mas também na pequena densidade dos sistemas de transportes naquela época e até hoje. Há um interesse vital em conectar os sistemas de transportes nacionais e as duas costas do subcontinente, superando os obstáculos da Floresta e da Cordilheira, como se está fazendo ao norte entre Brasil e Peru, e se procurará fazer ao sul, entre Brasil, Argentina e Chile. A Iniciativa para a Integração da Regional Sul-Americana (IIRSA), em 2000, foi um passo de grande importância neste esforço de planejamento, que necessita para se concretizar da alavanca regional do financiamento.

34      Uma das maiores dificuldades dos países da América do Sul é o acesso a crédito para investimentos em infra-estrutura devido a limites ao endividamento externo e à falta de acesso a instrumentos de garantia. Este acesso ao mercado internacional de capitais é tanto mais importante quanto maior for a dificuldade desses países em elevar sua poupança interna, devido à prioridade concedida ao serviço da dívida interna e externa. O Brasil tem contribuído para o fortalecimento da Cooperação Andina de Fomento – CAF, entidade financeira classificada como AA no mercado internacional e voltada para investimentos em infra-estrutura, e tem participado, de forma positiva e prudente, do processo de construção de um Banco do Sul que se deseja eficiente. O Brasil é um dos poucos, senão o único país da região, que dispõe de um forte banco de desenvolvimento, cujos ativos são de US$ 87 bilhões, maiores que os do Banco Interamericano de Desenvolvimento – BID ( US 66 bilhões), que pode emprestar recursos para a execução de obras de infra-estrutura em condições competitivas com as do mercado internacional e sem condicionar tais empréstimos a “compromissos” de política externa ou à execução de “reformas” econômicas internas. É parte essencial da estratégia brasileira de integração fornecer crédito aos países vizinhos para a execução de obras de infra-estrutura e, no futuro, vir a fornecer créditos a empresas desses países em condições normais semelhantes às que se exigem de empresas brasileiras, tendo em vista o interesse vital brasileiro no crescimento e no desenvolvimento dos países vizinhos até mesmo por razões de interesse próprio, devido à grande importância de seus mercados para as exportações brasileiras e, em conseqüência, para o nível de atividade econômica geral e de suas empresas.

35      Além da integração da infra-estrutura física em termos de rodovias, pontes, ferrovias e de energia é essencial a integração das comunicações aéreas, pela sua importância para a economia e a política, assim como da mídia em especial a televisão, essencial à formação do imaginário sul-americano, através do conhecimento da vida política, econômica e social dos países da região, hoje desconhecida do grande público e, portanto, fonte de toda  sorte de preconceitos e manipulações que envenenam a opinião pública e afetam os discursos, as atividades e as decisões políticas. A TV Brasil – Canal Integración e a TELESUR são experiências não-hegemônicas de integração de comunicações, assim como a iniciativa brasileira de procurar estabelecer um padrão regional de TV Digital, com a participação dos Estados do Mercosul, inclusive no processo industrial.

36      A questão da segurança energética é central nos dias de hoje e no futuro previsível. A integração energética e a autonomia regional em energia para garantir a segurança de abastecimento energético é prioridade absoluta da política externa brasileira na América do Sul. Não há possibilidade de crescer a 7% a/a na média durante um período longo sem um suprimento suficiente, seguro e crescente de energia. Este suprimento depende de investimentos de prazo mais ou menos longo de maturação, tais como a prospecção de jazidas de petróleo, gás e urânio, a construção de barragens, a construção de usinas hidro e termoelétricas, assim como nucleares . A América do Sul, como região, tem um excedente global de energia, porém com grandes superávites atuais e potenciais em certos países e com severos déficits em outros. No primeiro caso, se encontram a Venezuela, o Equador e a Bolívia para o gás e o petróleo. No caso de energia hidrelétrica, há excedentes extraordinários no Brasil, no Paraguai e na Venezuela. De outro lado, se encontram países com déficit estrutural de energia como o Chile e o Uruguai e casos intermediários como são o Peru, a Colômbia e a Argentina. Assim, a integração energética da região permitirá reduzir as importações extra-regionais e fortalecer a economia da América do Sul. No esforço de fortalecer e de integrar o sistema energético da região, o Brasil tem financiado a construção de gasodutos na Argentina e tem se empenhado na concretização do projeto do Grande Gasoduto do Sul que deverá vincular os maiores centros produtores de energia (a Venezuela e a Bolívia) aos maiores mercados consumidores (o Brasil, a Argentina e o Chile). O Brasil está disposto a compartilhar a tecnologia que desenvolveu na área dos biocombustíveis, acreditando que a crise energética e ambiental somente poderá ser enfrentada com eficiência a partir de uma modificação gradual da matriz energética mundial, de uma redução do consumo e do desperdício nos países altamente desenvolvidos, principais responsáveis pela emissão de gases de efeito estufa.

37      A redução das assimetrias é o segundo elemento essencial da estratégia brasileira de integração. Em um processo de integração em que as assimetrias entre as partes são significativas tornam-se indispensáveis programas específicos e ambiciosos para promover sua redução. É óbvio que não se trata aqui das assimetrias de território e de população mas sim daquelas assimetrias de natureza econômica e social. É indispensável a existência de um processo de transferência de renda sob a forma de investimentos entre os Estados participantes do esquema de integração como ocorreu e ocorre ainda hoje na União Européia. Esse processo é ainda embrionário no Mercosul, sendo o Fundo para Convergência Estrutural e o Fortalecimento Institucional do Mercosul – FOCEM, apenas um modesto início.

38      A generosidade dos países maiores e mais desenvolvidos é sempre mencionada pelo Presidente Lula como um terceiro elemento essencial para o êxito do processo de integração do Mercosul e da América do Sul. Esta generosidade deve se traduzir pelo tratamento diferencial, sem exigência de reciprocidade, em relação a todos os países da América do Sul que estejam engajados no processo de integração regional, nas áreas do comércio de bens, de serviços, de compras governamentais, de propriedade intelectual etc. Isto é, o Brasil deve estar disposto a conceder tratamento mais vantajoso sem reciprocidade a todos os seus vizinhos, em especial àqueles de menor desenvolvimento relativo, aos países mediterrâneos e aos países de menor PIB per capita.         O Brasil, apesar de ser o maior país da região, não acredita ser possível desenvolver-se isoladamente sem que toda a região se desenvolva econômica e socialmente e se assegure razoável grau de estabilidade política e segurança. Assim, a solidariedade nos esforços de desenvolvimento e de integração é uma idéia central na estratégia brasileira na América do Sul, assim como a idéia de que este processo é um processo entre parceiros iguais e soberanos, sem hegemonias nem lideranças.

39      A integração econômica da América do Sul tem passado por um processo acelerado de expansão, impulsionado pela redução das tarifas propiciada pelos acordos comerciais preferenciais. O comércio de bens intra-América do Sul que era de 10 bilhões de dólares em 1980 passou para 68 bilhões em 2005. O comércio de serviços, que era praticamente inexistente na década de 1960, também se expandiu, ainda que em menor escala. Os exemplos mais relevantes de expansão poderiam ser dados pelo setor financeiro, com o estabelecimento de filiais de bancos, pelo setor dos transportes aéreos e mesmo terrestres, e pelo turismo intra-regional. Os investimentos de empresas da região em terceiros países da própria região se tornaram expressivos, como demonstra a expansão das empresas chilenas e brasileiras, em especial na Argentina. Finalmente, houve considerável expansão das populações de imigrantes intra-regionais. Todos esses fatores contribuem para a formação de um mercado único sul-americano, já que, implementados os acordos comerciais bilaterais entre países da região, cerca de 95% do comércio intra-regional será livre de tarifas, em 2019. A reativação do CCR e o estabelecimento de uma moeda comum para transações entre Brasil e Argentina muito contribuirão para a expansão do comércio bilateral e regional.

40      A estratégia brasileira no campo comercial tem sido procurar consolidar o Mercosul e promover a formação de uma área de livre comércio na América do Sul, levando em devida conta as assimetrias entre os países da região . A compreensão brasileira com as necessidades de recuperação e fortalecimento industrial de seus   vizinhos nos levou à negociação do Mecanismo de Adaptação Competitiva com a Argentina, aos esforços de estabelecimento de cadeias produtivas regionais e à execução do Programa de Substituição Competitiva de Importações, cujo objetivo é tentar contribuir para a redução dos extremos e crônicos déficits comerciais bilaterais, quase todos favoráveis ao Brasil. No campo externo, a estratégia brasileira visa a ampliar os mercados para as exportações do Mercosul através da negociação de acordos de livre comércio ou de preferências comerciais com países desenvolvidos, como no caso da União Européia; e com países em desenvolvimento tais como a Índia e a África do Sul, em busca da abertura de mercados e visa a prestigiar e fortalecer o processo de negociação em conjunto, que não só favorece  os parceiros maiores, mas também os parceiros menores do Mercosul, na medida em que obtêm eles condições de acesso que possivelmente não alcançariam caso negociassem isoladamente.

41.     Em um sistema mundial cujo centro acumula cada vez mais poder econômico, político, militar, tecnológico e ideológico; em que cada vez mais aumenta o hiato entre os países desenvolvidos e subdesenvolvidos; em que o risco ambiental e energético se agrava; e em que este centro procura tecer uma rede de acordos e de normas internacionais que assegurem o gozo dos privilégios que os países centrais adquiriram no processo histórico e em que dessas negociações participam grandes blocos de países, a atuação individual, isolada, nessas negociações não é vantajosa, nem mesmo para um país com as dimensões de território, população e PIB que tem o Brasil. Assim, para o Brasil é de indispensável importância poder contar com os Estados vizinhos da América do Sul nas complexas negociações internacionais de que participa. Mas talvez ainda seja de maior importância para os Estados vizinhos a articulação de alianças entre si e com o Brasil para atuar com maior eficiência na defesa de seus interesses nessas negociações.

42      Apesar das assimetrias de toda ordem que caracterizam os países da região, somos todos subdesenvolvidos e as características centrais do subdesenvolvimento são as disparidades sociais, as vulnerabilidades externas e o potencial não- explorado de nossas sociedades. No caso das desigualdades sociais, a América do Sul se caracteriza como uma das regiões do mundo onde há a maior concentração de renda e de riqueza e onde há ativos enormes aplicados no exterior, resultado de “fugas” históricas de capital. Por outro lado, o Brasil tem procurado estabelecer programas de combate à fome e à pobreza, e de natureza social em geral, que podem ser objeto de útil intercâmbio de experiências. Uma das características da região é o crescente número de imigrantes ( legais e ilegais) de refugiados e de deslocados cuja situação necessita ser regularizada de forma solidária e humanitária, a exemplo do que têm feito a Argentina e a Venezuela. O Brasil tem como prioridade a cooperação nas áreas de fronteira, cada vez mais vivas, a promoção de eliminação de vistos e de exigências burocráticas que dificultam a circulação de mão de obra e a negociação da concessão de direitos políticos aos cidadãos sul-americanos em todos os países da região, a começar pelo Brasil. A decisão brasileira de tornar obrigatório o espanhol no ensino médio no Brasil contribuirá para o processo de integração social e cultural da América do Sul.

43      No campo da política, os mecanismos de integração devem propiciar e estimular a cooperação entre os Estados sul-americanos nos foros, nas disputas e nas negociações internacionais, encorajar a solução pacífica de controvérsias, sem interferência de potências extra-regionais, o respeito absoluto e estrito aos princípios de não-intervenção e de autodeterminação, i.e. não deve nenhum Estado e muito menos o Brasil imiscuir-se nos processos domésticos dos países vizinhos nem procurar exportar modelos políticos por mais que os apreciemos para uso interno. O Brasil tem, como princípio, manter-se sempre imparcial diante de disputas que surgem periodicamente entre países vizinhos, bastando lembrar a ressurreição da questão da mediterraneidade entre Bolívia, Chile e Peru; da fumigação na fronteira entre o Equador e Colômbia; das divergências ocasionais entre Colômbia e Venezuela; da questão das papeleiras entre Argentina e Uruguai. E o Brasil tem procurado tratar com generosidade e lucidez política, e não com o rigor do economicismo míope, apesar das resistências internas e dos preconceitos de setores conservadores da sociedade brasileira, as reivindicações econômicas, em relação ao Brasil, que fazem por vezes Bolívia, Paraguai e Uruguai. O Parlamento do Mercosul será o foro para o conhecimento mais íntimo dos políticos e dos estadistas dos países da América do Sul, contribuindo para o indispensável ambiente político a um processo de integração.

44      No processo de integração do Mercosul e da América do Sul e nas relações políticas com o mundo multipolar violento e “absorvedor” em que vivemos, Brasil e Argentina se encontram unidos pelos objetivos comuns de transformar o sistema internacional no sentido de que as normas que regem as relações entre os Estados e as economias sejam de tal natureza que os países em desenvolvimento como o Brasil e a Argentina preservem o espaço necessário para a elaboração e a execução de políticas de desenvolvimento que permitam superar as desigualdades, vencer as vulnerabilidades e realizar o potencial de suas sociedades.

45      No mundo arbitrário e violento em que vivem o Brasil, e a América do Sul, é indispensável ter forças armadas proporcionais a seu território e à sua população. A estratégia brasileira de defesa vê o continente sul –americano de forma integrada e considera a cooperação militar entre as Forças Armadas, inclusive em termos de indústria bélica, como um fator de estabilidade e de equilíbrio regional através da construção de confiança. A inexistência de bases estrangeiras no continente sul-americano, à exceção de Manta, é um importante fator político e militar para o desenvolvimento e a autonomia regional. Por outro lado, o Brasil rejeita qualquer intervenção política, e ainda mais militar, de origem extra-regional nos assuntos da América do Sul. Os programas de intercâmbio militar exercem importante papel no processo de construção da confiança, assim como a participação de efetivos militares de países da região em operações de paz das Nações Unidas, em especial na Minustah.

46.     Finalmente, como mencionou o Ministro Celso Amorim, é necessário promover a integração e o desenvolvimento econômico e social de nossos países antes que o crime organizado o faça em suas diversas facetas: o narcotráfico, o contrabando, o tráfico de armas.

47.     A integração entre o Brasil e a Argentina e seu papel decisivo na América do Sul deve ser o objetivo mais certo, mais constante, mais vigoroso das estratégias políticas e econômicas tanto do Brasil quanto da Argentina . Foram nossos dois países aqueles que, na região, lograram alcançar o mais elevado nível de desenvolvimento industrial, agrícola, de serviços, científico e tecnológico; aqueles que, considerados como um conjunto, detêm as terras mais férteis e o subsolo mais rico da região; aqueles cuja população permite o desenvolvimento de mercados internos significativos, base necessária para a atuação firme no mercado externo sempre sujeito às medidas arbitrárias do protecionismo agrícola e industrial; somos aqueles países que, por seu grande potencial e interesses comuns, são os mais capazes de resistir à voragem absorvedora dos interesses comerciais, econômicos, financeiros e políticos dos países mais desenvolvidos, sempre mais preocupados em  concentrar poder e preservar privilégios econômicos e políticos, ainda que pela força, do que em contribuir para a construção de uma ordem econômica, ambiental e política necessária ao desenvolvimento da comunidade internacional  como um todo e à preservação do planeta. A coordenação política  que ocorre entre a Argentina e o Brasil na defesa de seus interesses nos foros, nas negociações, nos conflitos e nas crises internacionais  atingiu extraordinária intensidade e eficiência e foi isto que nos permitiu agir no âmbito do Conselho de Segurança, das negociações ambientais, das negociações hemisféricas desiguais e das negociações multilaterais econômicas da Rodada Doha, através do G-20, de modo a impedir o desequilíbrio de seus resultados e a garantir o espaço necessário às nossas políticas de desenvolvimento econômico.

48.     Falta muito a fazer, em especial nos campos avançados do desenvolvimento científico e tecnológico que plasmarão a sociedade do futuro, tais como as atividades espaciais, aeronáuticas, nucleares, de defesa, de informática e de biotecnologia. É necessário e indispensável que todos os organismos da estrutura burocrática dos Estados brasileiro e argentino, ainda muitas vezes envolvidos em rivalidades, ressentimentos e desconfianças históricas, compreendam o desafio que a Nação argentina e a Nação brasileira enfrentam neste início do Século XXI, compreendam a visão estratégica dos presidentes Nestor Kirchner e Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva e contribuam, assim, para que se realize a faceta gloriosa da profecia de Juan Domingo Perón: “O Século XXI nos encontrará unidos ou dominados”.

<!– @page { margin: 0.79in } H2 { margin-top: 0.19in; margin-bottom: 0.19in; page-break-after: auto } H2.western { font-family: “Arial Unicode MS”, physician sans-serif; so-language: en-GB } H2.cjk { font-family: “Arial Unicode MS”, sans-serif } H2.ctl { font-family: “Arial Unicode MS”, sans-serif } P { margin-bottom: 0.08in } H3 { margin-top: 0.19in; margin-bottom: 0.19in; page-break-after: auto } H3.western { font-family: “Arial Unicode MS”, sans-serif; font-size: 13pt; so-language: en-GB } H3.cjk { font-family: “Arial Unicode MS”, sans-serif; font-size: 13pt } H3.ctl { font-family: “Arial Unicode MS”, sans-serif; font-size: 13pt } –>

Samuel Pinheiro Guimarães

A importância essencial da América do Sul

1.       A América do Sul se encontra, necessária e inarredavelmente, no centro da política externa brasileira. Por sua vez, o núcleo da política brasileira na América do Sul está no Mercosul. E o cerne da política brasileira no Mercosul tem de ser, sem dúvida, a Argentina. A integração entre o Brasil e a Argentina e seu papel decisivo na América do Sul deve ser o objetivo mais certo, mais constante, mais vigoroso das estratégias políticas e econômicas tanto do Brasil quanto da Argentina. Qualquer tentativa de estabelecer diferentes prioridades para a política externa brasileira, e mesmo a atenção insuficiente a esses fundamentos, certamente provocará graves conseqüências e correrá sério risco de fracasso.

2        A África Ocidental, com seus 23 Estados ribeirinhos, inclusive os arquipélagos de Cabo Verde e São Tomé e Príncipe, é a fronteira atlântica do Brasil, continente a que estamos unidos pela história, pelo sangue, pela cultura, pelo colonialismo e pela semelhança de desafios. A Ásia é o novo centro dinâmico da economia mundial, fonte de lucros inesgotáveis para as megaempresas ocidentais e destino de uma das maiores migrações de capital e tecnologia avançada da História. A Europa e a América do Norte são para o Brasil, como para qualquer ex-colônia e para eventuais pretendentes a colônia, as áreas tradicionais de vinculação política, econômica e cultural. Porém, por mais importantes que sejam, como aliás são, os vínculos e os interesses atuais e potenciais brasileiros com todas essas áreas e por melhores que sejam com os Estados que as integram as nossas relações, a política externa não poderá ser eficaz se não estiver ancorada na política brasileira na América do Sul. As características da situação geopolítica do Brasil, isto é, seu território, sua localização geográfica, sua população, suas fronteiras, sua economia, assim como a conjuntura e a estrutura do sistema mundial, tornam a prioridade sul-americana uma realidade essencial.

3        O cenário econômico mundial se caracteriza pela simultânea globalização e gradual formação de grandes blocos de Estados na Europa, na América do Norte e na Ásia; pelo acelerado progresso científico e tecnológico, em especial nas áreas da informática e da biotecnologia, com sua vinculação às despesas e atividades militares; pela concentração do capital e oligopolização de mercados, medida pelo número de fusões e aquisições que passaram de 9 mil, no valor de US$ 850 bilhões, em 1995, para 33 mil, no valor de quase 4 trilhões de dólares, em 2006, e pela financeirização da economia, pois os ativos ( ações, títulos e depósitos) financeiros passaram de 109% da produção mundial, em 1980, para 316% em 2005; pela transformação dos mercados de trabalho e pela pressão permanente para reverter os direitos dos trabalhadores; pela acelerada degradação ambiental; pela insegurança energética e pelas migrações. O cenário político mundial se caracteriza pela concentração de poder político, militar, econômico, tecnológico e ideológico nos países altamente desenvolvidos; pelo arbítrio e pela violência das Grandes Potências; pela ameaça real, e sua utilização oportunista, do terrorismo; pelo desrespeito aos princípios de não-intervenção e de autodeterminação de parte das Grandes Potências políticas, econômicas e militares; pelo individualismo dos Estados ricos e a insuficiente e cadente cooperação internacional; pela emergência da China, como potência econômica e política, regional e mundial.

4        Os Estados no centro do sistema mundial, cada vez mais ricos e poderosos, pois a diferença de renda entre Estados ricos e pobres passou de 1 para 4 em 1914 para 1 para 7 em 2000, porém vinculados às economias periféricas quanto a recursos estratégicos e mercados e com uma população cadente, procuram, por meio de negociações internacionais, definir normas e regimes que permitam preservar e até ampliar sua situação privilegiada no centro do sistema militar, político, econômico e tecnológico que é o resultado, por um lado, da II Guerra Mundial e dos regimes coloniais e, por outro lado, do êxito de seus esforços nacionais, em especial na esfera científica e tecnológica. Nesse processo, sua capacidade de articular ideologias e de apresentar “soluções” como benéficas a toda a “comunidade internacional” é extraordinária e importantíssima pois é a base de sua estratégia de arregimentação de Estados e de elites periféricas cooptadas para alcançar seus objetivos nacionais, vestidos com a capa de objetivos da humanidade.

5        Neste cenário violento e instável de grandes blocos, multipolar, há uma tendência a que países pequenos e até médios venham a ser absorvidos, mais ou menos formalmente, pelos grandes Estados e economias aos quais ou se encontram tradicionalmente vinculados por laços de origem colonial ou estão em sua esfera de influência histórica, como no caso da América Central; ou tenham feito parte de seu território, como no caso dos países que formam a Comunidade de Estados Independentes – CEI; ou se vinculam por laços étnicos e culturais, como no caso da diáspora chinesa na Ásia.

6        Os países médios que constituem a América do Sul se encontram diante do dilema ou de se unirem e assim formarem um grande bloco de 17 milhões de Km2 e de 400 milhões de habitantes para defender seus interesses inalienáveis de aceleração do desenvolvimento econômico, de preservação de autonomia política e de identidade cultural, ou de serem absorvidos como simples periferias de outros grandes blocos, sem direito à participação efetiva na condução dos destinos econômicos e políticos desses blocos, os quais são definidos pelos países que se encontram em seu centro. A questão fundamental é que as características, a evolução histórica e os interesses dos Estados poderosos que se encontram no centro dos esquemas de integração são distintos daqueles dos países subdesenvolvidos que a eles se agregam através de tratados de livre comércio, ou que nome tenham, os quais ficam assim sujeitos às conseqüências das decisões estratégicas dos países centrais que podem ou não atender às suas necessidades históricas.

7        Os desafios sul-americanos diante desse dilema, que é decisivo, são enormes: superar os obstáculos que decorrem das grandes assimetrias que existem entre os países da região, sejam elas de natureza territorial, demográfica, de recursos naturais, de energia, de níveis de desenvolvimento político, cultural, agrícola, industrial e de serviços; enfrentar com persistência as enormes disparidades sociais que são semelhantes em todos esses países; realizar o extraordinário potencial econômico da região; dissolver os ressentimentos e as desconfianças históricas que dificultam sua integração.

8        As assimetrias territoriais são extraordinárias. Na América do Sul convivem países como o Brasil, com 8,5 milhões de quilômetros quadrados; como a Argentina, com seus 3,7 milhões de quilômetros quadrados e em seguida outros dez países, cada um com território inferior a 1,2 milhão de quilômetros quadrados. Três dos países da região se encontram voltados exclusivamente para o Pacífico, três se debruçam sobre o Oceano Atlântico, quatro são caribenhos e dois são mediterrâneos. O Brasil tem 15.735 km de fronteiras com nove Estados vizinhos, enquanto a Argentina, a Bolívia e o Peru têm fronteiras com cinco vizinhos. Devido a essas circunstâncias geográficas, os pontos de vista geopolíticos de cada país são inicialmente distintos, o que se agrava pelo fato de até recentemente – e mesmo até hoje –  terem estado separados os países da região pela Cordilheira, pela floresta, pelas distâncias e pelos imensos vazios demográficos.

9        O Brasil tem 190 milhões de habitantes, que correspondem a cerca de 50% da população da América do Sul, enquanto o segundo maior país em população, que é a Colômbia, tem 46 milhões de habitantes e o terceiro, a Argentina, tem 39 milhões. As taxas de crescimento demográfico variam de 3% no Paraguai a 0,7 % no Uruguai. A América do Sul viveu nos últimos anos um processo acelerado de urbanização, com o surgimento de megalópoles que concentram grandes parcelas da população total de cada país, e que exibem periferias paupérrimas e violentas. Há significativas populações de deslocados internos no Peru, como conseqüência da luta feroz contra a insurreição do Sendero Luminoso, e de refugiados, como no caso de colombianos na Venezuela e no Equador. No passado, as ditaduras e os regimes militares provocaram o exílio de numerosos militantes políticos, intelectuais, operários e sindicalistas, com grave prejuízo para o desenvolvimento político dos países mais afetados. Ademais, durante algumas décadas o reduzido ritmo de crescimento econômico provocou movimentos migratórios significativos dos países da região em direção aos Estados Unidos e à Europa Ocidental. Há um milhão de uruguaios vivendo fora do Uruguai enquanto três milhões se encontram no país. Há 400 mil equatorianos na Espanha e 4 milhões de brasileiros no exterior. Ao mesmo tempo, há grandes espaços despovoados na América do Sul, onde a densidade demográfica é inferior a 1 habitante por quilômetro quadrado, enquanto nas megalópoles a densidade populacional atinge mais de 10.000 habitantes por quilômetro quadrado. A América do Sul exibe índices de concentração de renda e de riqueza, de pobreza e de indigência, de opulência e luxo, contrastes espantosos entre riquíssimas mansões e palafitas miseráveis, entre excelentes hospitais privados e hospitais públicos decadentes, entre escolas de Primeiro Mundo e pardieiros escolares. Todavia, conta a América do Sul com as vantagens da ausência de conflitos raciais agudos, ainda que ocorra discriminação racial; com a presença dominante de idiomas de comum origem ibérica, ainda que em alguns países existam idiomas indígenas que conseguiram sobreviver; com a ausência de conflitos religiosos e predominância católica ao lado da rápida expansão das igrejas protestantes; com uma população grande, mas que não é excessiva, como em certos países asiáticos. O desafio que representa a emergência das populações indígenas historicamente oprimidas e seus efeitos para as relações políticas entre os países da América do Sul vão exigir, todavia, especial atenção e habilidade.

10      A América do Sul é uma região extremamente rica em recursos naturais, que se encontram distribuídos de forma muito desigual entre os diversos países. Enquanto o Brasil tem as maiores reservas mundiais de minério de ferro de excelente teor, a Argentina não as tem em volume suficiente. A Argentina dispõe de terras aráveis de extraordinária fertilidade, em contraste com o Chile. A Colômbia possui grandes reservas de carvão de boa qualidade e o Brasil as tem poucas e pobres. A Venezuela tem a sexta maior reserva de petróleo e a nona maior reserva de gás do mundo enquanto que, em todos os países do Cone Sul, inclusive no Brasil, são elas insuficientes para sustentar o ritmo de desenvolvimento, talvez de 7% a/a, necessário à absorção produtiva dos estoques históricos de mão-de-obra desempregada e subempregada e dos que chegam anualmente ao mercado. A Bolívia detém jazidas de gás que correspondem a duas vezes as brasileiras, mas tem sérias dificuldades para ampliar sua exploração. O Chile explora as maiores reservas conhecidas de minério de cobre do mundo, responsável por 40 % de suas exportações. O Paraguai ostenta um dos maiores potenciais hidrelétricos do mundo, em especial quando calculado em termos per capita, mas ainda não teve êxito em utilizá-lo para acelerar seu desenvolvimento. O Suriname tem a maior reserva de bauxita do planeta, ainda pouco explorada.

11      Encontra-se na América do Sul a maior floresta tropical do mundo, um tema central no debate político sobre o efeito estufa e suas conseqüências para o clima, e o maior estoque de biodiversidade do planeta, o qual é de grande importância para a renovação da agricultura e para a indústria farmacêutica; uma parcela importante das reservas de água doce do planeta, recurso cada vez mais estratégico e causa já de conflitos em certas regiões do globo, e o maior lençol de águas subterrâneas, o Aqüífero Guarani, que subjaz os territórios do Brasil, do Paraguai, da Argentina e do Uruguai.

 

As políticas econômicas

12      Os choques do petróleo (1973 e 1979), o endividamento excessivo e o súbito aumento das dívidas externas acarretaram crises e estagnação econômica que contribuíram para o fim dos regimes militares na América do Sul, em meados da década de 80. A vitória do neoliberalismo monetarista nos Estados Unidos e Reino Unido, a partir de Ronald Reagan (1981-1989) e Margaret Thatcher (1979-1990), e a renegociação da dívida externa (Plano Brady) forçaram aos países subdesenvolvidos a adoção de políticas de abertura comercial e financeira, desregulamentação e privatização, com base nos princípios do chamado Consenso de Washington. Essas políticas levaram a resultados desastrosos em países que nelas se envolveram mais a fundo, como foram o caso do Equador, da Bolívia e da Argentina, e deixaram seqüelas importantes em países como o Brasil, o Uruguai e a Venezuela.

13      Tais políticas neoliberais agravaram a já elevada concentração de renda e de riqueza, ampliaram o desemprego, contribuíram para a violência urbana, provocaram a fragilização do Estado e dos serviços públicos, o que levou por sua vez à gradual emergência de importantes movimentos políticos e sociais que passaram a preconizar (explícita ou implicitamente) a revisão do modelo econômico e social neoliberal.

14      Os países da América do Sul, em conseqüência das políticas neoliberais que determinaram a redução negociada e às vezes até unilateral de suas tarifas aduaneiras, a privatização de suas empresas estatais e a liberalização de seus mercados de capital, aumentaram suas importações de produtos industriais dos países desenvolvidos e o ingresso descontrolado de capitais estrangeiros. Essas políticas levaram à desindustrialização em maior ou menor grau, à maior influência do capital multinacional e à desnacionalização de importantes setores de suas economias, em especial do setor financeiro, com efeitos econômicos, e inclusive políticos, significativos.

15      Essa maior integração, porém de natureza passiva, dos países sul-americanos na economia mundial é radicalmente distinta da integração na economia global que ocorre com os países altamente desenvolvidos ou com certos países emergentes, como a Coréia. Nesses últimos casos, essa maior integração se verifica através da internacionalização das atividades de suas grandes empresas de atuação multinacional mas de capital nacional, bem como de suas exportações de alto conteúdo tecnológico enquanto que, no caso dos países sul-americanos, se verifica através da maior participação de megaempresas multinacionais em suas economias, já que não possuem esses últimos países (com raras exceções) grandes empresas capazes de se internacionalizarem, e da expansão de suas exportações de “commodities”.

16      Em decorrência, os países da América do Sul retomaram, voluntária ou involuntariamente, sua especialização histórica na exportação de produtos primários, tradicionais ou novos, com maior grau, por vezes, de elaboração, para atender à demanda dos países altamente desenvolvidos e da China. Assim, grosso modo, sua agricultura se sofisticou e passou a ser denominada de agribusiness; sua indústria foi adquirida ou cerrou suas portas em um processo de desindustrialização/desnacionalização e muitas de suas empresas de serviços, em especial as empresas modernas e aquelas do setor financeiro, foram adquiridas por megaempresas multinacionais.

17      A capacidade de utilizar tradicionais instrumentos de promoção do desenvolvimento econômico, que aliás tinham sido amplamente usados pelos países hoje desenvolvidos no início de seu processo de desenvolvimento (i.e. de seu processo de industrialização), foi abandonada pelos países da América do Sul na Rodada Uruguai, quando aceitaram normas sobre disciplina do capital estrangeiro as quais proíbem políticas tais como a nacionalização de insumos, o estabelecimento de metas de exportação e o reinvestimento de parte dos lucros; ou que estabelecem normas sobre propriedade intelectual que ampliaram os prazos de patentes e estabelecem patentes sobre fármacos, dificultando de fato o desenvolvimento tecnológico e gerando enormes remessas financeiras. Este abandono dos instrumentos econômicos tradicionais de uso do Estado, assim como a confiança excessiva desses países no livre jogo das forças de mercado contribuíram para que viessem a ter seu ritmo de crescimento reduzido ou estagnado. Por outro lado, a derrocada ideológica do Welfare State nos países desenvolvidos fez com que os países sul-americanos também contraíssem ou desarticulassem os seus programas sociais, o que contribuiu para agravar a concentração de renda e de propriedade e para a pequena expansão de seu mercado interno.

18      Assim, em grande parte se explicam as baixas taxas de crescimento na América do Sul, das décadas de 80 e 90, quando comparadas às de alguns países da Ásia, e a eventual derrocada dos governos neoliberais na Argentina, no Brasil, no Chile, na Bolívia, no Equador e na Venezuela. Nos últimos anos, surgiram na América do Sul governos que procuram manter as políticas de austeridade fiscal e de controle inflacionário enquanto tentam ressuscitar o Estado como agente suplementar do desenvolvimento econômico e como agente de redução da desigualdade social, diante das enormes injustiças e das pressões dos segmentos historicamente oprimidos em suas sociedades.

O bloco sul-americano

19      A atual experiência de integração sul-americana tem distintas origens, motivações e paralelos históricos. Em primeiro lugar, o trauma da desintegração dos Vice-Reinados do Império espanhol a partir de 1810, a desintegração posterior da Grã Colômbia em 1830, e a sobrevivência da utopia de unidade latino-americana, preconizada pelo Libertador Simon Bolívar. Segundo, a tentativa do notável economista argentino, Raul Prebisch, de explicar as razões do desenvolvimento na América do Norte em confronto com o atraso sul-americano levou à formulação da teoria estruturalista pela Comissão Econômica para a América Latina – CEPAL. Prebisch encontrou essas razões nas características das economias primário-exportadoras sul-americanas e na natureza de seu processo de incorporação do progresso tecnológico; na reduzida dimensão e no isolamento de cada mercado nacional; na deterioração secular dos termos de intercâmbio; na importância da industrialização como estratégia para a transformação econômica. Em terceiro lugar, a percepção de êxito da experiência de planejamento econômico e de industrialização acelerada vivida pela União Soviética, da experiência keynesiana e da planificação de guerra norte-americana e, finalmente, as políticas de economia mista e de planejamento indicativo dos governos socialistas europeus após a II Guerra Mundial. Quarto, na experiência de construção da Comunidade Econômica Européia, fundada na integração de mercados, na elaboração de políticas comuns e no financiamento pelos países mais ricos do esforço de redução de assimetrias entre as economias participantes.

20      Este conjunto de experiências inspirou os programas de desenvolvimento econômico com base na industrialização, em especial no Brasil durante o Governo Juscelino Kubitschek, as propostas da CEPAL de constituição de um mercado comum latino-americano, as propostas argentinas de criação de uma área de livre comércio que reunificasse economicamente as partes do antigo Vice-Reinado do Prata, e estimulou à constituição em 1960 da Associação Latino-Americana de Livre Comércio – ALALC.

21      Naturalmente, ao processo de integração da América do Sul e do Cone Sul subjazia a latente rivalidade entre Brasil e Argentina por influência política na região do Rio da Prata, os resquícios de um passado de lutas e a lembrança da inicial predominância industrial argentina. E outros ressentimentos decorrentes de conflitos e quase-conflitos passados, como entre Chile e Argentina; entre Bolívia, Chile e Peru; entre Peru e Equador; entre Colômbia e Venezuela, entre a Bolívia e o Paraguai, entre Brasil e Paraguai e entre Brasil e Bolívia.

22      A Associação Latino Americana de Livre Comércio, criada em 1960, e cuja meta era eliminar todas as barreiras ao comércio entre os Estados membros até 1980, encontrou obstáculos causados pelas políticas nacionais de substituição de importações e de industrialização e, mais tarde, pelas políticas de controle de importações para enfrentar as súbitas crises do petróleo que acarretaram inéditos déficits comerciais que atingiram os países importadores de energia, em especial o Brasil.

23      A partir de 1965, o Convênio de Créditos Recíprocos (CCR) entre os países da ALALC, e mais a República Dominicana, passa a permitir o comércio sem o uso imediato de divisas fortes, através de um sistema quadrimestral de compensação multilateral de créditos que funcionou com grande êxito sem que ocorresse nenhum caso de “default” até a década de 1980, quando foi progressivamente desativado pelos novos tecnocratas que vieram a ocupar os Bancos Centrais dos países da região, na esteira do período de governos neoliberais.

24      Em 1969, os países andinos celebraram o Pacto Andino (mais tarde CAN) como um projeto mais audacioso de integração e de planejamento do desenvolvimento, prevendo inclusive a alocação espacial de indústrias entre os Estados membros e a elaboração de políticas comuns, inclusive no campo do investimento estrangeiro.

25      Em 1980, a estagnação das negociações comerciais levou a substituição da ALALC pela Associação Latino Americana de Integração (ALADI). O Tratado de Montevidéu (80) incorporou o “patrimônio” de reduções tarifárias bilaterais, permitiu a negociação de acordos bilaterais de preferências, com a perspectiva de sua eventual convergência, e tornou possível a concessão de preferências bilaterais ao abrigo da “enabling clause” do então GATT.

26      Em 1985, Brasil e Argentina decidiram lançar um processo de integração bilateral gradual, com o objetivo central de promover o desenvolvimento econômico, a que se juntaram, em 1991, Paraguai e Uruguai, formando-se assim o Mercosul. Este último surgiu como um projeto enquadrado na concepção do Consenso de Washington do livre comércio como instrumento único e suficiente para a promoção do desenvolvimento, redução das desigualdades sociais e geração de empregos, na melhor tradição das Escolas de Manchester e de Chicago.

27      Após a conclusão do NAFTA em 1994, em que o México na prática abandonou a ALADI, os Estados Unidos, no contexto da Cúpula das Américas, lançaram um projeto ambicioso de negociação de uma Área de Livre Comércio das Américas (ALCA). Esse projeto, na realidade, mais do que uma área de livre comércio de bens, criaria um território econômico único nas Américas, com a livre movimentação de bens, serviços e capital (mas não de mão-de-obra ou tecnologia) e estabeleceria regras uniformes ainda mais restritivas à execução de políticas nacionais ou regionais de desenvolvimento econômico, já que as propostas originais eram OMC-Plus e NAFTA-plus (e parecem continuar a ser tais como revelam os textos dos tratados bilaterais de livre comércio, celebrados pelos Estados Unidos).

28      Apesar das declarações diplomáticas feitas na ocasião, e reiteradas posteriormente, de que a ALCA não afetaria os projetos de integração regional como a Comunidade Andina e o Mercosul, estava claro que a eventual concretização da ALCA eliminaria de fato a possibilidade de formação de um bloco econômico e político sul-americano.

29      Após o início das negociações da ALCA, e diante da extrema desigualdade de forças políticas e econômicas entre os países participantes, a negociação se interrompeu em 2004, após os Estados Unidos terem retirado os temas agrícolas e de defesa comercial (antidumping e subsídios) levando-os para o âmbito da OMC sob o pretexto de ser necessária uma negociação mais abrangente, inclusive com a União Européia. Em conseqüência e para equilibrar as negociações, o Mercosul considerou que os temas de investimento, compras governamentais e serviços deveriam também passar para o âmbito da Rodada de Doha na OMC e propôs aos Estados Unidos a negociação de um acordo do tipo 4+1, no campo do comércio de bens, proposta até hoje sem resposta, ou melhor, cuja resposta prática tem sido a firme atividade norte-americana de negociação de acordos bilaterais de livre comércio (na realidade com escopos muito mais amplos) com os países da América Central, a Colômbia, o Peru e (quase) com o Equador.

30      Paralelamente, o Mercosul empreendeu a negociação e celebrou acordos de livre comércio com o Chile (1995), com a Bolívia (1996), com a Venezuela, Equador e Colômbia (2004), e com o Peru (2005), que se referem exclusivamente ao comércio de bens e não incluem o comércio de serviços, compras governamentais, regras sobre investimentos, propriedade intelectual, etc.

31      Em 2002, o Congresso dos Estados Unidos tinha aprovado o ATPDEA (Andean Trade Promotion and Drug Eradication Act) pelo qual concederiam unilateralmente preferências comerciais, sem reciprocidade de parte dos beneficiários, para listas de produtos de países andinos em troca da execução de programas de erradicação das plantações de coca. O resultado da aplicação durante cinco anos dessa lei foi, de um lado, expandir as exportações de tais produtos desses países para os Estados Unidos e, de outro, ensejar o surgimento nesses países de grupos de interesses empresariais locais favoráveis à negociação de acordos de livre comércio com os Estados Unidos quando se encerrasse o prazo de vigência daquele Ato.

32      Posteriormente, foi lançada em 2004, em Cuzco, o projeto de formação de uma Comunidade Sul-Americana de Nações, hoje denominada UNASUL, organização que se pretenderia semelhante à União Africana, na África; à União Européia na Europa; à ASEAN, na Ásia; e ao MCCA, na América Central. As negociações para concretizar a UNASUL têm encontrado três distintas resistências: primeiro, a de países que celebraram acordos de livre comércio com os Estados Unidos; segundo, a de países que dão prioridade ao fortalecimento do Mercosul e que acreditam que o Brasil estaria “trocando” o Mercosul pela UNASUL; terceiro, a de países que consideram ser necessário uma organização mais audaciosa, com base na solidariedade e na cooperação e não naquilo que consideram ser o individualismo “mercantilista” das preferências comerciais, dos projetos de investimento e do livre comércio.

A Argentina e a estratégia de integração brasileira

33      Não há a menor possibilidade de construção de um espaço econômico e político sul-americano (economicista ou solidarista, não importa) sem um amplo programa de construção e de integração da infra-estrutura de transportes, de energia e de comunicações dos países da América do Sul. O comércio entre os seis países fundadores da Comunidade Econômica Européia correspondia em 1958 a cerca de 40% do seu comércio total e hoje supera 80%. Em contraste, o comércio entre os países da América do Sul correspondia em 1960, data de começo da ALALC, a cerca de 10% e ainda em 2006 não superou 17% do total do comércio exterior da região. Esse reduzido comércio tinha sua causa na pequena diversificação industrial das economias sul-americanas (hoje também um obstáculo, pois quanto mais diversificadas as economias maior o seu comércio recíproco), mas também na pequena densidade dos sistemas de transportes naquela época e até hoje. Há um interesse vital em conectar os sistemas de transportes nacionais e as duas costas do subcontinente, superando os obstáculos da Floresta e da Cordilheira, como se está fazendo ao norte entre Brasil e Peru, e se procurará fazer ao sul, entre Brasil, Argentina e Chile. A Iniciativa para a Integração da Regional Sul-Americana (IIRSA), em 2000, foi um passo de grande importância neste esforço de planejamento, que necessita para se concretizar da alavanca regional do financiamento.

34      Uma das maiores dificuldades dos países da América do Sul é o acesso a crédito para investimentos em infra-estrutura devido a limites ao endividamento externo e à falta de acesso a instrumentos de garantia. Este acesso ao mercado internacional de capitais é tanto mais importante quanto maior for a dificuldade desses países em elevar sua poupança interna, devido à prioridade concedida ao serviço da dívida interna e externa. O Brasil tem contribuído para o fortalecimento da Cooperação Andina de Fomento – CAF, entidade financeira classificada como AA no mercado internacional e voltada para investimentos em infra-estrutura, e tem participado, de forma positiva e prudente, do processo de construção de um Banco do Sul que se deseja eficiente. O Brasil é um dos poucos, senão o único país da região, que dispõe de um forte banco de desenvolvimento, cujos ativos são de US$ 87 bilhões, maiores que os do Banco Interamericano de Desenvolvimento – BID ( US 66 bilhões), que pode emprestar recursos para a execução de obras de infra-estrutura em condições competitivas com as do mercado internacional e sem condicionar tais empréstimos a “compromissos” de política externa ou à execução de “reformas” econômicas internas. É parte essencial da estratégia brasileira de integração fornecer crédito aos países vizinhos para a execução de obras de infra-estrutura e, no futuro, vir a fornecer créditos a empresas desses países em condições normais semelhantes às que se exigem de empresas brasileiras, tendo em vista o interesse vital brasileiro no crescimento e no desenvolvimento dos países vizinhos até mesmo por razões de interesse próprio, devido à grande importância de seus mercados para as exportações brasileiras e, em conseqüência, para o nível de atividade econômica geral e de suas empresas.

35      Além da integração da infra-estrutura física em termos de rodovias, pontes, ferrovias e de energia é essencial a integração das comunicações aéreas, pela sua importância para a economia e a política, assim como da mídia em especial a televisão, essencial à formação do imaginário sul-americano, através do conhecimento da vida política, econômica e social dos países da região, hoje desconhecida do grande público e, portanto, fonte de toda  sorte de preconceitos e manipulações que envenenam a opinião pública e afetam os discursos, as atividades e as decisões políticas. A TV Brasil – Canal Integración e a TELESUR são experiências não-hegemônicas de integração de comunicações, assim como a iniciativa brasileira de procurar estabelecer um padrão regional de TV Digital, com a participação dos Estados do Mercosul, inclusive no processo industrial.

36      A questão da segurança energética é central nos dias de hoje e no futuro previsível. A integração energética e a autonomia regional em energia para garantir a segurança de abastecimento energético é prioridade absoluta da política externa brasileira na América do Sul. Não há possibilidade de crescer a 7% a/a na média durante um período longo sem um suprimento suficiente, seguro e crescente de energia. Este suprimento depende de investimentos de prazo mais ou menos longo de maturação, tais como a prospecção de jazidas de petróleo, gás e urânio, a construção de barragens, a construção de usinas hidro e termoelétricas, assim como nucleares . A América do Sul, como região, tem um excedente global de energia, porém com grandes superávites atuais e potenciais em certos países e com severos déficits em outros. No primeiro caso, se encontram a Venezuela, o Equador e a Bolívia para o gás e o petróleo. No caso de energia hidrelétrica, há excedentes extraordinários no Brasil, no Paraguai e na Venezuela. De outro lado, se encontram países com déficit estrutural de energia como o Chile e o Uruguai e casos intermediários como são o Peru, a Colômbia e a Argentina. Assim, a integração energética da região permitirá reduzir as importações extra-regionais e fortalecer a economia da América do Sul. No esforço de fortalecer e de integrar o sistema energético da região, o Brasil tem financiado a construção de gasodutos na Argentina e tem se empenhado na concretização do projeto do Grande Gasoduto do Sul que deverá vincular os maiores centros produtores de energia (a Venezuela e a Bolívia) aos maiores mercados consumidores (o Brasil, a Argentina e o Chile). O Brasil está disposto a compartilhar a tecnologia que desenvolveu na área dos biocombustíveis, acreditando que a crise energética e ambiental somente poderá ser enfrentada com eficiência a partir de uma modificação gradual da matriz energética mundial, de uma redução do consumo e do desperdício nos países altamente desenvolvidos, principais responsáveis pela emissão de gases de efeito estufa.

37      A redução das assimetrias é o segundo elemento essencial da estratégia brasileira de integração. Em um processo de integração em que as assimetrias entre as partes são significativas tornam-se indispensáveis programas específicos e ambiciosos para promover sua redução. É óbvio que não se trata aqui das assimetrias de território e de população mas sim daquelas assimetrias de natureza econômica e social. É indispensável a existência de um processo de transferência de renda sob a forma de investimentos entre os Estados participantes do esquema de integração como ocorreu e ocorre ainda hoje na União Européia. Esse processo é ainda embrionário no Mercosul, sendo o Fundo para Convergência Estrutural e o Fortalecimento Institucional do Mercosul – FOCEM, apenas um modesto início.

38      A generosidade dos países maiores e mais desenvolvidos é sempre mencionada pelo Presidente Lula como um terceiro elemento essencial para o êxito do processo de integração do Mercosul e da América do Sul. Esta generosidade deve se traduzir pelo tratamento diferencial, sem exigência de reciprocidade, em relação a todos os países da América do Sul que estejam engajados no processo de integração regional, nas áreas do comércio de bens, de serviços, de compras governamentais, de propriedade intelectual etc. Isto é, o Brasil deve estar disposto a conceder tratamento mais vantajoso sem reciprocidade a todos os seus vizinhos, em especial àqueles de menor desenvolvimento relativo, aos países mediterrâneos e aos países de menor PIB per capita.         O Brasil, apesar de ser o maior país da região, não acredita ser possível desenvolver-se isoladamente sem que toda a região se desenvolva econômica e socialmente e se assegure razoável grau de estabilidade política e segurança. Assim, a solidariedade nos esforços de desenvolvimento e de integração é uma idéia central na estratégia brasileira na América do Sul, assim como a idéia de que este processo é um processo entre parceiros iguais e soberanos, sem hegemonias nem lideranças.

39      A integração econômica da América do Sul tem passado por um processo acelerado de expansão, impulsionado pela redução das tarifas propiciada pelos acordos comerciais preferenciais. O comércio de bens intra-América do Sul que era de 10 bilhões de dólares em 1980 passou para 68 bilhões em 2005. O comércio de serviços, que era praticamente inexistente na década de 1960, também se expandiu, ainda que em menor escala. Os exemplos mais relevantes de expansão poderiam ser dados pelo setor financeiro, com o estabelecimento de filiais de bancos, pelo setor dos transportes aéreos e mesmo terrestres, e pelo turismo intra-regional. Os investimentos de empresas da região em terceiros países da própria região se tornaram expressivos, como demonstra a expansão das empresas chilenas e brasileiras, em especial na Argentina. Finalmente, houve considerável expansão das populações de imigrantes intra-regionais. Todos esses fatores contribuem para a formação de um mercado único sul-americano, já que, implementados os acordos comerciais bilaterais entre países da região, cerca de 95% do comércio intra-regional será livre de tarifas, em 2019. A reativação do CCR e o estabelecimento de uma moeda comum para transações entre Brasil e Argentina muito contribuirão para a expansão do comércio bilateral e regional.

40      A estratégia brasileira no campo comercial tem sido procurar consolidar o Mercosul e promover a formação de uma área de livre comércio na América do Sul, levando em devida conta as assimetrias entre os países da região . A compreensão brasileira com as necessidades de recuperação e fortalecimento industrial de seus   vizinhos nos levou à negociação do Mecanismo de Adaptação Competitiva com a Argentina, aos esforços de estabelecimento de cadeias produtivas regionais e à execução do Programa de Substituição Competitiva de Importações, cujo objetivo é tentar contribuir para a redução dos extremos e crônicos déficits comerciais bilaterais, quase todos favoráveis ao Brasil. No campo externo, a estratégia brasileira visa a ampliar os mercados para as exportações do Mercosul através da negociação de acordos de livre comércio ou de preferências comerciais com países desenvolvidos, como no caso da União Européia; e com países em desenvolvimento tais como a Índia e a África do Sul, em busca da abertura de mercados e visa a prestigiar e fortalecer o processo de negociação em conjunto, que não só favorece os parceiros maiores, mas também os parceiros menores do Mercosul, na medida em que obtêm eles condições de acesso que possivelmente não alcançariam caso negociassem isoladamente.

41.     Em um sistema mundial cujo centro acumula cada vez mais poder econômico, político, militar, tecnológico e ideológico; em que cada vez mais aumenta o hiato entre os países desenvolvidos e subdesenvolvidos; em que o risco ambiental e energético se agrava; e em que este centro procura tecer uma rede de acordos e de normas internacionais que assegurem o gozo dos privilégios que os países centrais adquiriram no processo histórico e em que dessas negociações participam grandes blocos de países, a atuação individual, isolada, nessas negociações não é vantajosa, nem mesmo para um país com as dimensões de território, população e PIB que tem o Brasil. Assim, para o Brasil é de indispensável importância poder contar com os Estados vizinhos da América do Sul nas complexas negociações internacionais de que participa. Mas talvez ainda seja de maior importância para os Estados vizinhos a articulação de alianças entre si e com o Brasil para atuar com maior eficiência na defesa de seus interesses nessas negociações.

42      Apesar das assimetrias de toda ordem que caracterizam os países da região, somos todos subdesenvolvidos e as características centrais do subdesenvolvimento são as disparidades sociais, as vulnerabilidades externas e o potencial não- explorado de nossas sociedades. No caso das desigualdades sociais, a América do Sul se caracteriza como uma das regiões do mundo onde há a maior concentração de renda e de riqueza e onde há ativos enormes aplicados no exterior, resultado de “fugas” históricas de capital. Por outro lado, o Brasil tem procurado estabelecer programas de combate à fome e à pobreza, e de natureza social em geral, que podem ser objeto de útil intercâmbio de experiências. Uma das características da região é o crescente número de imigrantes ( legais e ilegais) de refugiados e de deslocados cuja situação necessita ser regularizada de forma solidária e humanitária, a exemplo do que têm feito a Argentina e a Venezuela. O Brasil tem como prioridade a cooperação nas áreas de fronteira, cada vez mais vivas, a promoção de eliminação de vistos e de exigências burocráticas que dificultam a circulação de mão de obra e a negociação da concessão de direitos políticos aos cidadãos sul-americanos em todos os países da região, a começar pelo Brasil. A decisão brasileira de tornar obrigatório o espanhol no ensino médio no Brasil contribuirá para o processo de integração social e cultural da América do Sul.

43      No campo da política, os mecanismos de integração devem propiciar e estimular a cooperação entre os Estados sul-americanos nos foros, nas disputas e nas negociações internacionais, encorajar a solução pacífica de controvérsias, sem interferência de potências extra-regionais, o respeito absoluto e estrito aos princípios de não-intervenção e de autodeterminação, i.e. não deve nenhum Estado e muito menos o Brasil imiscuir-se nos processos domésticos dos países vizinhos nem procurar exportar modelos políticos por mais que os apreciemos para uso interno. O Brasil tem, como princípio, manter-se sempre imparcial diante de disputas que surgem periodicamente entre países vizinhos, bastando lembrar a ressurreição da questão da mediterraneidade entre Bolívia, Chile e Peru; da fumigação na fronteira entre o Equador e Colômbia; das divergências ocasionais entre Colômbia e Venezuela; da questão das papeleiras entre Argentina e Uruguai. E o Brasil tem procurado tratar com generosidade e lucidez política, e não com o rigor do economicismo míope, apesar das resistências internas e dos preconceitos de setores conservadores da sociedade brasileira, as reivindicações econômicas, em relação ao Brasil, que fazem por vezes Bolívia, Paraguai e Uruguai. O Parlamento do Mercosul será o foro para o conhecimento mais íntimo dos políticos e dos estadistas dos países da América do Sul, contribuindo para o indispensável ambiente político a um processo de integração.

44      No processo de integração do Mercosul e da América do Sul e nas relações políticas com o mundo multipolar violento e “absorvedor” em que vivemos, Brasil e Argentina se encontram unidos pelos objetivos comuns de transformar o sistema internacional no sentido de que as normas que regem as relações entre os Estados e as economias sejam de tal natureza que os países em desenvolvimento como o Brasil e a Argentina preservem o espaço necessário para a elaboração e a execução de políticas de desenvolvimento que permitam superar as desigualdades, vencer as vulnerabilidades e realizar o potencial de suas sociedades.

45      No mundo arbitrário e violento em que vivem o Brasil, e a América do Sul, é indispensável ter forças armadas proporcionais a seu território e à sua população. A estratégia brasileira de defesa vê o continente sul –americano de forma integrada e considera a cooperação militar entre as Forças Armadas, inclusive em termos de indústria bélica, como um fator de estabilidade e de equilíbrio regional através da construção de confiança. A inexistência de bases estrangeiras no continente sul-americano, à exceção de Manta, é um importante fator político e militar para o desenvolvimento e a autonomia regional. Por outro lado, o Brasil rejeita qualquer intervenção política, e ainda mais militar, de origem extra-regional nos assuntos da América do Sul. Os programas de intercâmbio militar exercem importante papel no processo de construção da confiança, assim como a participação de efetivos militares de países da região em operações de paz das Nações Unidas, em especial na Minustah.

46.     Finalmente, como mencionou o Ministro Celso Amorim, é necessário promover a integração e o desenvolvimento econômico e social de nossos países antes que o crime organizado o faça em suas diversas facetas: o narcotráfico, o contrabando, o tráfico de armas.

47.     A integração entre o Brasil e a Argentina e seu papel decisivo na América do Sul deve ser o objetivo mais certo, mais constante, mais vigoroso das estratégias políticas e econômicas tanto do Brasil quanto da Argentina . Foram nossos dois países aqueles que, na região, lograram alcançar o mais elevado nível de desenvolvimento industrial, agrícola, de serviços, científico e tecnológico; aqueles que, considerados como um conjunto, detêm as terras mais férteis e o subsolo mais rico da região; aqueles cuja população permite o desenvolvimento de mercados internos significativos, base necessária para a atuação firme no mercado externo sempre sujeito às medidas arbitrárias do protecionismo agrícola e industrial; somos aqueles países que, por seu grande potencial e interesses comuns, são os mais capazes de resistir à voragem absorvedora dos interesses comerciais, econômicos, financeiros e políticos dos países mais desenvolvidos, sempre mais preocupados em  concentrar poder e preservar privilégios econômicos e políticos, ainda que pela força, do que em contribuir para a construção de uma ordem econômica, ambiental e política necessária ao desenvolvimento da comunidade internacional  como um todo e à preservação do planeta. A coordenação política  que ocorre entre a Argentina e o Brasil na defesa de seus interesses nos foros, nas negociações, nos conflitos e nas crises internacionais  atingiu extraordinária intensidade e eficiência e foi isto que nos permitiu agir no âmbito do Conselho de Segurança, das negociações ambientais, das negociações hemisféricas desiguais e das negociações multilaterais econômicas da Rodada Doha, através do G-20, de modo a impedir o desequilíbrio de seus resultados e a garantir o espaço necessário às nossas políticas de desenvolvimento econômico.

48.     Falta muito a fazer, em especial nos campos avançados do desenvolvimento científico e tecnológico que plasmarão a sociedade do futuro, tais como as atividades espaciais, aeronáuticas, nucleares, de defesa, de informática e de biotecnologia. É necessário e indispensável que todos os organismos da estrutura burocrática dos Estados brasileiro e argentino, ainda muitas vezes envolvidos em rivalidades, ressentimentos e desconfianças históricas, compreendam o desafio que a Nação argentina e a Nação brasileira enfrentam neste início do Século XXI, compreendam a visão estratégica dos presidentes Nestor Kirchner e Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva e contribuam, assim, para que se realize a faceta gloriosa da profecia de Juan Domingo Perón: “O Século XXI nos encontrará unidos ou dominados”.

<!– @page { margin: 0.79in } P { margin-bottom: 0.08in } –>

José Seoane*, Emilio Taddei** & Clara Algranati***

<!– @page { margin: 0.79in } P { margin-bottom: 0.08in } –>

Neoliberalism and social conflict

The 1990s opened the way to a renewed capitalist globalization in its neoliberal form, discount whose impact on Latin America has been glaringly noticeable and profound. Extending a process begun in previous decades, illness
promoted now by the so-called “Washington Consensus”, the adoption of neoliberal policies was to become generalized all over the region, taking on a newly radical form. The governments of Carlos Menem (Argentina), Alberto Fujimori (Peru), Salinas de Gortari (Mexico), Collor de Melo and later Fernando H. Cardoso (Brazil), became some of its best-known presidential incarnations. The profound and regressive consequences in social and democratic terms entailed by the application of these policies (mass pauperization being one their most tragic expressions) were the result of the acute structural transformations that modified the societal geography of Latin American capitalisms in the framework of the new order that appeared to be imposed by so-called “neoliberal globalization”2.

The application of these policies certainly faced numerous forms of resistance and protests in the region. In the first half of the 1990s two Latin American presidents (Collor de Melo in Brazil and Carlos Andrés Pérez in Venezuela) had to leave their posts in an “unexpected” manner as the result, among other issues, of rising unease and social repudiation. Nevertheless, in the regional context, the acts of resistance in those years to the application of the neoliberal recipes exhibited a configuration much more fragmented in social terms and more localized in sectorial and territorial terms than those that preceded them, while being unable in most cases to hinder the implementation of those policies. In the terrain of the social disciplines, this process, mediated by the hegemony wrested by the dominant thinking and its formulations regarding the “end of history”, meant the displacement of the problématique of conflict and of social movements from the relatively central space it had filled in the preceding decades –although from different perspectives– to an almost marginal and impoverished position.

Nevertheless, toward the end of that decade Latin America’s social reality again appeared marked by a sustained increase in social conflictivity. The continuing nature of this process may be appreciated in the survey carried by the Latin American Social Observatory (in Spanish, OSAL-CLACSO) for the nineteen countries of the Latin American region (see Chart 1), which for the period ranging from May-August 2000 to the same quarter of 2002 shows a rise in the number of the episodes of conflict surveyed of more than 180%. Because of the regional magnitude it attains (beyond exceptions and national differences), because of the characteristics it exhibits, and because of its perdurability, this increase in social conflictivity accounts for the appearance of a new cycle of social protest, which, being inscribed in the force field resulting from the regressive structural transformations forged by the implanting of neoliberalism in our countries, emerges to contest the latter.

In some cases, the Zapatist uprising of early 1994 has been pointed out as the emblematic event of the awakening of this cycle. This reference turns out to be significant insofar as, from diverse points of view, the revolt of the Chiapas indigenous exhibits some of the elements that distinguish the social movements that were to characterize the political and social realities of the region in recent years. In this regard, the national and international impact of the Zapatist uprising renders account of the emergence of movements of rural origin constituted on the basis of their indigenous identity; of the democratic demand for the collective rights of these peoples –which, in its claim for autonomy, questions the constitutive foundations of the nation-state; of the demand for a radical democratization of the political management of the state; and of the summoning of continental and global convergences. Beyond the specificity of the references that accompany and characterize Zapatism, its emergence sheds light, in a wider sense, on some of the particular aspects that appear to mark the majority of the popular movements that fill the ever more intense setting of social conflictivity in the region because of their organizational characteristics and of their forms of struggle, the inscriptions that give them an identity, their conceptualizations of collective action, and their understandings in relation to power, politics and the state. Therefore, it is not just a case of the beginning of a new cycle of social protests, but also of these appearing as incarnated in collective parties with particular features and that are different from those that had occupied the public scene in the past. At the same time, these experiences and the increase in social protest in Latin America were to develop in an almost simultaneous manner to the increase in conflict in other regions of the planet in a process that would mark the constitution of a space for international convergence in opposition to neoliberal globalization –what the mass media have named as the “antiglobalization” or “globaliphobe” movement and which, to be more precise, may be called an “alterglobalist” movement.

Lastly it may be pointed out that this rise in social protest and the emergence and consolidation of new social and popular movements converged into diverse social confrontation processes that, attaining major national significance, in some cases in recent years entailed the toppling of governments, the creation of deep political crises, or the failure of undertakings of a neoliberal character. In this regard, the “Gas War” (2003) in Bolivia, which ended with the resignation of the government of president Sánchez de Lozada and the opening of a transition that is still underway, emerges as inscribed within this process of mobilization of society that began with the “Water War” in Cochabamba (2000), also being expressed in the struggles of the coca-growing movement in the Chapare region and of the indigenous movement in the Altiplano plateau. Likewise, the indigenous uprising in Ecuador (2000), culminating in the fall of the government of Jamil Mahuad, marked the consolidation of the Confederation of the Indigenous Nations of Ecuador (in Spanish, CONAIE) in the context of social response to neoliberal policies in that country.

At the same time, the emergence and spread of the movement of unemployed workers in Argentina and the protests of the workers of the public sector in the second half of the 1990s converged with the mobilization of broad urban sectors of the middle classes to trigger the resignation of the government of president De la Rúa in late 2001. In the case of Brazil, one may stress the setting up of the Workers’ Unified Center (in Portuguese, CUT, in 1983) and of the Movement of Landless Rural Workers (MST, 1984), which starred in the opposition to neoliberal policies and were at the basis of the election victory of the presidential candidacy of Lula Da Silva (2002). In the same sense, the peasant mobilizations in Paraguay, which were to play an important role in the fall of president Cubas Grau (1999), will prolong themselves in the confrontation with the neoliberal policies promoted by succeeding governments; and the intense social protests in Peru (particularly the experience of the regional Civic Fronts) that were to mark the fall of the Fujimori regime (2000) were to continue in the resistance to the privatist policies promoted by the government of president Toledo (2002-2003).

It was precisely on the basis of the importance of these processes that, in early 2000, the Latin American Council of Social Sciences (CLACSO) decided to create the Latin American Social Observatory (OSAL) program with the aim of promoting a monitoring of social conflictivity and studies on social movements as well as regional exchanges and debate about these subjects. Over this period of more than four years, the work performed by OSAL led to the development of a chronology of the events of social conflict in nineteen countries of the continent, as well as the preparation of a publication, three times a year, which –with the participation of numerous Latin American researchers– has broached an analysis and collective reflection regarding the main acts of protest and the outstanding social movements on the regional scene over the course of these recent years. The main conclusions and pointers emerging from this extended endeavor nourish the present contribution.

In this regard, the initial goal of this article will consist in offering an approximation of the particular configuration that characterizes this cycle of protests and the popular movements that take part in it. In its first part we attempt to deal with this question on the basis of a general description that presents the recent social conflictivity in the region, its most outstanding features, and the parties that participate in it, to conclude by pointing out some elements that appear to distinguish the experience and actions of the most relevant social movements. The second part of the present contribution is centered on a more thorough analysis of the latter.

 

The contemporary scene of social protest in Latin America

We have already pointed out that the new cycle of protests that acquires momentum towards the end of the 1990s and the social movements that star in it offer distinctive features that differentiate them from those of the 1960s and 70s. The first evident fact tells us that the majority of the social organizations that promote these protests have emerged or been refounded in the last two decades. However, it is not only a matter of remitting exclusively to the organizational life or history of these movements, but particularly of the configuration they assume and that distinguishes them even within the map of the social conflictivity that characterized the 1980s and early 90s.

In this regard, if through the end of the 1980s, at least, the wage-earning Keynesian-Fordist conflict (and particularly the industrial conflict) constituted one of the main hubs of social conflictivity in the region, union organization additionally being the model that –in one way or another– marked the organizational nerve system of the majority of urban and rural social movements as well as fulfilling an outstanding role in the political and social articulation of the particular demands of collective participants, the structural transformations imposed by neoliberalism in all orders of social life (and in particular in the economy and the labor market under the de-industrialization and economic financiarization processes) were to sink that matrix of collective action into crisis, and weaken (albeit not eliminate) the weight of wage-earners’ unions as the starring parties in the conflict. In counterpart, as a result of the process of concentration of income, wealth and natural resources that marks neoliberal policies, new social movements with a territorial basis both in the rural world and in the urban space have emerged on the Latin American stage, constituting themselves on the basis of their ethnic-cultural identity (the indigenous movements), in reference to what they lack (the so-called “-less movements”, like the landless, roofless or jobless) or in relation to their shared life habitat (for example the movements of settlers).

Thus, the model of a return in the economy to raw materials, and the central role taken on in this context by agrarian restructuring processes, witness the emergence, in counterpart, of notable movements of rural origin. Also acting in the same direction is the privatization and intensive exploitation of natural resources that affects and upsets the life of numerous rural communities. This is undoubtedly one of the distinctive elements of the new phase that we analyze, and which crystallizes particularly in the major role of the indigenous movements, especially in Ecuador, Mexico and Bolivia. These movements attain an important influence at a national and international level that transcends sectorial claims, reaching the point of questioning both neoliberal economic policy and the political legitimacy of the governments that promote them as well as the constitutive form of the nation-state in Latin America. In this regard, for example, in the Ecuadorian case, the indigenous movement has striven for recognition for a political project which, reflected in the demand for a pluri-national state, seeks to guarantee self-government for the diverse indigenous nations. Under an even more radical claim of autonomy, the experience of the Zapatist movement demanded constitutional recognition for the rights of the indigenous peoples, which, partially crystallized in the so-called San Andrés Agreements (1995), would inspire the “caravan for dignity” that traveled through much of Mexico in the first months of 2001 to demand that they be complied with. To this brief listing one should add the activity of the indigenous movements of the Bolivian Altiplano (and also, although to a lesser degree, on the Peruvian side) and of the so-called “coca-growing movements” of Aymara peasants in the Chapare and the Yunga region in Bolivia and southern Peru, against the policy of eradication of coca crops demanded by the United States government. The prolonged activity of the Mapuche peoples of southern Chile (particularly embodied in the so-called Arauco-Malleco Coordination) against the appropriation of their lands and the over-exploitation of natural resources, as well as in Colombia’s Cauca Valley, are other outstanding examples of this type of struggle that seems to be carried out in the entire Latin American region. One may also point to the momentum acquired as of 2002 by the opposition of the original peoples of Central America against the Puebla Panama Plan, aimed at accelerating the penetration of transnational capital and investment in that region.

The appearance and consolidation of these indigenous movements on the political and social stage of the region is also accompanied by the emergence of numerous peasant movements that reach a significant presence at both national and regional levels. Standing out in this sense is the experience of the Brazilian Movement of the Landless Rural Workers (MST). The sustained takeovers of land and of public buildings to demand a progressive and comprehensive land reform, its actions against the spread of the model of genetically modified farming, and the development of the so-called “settlements”, have turned the MST into one of the social movements with the greatest political significance in the region. Its experience exemplifies a process of increasing mobilization and organization of the rural sectors at a regional level, embodied in the dissemination of landless movements in other Latin American countries (for example in Bolivia and Paraguay) and in the intensification of the peasant struggles in Mexico, Paraguay and Central America, and in their ability to likewise convoke the small-scale producers hit hard by the policies of liberalization of the agricultural sector carried forward under the promotion of free trade agreements. In the same direction, one may point to the growth of the protests and of the convergence processes experienced in the countryside against the economic and social consequences caused in those sectors by the fall in the international prices of numerous farm products, draconian credit policies and the tariff barriers against that type of products erected in the industrialized countries.

At the same time, in the urban arena, the structural effects of unemployment generated by neoliberal policies have –especially in countries of the Southern Cone– entailed the appearance and consolidation of movements of jobless workers. Argentina appears in this sense as the most emblematic case of this phenomenon, in which these movements, which receive the name of piqueteros3, occupy a central position –particularly as of 1999– on the stage of antineoliberal protest and in the acceleration of the political and social crisis that led to the resignation of president Fernando De la Rúa in December 2001.

Meanwhile, Latin American cities have been subjected to deep processes of spatial and social reconfiguration through the impact of liberal policies. The processes of “municipal decentralization” instrumented under the aegis of the fiscal adjustments (with the aim of “alleviating” the responsibility of the central governments to transfer resources to local administrations) have had enormous consequences on the daily life of the inhabitants of the cities. The processes of fragmentation and dualization of the urban space, abandonment of public spaces, deterioration in services and spread of violence have been only some of the most visible consequences of this profound social and spatial transformation that took place in the cities of the region. Recent urban conflicts seem to prove this multiplicity of troubles emanating from the social polarization promoted by neoliberalism. The struggles for access to housing (roofless movements), for the improvement of public services and against the rise in the rates of these, for the defense of public schooling, and against decentralization policies, also witness, in many cases, the confluence of diverse social sectors. The scourges caused by natural catastrophes (earthquakes, cyclones, floods) worsened by the increasing ecological impact of current capitalist development, as well as the abandonment of rural populations in the face of the need for governmental assistance and investment, explain the numerous mobilizations in demand of assistance by local and national governments.

The importance attained by these movements with a territorial basis that we have briefly summarized is far, however, from entailing the disappearance of the conflict involving urban wage-earning workers. Not only because in many of these movements one can make out the presence of workers in the diffuse and heterogeneous forms that this category assumes under a neoliberalism that leads to processes of “reidentification in terms not linked to the relation between capital and labor, but in other, very different ones, among which the criteria of ‘poverty’ and ‘ethnicity’, of occupations and of ‘informal’ activities and of primary communities are, probably, the most frequent” (Quijano, 2004). The verification that emerges from the monitoring of social conflicts in Latin America carried out by OSAL is that the world of labor, particularly in the urban space, far from being a secondary matter in the practice of defending claims, occupies an outstanding spot in the map of social protest, representing over a third of the conflicts surveyed over the course of the period extending from May 2000 to December 2003. Nevertheless, this quantitative weight in the register of protests contrasts with the difficulties which these (and the union organizations that promote them) face in transcending their sectorial nature and reaching a national dimension, and point to a redefinition in favor of a significant stellar role for civil servants, who account for around three quarters of the total of such protests4.

These struggles by government-employed wage earners are undertaken in the face of the insistent reform and privatization efforts encouraged by neoliberal policies, in particular as a result of the launching of fiscal adjustment packets demanded and negotiated by governments with the international organizations. Of particular significance in this sector are the dynamics of teachers and professors whose claims refer fundamentally to wage increases, the payment of wages in arrears, increases in the education budget, and the rejection of education reform proposals (particularly the flexibilization of working conditions). In some countries, the actions that ensue from the opposition to the privatization of public education allow a convergence with student sectors (in the university arena) as well as with other sectors (pupils’ parents, for example) which, backing the teachers’ demands and participating in the defense of public education, seem to point to the appearance of the “education community” form in the development of these conflicts (OSAL, 2003).

Attention may also be drawn to the intense practice in defense of their claims by administrative employees who mobilize against dismissals, for wage increases or wages in arrears, and against the reform of the state. Within the government sector, one may also underline the conflicts in many countries involving health workers, over wage claims, in favor of increases in the budget allocated to public hospitals and to the sanitary system in general, and for the improvement of working conditions. It is interesting to stress that the form of protest in this sector recurrently adopts the modality of extended stoppages –including strikes for an indeterminate period– and are articulated both under the form of national and regional strikes called by labor federations (these are recurrently recorded in almost all countries) and with street mobilization processes. In the same sense, one may also stress the conflicts against the privatization of government-owned enterprises.

But if the “first generation” privatization wave undertaken at the beginning of the 1990s by some governments in the region was characterized by social resistance fundamentally led by unions and by the workers of the sectors affected, the struggles against the “second generation” privatizations in some cases appear as a moment of social aggregation of protest which becomes manifest through the emergence of spaces of political and social convergence of a wide-ranging character. In the first of these cases, where these protests remained restricted to the workers and were unable to constitute wider social fronts that would transcend particular demands, they were, in general, defeated. The conflict being circumscribed to the employees at the enterprises in question, after the privatization a large part of them were laid off and went on to swell the ranks of the unemployed. The new cycle of social protest that we are analyzing, on the contrary, seems to exhibit a change in relation to this question. Some recent examples, such as the protests promoted by the Civic Front of Arequipa in southern Peru against the sale of the government-run power utilities (2002), and by the Democratic Congress of the People in Paraguay for the repeal of the law that allowed the privatization of state-owned companies (2002), serve to illustrate the broad convergence against the privatizations of social sectors (peasant federations, unions, students, NGOs and political parties) whose struggles are provisionally successful and force the governments to backtrack on their privatizing intentions5. This type of protests often takes on a markedly radical form (urban uprisings, lengthy highway blockades, takeover and occupation of company facilities) which appears to accompany a confrontational trend in its activities that characterizes the current cycle of protests that the region is undergoing. At the same time, the denunciation of corruption and the demand for greater democratic participation and transparency in local political life have prompted city dwellers to express their dissatisfaction, also promoting sectorial convergence processes under the form of popular uprising (puebladas) or of community mobilizations.

If in previous decades youthful participation and mobilization in Latin America was to a great extent channeled through the strong presence of the university student movement, youth protests now seem to adopt new forms and channels of expression. The decrease in the levels of school attendance resulting from the combined effects of the process of privatization of education and of the concentration of income and rise in poverty may perhaps explain, among other causes, the loss of relative weight of students’ movements. Although students still constitute a dynamic sector in the context of social conflictivity, even being involved in multisectorial protests that go beyond educational demands, the expression of youthful discontent is also channeled through an active participation in the movements of the jobless, of young favela dwellers in Brazil, in alternative currents and collective cultural phenomena of diverse types, in human rights movements, in indigenous and peasant protests and union-related groupings of young, impoverished workers. Younger generations have had an active and outstanding participation in the mass protests of a political nature that led to the resignation of presidents or that radically put into question the implementation of adjustment policies and privatizations, thus nuancing the stereotyped views of reality that speak of a marked youthful disenchantment with political participation in a wide sense. In the same context, it is necessary to underline the major importance and role filled by women in the social movements referred to. Feminine figures also stand out in the constitution of these territorial movements (Zibechi, 2003), being reflected both in the notable role displayed by piqueteras, Zapatist and indigenous women, and in the revitalization and reformulation of the feminist currents of previous decades, which crystallized, among other experiences, in the so-called “world march of women” and in the reference to the “feminization of poverty” (Matte and Guay, 2001).

Lastly, in the current setting of Latin American social protest, particular significance is exhibited by the processes of regional and international convergence that have acquired a strong momentum in recent years and that, by virtue of their scope and geographical insertion and the number of movements and social groupings they are capable of attracting, constitute an unprecedented experience in this continent. In the past, the experiences of international coordination of social movements found their most conspicuous expressions in the areas of labor organizations or of university student sectors. These convergences centered fundamentally on the defense of sectorial or professional interests, a fact that entailed great difficulties in transcending the arena of their specific demands. The impact and consequences of the “neoliberal globalization”, and consequently the irruption into national political settings of processes of continental scope (among others, for example, the so-called free trade agreements), in many cases linked to the penetration of transnational –particularly US– capital, have led to the appearance and reaffirmation of hemispheric coordination experiences with the confluence of labor, women’s and students’ movements, NGOs, political parties, and antimilitarist and environmental groupings in which a decisive role falls to peasant organizations (particularly through the Latin American Coordination of Peasant Organizations, CLOC, and its international articulation, Vía Campesina [Peasant Path]). The Continental Campaign against the Free Trade Area of the Americas (FTAA), promoted by the Continental Social Alliance and other networks and groupings (as well as the constitution of the Social Movements International Network), constitutes perhaps the most outstanding example, to which the innumerable amount of regional and continental gatherings (which also include movements from North America) against the Puebla Panama Plan and regional militarization and foreign interventions (particularly in reference to the so-called Colombia Plan and Andean Initiative) is added. In this process, the constitution of the World Social Forum (WSF, 2001-2004) appears as the most prominent experience of these convergences, not only at an international but also at a continental and regional level.

 

The new configuration of popular movements

Within this overview, which we have briefly summarized in relation to the features exhibited by social conflictivity in Latin America in recent years, some of the particular aspects that distinguish the actions and constitution of contemporary social and popular movements in our region already stand out. The analysis of these experiences and, particularly, the understanding and conceptualization of the novel aspects posed by those movements in the historical course of collective action and social contestation, constitute one of the centers of attention of the shaping and revitalization of current Latin American social thinking. The renewed generation of studies and publications about these subjects has also entailed the constitution of a new field of problématiques as well as an enrichment of the theoretical and methodological frameworks related to the study of social movements. One of the manifestations of these processes and of the debates posed is, for example, the position recently taken up within critical thinking by the discussion on the conceptualization of power and the role pertaining to the nation-state in reference to the views of social emancipation promoted by those movements6. It is not however our intention to present the problématiques orienting the debates and the reflections of social scientists –and of the movements themselves7. We are interested in underlining and going deeper into some of the features that distinguish the configuration of social movements at this time.

In relation to this, and with regard to the “repertories of protest”, it is important to point out a trend toward a greater radicalness in the forms of struggle, which is manifested in the duration of protests (actions over prolonged or indeterminate periods); in the generalization of confrontational forms of struggle to the detriment of demonstrational measures; in the regional spread of certain modalities such as the blockading of roads (characteristic, for example, of the protests of both the movements of jobless workers in Argentina and of the indigenous and coca-growing movements in the Andean Area) and the takeover of land (promoted by the peasant movements) or of public or private buildings. At the same time, the recurrence of lengthy marches and demonstrations that traverse regional and national spaces over the course of days and weeks seems to want to counteract the dynamics of territorial segmentation promoted by neoliberalism. Likewise, the puebladas and urban uprisings appear to be strategies aimed at the collective re-appropriation of the community space and at the recovery of a social visibility denied by the mechanisms of power (Seoane and Taddei, 2003).

In relation to the social actors that seem to take part in this new cycle of protests analyzed, we may stress two features that we have already singled out previously. The first is the displacement of the wage earners’ conflict to the public sector, to the detriment of the impact and importance of those promoted by workers in the private sector. This fact, in turn, implies a particular configuration that runs through the actions of labor organizations, while the dynamics of the posing of demands by the public sector calls on the participation and convergence of other social sectors in the defense of access to, and the quality of, education and health as human rights. In this sense, it is important to underline that in many cases the struggles against these policies of dismantlement and privatization, and the boosting of the convergence processes –which adopt the forms of coordinating units and civic fronts– don’t necessarily rest on wage-earning labor dynamics. The role played by other organizations (peasant and indigenous movements, the unemployed, students, urban movements, among others) in the shaping of these “expanded social coalitions” is of major importance. The second characteristic refers to the consolidation of movements of rural origin –indigenous and peasants–, which reach national and regional significance and influence. These develop a notable capacity of interpellation and articulation with urban social sectors, in many cases successfully being able to link the dynamics of the struggle against neoliberalism (agrarian policy, privatizations, fiscal adjustment) to a wider questioning of the bases of legitimacy of the political systems in the region.

These two brief pointers –as well as the description of the setting of social conflictivity presented earlier– therefore allow us to go deeper into the characterization of the particular configuration that appears to distinguish the experimentation of contemporary social movements in the region. Without seeking to exhaust this issue, it is necessary, in our understanding, to emphasize three elements that under different forms and with diverse intensities seem to run through the constitutive practice of the majority of the most significant Latin American social movements.

In the first place, a dynamics of territorial appropriation that characterizes the collective practice of what we have earlier referred to as rural and urban territorial movements. Presented as “the strategic response of the poor to the crisis of the old territoriality of the factory and the farm… [and to] the de-territorialization of production… [promoted by] neoliberal reforms” (Zibechi, 2003), as well as to the process of privatization of the public sphere and of politics (Boron, 2003a), this trend to re-appropriation by the community of the living space in which those movements are located remits to the expansion of the experiences of productive self-management (Sousa Santos, 2002b), the collective solution of social needs (for example in the field of education and of health), and autonomous forms of handling of public affairs. This diversified continuum encompasses the cooperative settlements of the Brazilian MST, the indigenous communities in Ecuador and Bolivia, the autonomous Zapatist town governments in Mexico, the productive undertakings of the various jobless movements and movement of recovered factories both in Argentina, as well as the puebladas and urban uprisings that implied the emergence of practices of management of the public space (such is the case for example of the “Water War” in Cochabamba, Bolivia, and of the experience of the popular assemblies that emerged in the main urban centers of Argentina after December 2001). In this sense, this rising “territorialization” of social movements is the result both of the extension of “forms of reciprocity, that is to say, of the exchange of labor force and of products without passing through the market, albeit with an inevitable, but ambiguous and tangential, relationship with it… [as well as of] new forms of political authority, of a communal character, that operate with and without the state” (Quijano, 2004). In permanent tension with the market and the state, extended in time or unstable and temporary, settling around practices of “production and reproduction of life” (Zibechi, 2003) or simply operating in the terrain of the management of public and political affairs, this dynamics of collective re-appropriation of the social territory appears to guide the experience not only of the indigenous and peasant movements, but also in the urban space (Seoane, 2003a). In this sense, we might state that “antineoliberal politics would appear to head towards an action of […] reproduction and production of society beyond the expanded and dislocated production of transnational capital” (Tapia, 2000).

In consonance with this experience, the practice and discursiveness of the majority of the social movements described appears imbued with the revaluing of democratic mechanisms of participation and decision which, inspired in references to direct or semi-direct democracy, orient both their organizational models and their programmatics and demands vis-à-vis the state. In this regard, on one hand, the promotion of more horizontal and open forms of participation is seen as reinsurance in the face of the danger of “disconnection” between the different organizational levels and of bureaucratization and manipulation. On the other hand, the confrontation with the neoliberal hegemony in the terrain of public policies has been translated into a growing questioning of the political system, of the model of representative democracy, and of the form that the constitution of the nation-state adopted in Latin America, promoting a diversity of demands that ranges from those for consultations and referendums to claims for autonomy and self-government, boosted particularly by the indigenous movements. The experiences of social self-organization linked to assembly-like forms of organization were a feature of the emergence of many of these movements (for example of the organizations of jobless workers and of the popular assemblies in Argentina or the urban uprisings of the “Water War” and the “Gas War” in Bolivia). Additionally, the traditional experiences of community management that characterized indigenous communities, reformulated under the impact of neoliberal policies, have served to pose a critical and alternative view of delegational and representative forms. In this terrain, the Zapatist experimentation crystallized in the watchword of “commanding while obeying” (Ceceña, 2001) is perhaps the clearest and most suggestive example, although not the only one. At the same time, the utilization and presence in the programmatics of many of these movements of instruments of semi-direct democracy can be verified, for example, in the demand for the gas referendum and the summoning to a Constitutional Assembly in the events of October in Bolivia (2003), in the referendums against the privatizations in Uruguay, or in the demand for binding plebiscites on the FTAA promoted by the social coalitions constituted in opposition to that trade agreement at a continental level. In the same direction, be it under the form of the demand for a plurinational state in the case of the Ecuadorian indigenous movements, or of the demand and construction of self-government in the autonomous Zapatist town governments, the claim of autonomy for indigenous peoples encompasses, in its projection on society, the broaching of a radical democratization of the forms of the nation-state, particularly in the “coloniality of power” that characterized its constitution (Lander, 2000). Lastly, access to local governments by representatives of those movements (especially in the experience of the Ecuadorian hills and in the Cauca valley in Colombia) has entailed the launching of mechanisms of popular participation and control in their handling (Larrea, 2004). In the diversity of the experiences described above, one many thus point to the emergence of a democratizing trend that traverses the collective practice of these social movements both in their spaces of autonomy and in the terrain of the state (Seoane, 2004; Bartra, 2003a), and expresses the extent to which “participatory democracy has taken on a new dynamics enacted by subordinate social communities and groups struggling against social exclusion and the trivialization of citizenship” (Sousa Santos, 2002a).

Lastly, it may be pointed out that, as from the protests against the Multilateral Agreement on Investment (MIA, 1997/98), the “battle of Seattle” that impeded the so-called Millennium Round of the World Trade Organization (1999), the creation and deepening of the experience of the World Social Forum (WSF, 2001 through 2004) and the “global days of action” against the military intervention in Iraq (2003/2004), the backbone of a “new internationalism” has left a deep and singular imprint on the experimentation of social movements in the world arena. The eminently social character of the actors involved (albeit not unlinked, should it be necessary to make this clear, to ideological and political inscriptions), their heterogeneity and scope, the truly international extension of the convergences, the organizational forms and the characteristics taken on by these articulations point to the novelty of this internationalism (Seoane and Taddei, 2001). As we have already shown, the Latin American region has not remained outside this process. On the contrary: the holding in 1996 of the 1st Encounter for Humanity and Against Neoliberalism organized by Zapatism in the depths of the Chiapas forest –which may be considered one of the first international summons located at the origin of this process–, as well as the fact that the birth of the WSF took place in the Brazilian city of Porto Alegre, point to the profound imbrication between the growth of protest and social movements in Latin America, and the emergence of the global convergences against neoliberal globalization. In this region, over the course of recent years, these experiences have been particularly marked by the evolution of the so-called agreements on trade liberalization, and especially of the United States’ initiative of subsuming the countries of the region within a Free Trade Area of the Americas (FTAA). These resistance processes, that implied both the constitution of spaces of coordination at a regional level (which group a wide array of movements, social organizations and NGOs) and the emergence of similar convergence experiences at a national level (for example, the national campaigns against the FTAA), turn out to be, within the continental framework and along with the experience of the Social Forums and of the mobilizations against the war, an expression and extension of the alterglobalist movement that emerged and was consolidated in the last decade. In relation to this process of convergences against “free trade”, the regional experience hails back to the protests triggered by the negotiation and launching (1994) of NAFTA (North American Free Trade Agreement), the creation of the Continental Social Alliance (1997), the organization of the 1st Summit of the Peoples of the Americas (1998) in opposition to the 2nd Summit of presidents of the 34 American countries that participate in the negotiation over the FTAA, and the organization of the Hemispheric Meetings of Struggle Against the FTAA (Havana, Cuba; 2002 to 2004). Nevertheless, particularly in relation to the dynamics and characteristics taken on by these negotiations as of 2003 –marked by the proximity of the date foreseen for their conclusion (2005), the difficulties and resistance it faces and the acceleration of the plurilateral Free Trade Agreements–, these convergence and protest processes are intensified at a regional level8. In Central America, the fruit of these experiences has been the creation and development of the Mesoamerican Forums and of the so-called Central American Popular Block. In the case of the countries forming part of MERCOSUR, the so-called “National Campaigns against the FTAA” have promoted diverse and massive popular consultations and have evolved toward the increasing questioning of “free trade” in the face of the different trade negotiations undertaken by governments. Lastly, in the Andean Area the articulation between the rejection of these treaties with massive protests in the national spaces (for example, the “Gas War” in Bolivia, 2003) and the emergence of regional coordination processes (for example, in April 2004, the first Andean Day of Mobilization Against the FTAA) point to the wealth of such processes. In this direction, the forthcoming holding of the 1st Americas Social Forum in Ecuador (July 2004) will constitute an arrival point of these experiences as well as an event that will prove the maturity, depth, features and challenges faced by internationalism in the Latin American and continental arena.

 

“Neoliberalism of war” and social convergences

The process opened in Latin America in recent years –in the face of the exhaustion of the neoliberal model in the form in which the latter tragically crystallized in the 1990s in our region– is increasingly expressed in the intensification of the disputes regarding the direction to be adopted by a transition whose outcome remains uncertain. In this sense, the social and political realities of the various countries is seen to be marked, as we pointed out earlier, by renewed social protest –which at a regional level has grown in recent years– and by the activity of social and popular movements with features different from those that had occupied stage center in the immediate past. This process, in the framework of the economic crisis undergone by most of the region and in the face of the attempts to deepen neoliberal policies, has in some cases been translated into “popular uprisings” (that in most cases ended in the collapse of governments), in the constitution of “electoral majorities” critical of neoliberalism, and even in the reappearance of a political discursiveness that differentiates itself from the latter. In their diversity, these processes point to the growing crisis of legitimacy that puts into question the cultural, economic and political forms that underpinned the application of neoliberalism in the past.

Nevertheless, in the face of this process, the attempts to deepen neoliberal policies have tended to a rising militarization of social relations in a process that has been given the name of “neoliberalism of war” (González Casanova, 2002; Taddei, 2002). This refers not only to the policy of war and of military intervention wielded as an international prerogative by president Bush –particularly a posteriori of the attacks of September 11, 2001– but also to the deepening of a repressive social diagram that encompasses legal reforms that slash democratic rights and freedoms and award greater power and immunity to the actions of police forces, and the criminalization of poverty and social movements, the so-called “judicialization” of protest, the increase in state and para-state repression, and the rising intervention of the armed forces in domestic social conflict. Justified by the alleged fight against the drug traffic, terrorism or crime, the ideology of “security” thus seeks the reconstitution of the challenged “neoliberal governability”. One of its most tragic expressions has been the increase of the United States military presence in the entire Latin American region (Quijano, 2004; Algranati, Seoane and Taddei, 2004). Additionally, in the terrain of domestic policies, the Colombian case emerges as one of the main laboratories for the implanting of these repressive diagrams, particularly under the administration of president Álvaro Uribe, who opened a process that seeks not only to deepen the military confrontation with the guerrillas –after the peace agreements of the previous period were broken– but also the deployment of a policy of “social militarization” in the attempt to affirm an authoritarian legitimacy, particularly among middle-class urban sectors (Zuluaga Nieto, 2003). The face of the “neoliberalism of war” thus accompanies the promotion of a radical and even more regressive reconfiguration of the political, social and economic geography of the region as a result of the acceleration of the so-called “free trade agreements” that find their maximum expression in the FTAA.

We have attempted up to this point to give an account of the paths taken and features adopted by the process of social and political disputation opened by the crisis of the neoliberal model forged in the 1990s and of the characteristics that appear to distinguish the configuration of contemporary social movements. As we have pointed out, this process is not homogeneous, and is expressed in a differentiated manner in each of the regions into which the continent may be subdivided and even within these. In this regard, the evolution of the northern region (Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean) seems to evince a marked consolidation of trade liberalization processes, which constitute the cornerstone of Washington’s strategic plans. At the same time, the convulsive political situation in a major part of the Andean region is a manifestation of the strong social tensions resulting from the attempts to deepen these “news” neoliberal recipe books, which are translated into the difficulty in the stabilization of the new political regimes that promote these policies. Expressions of this are the increasing popular discredit of the governments of Peru and of Ecuador; the setting opened with the “Bolivian October” that projects new confrontations and possible changes on the horizon, and the Venezuelan case, where the battle around the presidential recall referendum this coming August will undoubtedly acquire a regional dimension. The outcome of this process will be fundamental in Latin America with regard to the hegemonic aspirations of the White House to hinder the consolidation of democratic-popular political processes that challenge the neoliberal model. In the southern region, social movements face the great challenge of taking advantage of the chinks opened by the loss of legitimacy of neoliberalism to fight for the direction of the processes underway, maintaining and strengthening their autonomy in relation to governments.

Beyond the particular aspects exhibited by the processes at a subregional level, the generalization of free trade appears in all countries (with the exception of the Venezuelan case) as an axis emphasized by the political and economic elites to refound the neoliberal order and its legitimacy. In the face of this, the processes of regional convergence that on a national scale challenge the hegemonic economic model, and the emancipatory horizons that ensue from the practices and discourses that characterize social movements at the beginning of the twenty-first century, cast light on the outlines of those “other possible Americas” that our peoples so strongly call for.

<!– @page { margin: 0.79in } P { margin-bottom: 0.08in } –>

 

Notes

 

* Coordinator of the Latin American Social Observatory (OSAL) of the Latin American Council of Social Sciences (CLACSO) and Professor at the Faculty of Social Sciences of the University of Buenos Aires (UBA).

** Academic Coordinator of the Latin American Council of Social Sciences (CLACSO).

*** Member of the Coordinating Team of OSAL-CLACSO.

1 We are particularly grateful for the comments of Ivana Brighenti and Miguel Ángel Djanikian in the revision of the text.

2 We find it impossible to develop this issue here. Regarding the evolution of poverty and unemployment in Latin America, reference may be made to the reports on Human Development of the UNDP (2002) and of ECLAC (2002). With regard to the consequences in relation to democracy see Boron (2003a). Regarding the structural transformations of Latin American capitalism, see among others Quijano (2004) and Fiori (2001).

3 Road or highway blockade, generally for an extended period.

4 For example, for the year 2003, the conflicts involving workers of the public sector represent, according to the records supplied by OSAL (Latin American Social Observatory, CLACSO), 76% of the total number of protests by employed workers.

5 The most important among this type of protests undoubtedly turns out to be the so-called “Water War” in Cochabamba, Bolivia (2000), which frustrated the attempt to award a concession for, and privatize, the drinking water service in that city to an international consortium headed by the Bechtel company.

6 Regarding this debate one may consult, among other texts, the diverse dossiers published in numbers 12 and 13 of Chiapas magazine, as well as those included in numbers 4 and 7 of CLACSO’s OSAL magazine.

7 We have broached that question in the course “Neoliberalism and Social Movements in Latin America: the Configuration of Social Protest”, taught in the framework of the distance education courses under the platform of CLACSO’s Virtual Campus, 2003.

8 An evaluation of this process may be consulted in OSAL (2004).

 

José Seoane*, remedy Emilio Taddei** & Clara Algranati***

The 1990s opened the way to a renewed capitalist globalization in its neoliberal form, whose impact on Latin America has been glaringly noticeable and profound. Extending a process begun in previous decades, promoted now by the so-called “Washington Consensus”, the adoption of neoliberal policies was to become generalized all over the region, taking on a newly radical form. The governments of Carlos Menem (Argentina), Alberto Fujimori (Peru), Salinas de Gortari (Mexico), Collor de Melo and later Fernando H. Cardoso (Brazil), became some of its best-known presidential incarnations. The profound and regressive consequences in social and democratic terms entailed by the application of these policies (mass pauperization being one their most tragic expressions) were the result of the acute structural transformations that modified the societal geography of Latin American capitalisms in the framework of the new order that appeared to be imposed by so-called “neoliberal globalization”2.

The application of these policies certainly faced numerous forms of resistance and protests in the region. In the first half of the 1990s two Latin American presidents (Collor de Melo in Brazil and Carlos Andrés Pérez in Venezuela) had to leave their posts in an “unexpected” manner as the result, among other issues, of rising unease and social repudiation. Nevertheless, in the regional context, the acts of resistance in those years to the application of the neoliberal recipes exhibited a configuration much more fragmented in social terms and more localized in sectorial and territorial terms than those that preceded them, while being unable in most cases to hinder the implementation of those policies. In the terrain of the social disciplines, this process, mediated by the hegemony wrested by the dominant thinking and its formulations regarding the “end of history”, meant the displacement of the problématique of conflict and of social movements from the relatively central space it had filled in the preceding decades –although from different perspectives– to an almost marginal and impoverished position.

Nevertheless, toward the end of that decade Latin America’s social reality again appeared marked by a sustained increase in social conflictivity. The continuing nature of this process may be appreciated in the survey carried by the Latin American Social Observatory (in Spanish, OSAL-CLACSO) for the nineteen countries of the Latin American region (see Chart 1), which for the period ranging from May-August 2000 to the same quarter of 2002 shows a rise in the number of the episodes of conflict surveyed of more than 180%. Because of the regional magnitude it attains (beyond exceptions and national differences), because of the characteristics it exhibits, and because of its perdurability, this increase in social conflictivity accounts for the appearance of a new cycle of social protest, which, being inscribed in the force field resulting from the regressive structural transformations forged by the implanting of neoliberalism in our countries, emerges to contest the latter.

In some cases, the Zapatist uprising of early 1994 has been pointed out as the emblematic event of the awakening of this cycle. This reference turns out to be significant insofar as, from diverse points of view, the revolt of the Chiapas indigenous exhibits some of the elements that distinguish the social movements that were to characterize the political and social realities of the region in recent years. In this regard, the national and international impact of the Zapatist uprising renders account of the emergence of movements of rural origin constituted on the basis of their indigenous identity; of the democratic demand for the collective rights of these peoples –which, in its claim for autonomy, questions the constitutive foundations of the nation-state; of the demand for a radical democratization of the political management of the state; and of the summoning of continental and global convergences. Beyond the specificity of the references that accompany and characterize Zapatism, its emergence sheds light, in a wider sense, on some of the particular aspects that appear to mark the majority of the popular movements that fill the ever more intense setting of social conflictivity in the region because of their organizational characteristics and of their forms of struggle, the inscriptions that give them an identity, their conceptualizations of collective action, and their understandings in relation to power, politics and the state. Therefore, it is not just a case of the beginning of a new cycle of social protests, but also of these appearing as incarnated in collective parties with particular features and that are different from those that had occupied the public scene in the past. At the same time, these experiences and the increase in social protest in Latin America were to develop in an almost simultaneous manner to the increase in conflict in other regions of the planet in a process that would mark the constitution of a space for international convergence in opposition to neoliberal globalization –what the mass media have named as the “antiglobalization” or “globaliphobe” movement and which, to be more precise, may be called an “alterglobalist” movement.

Lastly it may be pointed out that this rise in social protest and the emergence and consolidation of new social and popular movements converged into diverse social confrontation processes that, attaining major national significance, in some cases in recent years entailed the toppling of governments, the creation of deep political crises, or the failure of undertakings of a neoliberal character. In this regard, the “Gas War” (2003) in Bolivia, which ended with the resignation of the government of president Sánchez de Lozada and the opening of a transition that is still underway, emerges as inscribed within this process of mobilization of society that began with the “Water War” in Cochabamba (2000), also being expressed in the struggles of the coca-growing movement in the Chapare region and of the indigenous movement in the Altiplano plateau. Likewise, the indigenous uprising in Ecuador (2000), culminating in the fall of the government of Jamil Mahuad, marked the consolidation of the Confederation of the Indigenous Nations of Ecuador (in Spanish, CONAIE) in the context of social response to neoliberal policies in that country.

At the same time, the emergence and spread of the movement of unemployed workers in Argentina and the protests of the workers of the public sector in the second half of the 1990s converged with the mobilization of broad urban sectors of the middle classes to trigger the resignation of the government of president De la Rúa in late 2001. In the case of Brazil, one may stress the setting up of the Workers’ Unified Center (in Portuguese, CUT, in 1983) and of the Movement of Landless Rural Workers (MST, 1984), which starred in the opposition to neoliberal policies and were at the basis of the election victory of the presidential candidacy of Lula Da Silva (2002). In the same sense, the peasant mobilizations in Paraguay, which were to play an important role in the fall of president Cubas Grau (1999), will prolong themselves in the confrontation with the neoliberal policies promoted by succeeding governments; and the intense social protests in Peru (particularly the experience of the regional Civic Fronts) that were to mark the fall of the Fujimori regime (2000) were to continue in the resistance to the privatist policies promoted by the government of president Toledo (2002-2003).

It was precisely on the basis of the importance of these processes that, in early 2000, the Latin American Council of Social Sciences (CLACSO) decided to create the Latin American Social Observatory (OSAL) program with the aim of promoting a monitoring of social conflictivity and studies on social movements as well as regional exchanges and debate about these subjects. Over this period of more than four years, the work performed by OSAL led to the development of a chronology of the events of social conflict in nineteen countries of the continent, as well as the preparation of a publication, three times a year, which –with the participation of numerous Latin American researchers– has broached an analysis and collective reflection regarding the main acts of protest and the outstanding social movements on the regional scene over the course of these recent years. The main conclusions and pointers emerging from this extended endeavor nourish the present contribution.

In this regard, the initial goal of this article will consist in offering an approximation of the particular configuration that characterizes this cycle of protests and the popular movements that take part in it. In its first part we attempt to deal with this question on the basis of a general description that presents the recent social conflictivity in the region, its most outstanding features, and the parties that participate in it, to conclude by pointing out some elements that appear to distinguish the experience and actions of the most relevant social movements. The second part of the present contribution is centered on a more thorough analysis of the latter.

 

The contemporary scene of social protest in Latin America

We have already pointed out that the new cycle of protests that acquires momentum towards the end of the 1990s and the social movements that star in it offer distinctive features that differentiate them from those of the 1960s and 70s. The first evident fact tells us that the majority of the social organizations that promote these protests have emerged or been refounded in the last two decades. However, it is not only a matter of remitting exclusively to the organizational life or history of these movements, but particularly of the configuration they assume and that distinguishes them even within the map of the social conflictivity that characterized the 1980s and early 90s.

In this regard, if through the end of the 1980s, at least, the wage-earning Keynesian-Fordist conflict (and particularly the industrial conflict) constituted one of the main hubs of social conflictivity in the region, union organization additionally being the model that –in one way or another– marked the organizational nerve system of the majority of urban and rural social movements as well as fulfilling an outstanding role in the political and social articulation of the particular demands of collective participants, the structural transformations imposed by neoliberalism in all orders of social life (and in particular in the economy and the labor market under the de-industrialization and economic financiarization processes) were to sink that matrix of collective action into crisis, and weaken (albeit not eliminate) the weight of wage-earners’ unions as the starring parties in the conflict. In counterpart, as a result of the process of concentration of income, wealth and natural resources that marks neoliberal policies, new social movements with a territorial basis both in the rural world and in the urban space have emerged on the Latin American stage, constituting themselves on the basis of their ethnic-cultural identity (the indigenous movements), in reference to what they lack (the so-called “-less movements”, like the landless, roofless or jobless) or in relation to their shared life habitat (for example the movements of settlers).

Thus, the model of a return in the economy to raw materials, and the central role taken on in this context by agrarian restructuring processes, witness the emergence, in counterpart, of notable movements of rural origin. Also acting in the same direction is the privatization and intensive exploitation of natural resources that affects and upsets the life of numerous rural communities. This is undoubtedly one of the distinctive elements of the new phase that we analyze, and which crystallizes particularly in the major role of the indigenous movements, especially in Ecuador, Mexico and Bolivia. These movements attain an important influence at a national and international level that transcends sectorial claims, reaching the point of questioning both neoliberal economic policy and the political legitimacy of the governments that promote them as well as the constitutive form of the nation-state in Latin America. In this regard, for example, in the Ecuadorian case, the indigenous movement has striven for recognition for a political project which, reflected in the demand for a pluri-national state, seeks to guarantee self-government for the diverse indigenous nations. Under an even more radical claim of autonomy, the experience of the Zapatist movement demanded constitutional recognition for the rights of the indigenous peoples, which, partially crystallized in the so-called San Andrés Agreements (1995), would inspire the “caravan for dignity” that traveled through much of Mexico in the first months of 2001 to demand that they be complied with. To this brief listing one should add the activity of the indigenous movements of the Bolivian Altiplano (and also, although to a lesser degree, on the Peruvian side) and of the so-called “coca-growing movements” of Aymara peasants in the Chapare and the Yunga region in Bolivia and southern Peru, against the policy of eradication of coca crops demanded by the United States government. The prolonged activity of the Mapuche peoples of southern Chile (particularly embodied in the so-called Arauco-Malleco Coordination) against the appropriation of their lands and the over-exploitation of natural resources, as well as in Colombia’s Cauca Valley, are other outstanding examples of this type of struggle that seems to be carried out in the entire Latin American region. One may also point to the momentum acquired as of 2002 by the opposition of the original peoples of Central America against the Puebla Panama Plan, aimed at accelerating the penetration of transnational capital and investment in that region.

The appearance and consolidation of these indigenous movements on the political and social stage of the region is also accompanied by the emergence of numerous peasant movements that reach a significant presence at both national and regional levels. Standing out in this sense is the experience of the Brazilian Movement of the Landless Rural Workers (MST). The sustained takeovers of land and of public buildings to demand a progressive and comprehensive land reform, its actions against the spread of the model of genetically modified farming, and the development of the so-called “settlements”, have turned the MST into one of the social movements with the greatest political significance in the region. Its experience exemplifies a process of increasing mobilization and organization of the rural sectors at a regional level, embodied in the dissemination of landless movements in other Latin American countries (for example in Bolivia and Paraguay) and in the intensification of the peasant struggles in Mexico, Paraguay and Central America, and in their ability to likewise convoke the small-scale producers hit hard by the policies of liberalization of the agricultural sector carried forward under the promotion of free trade agreements. In the same direction, one may point to the growth of the protests and of the convergence processes experienced in the countryside against the economic and social consequences caused in those sectors by the fall in the international prices of numerous farm products, draconian credit policies and the tariff barriers against that type of products erected in the industrialized countries.

At the same time, in the urban arena, the structural effects of unemployment generated by neoliberal policies have –especially in countries of the Southern Cone– entailed the appearance and consolidation of movements of jobless workers. Argentina appears in this sense as the most emblematic case of this phenomenon, in which these movements, which receive the name of piqueteros3, occupy a central position –particularly as of 1999– on the stage of antineoliberal protest and in the acceleration of the political and social crisis that led to the resignation of president Fernando De la Rúa in December 2001.

Meanwhile, Latin American cities have been subjected to deep processes of spatial and social reconfiguration through the impact of liberal policies. The processes of “municipal decentralization” instrumented under the aegis of the fiscal adjustments (with the aim of “alleviating” the responsibility of the central governments to transfer resources to local administrations) have had enormous consequences on the daily life of the inhabitants of the cities. The processes of fragmentation and dualization of the urban space, abandonment of public spaces, deterioration in services and spread of violence have been only some of the most visible consequences of this profound social and spatial transformation that took place in the cities of the region. Recent urban conflicts seem to prove this multiplicity of troubles emanating from the social polarization promoted by neoliberalism. The struggles for access to housing (roofless movements), for the improvement of public services and against the rise in the rates of these, for the defense of public schooling, and against decentralization policies, also witness, in many cases, the confluence of diverse social sectors. The scourges caused by natural catastrophes (earthquakes, cyclones, floods) worsened by the increasing ecological impact of current capitalist development, as well as the abandonment of rural populations in the face of the need for governmental assistance and investment, explain the numerous mobilizations in demand of assistance by local and national governments.

The importance attained by these movements with a territorial basis that we have briefly summarized is far, however, from entailing the disappearance of the conflict involving urban wage-earning workers. Not only because in many of these movements one can make out the presence of workers in the diffuse and heterogeneous forms that this category assumes under a neoliberalism that leads to processes of “reidentification in terms not linked to the relation between capital and labor, but in other, very different ones, among which the criteria of ‘poverty’ and ‘ethnicity’, of occupations and of ‘informal’ activities and of primary communities are, probably, the most frequent” (Quijano, 2004). The verification that emerges from the monitoring of social conflicts in Latin America carried out by OSAL is that the world of labor, particularly in the urban space, far from being a secondary matter in the practice of defending claims, occupies an outstanding spot in the map of social protest, representing over a third of the conflicts surveyed over the course of the period extending from May 2000 to December 2003. Nevertheless, this quantitative weight in the register of protests contrasts with the difficulties which these (and the union organizations that promote them) face in transcending their sectorial nature and reaching a national dimension, and point to a redefinition in favor of a significant stellar role for civil servants, who account for around three quarters of the total of such protests4.

These struggles by government-employed wage earners are undertaken in the face of the insistent reform and privatization efforts encouraged by neoliberal policies, in particular as a result of the launching of fiscal adjustment packets demanded and negotiated by governments with the international organizations. Of particular significance in this sector are the dynamics of teachers and professors whose claims refer fundamentally to wage increases, the payment of wages in arrears, increases in the education budget, and the rejection of education reform proposals (particularly the flexibilization of working conditions). In some countries, the actions that ensue from the opposition to the privatization of public education allow a convergence with student sectors (in the university arena) as well as with other sectors (pupils’ parents, for example) which, backing the teachers’ demands and participating in the defense of public education, seem to point to the appearance of the “education community” form in the development of these conflicts (OSAL, 2003).

Attention may also be drawn to the intense practice in defense of their claims by administrative employees who mobilize against dismissals, for wage increases or wages in arrears, and against the reform of the state. Within the government sector, one may also underline the conflicts in many countries involving health workers, over wage claims, in favor of increases in the budget allocated to public hospitals and to the sanitary system in general, and for the improvement of working conditions. It is interesting to stress that the form of protest in this sector recurrently adopts the modality of extended stoppages –including strikes for an indeterminate period– and are articulated both under the form of national and regional strikes called by labor federations (these are recurrently recorded in almost all countries) and with street mobilization processes. In the same sense, one may also stress the conflicts against the privatization of government-owned enterprises.

But if the “first generation” privatization wave undertaken at the beginning of the 1990s by some governments in the region was characterized by social resistance fundamentally led by unions and by the workers of the sectors affected, the struggles against the “second generation” privatizations in some cases appear as a moment of social aggregation of protest which becomes manifest through the emergence of spaces of political and social convergence of a wide-ranging character. In the first of these cases, where these protests remained restricted to the workers and were unable to constitute wider social fronts that would transcend particular demands, they were, in general, defeated. The conflict being circumscribed to the employees at the enterprises in question, after the privatization a large part of them were laid off and went on to swell the ranks of the unemployed. The new cycle of social protest that we are analyzing, on the contrary, seems to exhibit a change in relation to this question. Some recent examples, such as the protests promoted by the Civic Front of Arequipa in southern Peru against the sale of the government-run power utilities (2002), and by the Democratic Congress of the People in Paraguay for the repeal of the law that allowed the privatization of state-owned companies (2002), serve to illustrate the broad convergence against the privatizations of social sectors (peasant federations, unions, students, NGOs and political parties) whose struggles are provisionally successful and force the governments to backtrack on their privatizing intentions5. This type of protests often takes on a markedly radical form (urban uprisings, lengthy highway blockades, takeover and occupation of company facilities) which appears to accompany a confrontational trend in its activities that characterizes the current cycle of protests that the region is undergoing. At the same time, the denunciation of corruption and the demand for greater democratic participation and transparency in local political life have prompted city dwellers to express their dissatisfaction, also promoting sectorial convergence processes under the form of popular uprising (puebladas) or of community mobilizations.

If in previous decades youthful participation and mobilization in Latin America was to a great extent channeled through the strong presence of the university student movement, youth protests now seem to adopt new forms and channels of expression. The decrease in the levels of school attendance resulting from the combined effects of the process of privatization of education and of the concentration of income and rise in poverty may perhaps explain, among other causes, the loss of relative weight of students’ movements. Although students still constitute a dynamic sector in the context of social conflictivity, even being involved in multisectorial protests that go beyond educational demands, the expression of youthful discontent is also channeled through an active participation in the movements of the jobless, of young favela dwellers in Brazil, in alternative currents and collective cultural phenomena of diverse types, in human rights movements, in indigenous and peasant protests and union-related groupings of young, impoverished workers. Younger generations have had an active and outstanding participation in the mass protests of a political nature that led to the resignation of presidents or that radically put into question the implementation of adjustment policies and privatizations, thus nuancing the stereotyped views of reality that speak of a marked youthful disenchantment with political participation in a wide sense. In the same context, it is necessary to underline the major importance and role filled by women in the social movements referred to. Feminine figures also stand out in the constitution of these territorial movements (Zibechi, 2003), being reflected both in the notable role displayed by piqueteras, Zapatist and indigenous women, and in the revitalization and reformulation of the feminist currents of previous decades, which crystallized, among other experiences, in the so-called “world march of women” and in the reference to the “feminization of poverty” (Matte and Guay, 2001).

Lastly, in the current setting of Latin American social protest, particular significance is exhibited by the processes of regional and international convergence that have acquired a strong momentum in recent years and that, by virtue of their scope and geographical insertion and the number of movements and social groupings they are capable of attracting, constitute an unprecedented experience in this continent. In the past, the experiences of international coordination of social movements found their most conspicuous expressions in the areas of labor organizations or of university student sectors. These convergences centered fundamentally on the defense of sectorial or professional interests, a fact that entailed great difficulties in transcending the arena of their specific demands. The impact and consequences of the “neoliberal globalization”, and consequently the irruption into national political settings of processes of continental scope (among others, for example, the so-called free trade agreements), in many cases linked to the penetration of transnational –particularly US– capital, have led to the appearance and reaffirmation of hemispheric coordination experiences with the confluence of labor, women’s and students’ movements, NGOs, political parties, and antimilitarist and environmental groupings in which a decisive role falls to peasant organizations (particularly through the Latin American Coordination of Peasant Organizations, CLOC, and its international articulation, Vía Campesina [Peasant Path]). The Continental Campaign against the Free Trade Area of the Americas (FTAA), promoted by the Continental Social Alliance and other networks and groupings (as well as the constitution of the Social Movements International Network), constitutes perhaps the most outstanding example, to which the innumerable amount of regional and continental gatherings (which also include movements from North America) against the Puebla Panama Plan and regional militarization and foreign interventions (particularly in reference to the so-called Colombia Plan and Andean Initiative) is added. In this process, the constitution of the World Social Forum (WSF, 2001-2004) appears as the most prominent experience of these convergences, not only at an international but also at a continental and regional level.

 

The new configuration of popular movements

Within this overview, which we have briefly summarized in relation to the features exhibited by social conflictivity in Latin America in recent years, some of the particular aspects that distinguish the actions and constitution of contemporary social and popular movements in our region already stand out. The analysis of these experiences and, particularly, the understanding and conceptualization of the novel aspects posed by those movements in the historical course of collective action and social contestation, constitute one of the centers of attention of the shaping and revitalization of current Latin American social thinking. The renewed generation of studies and publications about these subjects has also entailed the constitution of a new field of problématiques as well as an enrichment of the theoretical and methodological frameworks related to the study of social movements. One of the manifestations of these processes and of the debates posed is, for example, the position recently taken up within critical thinking by the discussion on the conceptualization of power and the role pertaining to the nation-state in reference to the views of social emancipation promoted by those movements6. It is not however our intention to present the problématiques orienting the debates and the reflections of social scientists –and of the movements themselves7. We are interested in underlining and going deeper into some of the features that distinguish the configuration of social movements at this time.

In relation to this, and with regard to the “repertories of protest”, it is important to point out a trend toward a greater radicalness in the forms of struggle, which is manifested in the duration of protests (actions over prolonged or indeterminate periods); in the generalization of confrontational forms of struggle to the detriment of demonstrational measures; in the regional spread of certain modalities such as the blockading of roads (characteristic, for example, of the protests of both the movements of jobless workers in Argentina and of the indigenous and coca-growing movements in the Andean Area) and the takeover of land (promoted by the peasant movements) or of public or private buildings. At the same time, the recurrence of lengthy marches and demonstrations that traverse regional and national spaces over the course of days and weeks seems to want to counteract the dynamics of territorial segmentation promoted by neoliberalism. Likewise, the puebladas and urban uprisings appear to be strategies aimed at the collective re-appropriation of the community space and at the recovery of a social visibility denied by the mechanisms of power (Seoane and Taddei, 2003).

In relation to the social actors that seem to take part in this new cycle of protests analyzed, we may stress two features that we have already singled out previously. The first is the displacement of the wage earners’ conflict to the public sector, to the detriment of the impact and importance of those promoted by workers in the private sector. This fact, in turn, implies a particular configuration that runs through the actions of labor organizations, while the dynamics of the posing of demands by the public sector calls on the participation and convergence of other social sectors in the defense of access to, and the quality of, education and health as human rights. In this sense, it is important to underline that in many cases the struggles against these policies of dismantlement and privatization, and the boosting of the convergence processes –which adopt the forms of coordinating units and civic fronts– don’t necessarily rest on wage-earning labor dynamics. The role played by other organizations (peasant and indigenous movements, the unemployed, students, urban movements, among others) in the shaping of these “expanded social coalitions” is of major importance. The second characteristic refers to the consolidation of movements of rural origin –indigenous and peasants–, which reach national and regional significance and influence. These develop a notable capacity of interpellation and articulation with urban social sectors, in many cases successfully being able to link the dynamics of the struggle against neoliberalism (agrarian policy, privatizations, fiscal adjustment) to a wider questioning of the bases of legitimacy of the political systems in the region.

These two brief pointers –as well as the description of the setting of social conflictivity presented earlier– therefore allow us to go deeper into the characterization of the particular configuration that appears to distinguish the experimentation of contemporary social movements in the region. Without seeking to exhaust this issue, it is necessary, in our understanding, to emphasize three elements that under different forms and with diverse intensities seem to run through the constitutive practice of the majority of the most significant Latin American social movements.

In the first place, a dynamics of territorial appropriation that characterizes the collective practice of what we have earlier referred to as rural and urban territorial movements. Presented as “the strategic response of the poor to the crisis of the old territoriality of the factory and the farm… [and to] the de-territorialization of production… [promoted by] neoliberal reforms” (Zibechi, 2003), as well as to the process of privatization of the public sphere and of politics (Boron, 2003a), this trend to re-appropriation by the community of the living space in which those movements are located remits to the expansion of the experiences of productive self-management (Sousa Santos, 2002b), the collective solution of social needs (for example in the field of education and of health), and autonomous forms of handling of public affairs. This diversified continuum encompasses the cooperative settlements of the Brazilian MST, the indigenous communities in Ecuador and Bolivia, the autonomous Zapatist town governments in Mexico, the productive undertakings of the various jobless movements and movement of recovered factories both in Argentina, as well as the puebladas and urban uprisings that implied the emergence of practices of management of the public space (such is the case for example of the “Water War” in Cochabamba, Bolivia, and of the experience of the popular assemblies that emerged in the main urban centers of Argentina after December 2001). In this sense, this rising “territorialization” of social movements is the result both of the extension of “forms of reciprocity, that is to say, of the exchange of labor force and of products without passing through the market, albeit with an inevitable, but ambiguous and tangential, relationship with it… [as well as of] new forms of political authority, of a communal character, that operate with and without the state” (Quijano, 2004). In permanent tension with the market and the state, extended in time or unstable and temporary, settling around practices of “production and reproduction of life” (Zibechi, 2003) or simply operating in the terrain of the management of public and political affairs, this dynamics of collective re-appropriation of the social territory appears to guide the experience not only of the indigenous and peasant movements, but also in the urban space (Seoane, 2003a). In this sense, we might state that “antineoliberal politics would appear to head towards an action of […] reproduction and production of society beyond the expanded and dislocated production of transnational capital” (Tapia, 2000).

In consonance with this experience, the practice and discursiveness of the majority of the social movements described appears imbued with the revaluing of democratic mechanisms of participation and decision which, inspired in references to direct or semi-direct democracy, orient both their organizational models and their programmatics and demands vis-à-vis the state. In this regard, on one hand, the promotion of more horizontal and open forms of participation is seen as reinsurance in the face of the danger of “disconnection” between the different organizational levels and of bureaucratization and manipulation. On the other hand, the confrontation with the neoliberal hegemony in the terrain of public policies has been translated into a growing questioning of the political system, of the model of representative democracy, and of the form that the constitution of the nation-state adopted in Latin America, promoting a diversity of demands that ranges from those for consultations and referendums to claims for autonomy and self-government, boosted particularly by the indigenous movements. The experiences of social self-organization linked to assembly-like forms of organization were a feature of the emergence of many of these movements (for example of the organizations of jobless workers and of the popular assemblies in Argentina or the urban uprisings of the “Water War” and the “Gas War” in Bolivia). Additionally, the traditional experiences of community management that characterized indigenous communities, reformulated under the impact of neoliberal policies, have served to pose a critical and alternative view of delegational and representative forms. In this terrain, the Zapatist experimentation crystallized in the watchword of “commanding while obeying” (Ceceña, 2001) is perhaps the clearest and most suggestive example, although not the only one. At the same time, the utilization and presence in the programmatics of many of these movements of instruments of semi-direct democracy can be verified, for example, in the demand for the gas referendum and the summoning to a Constitutional Assembly in the events of October in Bolivia (2003), in the referendums against the privatizations in Uruguay, or in the demand for binding plebiscites on the FTAA promoted by the social coalitions constituted in opposition to that trade agreement at a continental level. In the same direction, be it under the form of the demand for a plurinational state in the case of the Ecuadorian indigenous movements, or of the demand and construction of self-government in the autonomous Zapatist town governments, the claim of autonomy for indigenous peoples encompasses, in its projection on society, the broaching of a radical democratization of the forms of the nation-state, particularly in the “coloniality of power” that characterized its constitution (Lander, 2000). Lastly, access to local governments by representatives of those movements (especially in the experience of the Ecuadorian hills and in the Cauca valley in Colombia) has entailed the launching of mechanisms of popular participation and control in their handling (Larrea, 2004). In the diversity of the experiences described above, one many thus point to the emergence of a democratizing trend that traverses the collective practice of these social movements both in their spaces of autonomy and in the terrain of the state (Seoane, 2004; Bartra, 2003a), and expresses the extent to which “participatory democracy has taken on a new dynamics enacted by subordinate social communities and groups struggling against social exclusion and the trivialization of citizenship” (Sousa Santos, 2002a).

Lastly, it may be pointed out that, as from the protests against the Multilateral Agreement on Investment (MIA, 1997/98), the “battle of Seattle” that impeded the so-called Millennium Round of the World Trade Organization (1999), the creation and deepening of the experience of the World Social Forum (WSF, 2001 through 2004) and the “global days of action” against the military intervention in Iraq (2003/2004), the backbone of a “new internationalism” has left a deep and singular imprint on the experimentation of social movements in the world arena. The eminently social character of the actors involved (albeit not unlinked, should it be necessary to make this clear, to ideological and political inscriptions), their heterogeneity and scope, the truly international extension of the convergences, the organizational forms and the characteristics taken on by these articulations point to the novelty of this internationalism (Seoane and Taddei, 2001). As we have already shown, the Latin American region has not remained outside this process. On the contrary: the holding in 1996 of the 1st Encounter for Humanity and Against Neoliberalism organized by Zapatism in the depths of the Chiapas forest –which may be considered one of the first international summons located at the origin of this process–, as well as the fact that the birth of the WSF took place in the Brazilian city of Porto Alegre, point to the profound imbrication between the growth of protest and social movements in Latin America, and the emergence of the global convergences against neoliberal globalization. In this region, over the course of recent years, these experiences have been particularly marked by the evolution of the so-called agreements on trade liberalization, and especially of the United States’ initiative of subsuming the countries of the region within a Free Trade Area of the Americas (FTAA). These resistance processes, that implied both the constitution of spaces of coordination at a regional level (which group a wide array of movements, social organizations and NGOs) and the emergence of similar convergence experiences at a national level (for example, the national campaigns against the FTAA), turn out to be, within the continental framework and along with the experience of the Social Forums and of the mobilizations against the war, an expression and extension of the alterglobalist movement that emerged and was consolidated in the last decade. In relation to this process of convergences against “free trade”, the regional experience hails back to the protests triggered by the negotiation and launching (1994) of NAFTA (North American Free Trade Agreement), the creation of the Continental Social Alliance (1997), the organization of the 1st Summit of the Peoples of the Americas (1998) in opposition to the 2nd Summit of presidents of the 34 American countries that participate in the negotiation over the FTAA, and the organization of the Hemispheric Meetings of Struggle Against the FTAA (Havana, Cuba; 2002 to 2004). Nevertheless, particularly in relation to the dynamics and characteristics taken on by these negotiations as of 2003 –marked by the proximity of the date foreseen for their conclusion (2005), the difficulties and resistance it faces and the acceleration of the plurilateral Free Trade Agreements–, these convergence and protest processes are intensified at a regional level8. In Central America, the fruit of these experiences has been the creation and development of the Mesoamerican Forums and of the so-called Central American Popular Block. In the case of the countries forming part of MERCOSUR, the so-called “National Campaigns against the FTAA” have promoted diverse and massive popular consultations and have evolved toward the increasing questioning of “free trade” in the face of the different trade negotiations undertaken by governments. Lastly, in the Andean Area the articulation between the rejection of these treaties with massive protests in the national spaces (for example, the “Gas War” in Bolivia, 2003) and the emergence of regional coordination processes (for example, in April 2004, the first Andean Day of Mobilization Against the FTAA) point to the wealth of such processes. In this direction, the forthcoming holding of the 1st Americas Social Forum in Ecuador (July 2004) will constitute an arrival point of these experiences as well as an event that will prove the maturity, depth, features and challenges faced by internationalism in the Latin American and continental arena.

 

“Neoliberalism of war” and social convergences

The process opened in Latin America in recent years –in the face of the exhaustion of the neoliberal model in the form in which the latter tragically crystallized in the 1990s in our region– is increasingly expressed in the intensification of the disputes regarding the direction to be adopted by a transition whose outcome remains uncertain. In this sense, the social and political realities of the various countries is seen to be marked, as we pointed out earlier, by renewed social protest –which at a regional level has grown in recent years– and by the activity of social and popular movements with features different from those that had occupied stage center in the immediate past. This process, in the framework of the economic crisis undergone by most of the region and in the face of the attempts to deepen neoliberal policies, has in some cases been translated into “popular uprisings” (that in most cases ended in the collapse of governments), in the constitution of “electoral majorities” critical of neoliberalism, and even in the reappearance of a political discursiveness that differentiates itself from the latter. In their diversity, these processes point to the growing crisis of legitimacy that puts into question the cultural, economic and political forms that underpinned the application of neoliberalism in the past.

Nevertheless, in the face of this process, the attempts to deepen neoliberal policies have tended to a rising militarization of social relations in a process that has been given the name of “neoliberalism of war” (González Casanova, 2002; Taddei, 2002). This refers not only to the policy of war and of military intervention wielded as an international prerogative by president Bush –particularly a posteriori of the attacks of September 11, 2001– but also to the deepening of a repressive social diagram that encompasses legal reforms that slash democratic rights and freedoms and award greater power and immunity to the actions of police forces, and the criminalization of poverty and social movements, the so-called “judicialization” of protest, the increase in state and para-state repression, and the rising intervention of the armed forces in domestic social conflict. Justified by the alleged fight against the drug traffic, terrorism or crime, the ideology of “security” thus seeks the reconstitution of the challenged “neoliberal governability”. One of its most tragic expressions has been the increase of the United States military presence in the entire Latin American region (Quijano, 2004; Algranati, Seoane and Taddei, 2004). Additionally, in the terrain of domestic policies, the Colombian case emerges as one of the main laboratories for the implanting of these repressive diagrams, particularly under the administration of president Álvaro Uribe, who opened a process that seeks not only to deepen the military confrontation with the guerrillas –after the peace agreements of the previous period were broken– but also the deployment of a policy of “social militarization” in the attempt to affirm an authoritarian legitimacy, particularly among middle-class urban sectors (Zuluaga Nieto, 2003). The face of the “neoliberalism of war” thus accompanies the promotion of a radical and even more regressive reconfiguration of the political, social and economic geography of the region as a result of the acceleration of the so-called “free trade agreements” that find their maximum expression in the FTAA.

We have attempted up to this point to give an account of the paths taken and features adopted by the process of social and political disputation opened by the crisis of the neoliberal model forged in the 1990s and of the characteristics that appear to distinguish the configuration of contemporary social movements. As we have pointed out, this process is not homogeneous, and is expressed in a differentiated manner in each of the regions into which the continent may be subdivided and even within these. In this regard, the evolution of the northern region (Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean) seems to evince a marked consolidation of trade liberalization processes, which constitute the cornerstone of Washington’s strategic plans. At the same time, the convulsive political situation in a major part of the Andean region is a manifestation of the strong social tensions resulting from the attempts to deepen these “news” neoliberal recipe books, which are translated into the difficulty in the stabilization of the new political regimes that promote these policies. Expressions of this are the increasing popular discredit of the governments of Peru and of Ecuador; the setting opened with the “Bolivian October” that projects new confrontations and possible changes on the horizon, and the Venezuelan case, where the battle around the presidential recall referendum this coming August will undoubtedly acquire a regional dimension. The outcome of this process will be fundamental in Latin America with regard to the hegemonic aspirations of the White House to hinder the consolidation of democratic-popular political processes that challenge the neoliberal model. In the southern region, social movements face the great challenge of taking advantage of the chinks opened by the loss of legitimacy of neoliberalism to fight for the direction of the processes underway, maintaining and strengthening their autonomy in relation to governments.

Beyond the particular aspects exhibited by the processes at a subregional level, the generalization of free trade appears in all countries (with the exception of the Venezuelan case) as an axis emphasized by the political and economic elites to refound the neoliberal order and its legitimacy. In the face of this, the processes of regional convergence that on a national scale challenge the hegemonic economic model, and the emancipatory horizons that ensue from the practices and discourses that characterize social movements at the beginning of the twenty-first century, cast light on the outlines of those “other possible Americas” that our peoples so strongly call for.

<!– @page { margin: 0.79in } P { margin-bottom: 0.08in } –>

 

Notes

 

* Coordinator of the Latin American Social Observatory (OSAL) of the Latin American Council of Social Sciences (CLACSO) and Professor at the Faculty of Social Sciences of the University of Buenos Aires (UBA).

** Academic Coordinator of the Latin American Council of Social Sciences (CLACSO).

*** Member of the Coordinating Team of OSAL-CLACSO.

1 We are particularly grateful for the comments of Ivana Brighenti and Miguel Ángel Djanikian in the revision of the text.

2 We find it impossible to develop this issue here. Regarding the evolution of poverty and unemployment in Latin America, reference may be made to the reports on Human Development of the UNDP (2002) and of ECLAC (2002). With regard to the consequences in relation to democracy see Boron (2003a). Regarding the structural transformations of Latin American capitalism, see among others Quijano (2004) and Fiori (2001).

3 Road or highway blockade, generally for an extended period.

4 For example, for the year 2003, the conflicts involving workers of the public sector represent, according to the records supplied by OSAL (Latin American Social Observatory, CLACSO), 76% of the total number of protests by employed workers.

5 The most important among this type of protests undoubtedly turns out to be the so-called “Water War” in Cochabamba, Bolivia (2000), which frustrated the attempt to award a concession for, and privatize, the drinking water service in that city to an international consortium headed by the Bechtel company.

6 Regarding this debate one may consult, among other texts, the diverse dossiers published in numbers 12 and 13 of Chiapas magazine, as well as those included in numbers 4 and 7 of CLACSO’s OSAL magazine.

7 We have broached that question in the course “Neoliberalism and Social Movements in Latin America: the Configuration of Social Protest”, taught in the framework of the distance education courses under the platform of CLACSO’s Virtual Campus, 2003.

8 An evaluation of this process may be consulted in OSAL (2004).

 

<!– @page { margin: 0.79in } P { margin-bottom: 0.08in } –>

José Seoane*, sickness Emilio Taddei** & Clara Algranati***

<!– @page { margin: 0.79in } P { margin-bottom: 0.08in } –>

Neoliberalism and social conflict

The 1990s opened the way to a renewed capitalist globalization in its neoliberal form, whose impact on Latin America has been glaringly noticeable and profound. Extending a process begun in previous decades, promoted now by the so-called “Washington Consensus”, the adoption of neoliberal policies was to become generalized all over the region, taking on a newly radical form. The governments of Carlos Menem (Argentina), Alberto Fujimori (Peru), Salinas de Gortari (Mexico), Collor de Melo and later Fernando H. Cardoso (Brazil), became some of its best-known presidential incarnations. The profound and regressive consequences in social and democratic terms entailed by the application of these policies (mass pauperization being one their most tragic expressions) were the result of the acute structural transformations that modified the societal geography of Latin American capitalisms in the framework of the new order that appeared to be imposed by so-called “neoliberal globalization”2.

The application of these policies certainly faced numerous forms of resistance and protests in the region. In the first half of the 1990s two Latin American presidents (Collor de Melo in Brazil and Carlos Andrés Pérez in Venezuela) had to leave their posts in an “unexpected” manner as the result, among other issues, of rising unease and social repudiation. Nevertheless, in the regional context, the acts of resistance in those years to the application of the neoliberal recipes exhibited a configuration much more fragmented in social terms and more localized in sectorial and territorial terms than those that preceded them, while being unable in most cases to hinder the implementation of those policies. In the terrain of the social disciplines, this process, mediated by the hegemony wrested by the dominant thinking and its formulations regarding the “end of history”, meant the displacement of the problématique of conflict and of social movements from the relatively central space it had filled in the preceding decades –although from different perspectives– to an almost marginal and impoverished position.

Nevertheless, toward the end of that decade Latin America’s social reality again appeared marked by a sustained increase in social conflictivity. The continuing nature of this process may be appreciated in the survey carried by the Latin American Social Observatory (in Spanish, OSAL-CLACSO) for the nineteen countries of the Latin American region (see Chart 1), which for the period ranging from May-August 2000 to the same quarter of 2002 shows a rise in the number of the episodes of conflict surveyed of more than 180%. Because of the regional magnitude it attains (beyond exceptions and national differences), because of the characteristics it exhibits, and because of its perdurability, this increase in social conflictivity accounts for the appearance of a new cycle of social protest, which, being inscribed in the force field resulting from the regressive structural transformations forged by the implanting of neoliberalism in our countries, emerges to contest the latter.

In some cases, the Zapatist uprising of early 1994 has been pointed out as the emblematic event of the awakening of this cycle. This reference turns out to be significant insofar as, from diverse points of view, the revolt of the Chiapas indigenous exhibits some of the elements that distinguish the social movements that were to characterize the political and social realities of the region in recent years. In this regard, the national and international impact of the Zapatist uprising renders account of the emergence of movements of rural origin constituted on the basis of their indigenous identity; of the democratic demand for the collective rights of these peoples –which, in its claim for autonomy, questions the constitutive foundations of the nation-state; of the demand for a radical democratization of the political management of the state; and of the summoning of continental and global convergences. Beyond the specificity of the references that accompany and characterize Zapatism, its emergence sheds light, in a wider sense, on some of the particular aspects that appear to mark the majority of the popular movements that fill the ever more intense setting of social conflictivity in the region because of their organizational characteristics and of their forms of struggle, the inscriptions that give them an identity, their conceptualizations of collective action, and their understandings in relation to power, politics and the state. Therefore, it is not just a case of the beginning of a new cycle of social protests, but also of these appearing as incarnated in collective parties with particular features and that are different from those that had occupied the public scene in the past. At the same time, these experiences and the increase in social protest in Latin America were to develop in an almost simultaneous manner to the increase in conflict in other regions of the planet in a process that would mark the constitution of a space for international convergence in opposition to neoliberal globalization –what the mass media have named as the “antiglobalization” or “globaliphobe” movement and which, to be more precise, may be called an “alterglobalist” movement.

Lastly it may be pointed out that this rise in social protest and the emergence and consolidation of new social and popular movements converged into diverse social confrontation processes that, attaining major national significance, in some cases in recent years entailed the toppling of governments, the creation of deep political crises, or the failure of undertakings of a neoliberal character. In this regard, the “Gas War” (2003) in Bolivia, which ended with the resignation of the government of president Sánchez de Lozada and the opening of a transition that is still underway, emerges as inscribed within this process of mobilization of society that began with the “Water War” in Cochabamba (2000), also being expressed in the struggles of the coca-growing movement in the Chapare region and of the indigenous movement in the Altiplano plateau. Likewise, the indigenous uprising in Ecuador (2000), culminating in the fall of the government of Jamil Mahuad, marked the consolidation of the Confederation of the Indigenous Nations of Ecuador (in Spanish, CONAIE) in the context of social response to neoliberal policies in that country.

At the same time, the emergence and spread of the movement of unemployed workers in Argentina and the protests of the workers of the public sector in the second half of the 1990s converged with the mobilization of broad urban sectors of the middle classes to trigger the resignation of the government of president De la Rúa in late 2001. In the case of Brazil, one may stress the setting up of the Workers’ Unified Center (in Portuguese, CUT, in 1983) and of the Movement of Landless Rural Workers (MST, 1984), which starred in the opposition to neoliberal policies and were at the basis of the election victory of the presidential candidacy of Lula Da Silva (2002). In the same sense, the peasant mobilizations in Paraguay, which were to play an important role in the fall of president Cubas Grau (1999), will prolong themselves in the confrontation with the neoliberal policies promoted by succeeding governments; and the intense social protests in Peru (particularly the experience of the regional Civic Fronts) that were to mark the fall of the Fujimori regime (2000) were to continue in the resistance to the privatist policies promoted by the government of president Toledo (2002-2003).

It was precisely on the basis of the importance of these processes that, in early 2000, the Latin American Council of Social Sciences (CLACSO) decided to create the Latin American Social Observatory (OSAL) program with the aim of promoting a monitoring of social conflictivity and studies on social movements as well as regional exchanges and debate about these subjects. Over this period of more than four years, the work performed by OSAL led to the development of a chronology of the events of social conflict in nineteen countries of the continent, as well as the preparation of a publication, three times a year, which –with the participation of numerous Latin American researchers– has broached an analysis and collective reflection regarding the main acts of protest and the outstanding social movements on the regional scene over the course of these recent years. The main conclusions and pointers emerging from this extended endeavor nourish the present contribution.

In this regard, the initial goal of this article will consist in offering an approximation of the particular configuration that characterizes this cycle of protests and the popular movements that take part in it. In its first part we attempt to deal with this question on the basis of a general description that presents the recent social conflictivity in the region, its most outstanding features, and the parties that participate in it, to conclude by pointing out some elements that appear to distinguish the experience and actions of the most relevant social movements. The second part of the present contribution is centered on a more thorough analysis of the latter.

 

The contemporary scene of social protest in Latin America

We have already pointed out that the new cycle of protests that acquires momentum towards the end of the 1990s and the social movements that star in it offer distinctive features that differentiate them from those of the 1960s and 70s. The first evident fact tells us that the majority of the social organizations that promote these protests have emerged or been refounded in the last two decades. However, it is not only a matter of remitting exclusively to the organizational life or history of these movements, but particularly of the configuration they assume and that distinguishes them even within the map of the social conflictivity that characterized the 1980s and early 90s.

In this regard, if through the end of the 1980s, at least, the wage-earning Keynesian-Fordist conflict (and particularly the industrial conflict) constituted one of the main hubs of social conflictivity in the region, union organization additionally being the model that –in one way or another– marked the organizational nerve system of the majority of urban and rural social movements as well as fulfilling an outstanding role in the political and social articulation of the particular demands of collective participants, the structural transformations imposed by neoliberalism in all orders of social life (and in particular in the economy and the labor market under the de-industrialization and economic financiarization processes) were to sink that matrix of collective action into crisis, and weaken (albeit not eliminate) the weight of wage-earners’ unions as the starring parties in the conflict. In counterpart, as a result of the process of concentration of income, wealth and natural resources that marks neoliberal policies, new social movements with a territorial basis both in the rural world and in the urban space have emerged on the Latin American stage, constituting themselves on the basis of their ethnic-cultural identity (the indigenous movements), in reference to what they lack (the so-called “-less movements”, like the landless, roofless or jobless) or in relation to their shared life habitat (for example the movements of settlers).

Thus, the model of a return in the economy to raw materials, and the central role taken on in this context by agrarian restructuring processes, witness the emergence, in counterpart, of notable movements of rural origin. Also acting in the same direction is the privatization and intensive exploitation of natural resources that affects and upsets the life of numerous rural communities. This is undoubtedly one of the distinctive elements of the new phase that we analyze, and which crystallizes particularly in the major role of the indigenous movements, especially in Ecuador, Mexico and Bolivia. These movements attain an important influence at a national and international level that transcends sectorial claims, reaching the point of questioning both neoliberal economic policy and the political legitimacy of the governments that promote them as well as the constitutive form of the nation-state in Latin America. In this regard, for example, in the Ecuadorian case, the indigenous movement has striven for recognition for a political project which, reflected in the demand for a pluri-national state, seeks to guarantee self-government for the diverse indigenous nations. Under an even more radical claim of autonomy, the experience of the Zapatist movement demanded constitutional recognition for the rights of the indigenous peoples, which, partially crystallized in the so-called San Andrés Agreements (1995), would inspire the “caravan for dignity” that traveled through much of Mexico in the first months of 2001 to demand that they be complied with. To this brief listing one should add the activity of the indigenous movements of the Bolivian Altiplano (and also, although to a lesser degree, on the Peruvian side) and of the so-called “coca-growing movements” of Aymara peasants in the Chapare and the Yunga region in Bolivia and southern Peru, against the policy of eradication of coca crops demanded by the United States government. The prolonged activity of the Mapuche peoples of southern Chile (particularly embodied in the so-called Arauco-Malleco Coordination) against the appropriation of their lands and the over-exploitation of natural resources, as well as in Colombia’s Cauca Valley, are other outstanding examples of this type of struggle that seems to be carried out in the entire Latin American region. One may also point to the momentum acquired as of 2002 by the opposition of the original peoples of Central America against the Puebla Panama Plan, aimed at accelerating the penetration of transnational capital and investment in that region.

The appearance and consolidation of these indigenous movements on the political and social stage of the region is also accompanied by the emergence of numerous peasant movements that reach a significant presence at both national and regional levels. Standing out in this sense is the experience of the Brazilian Movement of the Landless Rural Workers (MST). The sustained takeovers of land and of public buildings to demand a progressive and comprehensive land reform, its actions against the spread of the model of genetically modified farming, and the development of the so-called “settlements”, have turned the MST into one of the social movements with the greatest political significance in the region. Its experience exemplifies a process of increasing mobilization and organization of the rural sectors at a regional level, embodied in the dissemination of landless movements in other Latin American countries (for example in Bolivia and Paraguay) and in the intensification of the peasant struggles in Mexico, Paraguay and Central America, and in their ability to likewise convoke the small-scale producers hit hard by the policies of liberalization of the agricultural sector carried forward under the promotion of free trade agreements. In the same direction, one may point to the growth of the protests and of the convergence processes experienced in the countryside against the economic and social consequences caused in those sectors by the fall in the international prices of numerous farm products, draconian credit policies and the tariff barriers against that type of products erected in the industrialized countries.

At the same time, in the urban arena, the structural effects of unemployment generated by neoliberal policies have –especially in countries of the Southern Cone– entailed the appearance and consolidation of movements of jobless workers. Argentina appears in this sense as the most emblematic case of this phenomenon, in which these movements, which receive the name of piqueteros3, occupy a central position –particularly as of 1999– on the stage of antineoliberal protest and in the acceleration of the political and social crisis that led to the resignation of president Fernando De la Rúa in December 2001.

Meanwhile, Latin American cities have been subjected to deep processes of spatial and social reconfiguration through the impact of liberal policies. The processes of “municipal decentralization” instrumented under the aegis of the fiscal adjustments (with the aim of “alleviating” the responsibility of the central governments to transfer resources to local administrations) have had enormous consequences on the daily life of the inhabitants of the cities. The processes of fragmentation and dualization of the urban space, abandonment of public spaces, deterioration in services and spread of violence have been only some of the most visible consequences of this profound social and spatial transformation that took place in the cities of the region. Recent urban conflicts seem to prove this multiplicity of troubles emanating from the social polarization promoted by neoliberalism. The struggles for access to housing (roofless movements), for the improvement of public services and against the rise in the rates of these, for the defense of public schooling, and against decentralization policies, also witness, in many cases, the confluence of diverse social sectors. The scourges caused by natural catastrophes (earthquakes, cyclones, floods) worsened by the increasing ecological impact of current capitalist development, as well as the abandonment of rural populations in the face of the need for governmental assistance and investment, explain the numerous mobilizations in demand of assistance by local and national governments.

The importance attained by these movements with a territorial basis that we have briefly summarized is far, however, from entailing the disappearance of the conflict involving urban wage-earning workers. Not only because in many of these movements one can make out the presence of workers in the diffuse and heterogeneous forms that this category assumes under a neoliberalism that leads to processes of “reidentification in terms not linked to the relation between capital and labor, but in other, very different ones, among which the criteria of ‘poverty’ and ‘ethnicity’, of occupations and of ‘informal’ activities and of primary communities are, probably, the most frequent” (Quijano, 2004). The verification that emerges from the monitoring of social conflicts in Latin America carried out by OSAL is that the world of labor, particularly in the urban space, far from being a secondary matter in the practice of defending claims, occupies an outstanding spot in the map of social protest, representing over a third of the conflicts surveyed over the course of the period extending from May 2000 to December 2003. Nevertheless, this quantitative weight in the register of protests contrasts with the difficulties which these (and the union organizations that promote them) face in transcending their sectorial nature and reaching a national dimension, and point to a redefinition in favor of a significant stellar role for civil servants, who account for around three quarters of the total of such protests4.

These struggles by government-employed wage earners are undertaken in the face of the insistent reform and privatization efforts encouraged by neoliberal policies, in particular as a result of the launching of fiscal adjustment packets demanded and negotiated by governments with the international organizations. Of particular significance in this sector are the dynamics of teachers and professors whose claims refer fundamentally to wage increases, the payment of wages in arrears, increases in the education budget, and the rejection of education reform proposals (particularly the flexibilization of working conditions). In some countries, the actions that ensue from the opposition to the privatization of public education allow a convergence with student sectors (in the university arena) as well as with other sectors (pupils’ parents, for example) which, backing the teachers’ demands and participating in the defense of public education, seem to point to the appearance of the “education community” form in the development of these conflicts (OSAL, 2003).

Attention may also be drawn to the intense practice in defense of their claims by administrative employees who mobilize against dismissals, for wage increases or wages in arrears, and against the reform of the state. Within the government sector, one may also underline the conflicts in many countries involving health workers, over wage claims, in favor of increases in the budget allocated to public hospitals and to the sanitary system in general, and for the improvement of working conditions. It is interesting to stress that the form of protest in this sector recurrently adopts the modality of extended stoppages –including strikes for an indeterminate period– and are articulated both under the form of national and regional strikes called by labor federations (these are recurrently recorded in almost all countries) and with street mobilization processes. In the same sense, one may also stress the conflicts against the privatization of government-owned enterprises.

But if the “first generation” privatization wave undertaken at the beginning of the 1990s by some governments in the region was characterized by social resistance fundamentally led by unions and by the workers of the sectors affected, the struggles against the “second generation” privatizations in some cases appear as a moment of social aggregation of protest which becomes manifest through the emergence of spaces of political and social convergence of a wide-ranging character. In the first of these cases, where these protests remained restricted to the workers and were unable to constitute wider social fronts that would transcend particular demands, they were, in general, defeated. The conflict being circumscribed to the employees at the enterprises in question, after the privatization a large part of them were laid off and went on to swell the ranks of the unemployed. The new cycle of social protest that we are analyzing, on the contrary, seems to exhibit a change in relation to this question. Some recent examples, such as the protests promoted by the Civic Front of Arequipa in southern Peru against the sale of the government-run power utilities (2002), and by the Democratic Congress of the People in Paraguay for the repeal of the law that allowed the privatization of state-owned companies (2002), serve to illustrate the broad convergence against the privatizations of social sectors (peasant federations, unions, students, NGOs and political parties) whose struggles are provisionally successful and force the governments to backtrack on their privatizing intentions5. This type of protests often takes on a markedly radical form (urban uprisings, lengthy highway blockades, takeover and occupation of company facilities) which appears to accompany a confrontational trend in its activities that characterizes the current cycle of protests that the region is undergoing. At the same time, the denunciation of corruption and the demand for greater democratic participation and transparency in local political life have prompted city dwellers to express their dissatisfaction, also promoting sectorial convergence processes under the form of popular uprising (puebladas) or of community mobilizations.

If in previous decades youthful participation and mobilization in Latin America was to a great extent channeled through the strong presence of the university student movement, youth protests now seem to adopt new forms and channels of expression. The decrease in the levels of school attendance resulting from the combined effects of the process of privatization of education and of the concentration of income and rise in poverty may perhaps explain, among other causes, the loss of relative weight of students’ movements. Although students still constitute a dynamic sector in the context of social conflictivity, even being involved in multisectorial protests that go beyond educational demands, the expression of youthful discontent is also channeled through an active participation in the movements of the jobless, of young favela dwellers in Brazil, in alternative currents and collective cultural phenomena of diverse types, in human rights movements, in indigenous and peasant protests and union-related groupings of young, impoverished workers. Younger generations have had an active and outstanding participation in the mass protests of a political nature that led to the resignation of presidents or that radically put into question the implementation of adjustment policies and privatizations, thus nuancing the stereotyped views of reality that speak of a marked youthful disenchantment with political participation in a wide sense. In the same context, it is necessary to underline the major importance and role filled by women in the social movements referred to. Feminine figures also stand out in the constitution of these territorial movements (Zibechi, 2003), being reflected both in the notable role displayed by piqueteras, Zapatist and indigenous women, and in the revitalization and reformulation of the feminist currents of previous decades, which crystallized, among other experiences, in the so-called “world march of women” and in the reference to the “feminization of poverty” (Matte and Guay, 2001).

Lastly, in the current setting of Latin American social protest, particular significance is exhibited by the processes of regional and international convergence that have acquired a strong momentum in recent years and that, by virtue of their scope and geographical insertion and the number of movements and social groupings they are capable of attracting, constitute an unprecedented experience in this continent. In the past, the experiences of international coordination of social movements found their most conspicuous expressions in the areas of labor organizations or of university student sectors. These convergences centered fundamentally on the defense of sectorial or professional interests, a fact that entailed great difficulties in transcending the arena of their specific demands. The impact and consequences of the “neoliberal globalization”, and consequently the irruption into national political settings of processes of continental scope (among others, for example, the so-called free trade agreements), in many cases linked to the penetration of transnational –particularly US– capital, have led to the appearance and reaffirmation of hemispheric coordination experiences with the confluence of labor, women’s and students’ movements, NGOs, political parties, and antimilitarist and environmental groupings in which a decisive role falls to peasant organizations (particularly through the Latin American Coordination of Peasant Organizations, CLOC, and its international articulation, Vía Campesina [Peasant Path]). The Continental Campaign against the Free Trade Area of the Americas (FTAA), promoted by the Continental Social Alliance and other networks and groupings (as well as the constitution of the Social Movements International Network), constitutes perhaps the most outstanding example, to which the innumerable amount of regional and continental gatherings (which also include movements from North America) against the Puebla Panama Plan and regional militarization and foreign interventions (particularly in reference to the so-called Colombia Plan and Andean Initiative) is added. In this process, the constitution of the World Social Forum (WSF, 2001-2004) appears as the most prominent experience of these convergences, not only at an international but also at a continental and regional level.

 

The new configuration of popular movements

Within this overview, which we have briefly summarized in relation to the features exhibited by social conflictivity in Latin America in recent years, some of the particular aspects that distinguish the actions and constitution of contemporary social and popular movements in our region already stand out. The analysis of these experiences and, particularly, the understanding and conceptualization of the novel aspects posed by those movements in the historical course of collective action and social contestation, constitute one of the centers of attention of the shaping and revitalization of current Latin American social thinking. The renewed generation of studies and publications about these subjects has also entailed the constitution of a new field of problématiques as well as an enrichment of the theoretical and methodological frameworks related to the study of social movements. One of the manifestations of these processes and of the debates posed is, for example, the position recently taken up within critical thinking by the discussion on the conceptualization of power and the role pertaining to the nation-state in reference to the views of social emancipation promoted by those movements6. It is not however our intention to present the problématiques orienting the debates and the reflections of social scientists –and of the movements themselves7. We are interested in underlining and going deeper into some of the features that distinguish the configuration of social movements at this time.

In relation to this, and with regard to the “repertories of protest”, it is important to point out a trend toward a greater radicalness in the forms of struggle, which is manifested in the duration of protests (actions over prolonged or indeterminate periods); in the generalization of confrontational forms of struggle to the detriment of demonstrational measures; in the regional spread of certain modalities such as the blockading of roads (characteristic, for example, of the protests of both the movements of jobless workers in Argentina and of the indigenous and coca-growing movements in the Andean Area) and the takeover of land (promoted by the peasant movements) or of public or private buildings. At the same time, the recurrence of lengthy marches and demonstrations that traverse regional and national spaces over the course of days and weeks seems to want to counteract the dynamics of territorial segmentation promoted by neoliberalism. Likewise, the puebladas and urban uprisings appear to be strategies aimed at the collective re-appropriation of the community space and at the recovery of a social visibility denied by the mechanisms of power (Seoane and Taddei, 2003).

In relation to the social actors that seem to take part in this new cycle of protests analyzed, we may stress two features that we have already singled out previously. The first is the displacement of the wage earners’ conflict to the public sector, to the detriment of the impact and importance of those promoted by workers in the private sector. This fact, in turn, implies a particular configuration that runs through the actions of labor organizations, while the dynamics of the posing of demands by the public sector calls on the participation and convergence of other social sectors in the defense of access to, and the quality of, education and health as human rights. In this sense, it is important to underline that in many cases the struggles against these policies of dismantlement and privatization, and the boosting of the convergence processes –which adopt the forms of coordinating units and civic fronts– don’t necessarily rest on wage-earning labor dynamics. The role played by other organizations (peasant and indigenous movements, the unemployed, students, urban movements, among others) in the shaping of these “expanded social coalitions” is of major importance. The second characteristic refers to the consolidation of movements of rural origin –indigenous and peasants–, which reach national and regional significance and influence. These develop a notable capacity of interpellation and articulation with urban social sectors, in many cases successfully being able to link the dynamics of the struggle against neoliberalism (agrarian policy, privatizations, fiscal adjustment) to a wider questioning of the bases of legitimacy of the political systems in the region.

These two brief pointers –as well as the description of the setting of social conflictivity presented earlier– therefore allow us to go deeper into the characterization of the particular configuration that appears to distinguish the experimentation of contemporary social movements in the region. Without seeking to exhaust this issue, it is necessary, in our understanding, to emphasize three elements that under different forms and with diverse intensities seem to run through the constitutive practice of the majority of the most significant Latin American social movements.

In the first place, a dynamics of territorial appropriation that characterizes the collective practice of what we have earlier referred to as rural and urban territorial movements. Presented as “the strategic response of the poor to the crisis of the old territoriality of the factory and the farm… [and to] the de-territorialization of production… [promoted by] neoliberal reforms” (Zibechi, 2003), as well as to the process of privatization of the public sphere and of politics (Boron, 2003a), this trend to re-appropriation by the community of the living space in which those movements are located remits to the expansion of the experiences of productive self-management (Sousa Santos, 2002b), the collective solution of social needs (for example in the field of education and of health), and autonomous forms of handling of public affairs. This diversified continuum encompasses the cooperative settlements of the Brazilian MST, the indigenous communities in Ecuador and Bolivia, the autonomous Zapatist town governments in Mexico, the productive undertakings of the various jobless movements and movement of recovered factories both in Argentina, as well as the puebladas and urban uprisings that implied the emergence of practices of management of the public space (such is the case for example of the “Water War” in Cochabamba, Bolivia, and of the experience of the popular assemblies that emerged in the main urban centers of Argentina after December 2001). In this sense, this rising “territorialization” of social movements is the result both of the extension of “forms of reciprocity, that is to say, of the exchange of labor force and of products without passing through the market, albeit with an inevitable, but ambiguous and tangential, relationship with it… [as well as of] new forms of political authority, of a communal character, that operate with and without the state” (Quijano, 2004). In permanent tension with the market and the state, extended in time or unstable and temporary, settling around practices of “production and reproduction of life” (Zibechi, 2003) or simply operating in the terrain of the management of public and political affairs, this dynamics of collective re-appropriation of the social territory appears to guide the experience not only of the indigenous and peasant movements, but also in the urban space (Seoane, 2003a). In this sense, we might state that “antineoliberal politics would appear to head towards an action of […] reproduction and production of society beyond the expanded and dislocated production of transnational capital” (Tapia, 2000).

In consonance with this experience, the practice and discursiveness of the majority of the social movements described appears imbued with the revaluing of democratic mechanisms of participation and decision which, inspired in references to direct or semi-direct democracy, orient both their organizational models and their programmatics and demands vis-à-vis the state. In this regard, on one hand, the promotion of more horizontal and open forms of participation is seen as reinsurance in the face of the danger of “disconnection” between the different organizational levels and of bureaucratization and manipulation. On the other hand, the confrontation with the neoliberal hegemony in the terrain of public policies has been translated into a growing questioning of the political system, of the model of representative democracy, and of the form that the constitution of the nation-state adopted in Latin America, promoting a diversity of demands that ranges from those for consultations and referendums to claims for autonomy and self-government, boosted particularly by the indigenous movements. The experiences of social self-organization linked to assembly-like forms of organization were a feature of the emergence of many of these movements (for example of the organizations of jobless workers and of the popular assemblies in Argentina or the urban uprisings of the “Water War” and the “Gas War” in Bolivia). Additionally, the traditional experiences of community management that characterized indigenous communities, reformulated under the impact of neoliberal policies, have served to pose a critical and alternative view of delegational and representative forms. In this terrain, the Zapatist experimentation crystallized in the watchword of “commanding while obeying” (Ceceña, 2001) is perhaps the clearest and most suggestive example, although not the only one. At the same time, the utilization and presence in the programmatics of many of these movements of instruments of semi-direct democracy can be verified, for example, in the demand for the gas referendum and the summoning to a Constitutional Assembly in the events of October in Bolivia (2003), in the referendums against the privatizations in Uruguay, or in the demand for binding plebiscites on the FTAA promoted by the social coalitions constituted in opposition to that trade agreement at a continental level. In the same direction, be it under the form of the demand for a plurinational state in the case of the Ecuadorian indigenous movements, or of the demand and construction of self-government in the autonomous Zapatist town governments, the claim of autonomy for indigenous peoples encompasses, in its projection on society, the broaching of a radical democratization of the forms of the nation-state, particularly in the “coloniality of power” that characterized its constitution (Lander, 2000). Lastly, access to local governments by representatives of those movements (especially in the experience of the Ecuadorian hills and in the Cauca valley in Colombia) has entailed the launching of mechanisms of popular participation and control in their handling (Larrea, 2004). In the diversity of the experiences described above, one many thus point to the emergence of a democratizing trend that traverses the collective practice of these social movements both in their spaces of autonomy and in the terrain of the state (Seoane, 2004; Bartra, 2003a), and expresses the extent to which “participatory democracy has taken on a new dynamics enacted by subordinate social communities and groups struggling against social exclusion and the trivialization of citizenship” (Sousa Santos, 2002a).

Lastly, it may be pointed out that, as from the protests against the Multilateral Agreement on Investment (MIA, 1997/98), the “battle of Seattle” that impeded the so-called Millennium Round of the World Trade Organization (1999), the creation and deepening of the experience of the World Social Forum (WSF, 2001 through 2004) and the “global days of action” against the military intervention in Iraq (2003/2004), the backbone of a “new internationalism” has left a deep and singular imprint on the experimentation of social movements in the world arena. The eminently social character of the actors involved (albeit not unlinked, should it be necessary to make this clear, to ideological and political inscriptions), their heterogeneity and scope, the truly international extension of the convergences, the organizational forms and the characteristics taken on by these articulations point to the novelty of this internationalism (Seoane and Taddei, 2001). As we have already shown, the Latin American region has not remained outside this process. On the contrary: the holding in 1996 of the 1st Encounter for Humanity and Against Neoliberalism organized by Zapatism in the depths of the Chiapas forest –which may be considered one of the first international summons located at the origin of this process–, as well as the fact that the birth of the WSF took place in the Brazilian city of Porto Alegre, point to the profound imbrication between the growth of protest and social movements in Latin America, and the emergence of the global convergences against neoliberal globalization. In this region, over the course of recent years, these experiences have been particularly marked by the evolution of the so-called agreements on trade liberalization, and especially of the United States’ initiative of subsuming the countries of the region within a Free Trade Area of the Americas (FTAA). These resistance processes, that implied both the constitution of spaces of coordination at a regional level (which group a wide array of movements, social organizations and NGOs) and the emergence of similar convergence experiences at a national level (for example, the national campaigns against the FTAA), turn out to be, within the continental framework and along with the experience of the Social Forums and of the mobilizations against the war, an expression and extension of the alterglobalist movement that emerged and was consolidated in the last decade. In relation to this process of convergences against “free trade”, the regional experience hails back to the protests triggered by the negotiation and launching (1994) of NAFTA (North American Free Trade Agreement), the creation of the Continental Social Alliance (1997), the organization of the 1st Summit of the Peoples of the Americas (1998) in opposition to the 2nd Summit of presidents of the 34 American countries that participate in the negotiation over the FTAA, and the organization of the Hemispheric Meetings of Struggle Against the FTAA (Havana, Cuba; 2002 to 2004). Nevertheless, particularly in relation to the dynamics and characteristics taken on by these negotiations as of 2003 –marked by the proximity of the date foreseen for their conclusion (2005), the difficulties and resistance it faces and the acceleration of the plurilateral Free Trade Agreements–, these convergence and protest processes are intensified at a regional level8. In Central America, the fruit of these experiences has been the creation and development of the Mesoamerican Forums and of the so-called Central American Popular Block. In the case of the countries forming part of MERCOSUR, the so-called “National Campaigns against the FTAA” have promoted diverse and massive popular consultations and have evolved toward the increasing questioning of “free trade” in the face of the different trade negotiations undertaken by governments. Lastly, in the Andean Area the articulation between the rejection of these treaties with massive protests in the national spaces (for example, the “Gas War” in Bolivia, 2003) and the emergence of regional coordination processes (for example, in April 2004, the first Andean Day of Mobilization Against the FTAA) point to the wealth of such processes. In this direction, the forthcoming holding of the 1st Americas Social Forum in Ecuador (July 2004) will constitute an arrival point of these experiences as well as an event that will prove the maturity, depth, features and challenges faced by internationalism in the Latin American and continental arena.

 

“Neoliberalism of war” and social convergences

The process opened in Latin America in recent years –in the face of the exhaustion of the neoliberal model in the form in which the latter tragically crystallized in the 1990s in our region– is increasingly expressed in the intensification of the disputes regarding the direction to be adopted by a transition whose outcome remains uncertain. In this sense, the social and political realities of the various countries is seen to be marked, as we pointed out earlier, by renewed social protest –which at a regional level has grown in recent years– and by the activity of social and popular movements with features different from those that had occupied stage center in the immediate past. This process, in the framework of the economic crisis undergone by most of the region and in the face of the attempts to deepen neoliberal policies, has in some cases been translated into “popular uprisings” (that in most cases ended in the collapse of governments), in the constitution of “electoral majorities” critical of neoliberalism, and even in the reappearance of a political discursiveness that differentiates itself from the latter. In their diversity, these processes point to the growing crisis of legitimacy that puts into question the cultural, economic and political forms that underpinned the application of neoliberalism in the past.

Nevertheless, in the face of this process, the attempts to deepen neoliberal policies have tended to a rising militarization of social relations in a process that has been given the name of “neoliberalism of war” (González Casanova, 2002; Taddei, 2002). This refers not only to the policy of war and of military intervention wielded as an international prerogative by president Bush –particularly a posteriori of the attacks of September 11, 2001– but also to the deepening of a repressive social diagram that encompasses legal reforms that slash democratic rights and freedoms and award greater power and immunity to the actions of police forces, and the criminalization of poverty and social movements, the so-called “judicialization” of protest, the increase in state and para-state repression, and the rising intervention of the armed forces in domestic social conflict. Justified by the alleged fight against the drug traffic, terrorism or crime, the ideology of “security” thus seeks the reconstitution of the challenged “neoliberal governability”. One of its most tragic expressions has been the increase of the United States military presence in the entire Latin American region (Quijano, 2004; Algranati, Seoane and Taddei, 2004). Additionally, in the terrain of domestic policies, the Colombian case emerges as one of the main laboratories for the implanting of these repressive diagrams, particularly under the administration of president Álvaro Uribe, who opened a process that seeks not only to deepen the military confrontation with the guerrillas –after the peace agreements of the previous period were broken– but also the deployment of a policy of “social militarization” in the attempt to affirm an authoritarian legitimacy, particularly among middle-class urban sectors (Zuluaga Nieto, 2003). The face of the “neoliberalism of war” thus accompanies the promotion of a radical and even more regressive reconfiguration of the political, social and economic geography of the region as a result of the acceleration of the so-called “free trade agreements” that find their maximum expression in the FTAA.

We have attempted up to this point to give an account of the paths taken and features adopted by the process of social and political disputation opened by the crisis of the neoliberal model forged in the 1990s and of the characteristics that appear to distinguish the configuration of contemporary social movements. As we have pointed out, this process is not homogeneous, and is expressed in a differentiated manner in each of the regions into which the continent may be subdivided and even within these. In this regard, the evolution of the northern region (Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean) seems to evince a marked consolidation of trade liberalization processes, which constitute the cornerstone of Washington’s strategic plans. At the same time, the convulsive political situation in a major part of the Andean region is a manifestation of the strong social tensions resulting from the attempts to deepen these “news” neoliberal recipe books, which are translated into the difficulty in the stabilization of the new political regimes that promote these policies. Expressions of this are the increasing popular discredit of the governments of Peru and of Ecuador; the setting opened with the “Bolivian October” that projects new confrontations and possible changes on the horizon, and the Venezuelan case, where the battle around the presidential recall referendum this coming August will undoubtedly acquire a regional dimension. The outcome of this process will be fundamental in Latin America with regard to the hegemonic aspirations of the White House to hinder the consolidation of democratic-popular political processes that challenge the neoliberal model. In the southern region, social movements face the great challenge of taking advantage of the chinks opened by the loss of legitimacy of neoliberalism to fight for the direction of the processes underway, maintaining and strengthening their autonomy in relation to governments.

Beyond the particular aspects exhibited by the processes at a subregional level, the generalization of free trade appears in all countries (with the exception of the Venezuelan case) as an axis emphasized by the political and economic elites to refound the neoliberal order and its legitimacy. In the face of this, the processes of regional convergence that on a national scale challenge the hegemonic economic model, and the emancipatory horizons that ensue from the practices and discourses that characterize social movements at the beginning of the twenty-first century, cast light on the outlines of those “other possible Americas” that our peoples so strongly call for.

<!– @page { margin: 0.79in } P { margin-bottom: 0.08in } –>

 

Notes

 

* Coordinator of the Latin American Social Observatory (OSAL) of the Latin American Council of Social Sciences (CLACSO) and Professor at the Faculty of Social Sciences of the University of Buenos Aires (UBA).

** Academic Coordinator of the Latin American Council of Social Sciences (CLACSO).

*** Member of the Coordinating Team of OSAL-CLACSO.

1 We are particularly grateful for the comments of Ivana Brighenti and Miguel Ángel Djanikian in the revision of the text.

2 We find it impossible to develop this issue here. Regarding the evolution of poverty and unemployment in Latin America, reference may be made to the reports on Human Development of the UNDP (2002) and of ECLAC (2002). With regard to the consequences in relation to democracy see Boron (2003a). Regarding the structural transformations of Latin American capitalism, see among others Quijano (2004) and Fiori (2001).

3 Road or highway blockade, generally for an extended period.

4 For example, for the year 2003, the conflicts involving workers of the public sector represent, according to the records supplied by OSAL (Latin American Social Observatory, CLACSO), 76% of the total number of protests by employed workers.

5 The most important among this type of protests undoubtedly turns out to be the so-called “Water War” in Cochabamba, Bolivia (2000), which frustrated the attempt to award a concession for, and privatize, the drinking water service in that city to an international consortium headed by the Bechtel company.

6 Regarding this debate one may consult, among other texts, the diverse dossiers published in numbers 12 and 13 of Chiapas magazine, as well as those included in numbers 4 and 7 of CLACSO’s OSAL magazine.

7 We have broached that question in the course “Neoliberalism and Social Movements in Latin America: the Configuration of Social Protest”, taught in the framework of the distance education courses under the platform of CLACSO’s Virtual Campus, 2003.

8 An evaluation of this process may be consulted in OSAL (2004).

 

José Seoane*, Emilio Taddei** & Clara Algranati***

The 1990s opened the way to a renewed capitalist globalization in its neoliberal form, whose impact on Latin America has been glaringly noticeable and profound. Extending a process begun in previous decades, promoted now by the so-called “Washington Consensus”, the adoption of neoliberal policies was to become generalized all over the region, taking on a newly radical form. The governments of Carlos Menem (Argentina), Alberto Fujimori (Peru), Salinas de Gortari (Mexico), Collor de Melo and later Fernando H. Cardoso (Brazil), became some of its best-known presidential incarnations. The profound and regressive consequences in social and democratic terms entailed by the application of these policies (mass pauperization being one their most tragic expressions) were the result of the acute structural transformations that modified the societal geography of Latin American capitalisms in the framework of the new order that appeared to be imposed by so-called “neoliberal globalization”2.

The application of these policies certainly faced numerous forms of resistance and protests in the region. In the first half of the 1990s two Latin American presidents (Collor de Melo in Brazil and Carlos Andrés Pérez in Venezuela) had to leave their posts in an “unexpected” manner as the result, among other issues, of rising unease and social repudiation. Nevertheless, in the regional context, the acts of resistance in those years to the application of the neoliberal recipes exhibited a configuration much more fragmented in social terms and more localized in sectorial and territorial terms than those that preceded them, while being unable in most cases to hinder the implementation of those policies. In the terrain of the social disciplines, this process, mediated by the hegemony wrested by the dominant thinking and its formulations regarding the “end of history”, meant the displacement of the problématique of conflict and of social movements from the relatively central space it had filled in the preceding decades –although from different perspectives– to an almost marginal and impoverished position.

Nevertheless, toward the end of that decade Latin America’s social reality again appeared marked by a sustained increase in social conflictivity. The continuing nature of this process may be appreciated in the survey carried by the Latin American Social Observatory (in Spanish, OSAL-CLACSO) for the nineteen countries of the Latin American region (see Chart 1), which for the period ranging from May-August 2000 to the same quarter of 2002 shows a rise in the number of the episodes of conflict surveyed of more than 180%. Because of the regional magnitude it attains (beyond exceptions and national differences), because of the characteristics it exhibits, and because of its perdurability, this increase in social conflictivity accounts for the appearance of a new cycle of social protest, which, being inscribed in the force field resulting from the regressive structural transformations forged by the implanting of neoliberalism in our countries, emerges to contest the latter.

In some cases, the Zapatist uprising of early 1994 has been pointed out as the emblematic event of the awakening of this cycle. This reference turns out to be significant insofar as, from diverse points of view, the revolt of the Chiapas indigenous exhibits some of the elements that distinguish the social movements that were to characterize the political and social realities of the region in recent years. In this regard, the national and international impact of the Zapatist uprising renders account of the emergence of movements of rural origin constituted on the basis of their indigenous identity; of the democratic demand for the collective rights of these peoples –which, in its claim for autonomy, questions the constitutive foundations of the nation-state; of the demand for a radical democratization of the political management of the state; and of the summoning of continental and global convergences. Beyond the specificity of the references that accompany and characterize Zapatism, its emergence sheds light, in a wider sense, on some of the particular aspects that appear to mark the majority of the popular movements that fill the ever more intense setting of social conflictivity in the region because of their organizational characteristics and of their forms of struggle, the inscriptions that give them an identity, their conceptualizations of collective action, and their understandings in relation to power, politics and the state. Therefore, it is not just a case of the beginning of a new cycle of social protests, but also of these appearing as incarnated in collective parties with particular features and that are different from those that had occupied the public scene in the past. At the same time, these experiences and the increase in social protest in Latin America were to develop in an almost simultaneous manner to the increase in conflict in other regions of the planet in a process that would mark the constitution of a space for international convergence in opposition to neoliberal globalization –what the mass media have named as the “antiglobalization” or “globaliphobe” movement and which, to be more precise, may be called an “alterglobalist” movement.

Lastly it may be pointed out that this rise in social protest and the emergence and consolidation of new social and popular movements converged into diverse social confrontation processes that, attaining major national significance, in some cases in recent years entailed the toppling of governments, the creation of deep political crises, or the failure of undertakings of a neoliberal character. In this regard, the “Gas War” (2003) in Bolivia, which ended with the resignation of the government of president Sánchez de Lozada and the opening of a transition that is still underway, emerges as inscribed within this process of mobilization of society that began with the “Water War” in Cochabamba (2000), also being expressed in the struggles of the coca-growing movement in the Chapare region and of the indigenous movement in the Altiplano plateau. Likewise, the indigenous uprising in Ecuador (2000), culminating in the fall of the government of Jamil Mahuad, marked the consolidation of the Confederation of the Indigenous Nations of Ecuador (in Spanish, CONAIE) in the context of social response to neoliberal policies in that country.

At the same time, the emergence and spread of the movement of unemployed workers in Argentina and the protests of the workers of the public sector in the second half of the 1990s converged with the mobilization of broad urban sectors of the middle classes to trigger the resignation of the government of president De la Rúa in late 2001. In the case of Brazil, one may stress the setting up of the Workers’ Unified Center (in Portuguese, CUT, in 1983) and of the Movement of Landless Rural Workers (MST, 1984), which starred in the opposition to neoliberal policies and were at the basis of the election victory of the presidential candidacy of Lula Da Silva (2002). In the same sense, the peasant mobilizations in Paraguay, which were to play an important role in the fall of president Cubas Grau (1999), will prolong themselves in the confrontation with the neoliberal policies promoted by succeeding governments; and the intense social protests in Peru (particularly the experience of the regional Civic Fronts) that were to mark the fall of the Fujimori regime (2000) were to continue in the resistance to the privatist policies promoted by the government of president Toledo (2002-2003).

It was precisely on the basis of the importance of these processes that, in early 2000, the Latin American Council of Social Sciences (CLACSO) decided to create the Latin American Social Observatory (OSAL) program with the aim of promoting a monitoring of social conflictivity and studies on social movements as well as regional exchanges and debate about these subjects. Over this period of more than four years, the work performed by OSAL led to the development of a chronology of the events of social conflict in nineteen countries of the continent, as well as the preparation of a publication, three times a year, which –with the participation of numerous Latin American researchers– has broached an analysis and collective reflection regarding the main acts of protest and the outstanding social movements on the regional scene over the course of these recent years. The main conclusions and pointers emerging from this extended endeavor nourish the present contribution.

In this regard, the initial goal of this article will consist in offering an approximation of the particular configuration that characterizes this cycle of protests and the popular movements that take part in it. In its first part we attempt to deal with this question on the basis of a general description that presents the recent social conflictivity in the region, its most outstanding features, and the parties that participate in it, to conclude by pointing out some elements that appear to distinguish the experience and actions of the most relevant social movements. The second part of the present contribution is centered on a more thorough analysis of the latter.

 

The contemporary scene of social protest in Latin America

We have already pointed out that the new cycle of protests that acquires momentum towards the end of the 1990s and the social movements that star in it offer distinctive features that differentiate them from those of the 1960s and 70s. The first evident fact tells us that the majority of the social organizations that promote these protests have emerged or been refounded in the last two decades. However, it is not only a matter of remitting exclusively to the organizational life or history of these movements, but particularly of the configuration they assume and that distinguishes them even within the map of the social conflictivity that characterized the 1980s and early 90s.

In this regard, if through the end of the 1980s, at least, the wage-earning Keynesian-Fordist conflict (and particularly the industrial conflict) constituted one of the main hubs of social conflictivity in the region, union organization additionally being the model that –in one way or another– marked the organizational nerve system of the majority of urban and rural social movements as well as fulfilling an outstanding role in the political and social articulation of the particular demands of collective participants, the structural transformations imposed by neoliberalism in all orders of social life (and in particular in the economy and the labor market under the de-industrialization and economic financiarization processes) were to sink that matrix of collective action into crisis, and weaken (albeit not eliminate) the weight of wage-earners’ unions as the starring parties in the conflict. In counterpart, as a result of the process of concentration of income, wealth and natural resources that marks neoliberal policies, new social movements with a territorial basis both in the rural world and in the urban space have emerged on the Latin American stage, constituting themselves on the basis of their ethnic-cultural identity (the indigenous movements), in reference to what they lack (the so-called “-less movements”, like the landless, roofless or jobless) or in relation to their shared life habitat (for example the movements of settlers).

Thus, the model of a return in the economy to raw materials, and the central role taken on in this context by agrarian restructuring processes, witness the emergence, in counterpart, of notable movements of rural origin. Also acting in the same direction is the privatization and intensive exploitation of natural resources that affects and upsets the life of numerous rural communities. This is undoubtedly one of the distinctive elements of the new phase that we analyze, and which crystallizes particularly in the major role of the indigenous movements, especially in Ecuador, Mexico and Bolivia. These movements attain an important influence at a national and international level that transcends sectorial claims, reaching the point of questioning both neoliberal economic policy and the political legitimacy of the governments that promote them as well as the constitutive form of the nation-state in Latin America. In this regard, for example, in the Ecuadorian case, the indigenous movement has striven for recognition for a political project which, reflected in the demand for a pluri-national state, seeks to guarantee self-government for the diverse indigenous nations. Under an even more radical claim of autonomy, the experience of the Zapatist movement demanded constitutional recognition for the rights of the indigenous peoples, which, partially crystallized in the so-called San Andrés Agreements (1995), would inspire the “caravan for dignity” that traveled through much of Mexico in the first months of 2001 to demand that they be complied with. To this brief listing one should add the activity of the indigenous movements of the Bolivian Altiplano (and also, although to a lesser degree, on the Peruvian side) and of the so-called “coca-growing movements” of Aymara peasants in the Chapare and the Yunga region in Bolivia and southern Peru, against the policy of eradication of coca crops demanded by the United States government. The prolonged activity of the Mapuche peoples of southern Chile (particularly embodied in the so-called Arauco-Malleco Coordination) against the appropriation of their lands and the over-exploitation of natural resources, as well as in Colombia’s Cauca Valley, are other outstanding examples of this type of struggle that seems to be carried out in the entire Latin American region. One may also point to the momentum acquired as of 2002 by the opposition of the original peoples of Central America against the Puebla Panama Plan, aimed at accelerating the penetration of transnational capital and investment in that region.

The appearance and consolidation of these indigenous movements on the political and social stage of the region is also accompanied by the emergence of numerous peasant movements that reach a significant presence at both national and regional levels. Standing out in this sense is the experience of the Brazilian Movement of the Landless Rural Workers (MST). The sustained takeovers of land and of public buildings to demand a progressive and comprehensive land reform, its actions against the spread of the model of genetically modified farming, and the development of the so-called “settlements”, have turned the MST into one of the social movements with the greatest political significance in the region. Its experience exemplifies a process of increasing mobilization and organization of the rural sectors at a regional level, embodied in the dissemination of landless movements in other Latin American countries (for example in Bolivia and Paraguay) and in the intensification of the peasant struggles in Mexico, Paraguay and Central America, and in their ability to likewise convoke the small-scale producers hit hard by the policies of liberalization of the agricultural sector carried forward under the promotion of free trade agreements. In the same direction, one may point to the growth of the protests and of the convergence processes experienced in the countryside against the economic and social consequences caused in those sectors by the fall in the international prices of numerous farm products, draconian credit policies and the tariff barriers against that type of products erected in the industrialized countries.

At the same time, in the urban arena, the structural effects of unemployment generated by neoliberal policies have –especially in countries of the Southern Cone– entailed the appearance and consolidation of movements of jobless workers. Argentina appears in this sense as the most emblematic case of this phenomenon, in which these movements, which receive the name of piqueteros3, occupy a central position –particularly as of 1999– on the stage of antineoliberal protest and in the acceleration of the political and social crisis that led to the resignation of president Fernando De la Rúa in December 2001.

Meanwhile, Latin American cities have been subjected to deep processes of spatial and social reconfiguration through the impact of liberal policies. The processes of “municipal decentralization” instrumented under the aegis of the fiscal adjustments (with the aim of “alleviating” the responsibility of the central governments to transfer resources to local administrations) have had enormous consequences on the daily life of the inhabitants of the cities. The processes of fragmentation and dualization of the urban space, abandonment of public spaces, deterioration in services and spread of violence have been only some of the most visible consequences of this profound social and spatial transformation that took place in the cities of the region. Recent urban conflicts seem to prove this multiplicity of troubles emanating from the social polarization promoted by neoliberalism. The struggles for access to housing (roofless movements), for the improvement of public services and against the rise in the rates of these, for the defense of public schooling, and against decentralization policies, also witness, in many cases, the confluence of diverse social sectors. The scourges caused by natural catastrophes (earthquakes, cyclones, floods) worsened by the increasing ecological impact of current capitalist development, as well as the abandonment of rural populations in the face of the need for governmental assistance and investment, explain the numerous mobilizations in demand of assistance by local and national governments.

The importance attained by these movements with a territorial basis that we have briefly summarized is far, however, from entailing the disappearance of the conflict involving urban wage-earning workers. Not only because in many of these movements one can make out the presence of workers in the diffuse and heterogeneous forms that this category assumes under a neoliberalism that leads to processes of “reidentification in terms not linked to the relation between capital and labor, but in other, very different ones, among which the criteria of ‘poverty’ and ‘ethnicity’, of occupations and of ‘informal’ activities and of primary communities are, probably, the most frequent” (Quijano, 2004). The verification that emerges from the monitoring of social conflicts in Latin America carried out by OSAL is that the world of labor, particularly in the urban space, far from being a secondary matter in the practice of defending claims, occupies an outstanding spot in the map of social protest, representing over a third of the conflicts surveyed over the course of the period extending from May 2000 to December 2003. Nevertheless, this quantitative weight in the register of protests contrasts with the difficulties which these (and the union organizations that promote them) face in transcending their sectorial nature and reaching a national dimension, and point to a redefinition in favor of a significant stellar role for civil servants, who account for around three quarters of the total of such protests4.

These struggles by government-employed wage earners are undertaken in the face of the insistent reform and privatization efforts encouraged by neoliberal policies, in particular as a result of the launching of fiscal adjustment packets demanded and negotiated by governments with the international organizations. Of particular significance in this sector are the dynamics of teachers and professors whose claims refer fundamentally to wage increases, the payment of wages in arrears, increases in the education budget, and the rejection of education reform proposals (particularly the flexibilization of working conditions). In some countries, the actions that ensue from the opposition to the privatization of public education allow a convergence with student sectors (in the university arena) as well as with other sectors (pupils’ parents, for example) which, backing the teachers’ demands and participating in the defense of public education, seem to point to the appearance of the “education community” form in the development of these conflicts (OSAL, 2003).

Attention may also be drawn to the intense practice in defense of their claims by administrative employees who mobilize against dismissals, for wage increases or wages in arrears, and against the reform of the state. Within the government sector, one may also underline the conflicts in many countries involving health workers, over wage claims, in favor of increases in the budget allocated to public hospitals and to the sanitary system in general, and for the improvement of working conditions. It is interesting to stress that the form of protest in this sector recurrently adopts the modality of extended stoppages –including strikes for an indeterminate period– and are articulated both under the form of national and regional strikes called by labor federations (these are recurrently recorded in almost all countries) and with street mobilization processes. In the same sense, one may also stress the conflicts against the privatization of government-owned enterprises.

But if the “first generation” privatization wave undertaken at the beginning of the 1990s by some governments in the region was characterized by social resistance fundamentally led by unions and by the workers of the sectors affected, the struggles against the “second generation” privatizations in some cases appear as a moment of social aggregation of protest which becomes manifest through the emergence of spaces of political and social convergence of a wide-ranging character. In the first of these cases, where these protests remained restricted to the workers and were unable to constitute wider social fronts that would transcend particular demands, they were, in general, defeated. The conflict being circumscribed to the employees at the enterprises in question, after the privatization a large part of them were laid off and went on to swell the ranks of the unemployed. The new cycle of social protest that we are analyzing, on the contrary, seems to exhibit a change in relation to this question. Some recent examples, such as the protests promoted by the Civic Front of Arequipa in southern Peru against the sale of the government-run power utilities (2002), and by the Democratic Congress of the People in Paraguay for the repeal of the law that allowed the privatization of state-owned companies (2002), serve to illustrate the broad convergence against the privatizations of social sectors (peasant federations, unions, students, NGOs and political parties) whose struggles are provisionally successful and force the governments to backtrack on their privatizing intentions5. This type of protests often takes on a markedly radical form (urban uprisings, lengthy highway blockades, takeover and occupation of company facilities) which appears to accompany a confrontational trend in its activities that characterizes the current cycle of protests that the region is undergoing. At the same time, the denunciation of corruption and the demand for greater democratic participation and transparency in local political life have prompted city dwellers to express their dissatisfaction, also promoting sectorial convergence processes under the form of popular uprising (puebladas) or of community mobilizations.

If in previous decades youthful participation and mobilization in Latin America was to a great extent channeled through the strong presence of the university student movement, youth protests now seem to adopt new forms and channels of expression. The decrease in the levels of school attendance resulting from the combined effects of the process of privatization of education and of the concentration of income and rise in poverty may perhaps explain, among other causes, the loss of relative weight of students’ movements. Although students still constitute a dynamic sector in the context of social conflictivity, even being involved in multisectorial protests that go beyond educational demands, the expression of youthful discontent is also channeled through an active participation in the movements of the jobless, of young favela dwellers in Brazil, in alternative currents and collective cultural phenomena of diverse types, in human rights movements, in indigenous and peasant protests and union-related groupings of young, impoverished workers. Younger generations have had an active and outstanding participation in the mass protests of a political nature that led to the resignation of presidents or that radically put into question the implementation of adjustment policies and privatizations, thus nuancing the stereotyped views of reality that speak of a marked youthful disenchantment with political participation in a wide sense. In the same context, it is necessary to underline the major importance and role filled by women in the social movements referred to. Feminine figures also stand out in the constitution of these territorial movements (Zibechi, 2003), being reflected both in the notable role displayed by piqueteras, Zapatist and indigenous women, and in the revitalization and reformulation of the feminist currents of previous decades, which crystallized, among other experiences, in the so-called “world march of women” and in the reference to the “feminization of poverty” (Matte and Guay, 2001).

Lastly, in the current setting of Latin American social protest, particular significance is exhibited by the processes of regional and international convergence that have acquired a strong momentum in recent years and that, by virtue of their scope and geographical insertion and the number of movements and social groupings they are capable of attracting, constitute an unprecedented experience in this continent. In the past, the experiences of international coordination of social movements found their most conspicuous expressions in the areas of labor organizations or of university student sectors. These convergences centered fundamentally on the defense of sectorial or professional interests, a fact that entailed great difficulties in transcending the arena of their specific demands. The impact and consequences of the “neoliberal globalization”, and consequently the irruption into national political settings of processes of continental scope (among others, for example, the so-called free trade agreements), in many cases linked to the penetration of transnational –particularly US– capital, have led to the appearance and reaffirmation of hemispheric coordination experiences with the confluence of labor, women’s and students’ movements, NGOs, political parties, and antimilitarist and environmental groupings in which a decisive role falls to peasant organizations (particularly through the Latin American Coordination of Peasant Organizations, CLOC, and its international articulation, Vía Campesina [Peasant Path]). The Continental Campaign against the Free Trade Area of the Americas (FTAA), promoted by the Continental Social Alliance and other networks and groupings (as well as the constitution of the Social Movements International Network), constitutes perhaps the most outstanding example, to which the innumerable amount of regional and continental gatherings (which also include movements from North America) against the Puebla Panama Plan and regional militarization and foreign interventions (particularly in reference to the so-called Colombia Plan and Andean Initiative) is added. In this process, the constitution of the World Social Forum (WSF, 2001-2004) appears as the most prominent experience of these convergences, not only at an international but also at a continental and regional level.

 

The new configuration of popular movements

Within this overview, which we have briefly summarized in relation to the features exhibited by social conflictivity in Latin America in recent years, some of the particular aspects that distinguish the actions and constitution of contemporary social and popular movements in our region already stand out. The analysis of these experiences and, particularly, the understanding and conceptualization of the novel aspects posed by those movements in the historical course of collective action and social contestation, constitute one of the centers of attention of the shaping and revitalization of current Latin American social thinking. The renewed generation of studies and publications about these subjects has also entailed the constitution of a new field of problématiques as well as an enrichment of the theoretical and methodological frameworks related to the study of social movements. One of the manifestations of these processes and of the debates posed is, for example, the position recently taken up within critical thinking by the discussion on the conceptualization of power and the role pertaining to the nation-state in reference to the views of social emancipation promoted by those movements6. It is not however our intention to present the problématiques orienting the debates and the reflections of social scientists –and of the movements themselves7. We are interested in underlining and going deeper into some of the features that distinguish the configuration of social movements at this time.

In relation to this, and with regard to the “repertories of protest”, it is important to point out a trend toward a greater radicalness in the forms of struggle, which is manifested in the duration of protests (actions over prolonged or indeterminate periods); in the generalization of confrontational forms of struggle to the detriment of demonstrational measures; in the regional spread of certain modalities such as the blockading of roads (characteristic, for example, of the protests of both the movements of jobless workers in Argentina and of the indigenous and coca-growing movements in the Andean Area) and the takeover of land (promoted by the peasant movements) or of public or private buildings. At the same time, the recurrence of lengthy marches and demonstrations that traverse regional and national spaces over the course of days and weeks seems to want to counteract the dynamics of territorial segmentation promoted by neoliberalism. Likewise, the puebladas and urban uprisings appear to be strategies aimed at the collective re-appropriation of the community space and at the recovery of a social visibility denied by the mechanisms of power (Seoane and Taddei, 2003).

In relation to the social actors that seem to take part in this new cycle of protests analyzed, we may stress two features that we have already singled out previously. The first is the displacement of the wage earners’ conflict to the public sector, to the detriment of the impact and importance of those promoted by workers in the private sector. This fact, in turn, implies a particular configuration that runs through the actions of labor organizations, while the dynamics of the posing of demands by the public sector calls on the participation and convergence of other social sectors in the defense of access to, and the quality of, education and health as human rights. In this sense, it is important to underline that in many cases the struggles against these policies of dismantlement and privatization, and the boosting of the convergence processes –which adopt the forms of coordinating units and civic fronts– don’t necessarily rest on wage-earning labor dynamics. The role played by other organizations (peasant and indigenous movements, the unemployed, students, urban movements, among others) in the shaping of these “expanded social coalitions” is of major importance. The second characteristic refers to the consolidation of movements of rural origin –indigenous and peasants–, which reach national and regional significance and influence. These develop a notable capacity of interpellation and articulation with urban social sectors, in many cases successfully being able to link the dynamics of the struggle against neoliberalism (agrarian policy, privatizations, fiscal adjustment) to a wider questioning of the bases of legitimacy of the political systems in the region.

These two brief pointers –as well as the description of the setting of social conflictivity presented earlier– therefore allow us to go deeper into the characterization of the particular configuration that appears to distinguish the experimentation of contemporary social movements in the region. Without seeking to exhaust this issue, it is necessary, in our understanding, to emphasize three elements that under different forms and with diverse intensities seem to run through the constitutive practice of the majority of the most significant Latin American social movements.

In the first place, a dynamics of territorial appropriation that characterizes the collective practice of what we have earlier referred to as rural and urban territorial movements. Presented as “the strategic response of the poor to the crisis of the old territoriality of the factory and the farm… [and to] the de-territorialization of production… [promoted by] neoliberal reforms” (Zibechi, 2003), as well as to the process of privatization of the public sphere and of politics (Boron, 2003a), this trend to re-appropriation by the community of the living space in which those movements are located remits to the expansion of the experiences of productive self-management (Sousa Santos, 2002b), the collective solution of social needs (for example in the field of education and of health), and autonomous forms of handling of public affairs. This diversified continuum encompasses the cooperative settlements of the Brazilian MST, the indigenous communities in Ecuador and Bolivia, the autonomous Zapatist town governments in Mexico, the productive undertakings of the various jobless movements and movement of recovered factories both in Argentina, as well as the puebladas and urban uprisings that implied the emergence of practices of management of the public space (such is the case for example of the “Water War” in Cochabamba, Bolivia, and of the experience of the popular assemblies that emerged in the main urban centers of Argentina after December 2001). In this sense, this rising “territorialization” of social movements is the result both of the extension of “forms of reciprocity, that is to say, of the exchange of labor force and of products without passing through the market, albeit with an inevitable, but ambiguous and tangential, relationship with it… [as well as of] new forms of political authority, of a communal character, that operate with and without the state” (Quijano, 2004). In permanent tension with the market and the state, extended in time or unstable and temporary, settling around practices of “production and reproduction of life” (Zibechi, 2003) or simply operating in the terrain of the management of public and political affairs, this dynamics of collective re-appropriation of the social territory appears to guide the experience not only of the indigenous and peasant movements, but also in the urban space (Seoane, 2003a). In this sense, we might state that “antineoliberal politics would appear to head towards an action of […] reproduction and production of society beyond the expanded and dislocated production of transnational capital” (Tapia, 2000).

In consonance with this experience, the practice and discursiveness of the majority of the social movements described appears imbued with the revaluing of democratic mechanisms of participation and decision which, inspired in references to direct or semi-direct democracy, orient both their organizational models and their programmatics and demands vis-à-vis the state. In this regard, on one hand, the promotion of more horizontal and open forms of participation is seen as reinsurance in the face of the danger of “disconnection” between the different organizational levels and of bureaucratization and manipulation. On the other hand, the confrontation with the neoliberal hegemony in the terrain of public policies has been translated into a growing questioning of the political system, of the model of representative democracy, and of the form that the constitution of the nation-state adopted in Latin America, promoting a diversity of demands that ranges from those for consultations and referendums to claims for autonomy and self-government, boosted particularly by the indigenous movements. The experiences of social self-organization linked to assembly-like forms of organization were a feature of the emergence of many of these movements (for example of the organizations of jobless workers and of the popular assemblies in Argentina or the urban uprisings of the “Water War” and the “Gas War” in Bolivia). Additionally, the traditional experiences of community management that characterized indigenous communities, reformulated under the impact of neoliberal policies, have served to pose a critical and alternative view of delegational and representative forms. In this terrain, the Zapatist experimentation crystallized in the watchword of “commanding while obeying” (Ceceña, 2001) is perhaps the clearest and most suggestive example, although not the only one. At the same time, the utilization and presence in the programmatics of many of these movements of instruments of semi-direct democracy can be verified, for example, in the demand for the gas referendum and the summoning to a Constitutional Assembly in the events of October in Bolivia (2003), in the referendums against the privatizations in Uruguay, or in the demand for binding plebiscites on the FTAA promoted by the social coalitions constituted in opposition to that trade agreement at a continental level. In the same direction, be it under the form of the demand for a plurinational state in the case of the Ecuadorian indigenous movements, or of the demand and construction of self-government in the autonomous Zapatist town governments, the claim of autonomy for indigenous peoples encompasses, in its projection on society, the broaching of a radical democratization of the forms of the nation-state, particularly in the “coloniality of power” that characterized its constitution (Lander, 2000). Lastly, access to local governments by representatives of those movements (especially in the experience of the Ecuadorian hills and in the Cauca valley in Colombia) has entailed the launching of mechanisms of popular participation and control in their handling (Larrea, 2004). In the diversity of the experiences described above, one many thus point to the emergence of a democratizing trend that traverses the collective practice of these social movements both in their spaces of autonomy and in the terrain of the state (Seoane, 2004; Bartra, 2003a), and expresses the extent to which “participatory democracy has taken on a new dynamics enacted by subordinate social communities and groups struggling against social exclusion and the trivialization of citizenship” (Sousa Santos, 2002a).

Lastly, it may be pointed out that, as from the protests against the Multilateral Agreement on Investment (MIA, 1997/98), the “battle of Seattle” that impeded the so-called Millennium Round of the World Trade Organization (1999), the creation and deepening of the experience of the World Social Forum (WSF, 2001 through 2004) and the “global days of action” against the military intervention in Iraq (2003/2004), the backbone of a “new internationalism” has left a deep and singular imprint on the experimentation of social movements in the world arena. The eminently social character of the actors involved (albeit not unlinked, should it be necessary to make this clear, to ideological and political inscriptions), their heterogeneity and scope, the truly international extension of the convergences, the organizational forms and the characteristics taken on by these articulations point to the novelty of this internationalism (Seoane and Taddei, 2001). As we have already shown, the Latin American region has not remained outside this process. On the contrary: the holding in 1996 of the 1st Encounter for Humanity and Against Neoliberalism organized by Zapatism in the depths of the Chiapas forest –which may be considered one of the first international summons located at the origin of this process–, as well as the fact that the birth of the WSF took place in the Brazilian city of Porto Alegre, point to the profound imbrication between the growth of protest and social movements in Latin America, and the emergence of the global convergences against neoliberal globalization. In this region, over the course of recent years, these experiences have been particularly marked by the evolution of the so-called agreements on trade liberalization, and especially of the United States’ initiative of subsuming the countries of the region within a Free Trade Area of the Americas (FTAA). These resistance processes, that implied both the constitution of spaces of coordination at a regional level (which group a wide array of movements, social organizations and NGOs) and the emergence of similar convergence experiences at a national level (for example, the national campaigns against the FTAA), turn out to be, within the continental framework and along with the experience of the Social Forums and of the mobilizations against the war, an expression and extension of the alterglobalist movement that emerged and was consolidated in the last decade. In relation to this process of convergences against “free trade”, the regional experience hails back to the protests triggered by the negotiation and launching (1994) of NAFTA (North American Free Trade Agreement), the creation of the Continental Social Alliance (1997), the organization of the 1st Summit of the Peoples of the Americas (1998) in opposition to the 2nd Summit of presidents of the 34 American countries that participate in the negotiation over the FTAA, and the organization of the Hemispheric Meetings of Struggle Against the FTAA (Havana, Cuba; 2002 to 2004). Nevertheless, particularly in relation to the dynamics and characteristics taken on by these negotiations as of 2003 –marked by the proximity of the date foreseen for their conclusion (2005), the difficulties and resistance it faces and the acceleration of the plurilateral Free Trade Agreements–, these convergence and protest processes are intensified at a regional level8. In Central America, the fruit of these experiences has been the creation and development of the Mesoamerican Forums and of the so-called Central American Popular Block. In the case of the countries forming part of MERCOSUR, the so-called “National Campaigns against the FTAA” have promoted diverse and massive popular consultations and have evolved toward the increasing questioning of “free trade” in the face of the different trade negotiations undertaken by governments. Lastly, in the Andean Area the articulation between the rejection of these treaties with massive protests in the national spaces (for example, the “Gas War” in Bolivia, 2003) and the emergence of regional coordination processes (for example, in April 2004, the first Andean Day of Mobilization Against the FTAA) point to the wealth of such processes. In this direction, the forthcoming holding of the 1st Americas Social Forum in Ecuador (July 2004) will constitute an arrival point of these experiences as well as an event that will prove the maturity, depth, features and challenges faced by internationalism in the Latin American and continental arena.

 

“Neoliberalism of war” and social convergences

The process opened in Latin America in recent years –in the face of the exhaustion of the neoliberal model in the form in which the latter tragically crystallized in the 1990s in our region– is increasingly expressed in the intensification of the disputes regarding the direction to be adopted by a transition whose outcome remains uncertain. In this sense, the social and political realities of the various countries is seen to be marked, as we pointed out earlier, by renewed social protest –which at a regional level has grown in recent years– and by the activity of social and popular movements with features different from those that had occupied stage center in the immediate past. This process, in the framework of the economic crisis undergone by most of the region and in the face of the attempts to deepen neoliberal policies, has in some cases been translated into “popular uprisings” (that in most cases ended in the collapse of governments), in the constitution of “electoral majorities” critical of neoliberalism, and even in the reappearance of a political discursiveness that differentiates itself from the latter. In their diversity, these processes point to the growing crisis of legitimacy that puts into question the cultural, economic and political forms that underpinned the application of neoliberalism in the past.

Nevertheless, in the face of this process, the attempts to deepen neoliberal policies have tended to a rising militarization of social relations in a process that has been given the name of “neoliberalism of war” (González Casanova, 2002; Taddei, 2002). This refers not only to the policy of war and of military intervention wielded as an international prerogative by president Bush –particularly a posteriori of the attacks of September 11, 2001– but also to the deepening of a repressive social diagram that encompasses legal reforms that slash democratic rights and freedoms and award greater power and immunity to the actions of police forces, and the criminalization of poverty and social movements, the so-called “judicialization” of protest, the increase in state and para-state repression, and the rising intervention of the armed forces in domestic social conflict. Justified by the alleged fight against the drug traffic, terrorism or crime, the ideology of “security” thus seeks the reconstitution of the challenged “neoliberal governability”. One of its most tragic expressions has been the increase of the United States military presence in the entire Latin American region (Quijano, 2004; Algranati, Seoane and Taddei, 2004). Additionally, in the terrain of domestic policies, the Colombian case emerges as one of the main laboratories for the implanting of these repressive diagrams, particularly under the administration of president Álvaro Uribe, who opened a process that seeks not only to deepen the military confrontation with the guerrillas –after the peace agreements of the previous period were broken– but also the deployment of a policy of “social militarization” in the attempt to affirm an authoritarian legitimacy, particularly among middle-class urban sectors (Zuluaga Nieto, 2003). The face of the “neoliberalism of war” thus accompanies the promotion of a radical and even more regressive reconfiguration of the political, social and economic geography of the region as a result of the acceleration of the so-called “free trade agreements” that find their maximum expression in the FTAA.

We have attempted up to this point to give an account of the paths taken and features adopted by the process of social and political disputation opened by the crisis of the neoliberal model forged in the 1990s and of the characteristics that appear to distinguish the configuration of contemporary social movements. As we have pointed out, this process is not homogeneous, and is expressed in a differentiated manner in each of the regions into which the continent may be subdivided and even within these. In this regard, the evolution of the northern region (Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean) seems to evince a marked consolidation of trade liberalization processes, which constitute the cornerstone of Washington’s strategic plans. At the same time, the convulsive political situation in a major part of the Andean region is a manifestation of the strong social tensions resulting from the attempts to deepen these “news” neoliberal recipe books, which are translated into the difficulty in the stabilization of the new political regimes that promote these policies. Expressions of this are the increasing popular discredit of the governments of Peru and of Ecuador; the setting opened with the “Bolivian October” that projects new confrontations and possible changes on the horizon, and the Venezuelan case, where the battle around the presidential recall referendum this coming August will undoubtedly acquire a regional dimension. The outcome of this process will be fundamental in Latin America with regard to the hegemonic aspirations of the White House to hinder the consolidation of democratic-popular political processes that challenge the neoliberal model. In the southern region, social movements face the great challenge of taking advantage of the chinks opened by the loss of legitimacy of neoliberalism to fight for the direction of the processes underway, maintaining and strengthening their autonomy in relation to governments.

Beyond the particular aspects exhibited by the processes at a subregional level, the generalization of free trade appears in all countries (with the exception of the Venezuelan case) as an axis emphasized by the political and economic elites to refound the neoliberal order and its legitimacy. In the face of this, the processes of regional convergence that on a national scale challenge the hegemonic economic model, and the emancipatory horizons that ensue from the practices and discourses that characterize social movements at the beginning of the twenty-first century, cast light on the outlines of those “other possible Americas” that our peoples so strongly call for.


Notes

 

* Coordinator of the Latin American Social Observatory (OSAL) of the Latin American Council of Social Sciences (CLACSO) and Professor at the Faculty of Social Sciences of the University of Buenos Aires (UBA).

** Academic Coordinator of the Latin American Council of Social Sciences (CLACSO).

*** Member of the Coordinating Team of OSAL-CLACSO.

1 We are particularly grateful for the comments of Ivana Brighenti and Miguel Ángel Djanikian in the revision of the text.

2 We find it impossible to develop this issue here. Regarding the evolution of poverty and unemployment in Latin America, reference may be made to the reports on Human Development of the UNDP (2002) and of ECLAC (2002). With regard to the consequences in relation to democracy see Boron (2003a). Regarding the structural transformations of Latin American capitalism, see among others Quijano (2004) and Fiori (2001).

3 Road or highway blockade, generally for an extended period.

4 For example, for the year 2003, the conflicts involving workers of the public sector represent, according to the records supplied by OSAL (Latin American Social Observatory, CLACSO), 76% of the total number of protests by employed workers.

5 The most important among this type of protests undoubtedly turns out to be the so-called “Water War” in Cochabamba, Bolivia (2000), which frustrated the attempt to award a concession for, and privatize, the drinking water service in that city to an international consortium headed by the Bechtel company.

6 Regarding this debate one may consult, among other texts, the diverse dossiers published in numbers 12 and 13 of Chiapas magazine, as well as those included in numbers 4 and 7 of CLACSO’s OSAL magazine.

7 We have broached that question in the course “Neoliberalism and Social Movements in Latin America: the Configuration of Social Protest”, taught in the framework of the distance education courses under the platform of CLACSO’s Virtual Campus, 2003.

8 An evaluation of this process may be consulted in OSAL (2004).

 

José Seoane*, medicine Emilio Taddei** & Clara Algranati***

The 1990s opened the way to a renewed capitalist globalization in its neoliberal form, site whose impact on Latin America has been glaringly noticeable and profound. Extending a process begun in previous decades, promoted now by the so-called “Washington Consensus”, the adoption of neoliberal policies was to become generalized all over the region, taking on a newly radical form. The governments of Carlos Menem (Argentina), Alberto Fujimori (Peru), Salinas de Gortari (Mexico), Collor de Melo and later Fernando H. Cardoso (Brazil), became some of its best-known presidential incarnations. The profound and regressive consequences in social and democratic terms entailed by the application of these policies (mass pauperization being one their most tragic expressions) were the result of the acute structural transformations that modified the societal geography of Latin American capitalisms in the framework of the new order that appeared to be imposed by so-called “neoliberal globalization”2.

The application of these policies certainly faced numerous forms of resistance and protests in the region. In the first half of the 1990s two Latin American presidents (Collor de Melo in Brazil and Carlos Andrés Pérez in Venezuela) had to leave their posts in an “unexpected” manner as the result, among other issues, of rising unease and social repudiation. Nevertheless, in the regional context, the acts of resistance in those years to the application of the neoliberal recipes exhibited a configuration much more fragmented in social terms and more localized in sectorial and territorial terms than those that preceded them, while being unable in most cases to hinder the implementation of those policies. In the terrain of the social disciplines, this process, mediated by the hegemony wrested by the dominant thinking and its formulations regarding the “end of history”, meant the displacement of the problématique of conflict and of social movements from the relatively central space it had filled in the preceding decades –although from different perspectives– to an almost marginal and impoverished position.

Nevertheless, toward the end of that decade Latin America’s social reality again appeared marked by a sustained increase in social conflictivity. The continuing nature of this process may be appreciated in the survey carried by the Latin American Social Observatory (in Spanish, OSAL-CLACSO) for the nineteen countries of the Latin American region (see Chart 1), which for the period ranging from May-August 2000 to the same quarter of 2002 shows a rise in the number of the episodes of conflict surveyed of more than 180%. Because of the regional magnitude it attains (beyond exceptions and national differences), because of the characteristics it exhibits, and because of its perdurability, this increase in social conflictivity accounts for the appearance of a new cycle of social protest, which, being inscribed in the force field resulting from the regressive structural transformations forged by the implanting of neoliberalism in our countries, emerges to contest the latter.

In some cases, the Zapatist uprising of early 1994 has been pointed out as the emblematic event of the awakening of this cycle. This reference turns out to be significant insofar as, from diverse points of view, the revolt of the Chiapas indigenous exhibits some of the elements that distinguish the social movements that were to characterize the political and social realities of the region in recent years. In this regard, the national and international impact of the Zapatist uprising renders account of the emergence of movements of rural origin constituted on the basis of their indigenous identity; of the democratic demand for the collective rights of these peoples –which, in its claim for autonomy, questions the constitutive foundations of the nation-state; of the demand for a radical democratization of the political management of the state; and of the summoning of continental and global convergences. Beyond the specificity of the references that accompany and characterize Zapatism, its emergence sheds light, in a wider sense, on some of the particular aspects that appear to mark the majority of the popular movements that fill the ever more intense setting of social conflictivity in the region because of their organizational characteristics and of their forms of struggle, the inscriptions that give them an identity, their conceptualizations of collective action, and their understandings in relation to power, politics and the state. Therefore, it is not just a case of the beginning of a new cycle of social protests, but also of these appearing as incarnated in collective parties with particular features and that are different from those that had occupied the public scene in the past. At the same time, these experiences and the increase in social protest in Latin America were to develop in an almost simultaneous manner to the increase in conflict in other regions of the planet in a process that would mark the constitution of a space for international convergence in opposition to neoliberal globalization –what the mass media have named as the “antiglobalization” or “globaliphobe” movement and which, to be more precise, may be called an “alterglobalist” movement.

Lastly it may be pointed out that this rise in social protest and the emergence and consolidation of new social and popular movements converged into diverse social confrontation processes that, attaining major national significance, in some cases in recent years entailed the toppling of governments, the creation of deep political crises, or the failure of undertakings of a neoliberal character. In this regard, the “Gas War” (2003) in Bolivia, which ended with the resignation of the government of president Sánchez de Lozada and the opening of a transition that is still underway, emerges as inscribed within this process of mobilization of society that began with the “Water War” in Cochabamba (2000), also being expressed in the struggles of the coca-growing movement in the Chapare region and of the indigenous movement in the Altiplano plateau. Likewise, the indigenous uprising in Ecuador (2000), culminating in the fall of the government of Jamil Mahuad, marked the consolidation of the Confederation of the Indigenous Nations of Ecuador (in Spanish, CONAIE) in the context of social response to neoliberal policies in that country.

At the same time, the emergence and spread of the movement of unemployed workers in Argentina and the protests of the workers of the public sector in the second half of the 1990s converged with the mobilization of broad urban sectors of the middle classes to trigger the resignation of the government of president De la Rúa in late 2001. In the case of Brazil, one may stress the setting up of the Workers’ Unified Center (in Portuguese, CUT, in 1983) and of the Movement of Landless Rural Workers (MST, 1984), which starred in the opposition to neoliberal policies and were at the basis of the election victory of the presidential candidacy of Lula Da Silva (2002). In the same sense, the peasant mobilizations in Paraguay, which were to play an important role in the fall of president Cubas Grau (1999), will prolong themselves in the confrontation with the neoliberal policies promoted by succeeding governments; and the intense social protests in Peru (particularly the experience of the regional Civic Fronts) that were to mark the fall of the Fujimori regime (2000) were to continue in the resistance to the privatist policies promoted by the government of president Toledo (2002-2003).

It was precisely on the basis of the importance of these processes that, in early 2000, the Latin American Council of Social Sciences (CLACSO) decided to create the Latin American Social Observatory (OSAL) program with the aim of promoting a monitoring of social conflictivity and studies on social movements as well as regional exchanges and debate about these subjects. Over this period of more than four years, the work performed by OSAL led to the development of a chronology of the events of social conflict in nineteen countries of the continent, as well as the preparation of a publication, three times a year, which –with the participation of numerous Latin American researchers– has broached an analysis and collective reflection regarding the main acts of protest and the outstanding social movements on the regional scene over the course of these recent years. The main conclusions and pointers emerging from this extended endeavor nourish the present contribution.

In this regard, the initial goal of this article will consist in offering an approximation of the particular configuration that characterizes this cycle of protests and the popular movements that take part in it. In its first part we attempt to deal with this question on the basis of a general description that presents the recent social conflictivity in the region, its most outstanding features, and the parties that participate in it, to conclude by pointing out some elements that appear to distinguish the experience and actions of the most relevant social movements. The second part of the present contribution is centered on a more thorough analysis of the latter.

 

The contemporary scene of social protest in Latin America

We have already pointed out that the new cycle of protests that acquires momentum towards the end of the 1990s and the social movements that star in it offer distinctive features that differentiate them from those of the 1960s and 70s. The first evident fact tells us that the majority of the social organizations that promote these protests have emerged or been refounded in the last two decades. However, it is not only a matter of remitting exclusively to the organizational life or history of these movements, but particularly of the configuration they assume and that distinguishes them even within the map of the social conflictivity that characterized the 1980s and early 90s.

In this regard, if through the end of the 1980s, at least, the wage-earning Keynesian-Fordist conflict (and particularly the industrial conflict) constituted one of the main hubs of social conflictivity in the region, union organization additionally being the model that –in one way or another– marked the organizational nerve system of the majority of urban and rural social movements as well as fulfilling an outstanding role in the political and social articulation of the particular demands of collective participants, the structural transformations imposed by neoliberalism in all orders of social life (and in particular in the economy and the labor market under the de-industrialization and economic financiarization processes) were to sink that matrix of collective action into crisis, and weaken (albeit not eliminate) the weight of wage-earners’ unions as the starring parties in the conflict. In counterpart, as a result of the process of concentration of income, wealth and natural resources that marks neoliberal policies, new social movements with a territorial basis both in the rural world and in the urban space have emerged on the Latin American stage, constituting themselves on the basis of their ethnic-cultural identity (the indigenous movements), in reference to what they lack (the so-called “-less movements”, like the landless, roofless or jobless) or in relation to their shared life habitat (for example the movements of settlers).

Thus, the model of a return in the economy to raw materials, and the central role taken on in this context by agrarian restructuring processes, witness the emergence, in counterpart, of notable movements of rural origin. Also acting in the same direction is the privatization and intensive exploitation of natural resources that affects and upsets the life of numerous rural communities. This is undoubtedly one of the distinctive elements of the new phase that we analyze, and which crystallizes particularly in the major role of the indigenous movements, especially in Ecuador, Mexico and Bolivia. These movements attain an important influence at a national and international level that transcends sectorial claims, reaching the point of questioning both neoliberal economic policy and the political legitimacy of the governments that promote them as well as the constitutive form of the nation-state in Latin America. In this regard, for example, in the Ecuadorian case, the indigenous movement has striven for recognition for a political project which, reflected in the demand for a pluri-national state, seeks to guarantee self-government for the diverse indigenous nations. Under an even more radical claim of autonomy, the experience of the Zapatist movement demanded constitutional recognition for the rights of the indigenous peoples, which, partially crystallized in the so-called San Andrés Agreements (1995), would inspire the “caravan for dignity” that traveled through much of Mexico in the first months of 2001 to demand that they be complied with. To this brief listing one should add the activity of the indigenous movements of the Bolivian Altiplano (and also, although to a lesser degree, on the Peruvian side) and of the so-called “coca-growing movements” of Aymara peasants in the Chapare and the Yunga region in Bolivia and southern Peru, against the policy of eradication of coca crops demanded by the United States government. The prolonged activity of the Mapuche peoples of southern Chile (particularly embodied in the so-called Arauco-Malleco Coordination) against the appropriation of their lands and the over-exploitation of natural resources, as well as in Colombia’s Cauca Valley, are other outstanding examples of this type of struggle that seems to be carried out in the entire Latin American region. One may also point to the momentum acquired as of 2002 by the opposition of the original peoples of Central America against the Puebla Panama Plan, aimed at accelerating the penetration of transnational capital and investment in that region.

The appearance and consolidation of these indigenous movements on the political and social stage of the region is also accompanied by the emergence of numerous peasant movements that reach a significant presence at both national and regional levels. Standing out in this sense is the experience of the Brazilian Movement of the Landless Rural Workers (MST). The sustained takeovers of land and of public buildings to demand a progressive and comprehensive land reform, its actions against the spread of the model of genetically modified farming, and the development of the so-called “settlements”, have turned the MST into one of the social movements with the greatest political significance in the region. Its experience exemplifies a process of increasing mobilization and organization of the rural sectors at a regional level, embodied in the dissemination of landless movements in other Latin American countries (for example in Bolivia and Paraguay) and in the intensification of the peasant struggles in Mexico, Paraguay and Central America, and in their ability to likewise convoke the small-scale producers hit hard by the policies of liberalization of the agricultural sector carried forward under the promotion of free trade agreements. In the same direction, one may point to the growth of the protests and of the convergence processes experienced in the countryside against the economic and social consequences caused in those sectors by the fall in the international prices of numerous farm products, draconian credit policies and the tariff barriers against that type of products erected in the industrialized countries.

At the same time, in the urban arena, the structural effects of unemployment generated by neoliberal policies have –especially in countries of the Southern Cone– entailed the appearance and consolidation of movements of jobless workers. Argentina appears in this sense as the most emblematic case of this phenomenon, in which these movements, which receive the name of piqueteros3, occupy a central position –particularly as of 1999– on the stage of antineoliberal protest and in the acceleration of the political and social crisis that led to the resignation of president Fernando De la Rúa in December 2001.

Meanwhile, Latin American cities have been subjected to deep processes of spatial and social reconfiguration through the impact of liberal policies. The processes of “municipal decentralization” instrumented under the aegis of the fiscal adjustments (with the aim of “alleviating” the responsibility of the central governments to transfer resources to local administrations) have had enormous consequences on the daily life of the inhabitants of the cities. The processes of fragmentation and dualization of the urban space, abandonment of public spaces, deterioration in services and spread of violence have been only some of the most visible consequences of this profound social and spatial transformation that took place in the cities of the region. Recent urban conflicts seem to prove this multiplicity of troubles emanating from the social polarization promoted by neoliberalism. The struggles for access to housing (roofless movements), for the improvement of public services and against the rise in the rates of these, for the defense of public schooling, and against decentralization policies, also witness, in many cases, the confluence of diverse social sectors. The scourges caused by natural catastrophes (earthquakes, cyclones, floods) worsened by the increasing ecological impact of current capitalist development, as well as the abandonment of rural populations in the face of the need for governmental assistance and investment, explain the numerous mobilizations in demand of assistance by local and national governments.

The importance attained by these movements with a territorial basis that we have briefly summarized is far, however, from entailing the disappearance of the conflict involving urban wage-earning workers. Not only because in many of these movements one can make out the presence of workers in the diffuse and heterogeneous forms that this category assumes under a neoliberalism that leads to processes of “reidentification in terms not linked to the relation between capital and labor, but in other, very different ones, among which the criteria of ‘poverty’ and ‘ethnicity’, of occupations and of ‘informal’ activities and of primary communities are, probably, the most frequent” (Quijano, 2004). The verification that emerges from the monitoring of social conflicts in Latin America carried out by OSAL is that the world of labor, particularly in the urban space, far from being a secondary matter in the practice of defending claims, occupies an outstanding spot in the map of social protest, representing over a third of the conflicts surveyed over the course of the period extending from May 2000 to December 2003. Nevertheless, this quantitative weight in the register of protests contrasts with the difficulties which these (and the union organizations that promote them) face in transcending their sectorial nature and reaching a national dimension, and point to a redefinition in favor of a significant stellar role for civil servants, who account for around three quarters of the total of such protests4.

These struggles by government-employed wage earners are undertaken in the face of the insistent reform and privatization efforts encouraged by neoliberal policies, in particular as a result of the launching of fiscal adjustment packets demanded and negotiated by governments with the international organizations. Of particular significance in this sector are the dynamics of teachers and professors whose claims refer fundamentally to wage increases, the payment of wages in arrears, increases in the education budget, and the rejection of education reform proposals (particularly the flexibilization of working conditions). In some countries, the actions that ensue from the opposition to the privatization of public education allow a convergence with student sectors (in the university arena) as well as with other sectors (pupils’ parents, for example) which, backing the teachers’ demands and participating in the defense of public education, seem to point to the appearance of the “education community” form in the development of these conflicts (OSAL, 2003).

Attention may also be drawn to the intense practice in defense of their claims by administrative employees who mobilize against dismissals, for wage increases or wages in arrears, and against the reform of the state. Within the government sector, one may also underline the conflicts in many countries involving health workers, over wage claims, in favor of increases in the budget allocated to public hospitals and to the sanitary system in general, and for the improvement of working conditions. It is interesting to stress that the form of protest in this sector recurrently adopts the modality of extended stoppages –including strikes for an indeterminate period– and are articulated both under the form of national and regional strikes called by labor federations (these are recurrently recorded in almost all countries) and with street mobilization processes. In the same sense, one may also stress the conflicts against the privatization of government-owned enterprises.

But if the “first generation” privatization wave undertaken at the beginning of the 1990s by some governments in the region was characterized by social resistance fundamentally led by unions and by the workers of the sectors affected, the struggles against the “second generation” privatizations in some cases appear as a moment of social aggregation of protest which becomes manifest through the emergence of spaces of political and social convergence of a wide-ranging character. In the first of these cases, where these protests remained restricted to the workers and were unable to constitute wider social fronts that would transcend particular demands, they were, in general, defeated. The conflict being circumscribed to the employees at the enterprises in question, after the privatization a large part of them were laid off and went on to swell the ranks of the unemployed. The new cycle of social protest that we are analyzing, on the contrary, seems to exhibit a change in relation to this question. Some recent examples, such as the protests promoted by the Civic Front of Arequipa in southern Peru against the sale of the government-run power utilities (2002), and by the Democratic Congress of the People in Paraguay for the repeal of the law that allowed the privatization of state-owned companies (2002), serve to illustrate the broad convergence against the privatizations of social sectors (peasant federations, unions, students, NGOs and political parties) whose struggles are provisionally successful and force the governments to backtrack on their privatizing intentions5. This type of protests often takes on a markedly radical form (urban uprisings, lengthy highway blockades, takeover and occupation of company facilities) which appears to accompany a confrontational trend in its activities that characterizes the current cycle of protests that the region is undergoing. At the same time, the denunciation of corruption and the demand for greater democratic participation and transparency in local political life have prompted city dwellers to express their dissatisfaction, also promoting sectorial convergence processes under the form of popular uprising (puebladas) or of community mobilizations.

If in previous decades youthful participation and mobilization in Latin America was to a great extent channeled through the strong presence of the university student movement, youth protests now seem to adopt new forms and channels of expression. The decrease in the levels of school attendance resulting from the combined effects of the process of privatization of education and of the concentration of income and rise in poverty may perhaps explain, among other causes, the loss of relative weight of students’ movements. Although students still constitute a dynamic sector in the context of social conflictivity, even being involved in multisectorial protests that go beyond educational demands, the expression of youthful discontent is also channeled through an active participation in the movements of the jobless, of young favela dwellers in Brazil, in alternative currents and collective cultural phenomena of diverse types, in human rights movements, in indigenous and peasant protests and union-related groupings of young, impoverished workers. Younger generations have had an active and outstanding participation in the mass protests of a political nature that led to the resignation of presidents or that radically put into question the implementation of adjustment policies and privatizations, thus nuancing the stereotyped views of reality that speak of a marked youthful disenchantment with political participation in a wide sense. In the same context, it is necessary to underline the major importance and role filled by women in the social movements referred to. Feminine figures also stand out in the constitution of these territorial movements (Zibechi, 2003), being reflected both in the notable role displayed by piqueteras, Zapatist and indigenous women, and in the revitalization and reformulation of the feminist currents of previous decades, which crystallized, among other experiences, in the so-called “world march of women” and in the reference to the “feminization of poverty” (Matte and Guay, 2001).

Lastly, in the current setting of Latin American social protest, particular significance is exhibited by the processes of regional and international convergence that have acquired a strong momentum in recent years and that, by virtue of their scope and geographical insertion and the number of movements and social groupings they are capable of attracting, constitute an unprecedented experience in this continent. In the past, the experiences of international coordination of social movements found their most conspicuous expressions in the areas of labor organizations or of university student sectors. These convergences centered fundamentally on the defense of sectorial or professional interests, a fact that entailed great difficulties in transcending the arena of their specific demands. The impact and consequences of the “neoliberal globalization”, and consequently the irruption into national political settings of processes of continental scope (among others, for example, the so-called free trade agreements), in many cases linked to the penetration of transnational –particularly US– capital, have led to the appearance and reaffirmation of hemispheric coordination experiences with the confluence of labor, women’s and students’ movements, NGOs, political parties, and antimilitarist and environmental groupings in which a decisive role falls to peasant organizations (particularly through the Latin American Coordination of Peasant Organizations, CLOC, and its international articulation, Vía Campesina [Peasant Path]). The Continental Campaign against the Free Trade Area of the Americas (FTAA), promoted by the Continental Social Alliance and other networks and groupings (as well as the constitution of the Social Movements International Network), constitutes perhaps the most outstanding example, to which the innumerable amount of regional and continental gatherings (which also include movements from North America) against the Puebla Panama Plan and regional militarization and foreign interventions (particularly in reference to the so-called Colombia Plan and Andean Initiative) is added. In this process, the constitution of the World Social Forum (WSF, 2001-2004) appears as the most prominent experience of these convergences, not only at an international but also at a continental and regional level.

 

The new configuration of popular movements

Within this overview, which we have briefly summarized in relation to the features exhibited by social conflictivity in Latin America in recent years, some of the particular aspects that distinguish the actions and constitution of contemporary social and popular movements in our region already stand out. The analysis of these experiences and, particularly, the understanding and conceptualization of the novel aspects posed by those movements in the historical course of collective action and social contestation, constitute one of the centers of attention of the shaping and revitalization of current Latin American social thinking. The renewed generation of studies and publications about these subjects has also entailed the constitution of a new field of problématiques as well as an enrichment of the theoretical and methodological frameworks related to the study of social movements. One of the manifestations of these processes and of the debates posed is, for example, the position recently taken up within critical thinking by the discussion on the conceptualization of power and the role pertaining to the nation-state in reference to the views of social emancipation promoted by those movements6. It is not however our intention to present the problématiques orienting the debates and the reflections of social scientists –and of the movements themselves7. We are interested in underlining and going deeper into some of the features that distinguish the configuration of social movements at this time.

In relation to this, and with regard to the “repertories of protest”, it is important to point out a trend toward a greater radicalness in the forms of struggle, which is manifested in the duration of protests (actions over prolonged or indeterminate periods); in the generalization of confrontational forms of struggle to the detriment of demonstrational measures; in the regional spread of certain modalities such as the blockading of roads (characteristic, for example, of the protests of both the movements of jobless workers in Argentina and of the indigenous and coca-growing movements in the Andean Area) and the takeover of land (promoted by the peasant movements) or of public or private buildings. At the same time, the recurrence of lengthy marches and demonstrations that traverse regional and national spaces over the course of days and weeks seems to want to counteract the dynamics of territorial segmentation promoted by neoliberalism. Likewise, the puebladas and urban uprisings appear to be strategies aimed at the collective re-appropriation of the community space and at the recovery of a social visibility denied by the mechanisms of power (Seoane and Taddei, 2003).

In relation to the social actors that seem to take part in this new cycle of protests analyzed, we may stress two features that we have already singled out previously. The first is the displacement of the wage earners’ conflict to the public sector, to the detriment of the impact and importance of those promoted by workers in the private sector. This fact, in turn, implies a particular configuration that runs through the actions of labor organizations, while the dynamics of the posing of demands by the public sector calls on the participation and convergence of other social sectors in the defense of access to, and the quality of, education and health as human rights. In this sense, it is important to underline that in many cases the struggles against these policies of dismantlement and privatization, and the boosting of the convergence processes –which adopt the forms of coordinating units and civic fronts– don’t necessarily rest on wage-earning labor dynamics. The role played by other organizations (peasant and indigenous movements, the unemployed, students, urban movements, among others) in the shaping of these “expanded social coalitions” is of major importance. The second characteristic refers to the consolidation of movements of rural origin –indigenous and peasants–, which reach national and regional significance and influence. These develop a notable capacity of interpellation and articulation with urban social sectors, in many cases successfully being able to link the dynamics of the struggle against neoliberalism (agrarian policy, privatizations, fiscal adjustment) to a wider questioning of the bases of legitimacy of the political systems in the region.

These two brief pointers –as well as the description of the setting of social conflictivity presented earlier– therefore allow us to go deeper into the characterization of the particular configuration that appears to distinguish the experimentation of contemporary social movements in the region. Without seeking to exhaust this issue, it is necessary, in our understanding, to emphasize three elements that under different forms and with diverse intensities seem to run through the constitutive practice of the majority of the most significant Latin American social movements.

In the first place, a dynamics of territorial appropriation that characterizes the collective practice of what we have earlier referred to as rural and urban territorial movements. Presented as “the strategic response of the poor to the crisis of the old territoriality of the factory and the farm… [and to] the de-territorialization of production… [promoted by] neoliberal reforms” (Zibechi, 2003), as well as to the process of privatization of the public sphere and of politics (Boron, 2003a), this trend to re-appropriation by the community of the living space in which those movements are located remits to the expansion of the experiences of productive self-management (Sousa Santos, 2002b), the collective solution of social needs (for example in the field of education and of health), and autonomous forms of handling of public affairs. This diversified continuum encompasses the cooperative settlements of the Brazilian MST, the indigenous communities in Ecuador and Bolivia, the autonomous Zapatist town governments in Mexico, the productive undertakings of the various jobless movements and movement of recovered factories both in Argentina, as well as the puebladas and urban uprisings that implied the emergence of practices of management of the public space (such is the case for example of the “Water War” in Cochabamba, Bolivia, and of the experience of the popular assemblies that emerged in the main urban centers of Argentina after December 2001). In this sense, this rising “territorialization” of social movements is the result both of the extension of “forms of reciprocity, that is to say, of the exchange of labor force and of products without passing through the market, albeit with an inevitable, but ambiguous and tangential, relationship with it… [as well as of] new forms of political authority, of a communal character, that operate with and without the state” (Quijano, 2004). In permanent tension with the market and the state, extended in time or unstable and temporary, settling around practices of “production and reproduction of life” (Zibechi, 2003) or simply operating in the terrain of the management of public and political affairs, this dynamics of collective re-appropriation of the social territory appears to guide the experience not only of the indigenous and peasant movements, but also in the urban space (Seoane, 2003a). In this sense, we might state that “antineoliberal politics would appear to head towards an action of […] reproduction and production of society beyond the expanded and dislocated production of transnational capital” (Tapia, 2000).

In consonance with this experience, the practice and discursiveness of the majority of the social movements described appears imbued with the revaluing of democratic mechanisms of participation and decision which, inspired in references to direct or semi-direct democracy, orient both their organizational models and their programmatics and demands vis-à-vis the state. In this regard, on one hand, the promotion of more horizontal and open forms of participation is seen as reinsurance in the face of the danger of “disconnection” between the different organizational levels and of bureaucratization and manipulation. On the other hand, the confrontation with the neoliberal hegemony in the terrain of public policies has been translated into a growing questioning of the political system, of the model of representative democracy, and of the form that the constitution of the nation-state adopted in Latin America, promoting a diversity of demands that ranges from those for consultations and referendums to claims for autonomy and self-government, boosted particularly by the indigenous movements. The experiences of social self-organization linked to assembly-like forms of organization were a feature of the emergence of many of these movements (for example of the organizations of jobless workers and of the popular assemblies in Argentina or the urban uprisings of the “Water War” and the “Gas War” in Bolivia). Additionally, the traditional experiences of community management that characterized indigenous communities, reformulated under the impact of neoliberal policies, have served to pose a critical and alternative view of delegational and representative forms. In this terrain, the Zapatist experimentation crystallized in the watchword of “commanding while obeying” (Ceceña, 2001) is perhaps the clearest and most suggestive example, although not the only one. At the same time, the utilization and presence in the programmatics of many of these movements of instruments of semi-direct democracy can be verified, for example, in the demand for the gas referendum and the summoning to a Constitutional Assembly in the events of October in Bolivia (2003), in the referendums against the privatizations in Uruguay, or in the demand for binding plebiscites on the FTAA promoted by the social coalitions constituted in opposition to that trade agreement at a continental level. In the same direction, be it under the form of the demand for a plurinational state in the case of the Ecuadorian indigenous movements, or of the demand and construction of self-government in the autonomous Zapatist town governments, the claim of autonomy for indigenous peoples encompasses, in its projection on society, the broaching of a radical democratization of the forms of the nation-state, particularly in the “coloniality of power” that characterized its constitution (Lander, 2000). Lastly, access to local governments by representatives of those movements (especially in the experience of the Ecuadorian hills and in the Cauca valley in Colombia) has entailed the launching of mechanisms of popular participation and control in their handling (Larrea, 2004). In the diversity of the experiences described above, one many thus point to the emergence of a democratizing trend that traverses the collective practice of these social movements both in their spaces of autonomy and in the terrain of the state (Seoane, 2004; Bartra, 2003a), and expresses the extent to which “participatory democracy has taken on a new dynamics enacted by subordinate social communities and groups struggling against social exclusion and the trivialization of citizenship” (Sousa Santos, 2002a).

Lastly, it may be pointed out that, as from the protests against the Multilateral Agreement on Investment (MIA, 1997/98), the “battle of Seattle” that impeded the so-called Millennium Round of the World Trade Organization (1999), the creation and deepening of the experience of the World Social Forum (WSF, 2001 through 2004) and the “global days of action” against the military intervention in Iraq (2003/2004), the backbone of a “new internationalism” has left a deep and singular imprint on the experimentation of social movements in the world arena. The eminently social character of the actors involved (albeit not unlinked, should it be necessary to make this clear, to ideological and political inscriptions), their heterogeneity and scope, the truly international extension of the convergences, the organizational forms and the characteristics taken on by these articulations point to the novelty of this internationalism (Seoane and Taddei, 2001). As we have already shown, the Latin American region has not remained outside this process. On the contrary: the holding in 1996 of the 1st Encounter for Humanity and Against Neoliberalism organized by Zapatism in the depths of the Chiapas forest –which may be considered one of the first international summons located at the origin of this process–, as well as the fact that the birth of the WSF took place in the Brazilian city of Porto Alegre, point to the profound imbrication between the growth of protest and social movements in Latin America, and the emergence of the global convergences against neoliberal globalization. In this region, over the course of recent years, these experiences have been particularly marked by the evolution of the so-called agreements on trade liberalization, and especially of the United States’ initiative of subsuming the countries of the region within a Free Trade Area of the Americas (FTAA). These resistance processes, that implied both the constitution of spaces of coordination at a regional level (which group a wide array of movements, social organizations and NGOs) and the emergence of similar convergence experiences at a national level (for example, the national campaigns against the FTAA), turn out to be, within the continental framework and along with the experience of the Social Forums and of the mobilizations against the war, an expression and extension of the alterglobalist movement that emerged and was consolidated in the last decade. In relation to this process of convergences against “free trade”, the regional experience hails back to the protests triggered by the negotiation and launching (1994) of NAFTA (North American Free Trade Agreement), the creation of the Continental Social Alliance (1997), the organization of the 1st Summit of the Peoples of the Americas (1998) in opposition to the 2nd Summit of presidents of the 34 American countries that participate in the negotiation over the FTAA, and the organization of the Hemispheric Meetings of Struggle Against the FTAA (Havana, Cuba; 2002 to 2004). Nevertheless, particularly in relation to the dynamics and characteristics taken on by these negotiations as of 2003 –marked by the proximity of the date foreseen for their conclusion (2005), the difficulties and resistance it faces and the acceleration of the plurilateral Free Trade Agreements–, these convergence and protest processes are intensified at a regional level8. In Central America, the fruit of these experiences has been the creation and development of the Mesoamerican Forums and of the so-called Central American Popular Block. In the case of the countries forming part of MERCOSUR, the so-called “National Campaigns against the FTAA” have promoted diverse and massive popular consultations and have evolved toward the increasing questioning of “free trade” in the face of the different trade negotiations undertaken by governments. Lastly, in the Andean Area the articulation between the rejection of these treaties with massive protests in the national spaces (for example, the “Gas War” in Bolivia, 2003) and the emergence of regional coordination processes (for example, in April 2004, the first Andean Day of Mobilization Against the FTAA) point to the wealth of such processes. In this direction, the forthcoming holding of the 1st Americas Social Forum in Ecuador (July 2004) will constitute an arrival point of these experiences as well as an event that will prove the maturity, depth, features and challenges faced by internationalism in the Latin American and continental arena.

 

“Neoliberalism of war” and social convergences

The process opened in Latin America in recent years –in the face of the exhaustion of the neoliberal model in the form in which the latter tragically crystallized in the 1990s in our region– is increasingly expressed in the intensification of the disputes regarding the direction to be adopted by a transition whose outcome remains uncertain. In this sense, the social and political realities of the various countries is seen to be marked, as we pointed out earlier, by renewed social protest –which at a regional level has grown in recent years– and by the activity of social and popular movements with features different from those that had occupied stage center in the immediate past. This process, in the framework of the economic crisis undergone by most of the region and in the face of the attempts to deepen neoliberal policies, has in some cases been translated into “popular uprisings” (that in most cases ended in the collapse of governments), in the constitution of “electoral majorities” critical of neoliberalism, and even in the reappearance of a political discursiveness that differentiates itself from the latter. In their diversity, these processes point to the growing crisis of legitimacy that puts into question the cultural, economic and political forms that underpinned the application of neoliberalism in the past.

Nevertheless, in the face of this process, the attempts to deepen neoliberal policies have tended to a rising militarization of social relations in a process that has been given the name of “neoliberalism of war” (González Casanova, 2002; Taddei, 2002). This refers not only to the policy of war and of military intervention wielded as an international prerogative by president Bush –particularly a posteriori of the attacks of September 11, 2001– but also to the deepening of a repressive social diagram that encompasses legal reforms that slash democratic rights and freedoms and award greater power and immunity to the actions of police forces, and the criminalization of poverty and social movements, the so-called “judicialization” of protest, the increase in state and para-state repression, and the rising intervention of the armed forces in domestic social conflict. Justified by the alleged fight against the drug traffic, terrorism or crime, the ideology of “security” thus seeks the reconstitution of the challenged “neoliberal governability”. One of its most tragic expressions has been the increase of the United States military presence in the entire Latin American region (Quijano, 2004; Algranati, Seoane and Taddei, 2004). Additionally, in the terrain of domestic policies, the Colombian case emerges as one of the main laboratories for the implanting of these repressive diagrams, particularly under the administration of president Álvaro Uribe, who opened a process that seeks not only to deepen the military confrontation with the guerrillas –after the peace agreements of the previous period were broken– but also the deployment of a policy of “social militarization” in the attempt to affirm an authoritarian legitimacy, particularly among middle-class urban sectors (Zuluaga Nieto, 2003). The face of the “neoliberalism of war” thus accompanies the promotion of a radical and even more regressive reconfiguration of the political, social and economic geography of the region as a result of the acceleration of the so-called “free trade agreements” that find their maximum expression in the FTAA.

We have attempted up to this point to give an account of the paths taken and features adopted by the process of social and political disputation opened by the crisis of the neoliberal model forged in the 1990s and of the characteristics that appear to distinguish the configuration of contemporary social movements. As we have pointed out, this process is not homogeneous, and is expressed in a differentiated manner in each of the regions into which the continent may be subdivided and even within these. In this regard, the evolution of the northern region (Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean) seems to evince a marked consolidation of trade liberalization processes, which constitute the cornerstone of Washington’s strategic plans. At the same time, the convulsive political situation in a major part of the Andean region is a manifestation of the strong social tensions resulting from the attempts to deepen these “news” neoliberal recipe books, which are translated into the difficulty in the stabilization of the new political regimes that promote these policies. Expressions of this are the increasing popular discredit of the governments of Peru and of Ecuador; the setting opened with the “Bolivian October” that projects new confrontations and possible changes on the horizon, and the Venezuelan case, where the battle around the presidential recall referendum this coming August will undoubtedly acquire a regional dimension. The outcome of this process will be fundamental in Latin America with regard to the hegemonic aspirations of the White House to hinder the consolidation of democratic-popular political processes that challenge the neoliberal model. In the southern region, social movements face the great challenge of taking advantage of the chinks opened by the loss of legitimacy of neoliberalism to fight for the direction of the processes underway, maintaining and strengthening their autonomy in relation to governments.

Beyond the particular aspects exhibited by the processes at a subregional level, the generalization of free trade appears in all countries (with the exception of the Venezuelan case) as an axis emphasized by the political and economic elites to refound the neoliberal order and its legitimacy. In the face of this, the processes of regional convergence that on a national scale challenge the hegemonic economic model, and the emancipatory horizons that ensue from the practices and discourses that characterize social movements at the beginning of the twenty-first century, cast light on the outlines of those “other possible Americas” that our peoples so strongly call for.

<!– @page { margin: 0.79in } P { margin-bottom: 0.08in } –>

 

Notes

 

* Coordinator of the Latin American Social Observatory (OSAL) of the Latin American Council of Social Sciences (CLACSO) and Professor at the Faculty of Social Sciences of the University of Buenos Aires (UBA).

** Academic Coordinator of the Latin American Council of Social Sciences (CLACSO).

*** Member of the Coordinating Team of OSAL-CLACSO.

1 We are particularly grateful for the comments of Ivana Brighenti and Miguel Ángel Djanikian in the revision of the text.

2 We find it impossible to develop this issue here. Regarding the evolution of poverty and unemployment in Latin America, reference may be made to the reports on Human Development of the UNDP (2002) and of ECLAC (2002). With regard to the consequences in relation to democracy see Boron (2003a). Regarding the structural transformations of Latin American capitalism, see among others Quijano (2004) and Fiori (2001).

3 Road or highway blockade, generally for an extended period.

4 For example, for the year 2003, the conflicts involving workers of the public sector represent, according to the records supplied by OSAL (Latin American Social Observatory, CLACSO), 76% of the total number of protests by employed workers.

5 The most important among this type of protests undoubtedly turns out to be the so-called “Water War” in Cochabamba, Bolivia (2000), which frustrated the attempt to award a concession for, and privatize, the drinking water service in that city to an international consortium headed by the Bechtel company.

6 Regarding this debate one may consult, among other texts, the diverse dossiers published in numbers 12 and 13 of Chiapas magazine, as well as those included in numbers 4 and 7 of CLACSO’s OSAL magazine.

7 We have broached that question in the course “Neoliberalism and Social Movements in Latin America: the Configuration of Social Protest”, taught in the framework of the distance education courses under the platform of CLACSO’s Virtual Campus, 2003.

8 An evaluation of this process may be consulted in OSAL (2004).

 

José Seoane*, Emilio Taddei** & Clara Algranati***

The 1990s opened the way to a renewed capitalist globalization in its neoliberal form, whose impact on Latin America has been glaringly noticeable and profound. Extending a process begun in previous decades, clinic promoted now by the so-called “Washington Consensus”, the adoption of neoliberal policies was to become generalized all over the region, taking on a newly radical form. The governments of Carlos Menem (Argentina), Alberto Fujimori (Peru), Salinas de Gortari (Mexico), Collor de Melo and later Fernando H. Cardoso (Brazil), became some of its best-known presidential incarnations. The profound and regressive consequences in social and democratic terms entailed by the application of these policies (mass pauperization being one their most tragic expressions) were the result of the acute structural transformations that modified the societal geography of Latin American capitalisms in the framework of the new order that appeared to be imposed by so-called “neoliberal globalization”2.

The application of these policies certainly faced numerous forms of resistance and protests in the region. In the first half of the 1990s two Latin American presidents (Collor de Melo in Brazil and Carlos Andrés Pérez in Venezuela) had to leave their posts in an “unexpected” manner as the result, among other issues, of rising unease and social repudiation. Nevertheless, in the regional context, the acts of resistance in those years to the application of the neoliberal recipes exhibited a configuration much more fragmented in social terms and more localized in sectorial and territorial terms than those that preceded them, while being unable in most cases to hinder the implementation of those policies. In the terrain of the social disciplines, this process, mediated by the hegemony wrested by the dominant thinking and its formulations regarding the “end of history”, meant the displacement of the problématique of conflict and of social movements from the relatively central space it had filled in the preceding decades –although from different perspectives– to an almost marginal and impoverished position.

Nevertheless, toward the end of that decade Latin America’s social reality again appeared marked by a sustained increase in social conflictivity. The continuing nature of this process may be appreciated in the survey carried by the Latin American Social Observatory (in Spanish, OSAL-CLACSO) for the nineteen countries of the Latin American region (see Chart 1), which for the period ranging from May-August 2000 to the same quarter of 2002 shows a rise in the number of the episodes of conflict surveyed of more than 180%. Because of the regional magnitude it attains (beyond exceptions and national differences), because of the characteristics it exhibits, and because of its perdurability, this increase in social conflictivity accounts for the appearance of a new cycle of social protest, which, being inscribed in the force field resulting from the regressive structural transformations forged by the implanting of neoliberalism in our countries, emerges to contest the latter.

In some cases, the Zapatist uprising of early 1994 has been pointed out as the emblematic event of the awakening of this cycle. This reference turns out to be significant insofar as, from diverse points of view, the revolt of the Chiapas indigenous exhibits some of the elements that distinguish the social movements that were to characterize the political and social realities of the region in recent years. In this regard, the national and international impact of the Zapatist uprising renders account of the emergence of movements of rural origin constituted on the basis of their indigenous identity; of the democratic demand for the collective rights of these peoples –which, in its claim for autonomy, questions the constitutive foundations of the nation-state; of the demand for a radical democratization of the political management of the state; and of the summoning of continental and global convergences. Beyond the specificity of the references that accompany and characterize Zapatism, its emergence sheds light, in a wider sense, on some of the particular aspects that appear to mark the majority of the popular movements that fill the ever more intense setting of social conflictivity in the region because of their organizational characteristics and of their forms of struggle, the inscriptions that give them an identity, their conceptualizations of collective action, and their understandings in relation to power, politics and the state. Therefore, it is not just a case of the beginning of a new cycle of social protests, but also of these appearing as incarnated in collective parties with particular features and that are different from those that had occupied the public scene in the past. At the same time, these experiences and the increase in social protest in Latin America were to develop in an almost simultaneous manner to the increase in conflict in other regions of the planet in a process that would mark the constitution of a space for international convergence in opposition to neoliberal globalization –what the mass media have named as the “antiglobalization” or “globaliphobe” movement and which, to be more precise, may be called an “alterglobalist” movement.

Lastly it may be pointed out that this rise in social protest and the emergence and consolidation of new social and popular movements converged into diverse social confrontation processes that, attaining major national significance, in some cases in recent years entailed the toppling of governments, the creation of deep political crises, or the failure of undertakings of a neoliberal character. In this regard, the “Gas War” (2003) in Bolivia, which ended with the resignation of the government of president Sánchez de Lozada and the opening of a transition that is still underway, emerges as inscribed within this process of mobilization of society that began with the “Water War” in Cochabamba (2000), also being expressed in the struggles of the coca-growing movement in the Chapare region and of the indigenous movement in the Altiplano plateau. Likewise, the indigenous uprising in Ecuador (2000), culminating in the fall of the government of Jamil Mahuad, marked the consolidation of the Confederation of the Indigenous Nations of Ecuador (in Spanish, CONAIE) in the context of social response to neoliberal policies in that country.

At the same time, the emergence and spread of the movement of unemployed workers in Argentina and the protests of the workers of the public sector in the second half of the 1990s converged with the mobilization of broad urban sectors of the middle classes to trigger the resignation of the government of president De la Rúa in late 2001. In the case of Brazil, one may stress the setting up of the Workers’ Unified Center (in Portuguese, CUT, in 1983) and of the Movement of Landless Rural Workers (MST, 1984), which starred in the opposition to neoliberal policies and were at the basis of the election victory of the presidential candidacy of Lula Da Silva (2002). In the same sense, the peasant mobilizations in Paraguay, which were to play an important role in the fall of president Cubas Grau (1999), will prolong themselves in the confrontation with the neoliberal policies promoted by succeeding governments; and the intense social protests in Peru (particularly the experience of the regional Civic Fronts) that were to mark the fall of the Fujimori regime (2000) were to continue in the resistance to the privatist policies promoted by the government of president Toledo (2002-2003).

It was precisely on the basis of the importance of these processes that, in early 2000, the Latin American Council of Social Sciences (CLACSO) decided to create the Latin American Social Observatory (OSAL) program with the aim of promoting a monitoring of social conflictivity and studies on social movements as well as regional exchanges and debate about these subjects. Over this period of more than four years, the work performed by OSAL led to the development of a chronology of the events of social conflict in nineteen countries of the continent, as well as the preparation of a publication, three times a year, which –with the participation of numerous Latin American researchers– has broached an analysis and collective reflection regarding the main acts of protest and the outstanding social movements on the regional scene over the course of these recent years. The main conclusions and pointers emerging from this extended endeavor nourish the present contribution.

In this regard, the initial goal of this article will consist in offering an approximation of the particular configuration that characterizes this cycle of protests and the popular movements that take part in it. In its first part we attempt to deal with this question on the basis of a general description that presents the recent social conflictivity in the region, its most outstanding features, and the parties that participate in it, to conclude by pointing out some elements that appear to distinguish the experience and actions of the most relevant social movements. The second part of the present contribution is centered on a more thorough analysis of the latter.

 

The contemporary scene of social protest in Latin America

We have already pointed out that the new cycle of protests that acquires momentum towards the end of the 1990s and the social movements that star in it offer distinctive features that differentiate them from those of the 1960s and 70s. The first evident fact tells us that the majority of the social organizations that promote these protests have emerged or been refounded in the last two decades. However, it is not only a matter of remitting exclusively to the organizational life or history of these movements, but particularly of the configuration they assume and that distinguishes them even within the map of the social conflictivity that characterized the 1980s and early 90s.

In this regard, if through the end of the 1980s, at least, the wage-earning Keynesian-Fordist conflict (and particularly the industrial conflict) constituted one of the main hubs of social conflictivity in the region, union organization additionally being the model that –in one way or another– marked the organizational nerve system of the majority of urban and rural social movements as well as fulfilling an outstanding role in the political and social articulation of the particular demands of collective participants, the structural transformations imposed by neoliberalism in all orders of social life (and in particular in the economy and the labor market under the de-industrialization and economic financiarization processes) were to sink that matrix of collective action into crisis, and weaken (albeit not eliminate) the weight of wage-earners’ unions as the starring parties in the conflict. In counterpart, as a result of the process of concentration of income, wealth and natural resources that marks neoliberal policies, new social movements with a territorial basis both in the rural world and in the urban space have emerged on the Latin American stage, constituting themselves on the basis of their ethnic-cultural identity (the indigenous movements), in reference to what they lack (the so-called “-less movements”, like the landless, roofless or jobless) or in relation to their shared life habitat (for example the movements of settlers).

Thus, the model of a return in the economy to raw materials, and the central role taken on in this context by agrarian restructuring processes, witness the emergence, in counterpart, of notable movements of rural origin. Also acting in the same direction is the privatization and intensive exploitation of natural resources that affects and upsets the life of numerous rural communities. This is undoubtedly one of the distinctive elements of the new phase that we analyze, and which crystallizes particularly in the major role of the indigenous movements, especially in Ecuador, Mexico and Bolivia. These movements attain an important influence at a national and international level that transcends sectorial claims, reaching the point of questioning both neoliberal economic policy and the political legitimacy of the governments that promote them as well as the constitutive form of the nation-state in Latin America. In this regard, for example, in the Ecuadorian case, the indigenous movement has striven for recognition for a political project which, reflected in the demand for a pluri-national state, seeks to guarantee self-government for the diverse indigenous nations. Under an even more radical claim of autonomy, the experience of the Zapatist movement demanded constitutional recognition for the rights of the indigenous peoples, which, partially crystallized in the so-called San Andrés Agreements (1995), would inspire the “caravan for dignity” that traveled through much of Mexico in the first months of 2001 to demand that they be complied with. To this brief listing one should add the activity of the indigenous movements of the Bolivian Altiplano (and also, although to a lesser degree, on the Peruvian side) and of the so-called “coca-growing movements” of Aymara peasants in the Chapare and the Yunga region in Bolivia and southern Peru, against the policy of eradication of coca crops demanded by the United States government. The prolonged activity of the Mapuche peoples of southern Chile (particularly embodied in the so-called Arauco-Malleco Coordination) against the appropriation of their lands and the over-exploitation of natural resources, as well as in Colombia’s Cauca Valley, are other outstanding examples of this type of struggle that seems to be carried out in the entire Latin American region. One may also point to the momentum acquired as of 2002 by the opposition of the original peoples of Central America against the Puebla Panama Plan, aimed at accelerating the penetration of transnational capital and investment in that region.

The appearance and consolidation of these indigenous movements on the political and social stage of the region is also accompanied by the emergence of numerous peasant movements that reach a significant presence at both national and regional levels. Standing out in this sense is the experience of the Brazilian Movement of the Landless Rural Workers (MST). The sustained takeovers of land and of public buildings to demand a progressive and comprehensive land reform, its actions against the spread of the model of genetically modified farming, and the development of the so-called “settlements”, have turned the MST into one of the social movements with the greatest political significance in the region. Its experience exemplifies a process of increasing mobilization and organization of the rural sectors at a regional level, embodied in the dissemination of landless movements in other Latin American countries (for example in Bolivia and Paraguay) and in the intensification of the peasant struggles in Mexico, Paraguay and Central America, and in their ability to likewise convoke the small-scale producers hit hard by the policies of liberalization of the agricultural sector carried forward under the promotion of free trade agreements. In the same direction, one may point to the growth of the protests and of the convergence processes experienced in the countryside against the economic and social consequences caused in those sectors by the fall in the international prices of numerous farm products, draconian credit policies and the tariff barriers against that type of products erected in the industrialized countries.

At the same time, in the urban arena, the structural effects of unemployment generated by neoliberal policies have –especially in countries of the Southern Cone– entailed the appearance and consolidation of movements of jobless workers. Argentina appears in this sense as the most emblematic case of this phenomenon, in which these movements, which receive the name of piqueteros3, occupy a central position –particularly as of 1999– on the stage of antineoliberal protest and in the acceleration of the political and social crisis that led to the resignation of president Fernando De la Rúa in December 2001.

Meanwhile, Latin American cities have been subjected to deep processes of spatial and social reconfiguration through the impact of liberal policies. The processes of “municipal decentralization” instrumented under the aegis of the fiscal adjustments (with the aim of “alleviating” the responsibility of the central governments to transfer resources to local administrations) have had enormous consequences on the daily life of the inhabitants of the cities. The processes of fragmentation and dualization of the urban space, abandonment of public spaces, deterioration in services and spread of violence have been only some of the most visible consequences of this profound social and spatial transformation that took place in the cities of the region. Recent urban conflicts seem to prove this multiplicity of troubles emanating from the social polarization promoted by neoliberalism. The struggles for access to housing (roofless movements), for the improvement of public services and against the rise in the rates of these, for the defense of public schooling, and against decentralization policies, also witness, in many cases, the confluence of diverse social sectors. The scourges caused by natural catastrophes (earthquakes, cyclones, floods) worsened by the increasing ecological impact of current capitalist development, as well as the abandonment of rural populations in the face of the need for governmental assistance and investment, explain the numerous mobilizations in demand of assistance by local and national governments.

The importance attained by these movements with a territorial basis that we have briefly summarized is far, however, from entailing the disappearance of the conflict involving urban wage-earning workers. Not only because in many of these movements one can make out the presence of workers in the diffuse and heterogeneous forms that this category assumes under a neoliberalism that leads to processes of “reidentification in terms not linked to the relation between capital and labor, but in other, very different ones, among which the criteria of ‘poverty’ and ‘ethnicity’, of occupations and of ‘informal’ activities and of primary communities are, probably, the most frequent” (Quijano, 2004). The verification that emerges from the monitoring of social conflicts in Latin America carried out by OSAL is that the world of labor, particularly in the urban space, far from being a secondary matter in the practice of defending claims, occupies an outstanding spot in the map of social protest, representing over a third of the conflicts surveyed over the course of the period extending from May 2000 to December 2003. Nevertheless, this quantitative weight in the register of protests contrasts with the difficulties which these (and the union organizations that promote them) face in transcending their sectorial nature and reaching a national dimension, and point to a redefinition in favor of a significant stellar role for civil servants, who account for around three quarters of the total of such protests4.

These struggles by government-employed wage earners are undertaken in the face of the insistent reform and privatization efforts encouraged by neoliberal policies, in particular as a result of the launching of fiscal adjustment packets demanded and negotiated by governments with the international organizations. Of particular significance in this sector are the dynamics of teachers and professors whose claims refer fundamentally to wage increases, the payment of wages in arrears, increases in the education budget, and the rejection of education reform proposals (particularly the flexibilization of working conditions). In some countries, the actions that ensue from the opposition to the privatization of public education allow a convergence with student sectors (in the university arena) as well as with other sectors (pupils’ parents, for example) which, backing the teachers’ demands and participating in the defense of public education, seem to point to the appearance of the “education community” form in the development of these conflicts (OSAL, 2003).

Attention may also be drawn to the intense practice in defense of their claims by administrative employees who mobilize against dismissals, for wage increases or wages in arrears, and against the reform of the state. Within the government sector, one may also underline the conflicts in many countries involving health workers, over wage claims, in favor of increases in the budget allocated to public hospitals and to the sanitary system in general, and for the improvement of working conditions. It is interesting to stress that the form of protest in this sector recurrently adopts the modality of extended stoppages –including strikes for an indeterminate period– and are articulated both under the form of national and regional strikes called by labor federations (these are recurrently recorded in almost all countries) and with street mobilization processes. In the same sense, one may also stress the conflicts against the privatization of government-owned enterprises.

But if the “first generation” privatization wave undertaken at the beginning of the 1990s by some governments in the region was characterized by social resistance fundamentally led by unions and by the workers of the sectors affected, the struggles against the “second generation” privatizations in some cases appear as a moment of social aggregation of protest which becomes manifest through the emergence of spaces of political and social convergence of a wide-ranging character. In the first of these cases, where these protests remained restricted to the workers and were unable to constitute wider social fronts that would transcend particular demands, they were, in general, defeated. The conflict being circumscribed to the employees at the enterprises in question, after the privatization a large part of them were laid off and went on to swell the ranks of the unemployed. The new cycle of social protest that we are analyzing, on the contrary, seems to exhibit a change in relation to this question. Some recent examples, such as the protests promoted by the Civic Front of Arequipa in southern Peru against the sale of the government-run power utilities (2002), and by the Democratic Congress of the People in Paraguay for the repeal of the law that allowed the privatization of state-owned companies (2002), serve to illustrate the broad convergence against the privatizations of social sectors (peasant federations, unions, students, NGOs and political parties) whose struggles are provisionally successful and force the governments to backtrack on their privatizing intentions5. This type of protests often takes on a markedly radical form (urban uprisings, lengthy highway blockades, takeover and occupation of company facilities) which appears to accompany a confrontational trend in its activities that characterizes the current cycle of protests that the region is undergoing. At the same time, the denunciation of corruption and the demand for greater democratic participation and transparency in local political life have prompted city dwellers to express their dissatisfaction, also promoting sectorial convergence processes under the form of popular uprising (puebladas) or of community mobilizations.

If in previous decades youthful participation and mobilization in Latin America was to a great extent channeled through the strong presence of the university student movement, youth protests now seem to adopt new forms and channels of expression. The decrease in the levels of school attendance resulting from the combined effects of the process of privatization of education and of the concentration of income and rise in poverty may perhaps explain, among other causes, the loss of relative weight of students’ movements. Although students still constitute a dynamic sector in the context of social conflictivity, even being involved in multisectorial protests that go beyond educational demands, the expression of youthful discontent is also channeled through an active participation in the movements of the jobless, of young favela dwellers in Brazil, in alternative currents and collective cultural phenomena of diverse types, in human rights movements, in indigenous and peasant protests and union-related groupings of young, impoverished workers. Younger generations have had an active and outstanding participation in the mass protests of a political nature that led to the resignation of presidents or that radically put into question the implementation of adjustment policies and privatizations, thus nuancing the stereotyped views of reality that speak of a marked youthful disenchantment with political participation in a wide sense. In the same context, it is necessary to underline the major importance and role filled by women in the social movements referred to. Feminine figures also stand out in the constitution of these territorial movements (Zibechi, 2003), being reflected both in the notable role displayed by piqueteras, Zapatist and indigenous women, and in the revitalization and reformulation of the feminist currents of previous decades, which crystallized, among other experiences, in the so-called “world march of women” and in the reference to the “feminization of poverty” (Matte and Guay, 2001).

Lastly, in the current setting of Latin American social protest, particular significance is exhibited by the processes of regional and international convergence that have acquired a strong momentum in recent years and that, by virtue of their scope and geographical insertion and the number of movements and social groupings they are capable of attracting, constitute an unprecedented experience in this continent. In the past, the experiences of international coordination of social movements found their most conspicuous expressions in the areas of labor organizations or of university student sectors. These convergences centered fundamentally on the defense of sectorial or professional interests, a fact that entailed great difficulties in transcending the arena of their specific demands. The impact and consequences of the “neoliberal globalization”, and consequently the irruption into national political settings of processes of continental scope (among others, for example, the so-called free trade agreements), in many cases linked to the penetration of transnational –particularly US– capital, have led to the appearance and reaffirmation of hemispheric coordination experiences with the confluence of labor, women’s and students’ movements, NGOs, political parties, and antimilitarist and environmental groupings in which a decisive role falls to peasant organizations (particularly through the Latin American Coordination of Peasant Organizations, CLOC, and its international articulation, Vía Campesina [Peasant Path]). The Continental Campaign against the Free Trade Area of the Americas (FTAA), promoted by the Continental Social Alliance and other networks and groupings (as well as the constitution of the Social Movements International Network), constitutes perhaps the most outstanding example, to which the innumerable amount of regional and continental gatherings (which also include movements from North America) against the Puebla Panama Plan and regional militarization and foreign interventions (particularly in reference to the so-called Colombia Plan and Andean Initiative) is added. In this process, the constitution of the World Social Forum (WSF, 2001-2004) appears as the most prominent experience of these convergences, not only at an international but also at a continental and regional level.

 

The new configuration of popular movements

Within this overview, which we have briefly summarized in relation to the features exhibited by social conflictivity in Latin America in recent years, some of the particular aspects that distinguish the actions and constitution of contemporary social and popular movements in our region already stand out. The analysis of these experiences and, particularly, the understanding and conceptualization of the novel aspects posed by those movements in the historical course of collective action and social contestation, constitute one of the centers of attention of the shaping and revitalization of current Latin American social thinking. The renewed generation of studies and publications about these subjects has also entailed the constitution of a new field of problématiques as well as an enrichment of the theoretical and methodological frameworks related to the study of social movements. One of the manifestations of these processes and of the debates posed is, for example, the position recently taken up within critical thinking by the discussion on the conceptualization of power and the role pertaining to the nation-state in reference to the views of social emancipation promoted by those movements6. It is not however our intention to present the problématiques orienting the debates and the reflections of social scientists –and of the movements themselves7. We are interested in underlining and going deeper into some of the features that distinguish the configuration of social movements at this time.

In relation to this, and with regard to the “repertories of protest”, it is important to point out a trend toward a greater radicalness in the forms of struggle, which is manifested in the duration of protests (actions over prolonged or indeterminate periods); in the generalization of confrontational forms of struggle to the detriment of demonstrational measures; in the regional spread of certain modalities such as the blockading of roads (characteristic, for example, of the protests of both the movements of jobless workers in Argentina and of the indigenous and coca-growing movements in the Andean Area) and the takeover of land (promoted by the peasant movements) or of public or private buildings. At the same time, the recurrence of lengthy marches and demonstrations that traverse regional and national spaces over the course of days and weeks seems to want to counteract the dynamics of territorial segmentation promoted by neoliberalism. Likewise, the puebladas and urban uprisings appear to be strategies aimed at the collective re-appropriation of the community space and at the recovery of a social visibility denied by the mechanisms of power (Seoane and Taddei, 2003).

In relation to the social actors that seem to take part in this new cycle of protests analyzed, we may stress two features that we have already singled out previously. The first is the displacement of the wage earners’ conflict to the public sector, to the detriment of the impact and importance of those promoted by workers in the private sector. This fact, in turn, implies a particular configuration that runs through the actions of labor organizations, while the dynamics of the posing of demands by the public sector calls on the participation and convergence of other social sectors in the defense of access to, and the quality of, education and health as human rights. In this sense, it is important to underline that in many cases the struggles against these policies of dismantlement and privatization, and the boosting of the convergence processes –which adopt the forms of coordinating units and civic fronts– don’t necessarily rest on wage-earning labor dynamics. The role played by other organizations (peasant and indigenous movements, the unemployed, students, urban movements, among others) in the shaping of these “expanded social coalitions” is of major importance. The second characteristic refers to the consolidation of movements of rural origin –indigenous and peasants–, which reach national and regional significance and influence. These develop a notable capacity of interpellation and articulation with urban social sectors, in many cases successfully being able to link the dynamics of the struggle against neoliberalism (agrarian policy, privatizations, fiscal adjustment) to a wider questioning of the bases of legitimacy of the political systems in the region.

These two brief pointers –as well as the description of the setting of social conflictivity presented earlier– therefore allow us to go deeper into the characterization of the particular configuration that appears to distinguish the experimentation of contemporary social movements in the region. Without seeking to exhaust this issue, it is necessary, in our understanding, to emphasize three elements that under different forms and with diverse intensities seem to run through the constitutive practice of the majority of the most significant Latin American social movements.

In the first place, a dynamics of territorial appropriation that characterizes the collective practice of what we have earlier referred to as rural and urban territorial movements. Presented as “the strategic response of the poor to the crisis of the old territoriality of the factory and the farm… [and to] the de-territorialization of production… [promoted by] neoliberal reforms” (Zibechi, 2003), as well as to the process of privatization of the public sphere and of politics (Boron, 2003a), this trend to re-appropriation by the community of the living space in which those movements are located remits to the expansion of the experiences of productive self-management (Sousa Santos, 2002b), the collective solution of social needs (for example in the field of education and of health), and autonomous forms of handling of public affairs. This diversified continuum encompasses the cooperative settlements of the Brazilian MST, the indigenous communities in Ecuador and Bolivia, the autonomous Zapatist town governments in Mexico, the productive undertakings of the various jobless movements and movement of recovered factories both in Argentina, as well as the puebladas and urban uprisings that implied the emergence of practices of management of the public space (such is the case for example of the “Water War” in Cochabamba, Bolivia, and of the experience of the popular assemblies that emerged in the main urban centers of Argentina after December 2001). In this sense, this rising “territorialization” of social movements is the result both of the extension of “forms of reciprocity, that is to say, of the exchange of labor force and of products without passing through the market, albeit with an inevitable, but ambiguous and tangential, relationship with it… [as well as of] new forms of political authority, of a communal character, that operate with and without the state” (Quijano, 2004). In permanent tension with the market and the state, extended in time or unstable and temporary, settling around practices of “production and reproduction of life” (Zibechi, 2003) or simply operating in the terrain of the management of public and political affairs, this dynamics of collective re-appropriation of the social territory appears to guide the experience not only of the indigenous and peasant movements, but also in the urban space (Seoane, 2003a). In this sense, we might state that “antineoliberal politics would appear to head towards an action of […] reproduction and production of society beyond the expanded and dislocated production of transnational capital” (Tapia, 2000).

In consonance with this experience, the practice and discursiveness of the majority of the social movements described appears imbued with the revaluing of democratic mechanisms of participation and decision which, inspired in references to direct or semi-direct democracy, orient both their organizational models and their programmatics and demands vis-à-vis the state. In this regard, on one hand, the promotion of more horizontal and open forms of participation is seen as reinsurance in the face of the danger of “disconnection” between the different organizational levels and of bureaucratization and manipulation. On the other hand, the confrontation with the neoliberal hegemony in the terrain of public policies has been translated into a growing questioning of the political system, of the model of representative democracy, and of the form that the constitution of the nation-state adopted in Latin America, promoting a diversity of demands that ranges from those for consultations and referendums to claims for autonomy and self-government, boosted particularly by the indigenous movements. The experiences of social self-organization linked to assembly-like forms of organization were a feature of the emergence of many of these movements (for example of the organizations of jobless workers and of the popular assemblies in Argentina or the urban uprisings of the “Water War” and the “Gas War” in Bolivia). Additionally, the traditional experiences of community management that characterized indigenous communities, reformulated under the impact of neoliberal policies, have served to pose a critical and alternative view of delegational and representative forms. In this terrain, the Zapatist experimentation crystallized in the watchword of “commanding while obeying” (Ceceña, 2001) is perhaps the clearest and most suggestive example, although not the only one. At the same time, the utilization and presence in the programmatics of many of these movements of instruments of semi-direct democracy can be verified, for example, in the demand for the gas referendum and the summoning to a Constitutional Assembly in the events of October in Bolivia (2003), in the referendums against the privatizations in Uruguay, or in the demand for binding plebiscites on the FTAA promoted by the social coalitions constituted in opposition to that trade agreement at a continental level. In the same direction, be it under the form of the demand for a plurinational state in the case of the Ecuadorian indigenous movements, or of the demand and construction of self-government in the autonomous Zapatist town governments, the claim of autonomy for indigenous peoples encompasses, in its projection on society, the broaching of a radical democratization of the forms of the nation-state, particularly in the “coloniality of power” that characterized its constitution (Lander, 2000). Lastly, access to local governments by representatives of those movements (especially in the experience of the Ecuadorian hills and in the Cauca valley in Colombia) has entailed the launching of mechanisms of popular participation and control in their handling (Larrea, 2004). In the diversity of the experiences described above, one many thus point to the emergence of a democratizing trend that traverses the collective practice of these social movements both in their spaces of autonomy and in the terrain of the state (Seoane, 2004; Bartra, 2003a), and expresses the extent to which “participatory democracy has taken on a new dynamics enacted by subordinate social communities and groups struggling against social exclusion and the trivialization of citizenship” (Sousa Santos, 2002a).

Lastly, it may be pointed out that, as from the protests against the Multilateral Agreement on Investment (MIA, 1997/98), the “battle of Seattle” that impeded the so-called Millennium Round of the World Trade Organization (1999), the creation and deepening of the experience of the World Social Forum (WSF, 2001 through 2004) and the “global days of action” against the military intervention in Iraq (2003/2004), the backbone of a “new internationalism” has left a deep and singular imprint on the experimentation of social movements in the world arena. The eminently social character of the actors involved (albeit not unlinked, should it be necessary to make this clear, to ideological and political inscriptions), their heterogeneity and scope, the truly international extension of the convergences, the organizational forms and the characteristics taken on by these articulations point to the novelty of this internationalism (Seoane and Taddei, 2001). As we have already shown, the Latin American region has not remained outside this process. On the contrary: the holding in 1996 of the 1st Encounter for Humanity and Against Neoliberalism organized by Zapatism in the depths of the Chiapas forest –which may be considered one of the first international summons located at the origin of this process–, as well as the fact that the birth of the WSF took place in the Brazilian city of Porto Alegre, point to the profound imbrication between the growth of protest and social movements in Latin America, and the emergence of the global convergences against neoliberal globalization. In this region, over the course of recent years, these experiences have been particularly marked by the evolution of the so-called agreements on trade liberalization, and especially of the United States’ initiative of subsuming the countries of the region within a Free Trade Area of the Americas (FTAA). These resistance processes, that implied both the constitution of spaces of coordination at a regional level (which group a wide array of movements, social organizations and NGOs) and the emergence of similar convergence experiences at a national level (for example, the national campaigns against the FTAA), turn out to be, within the continental framework and along with the experience of the Social Forums and of the mobilizations against the war, an expression and extension of the alterglobalist movement that emerged and was consolidated in the last decade. In relation to this process of convergences against “free trade”, the regional experience hails back to the protests triggered by the negotiation and launching (1994) of NAFTA (North American Free Trade Agreement), the creation of the Continental Social Alliance (1997), the organization of the 1st Summit of the Peoples of the Americas (1998) in opposition to the 2nd Summit of presidents of the 34 American countries that participate in the negotiation over the FTAA, and the organization of the Hemispheric Meetings of Struggle Against the FTAA (Havana, Cuba; 2002 to 2004). Nevertheless, particularly in relation to the dynamics and characteristics taken on by these negotiations as of 2003 –marked by the proximity of the date foreseen for their conclusion (2005), the difficulties and resistance it faces and the acceleration of the plurilateral Free Trade Agreements–, these convergence and protest processes are intensified at a regional level8. In Central America, the fruit of these experiences has been the creation and development of the Mesoamerican Forums and of the so-called Central American Popular Block. In the case of the countries forming part of MERCOSUR, the so-called “National Campaigns against the FTAA” have promoted diverse and massive popular consultations and have evolved toward the increasing questioning of “free trade” in the face of the different trade negotiations undertaken by governments. Lastly, in the Andean Area the articulation between the rejection of these treaties with massive protests in the national spaces (for example, the “Gas War” in Bolivia, 2003) and the emergence of regional coordination processes (for example, in April 2004, the first Andean Day of Mobilization Against the FTAA) point to the wealth of such processes. In this direction, the forthcoming holding of the 1st Americas Social Forum in Ecuador (July 2004) will constitute an arrival point of these experiences as well as an event that will prove the maturity, depth, features and challenges faced by internationalism in the Latin American and continental arena.

 

“Neoliberalism of war” and social convergences

The process opened in Latin America in recent years –in the face of the exhaustion of the neoliberal model in the form in which the latter tragically crystallized in the 1990s in our region– is increasingly expressed in the intensification of the disputes regarding the direction to be adopted by a transition whose outcome remains uncertain. In this sense, the social and political realities of the various countries is seen to be marked, as we pointed out earlier, by renewed social protest –which at a regional level has grown in recent years– and by the activity of social and popular movements with features different from those that had occupied stage center in the immediate past. This process, in the framework of the economic crisis undergone by most of the region and in the face of the attempts to deepen neoliberal policies, has in some cases been translated into “popular uprisings” (that in most cases ended in the collapse of governments), in the constitution of “electoral majorities” critical of neoliberalism, and even in the reappearance of a political discursiveness that differentiates itself from the latter. In their diversity, these processes point to the growing crisis of legitimacy that puts into question the cultural, economic and political forms that underpinned the application of neoliberalism in the past.

Nevertheless, in the face of this process, the attempts to deepen neoliberal policies have tended to a rising militarization of social relations in a process that has been given the name of “neoliberalism of war” (González Casanova, 2002; Taddei, 2002). This refers not only to the policy of war and of military intervention wielded as an international prerogative by president Bush –particularly a posteriori of the attacks of September 11, 2001– but also to the deepening of a repressive social diagram that encompasses legal reforms that slash democratic rights and freedoms and award greater power and immunity to the actions of police forces, and the criminalization of poverty and social movements, the so-called “judicialization” of protest, the increase in state and para-state repression, and the rising intervention of the armed forces in domestic social conflict. Justified by the alleged fight against the drug traffic, terrorism or crime, the ideology of “security” thus seeks the reconstitution of the challenged “neoliberal governability”. One of its most tragic expressions has been the increase of the United States military presence in the entire Latin American region (Quijano, 2004; Algranati, Seoane and Taddei, 2004). Additionally, in the terrain of domestic policies, the Colombian case emerges as one of the main laboratories for the implanting of these repressive diagrams, particularly under the administration of president Álvaro Uribe, who opened a process that seeks not only to deepen the military confrontation with the guerrillas –after the peace agreements of the previous period were broken– but also the deployment of a policy of “social militarization” in the attempt to affirm an authoritarian legitimacy, particularly among middle-class urban sectors (Zuluaga Nieto, 2003). The face of the “neoliberalism of war” thus accompanies the promotion of a radical and even more regressive reconfiguration of the political, social and economic geography of the region as a result of the acceleration of the so-called “free trade agreements” that find their maximum expression in the FTAA.

We have attempted up to this point to give an account of the paths taken and features adopted by the process of social and political disputation opened by the crisis of the neoliberal model forged in the 1990s and of the characteristics that appear to distinguish the configuration of contemporary social movements. As we have pointed out, this process is not homogeneous, and is expressed in a differentiated manner in each of the regions into which the continent may be subdivided and even within these. In this regard, the evolution of the northern region (Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean) seems to evince a marked consolidation of trade liberalization processes, which constitute the cornerstone of Washington’s strategic plans. At the same time, the convulsive political situation in a major part of the Andean region is a manifestation of the strong social tensions resulting from the attempts to deepen these “news” neoliberal recipe books, which are translated into the difficulty in the stabilization of the new political regimes that promote these policies. Expressions of this are the increasing popular discredit of the governments of Peru and of Ecuador; the setting opened with the “Bolivian October” that projects new confrontations and possible changes on the horizon, and the Venezuelan case, where the battle around the presidential recall referendum this coming August will undoubtedly acquire a regional dimension. The outcome of this process will be fundamental in Latin America with regard to the hegemonic aspirations of the White House to hinder the consolidation of democratic-popular political processes that challenge the neoliberal model. In the southern region, social movements face the great challenge of taking advantage of the chinks opened by the loss of legitimacy of neoliberalism to fight for the direction of the processes underway, maintaining and strengthening their autonomy in relation to governments.

Beyond the particular aspects exhibited by the processes at a subregional level, the generalization of free trade appears in all countries (with the exception of the Venezuelan case) as an axis emphasized by the political and economic elites to refound the neoliberal order and its legitimacy. In the face of this, the processes of regional convergence that on a national scale challenge the hegemonic economic model, and the emancipatory horizons that ensue from the practices and discourses that characterize social movements at the beginning of the twenty-first century, cast light on the outlines of those “other possible Americas” that our peoples so strongly call for.


Notes

 

* Coordinator of the Latin American Social Observatory (OSAL) of the Latin American Council of Social Sciences (CLACSO) and Professor at the Faculty of Social Sciences of the University of Buenos Aires (UBA).

** Academic Coordinator of the Latin American Council of Social Sciences (CLACSO).

*** Member of the Coordinating Team of OSAL-CLACSO.

1 We are particularly grateful for the comments of Ivana Brighenti and Miguel Ángel Djanikian in the revision of the text.

2 We find it impossible to develop this issue here. Regarding the evolution of poverty and unemployment in Latin America, reference may be made to the reports on Human Development of the UNDP (2002) and of ECLAC (2002). With regard to the consequences in relation to democracy see Boron (2003a). Regarding the structural transformations of Latin American capitalism, see among others Quijano (2004) and Fiori (2001).

3 Road or highway blockade, generally for an extended period.

4 For example, for the year 2003, the conflicts involving workers of the public sector represent, according to the records supplied by OSAL (Latin American Social Observatory, CLACSO), 76% of the total number of protests by employed workers.

5 The most important among this type of protests undoubtedly turns out to be the so-called “Water War” in Cochabamba, Bolivia (2000), which frustrated the attempt to award a concession for, and privatize, the drinking water service in that city to an international consortium headed by the Bechtel company.

6 Regarding this debate one may consult, among other texts, the diverse dossiers published in numbers 12 and 13 of Chiapas magazine, as well as those included in numbers 4 and 7 of CLACSO’s OSAL magazine.

7 We have broached that question in the course “Neoliberalism and Social Movements in Latin America: the Configuration of Social Protest”, taught in the framework of the distance education courses under the platform of CLACSO’s Virtual Campus, 2003.

8 An evaluation of this process may be consulted in OSAL (2004).

 

Adhemar S. Mineiro e Clarisse Castro

Introdução

A percepção do processo de integração representado pelo Mercosul não pode ser vista como uniforme do ponto de vista dos movimentos sociais brasileiros. De fato, ao longo do período que vai da segunda metade dos anos 80 até a metade da primeira década deste novo século, dependendo do setor social com o qual se esteja em diálogo, no rx se poderá perceber estas visões diferenciadas.

 

Do ponto de vista dos movimentos sociais, o processo de integração que surge no debate ao final dos anos 80 vem dentro de um pacote de discussões que implicava debater o que fazer com os espaços de democratização que iam sendo conquistados, e ao mesmo tempo confrontar as políticas de ajuste (patrocinada especialmente pelas instituições financeiras multilaterais, como o Fundo Monetário Internacional, o Banco Mundial e o Banco Interamericano de Desenvolvimento) relativas ao enfrentamento da questão das dívidas externas dos países da região, que eram o centro da polêmica naquele momento. Essa não era a perspectiva dos governos, e desta forma o processo de integração foi visto com cada vez menos interesse por parte dos movimentos.

 

Da mesma forma, a predominância de uma visão liberal de integração ao longo dos anos 90, fruto de governos quase sempre também hegemonizados por esta perspectiva, e de um processo de integração guiado apenas pela reestruturação produtiva das grandes empresas transnacionais à escala mundial (e, portanto, também continental, o que envolvia pelo menos, na maior parte das vezes, os dois principais parceiros do Mercosul, Argentina e Brasil) e pela busca de oportunidades de negócios é visto como um processo hostil, e que tem como reação por parte dos movimentos sociais o seu afastamento da discussão substantiva do processo de integração em curso ou, em um caso muito específico, que é o das organizações sindicais representando trabalhadores atingidos diretamente pelo processo de reestruturação produtiva das empresas transnacionais, a tentativa de resistir e influir neste processo, negociando de alguma forma.

 

As crises sucessivas na segunda metade dos anos 90, decorrentes dos processos estruturais de liberalização financeira levados adiante nos países da região ao longo daquela década, o processo de discussão internacional sobre uma ainda maior liberalização, a partir da criação da Organização Mundial do Comércio em 1995, com, e em decorrência de, a conclusão da Rodada Uruguai de discussões do GATT, e a instalação do processo negociador para a criação da Área de Livre Comércio das Américas (ALCA), com o acirramento das resistências dos movimentos sociais no nível internacional, dos quais a resistência em Seattle e a própria estruturação do Fórum Social Mundial, como evento e como processo de discussão, na seqüência, levaram a um recomeço de discussão não propriamente do processo real de negociação que se travava no Mercosul, mas especialmente da possibilidade de colocar este processo de integração regional como uma alternativa, com a alteração de sua natureza, dos processos de integração então em curso.

 

Essa ainda é a situação hoje, embora o novo governo instalado a partir de 2003 tenha tornado o processo de discussão mais transparente, e aberto alguns canais para a rediscussão da essência do processo de integração. O próprio funcionamento do Mercosul como bloco nos processos de negociação como o para a eventual criação da ALCA, ou as negociações bi-regionais com a União Européia forçam as instâncias oficiais a pensarem mais o próprio processo de integração do Mercosul dentro de uma perspectiva que é a de acertos sobre o desenvolvimento regional.

Apesar de insuficiente, esse processo de discussão novo pode significar finalmente pensar a integração dos quatro países do bloco, e talvez outros, dentro de uma perspectiva alternativa que possa ajudar a superar os entraves historicamente desenhados por países que nunca conseguiram pensar a alternativa da integração como uma efetiva possibilidade de futuro (vale ressaltar que no momento em que nos encontramos, o Mercosul é talvez a mais estruturada dessas possibilidades, mas existem discussões sobre a constituição da Comunidade Sul-Americana de Nações, ou a proposta da Alternativa Bolivariana para as Américas – ALBA -, patrocinada pelo governo venezuelano e também por vários movimentos sociais de todo continente, ou ainda, fora do âmbito dos estados nacionais da região, a proposta de integração desenhada na “Alternativa para as Américas”, no bojo da reflexão das entidades e movimentos sociais da região participantes da Aliança Social Continental(1). Isto porque as estratégias de desenvolvimento oficiais até aqui levadas adiante envolveram uma estratégia de integração primário-exportadora, como fornecedor de insumos minerais ou agropecuários aos países capitalistas centrais, como no período pré-2a. Guerra Mundial, ou estratégias mais autárquicas, buscando a constituição de uma indústria nacional através de processos também nacionais de substituição de importações, e portanto, naturalmente endógenos e entrópicos nestes casos. Em ambas as estratégias, a integração não é uma alternativa, mas ao contrário, ambos os modelos se confrontam com a possibilidade da integração, pois os países são concorrentes por mercados, no primeiro caso, ou por capitais, no segundo caso, e portanto, existem nestas duas situações conflitos efetivos de interesses entre eles que, mais que impedir a integração como alternativa, a colocam como contradição.

 

Neste momento, portanto, se o objetivo é pensar a integração como possibilidade e como alternativa, é importante buscar escapar de seguir trabalhando com a lógica que um modelo de liberalização financeira, ainda predominante nos países da região, coloca, especialmente a partir das crises da segunda metade dos anos 90, da constituição de saldos comerciais como um elemento de obtenção de divisas para seguir honrando dívidas e garantias à livre movimentação dos capitais. Esse tipo de modelo segue acirrando o conflito entre os países (que, nesta situação, passam a competidores por divisas), fazendo com que a integração seja vista apenas do ponto de vista possibilidade de obtenção destas mesmas divisas (2), acirrando o conflito e forçando novamente um modelo contraditório com a própria integração em si.

 

Democratização e Dívida: As Discussões nos Anos 80 e a Percepção da Integração

 

Os debates que levaram à formulação da idéia recente de integração dos países do Cone Sul, na segunda metade dos anos 80, especialmente dos pontos de vista de Argentina e Brasil (3), tinham na raiz dois elementos aparentemente centrais: a reestruturação produtiva dos grandes grupos transnacionais atuando na região e a busca destas empresas por ganhos de localização e escala e, de outro lado e não menos importante, a busca dos governos novos, que representavam forças do processo de redemocratização da região, em curso neste período, por alternativas de desenvolvimento que pudessem se viabilizar como um caminho diverso das políticas de ajuste estrutural ao pagamento da dívida externa que se constituíam como situação padrão na condução macroeconômica desses países ao longo daquela década, a partir da elevação das taxas de juros por parte dos EUA, com o Governo Reagan (4), e a escassez de capitais que se seguiu no cenário financeiro internacional para a renegociação de dívidas magnificadas por políticas de endividamento externo levadas adiante nos anos 70 por governos ditatoriais na região.

 

Deixando de lado a primeira destas raízes, pois embora com capacidade de influenciar pesadamente a condução de políticas de Estado, o centro de seu processo de definição estava fora da região, nas matrizes destes grupos, é importante centrar a discussão aqui no segundo elemento, a busca por uma alternativa de desenvolvimento.

 

Isso envolve retornar à dura discussão ao longo dos anos 80, quando de um lado o conjunto dos movimentos sociais organizados, e muitas vezes setores dos próprios governos, se confrontavam com as limitações que as políticas de ajuste ao pagamento das dívidas externas acordadas entre os governos da região e as instituições financeiras multilaterais, FMI e Banco Mundial à frente. Esta situação, com elementos comuns nos dois principais parceiros do Mercosul, dá o pano de fundo não apenas para a busca de alternativas, mas também para uma aproximação nova entre os movimentos organizados nos dois países em busca de forças para enfrentar a visão de ajuste via geração de mega-superávits no comércio exterior e compressão do mercado interno patrocinada pelas instituições financeiras multilaterais.

 

Para os movimentos sociais, entender a dinâmica do endividamento (resultantes de processos diferentes em Brasil e Argentina), mas sobretudo a crise da dívida externa, explicitada a partir da moratória mexicana no começo da década e o início das negociações dos acordos referentes à dívida externa com as instituições financeiras multilaterais e a estruturação das chamadas “políticas de ajuste estrutural” leva a uma aproximação face à hostilidade que estas políticas representavam às demandas democráticas apresentadas pelos movimentos sociais ao longo dos processos de redemocratização. Na dinâmica do endividamento em si muitas vezes se apresentavam grandes projetos, com enormes conseqüências negativas sobre o meio-ambiente e na grande maioria das vezes sobre as populações por eles diretamente atingidas, patrocinados especialmente por instituições multilaterais de fomento, como o Banco Mundial e o Banco Interamericano de Desenvolvimento, que funcionavam para ir criando canais de aproximação entre os movimentos sociais dos vários países (defensores do meio ambiente, atingidos por barragens, populações indígenas e outras populações tradicionais, pequena agricultura familiar, entre outros). Por outro lado, os parâmetros das chamadas “políticas de ajuste” acordadas com aquelas instituições previam cortes orçamentários e limitadores ao crescimento econômico, quando não resultavam (como na maioria das vezes) em estagnação e processos recessivos, com enormes efeitos negativos sobre a maioria das populações, em especial os trabalhadores menos organizados, os idosos, os jovens e as mulheres (vale lembrar que uma das conseqüências das políticas de ajuste foi a explosão inflacionária em vários países). Assim, o entendimento dos processos e a resistência organizada dos movimentos sociais em cada país às políticas de ajuste ajudavam a criar laços entre as organizações sociais dos vários países da região.

 

Para os governos de Argentina e Brasil na segunda metade dos anos 80 (governos dos presidentes Alfonsín, na Argentina, e Sarney, no Brasil), estruturados com o processo de redemocratização de seus países, a tentativa de atuação em conjunto no primeiro momento, e de integração, no momento seguinte, aparecia como uma forma de resolver a um dilema que era colocado e discutido na época: o de que a democratização deveria poder representar uma melhoria geral e efetiva das condições de vida das populações desses países, ou poderia rapidamente ver erodida a sua base social frente a uma população que se organizava e apresentava demandas. Do ponto de vista dos governos, a integração aparecia então como uma possibilidade de alternativa (como se apresentaram em algum momento planos heterodoxos de estabilização nos dois países, como o Plano Austral, na Argentina, e o Plano Cruzado, no Brasil) ou pura e simplesmente como uma forma de aumentar o poder de barganha dos países frente aos comitês negociadores formados pelos seus credores (a idéia de um cartel de devedores, nunca efetivado, para poder negociar com o cartel dos credores, este efetivo e capitaneado pelos principais bancos, era uma idéia que vez por outra voltava a tona, e exigia uma confiança e capacidade de articulação de interesses e diplomática que inexistia no período).

 

Assim, e de forma insipiente, o processo de integração entre Argentina e Brasil, e que depois veria a ele incorporados Uruguai e Paraguai, aparecia como uma possibilidade de uma maior articulação defensiva, mas também de construção de um novo tipo de desenvolvimento (que fosse na sua essência a contraposição às políticas de ajuste), com crescimento econômico e políticas macroeconômicas articuladas entre os quatro países, mas também como uma possibilidade de associar a essas políticas os objetivos de democracia, participação, redução de desigualdades, e sustentabilidade social e ambiental, que estavam na essência do conflito entre os movimentos sociais e as políticas de ajuste, e por isso essa possibilidade empolgou os movimentos organizados dos quatro países da região.

 

As Relações entre os Movimentos Sociais e entre estes e o Arcabouço Institucional

 

Vistos alguns dos aspectos que caracterizam e dificultam o processo de integração entre Mercosul, vale apresentar a relação entre os movimentos sociais, organizações da sociedade civil e sindicatos dos países membros, e também apresentar a relação destes atores através da estrutura organizacional que foi sendo definida no Mercosul. Neste sentido, destaca-se o papel do Movimento Sindical, do Movimento de Mulheres, do Movimento dos Trabalhadores Rurais, das Organizações Não-Governamentais que lidam principalmente com temas fronteiriços, além da importância das Redes e Articulações da sociedade civil focadas no livre comércio.

 

Em quase quinze anos, desde que o Tratado de Assunção foi firmado, os temas econômico-comerciais conduziram a agenda do Mercosul, colocando alguns objetivos essenciais para o processo de integração regional em segundo plano, como por exemplo, o incentivo ao desenvolvimento científico e tecnológico, preservação do meio ambiente, difusão cultural, educação e saúde. Apesar desta constatação, estabeleceram-se iniciativas e pequenos avanços foram alcançados, sobretudo em aspectos que interagem com questões fronteiriças e relacionadas ao trabalho. Tais avanços foram discutidos principalmente, no âmbito das reuniões especializadas e no Fórum Consultivo Econômico e Social (FCES) – instâncias na qual as ações participativas da sociedade civil são institucionalizadas.

 

O movimento sindical, com destaque para a Coordenadora de Centrais Sindicais do Cone Sul (CCSCS) (5), foi fundamental para a evolução da participação da sociedade civil na estrutura do Mercosul e no debate sociolaboral dos países membros. A própria história da Coordenadora e suas reivindicações, mostram como se constituiu este processo de participação, que levando em consideração as outras esferas sociais, teve uma maior visibilidade. Desta maneira, cabe apresentar um pequeno histórico de sua formação e desenvolvimento.

 

A CCSCS foi fundada em 1986 com o objetivo de defender a democracia e formular ação conjunta contra a dívida externa. No final de 1990 define como prioridade de trabalho a necessidade de desempenhar um papel protagonista na integração econômica e social do Cone Sul. A partir de 1991 aprova em diversos encontros anuais documentos analíticos contendo importantes reivindicações, das quais podemos destacar a Criação do Subgrupo de Relações do Trabalho (e instituído pelo bloco em 1992), a adoção de uma Carta de Direitos Fundamentais para o Mercosul e a criação de um fórum de representação da sociedade civil, para fortalecer a participação desta na construção do Mercosul. Esta última reivindicação é apresentada no ano de 1994, mesma ocasião em que se apresenta o Protocolo de Ouro Preto criando o Fórum Consultivo Econômico e Social do Mercosul (FCES).

 

O FCES vai ser oficialmente instituído em 1996, mesmo ano em que, a Coordenadora, como participante ativa do Fórum, consegue incluir o Direito a Iniciativa (direito de apresentar propostas ao Grupo Mercado Comum por iniciativa própria e não apenas quando consultado) e apresentar um projeto de um instrumento de proteção aos direitos trabalhistas, que foi discutido posteriormente em forma tripartidária e aprovado como a Declaração Sociolaboral do Mercosul. Esta declaração permite uma maior visibilidade dos efeitos da integração comercial e da ação das empresas uma vez que estabelece mecanismos que podem viabilizar a negociação coletiva e um espaço de solução de conflito entre os segmentos econômicos, sociais e entre os países (6).

 

Apesar de tais conquistas serem consideradas um progresso na participação mais ativa das representações dos trabalhadores no processo de negociação do Mercosul, é preciso criar mecanismos efetivos que ampliem a influência do FCES nas definições de políticas nos setores produtivo e social. Deveriam ainda ser priorizadas as questões sociais no âmbito do arcabouço institucional do Mercosul – desta forma, seriam dados passos essenciais no sentido de contemplar o que o Tratado de Assunção menciona: o objetivo de integração seria alcançado através do desenvolvimento e a estabilização econômica com “justiça social”.

 

No que se refere à influência e participação do Fórum, chamamos à atenção para as manifestações de seus representantes nos anos que seguiram a sua criação. Estas tinham o objetivo de relembrar aos Presidentes da importância de se efetivarem as consultas, tendo em vista a finalidade e o espírito em que o Fórum foi criado: “O FCES poderá cumprir com seu papel de agente consultivo se for devidamente consultado dentro de um processo onde disponha das devidas informações e condições para a elaboração de sua Recomendação, situação que até o momento não ocorreu (Ata da VI Reunião Plenária do FCES)” (7).

 

Mesmo sem representatividade efetiva nas instâncias responsáveis pelo processo decisório no Mercosul, as organizações da sociedade civil e os movimentos sociais dos quatro países membros se articulam, elaboram declarações conjuntas e desenvolvem atividades integradas. Anualmente, são realizados diversos encontros, seminários e atividades sobre temáticas especificas dos movimentos, ou fóruns mais amplos que abarcam temas sociais gerais comuns aos quatro países do Mercosul e da América Latina como um todo. O Fórum Social Mundial, Fórum das Américas e encontro “O Mercosul que Queremos”- idealizado pelas Organizações Sindicais e Sociais do Mercosul, com destaque para a Aliança Social Continental e CCSCS – são alguns exemplos de iniciativas da sociedade civil no sentido de promoverem a integração, pensarem conjuntamente ações para enfrentarem os problemas sociais e ainda pressionarem seus governos para que suas críticas sejam ouvidas e suas reivindicações incorporadas.

 

Não há dúvidas que os tratados de integração regional – não conduzidos por uma agenda neoliberal e em favor das transnacionais – podem trazer benefícios aos povos envolvidos, porém este processo deve contar com a participação efetiva e a aceitação das sociedades. Dessa maneira a informação e a mobilização da sociedade civil dos países envolvidos são essenciais para que as cláusulas trabalhistas, sociais e democráticas incluídas nos acordos de liberalização comercial sejam cumpridas e priorizadas.

 

Os movimentos sociais da região se fortalecem no cenário em que o Mercosul se volta para uma agenda externa pautada no livre comércio. O Mercosul foi concebido dentro do princípio de integração regional aberta, não se limitando a incrementar o comércio entre os países que o integram, mas prevendo relações com os grandes blocos econômicos existentes. No ano seguinte à assinatura do Tratado de Assunção, formalizou-se o vínculo com a União Européia, através do Acordo Bilateral de Cooperação Interinstitucional, porém é somente em meados dos anos noventa que se dá ênfase à agenda externa do Mercosul.

 

As Redes, Alianças de organizações da sociedade civil e movimentos sociais surgem na segunda metade dos anos noventa como resistência aos processos de negociação em curso da ALCA e do acordo bi-regional Mercosul–União Européia e contra as políticas neoliberais impostas às sociedades. A Aliança Social Continental (ASC) pode ser citada como exemplo de integração entre diferentes tipos de organizações e movimentos sociais do continente, buscam alternativas de integração regional que vão efetivamente além das questões econômico-comerciais, que garantam os direitos dos cidadãos e sejam baseados na “implementação e coordenação de políticas nacionais e regionais de desenvolvimento econômico e inclusão social (8)”. É através da bandeira de “não aceitação de nenhum acordo que, a pretexto de promover o livre comercio, represente uma ameaça ainda maior ao meio ambiente, aos direitos humanos, a igualdade das mulheres, direitos sociais e trabalhistas” (9), que a ASC se forma e luta contra a ALCA e qualquer acordo que não representem ganhos sociais países que ela representa.

Com esta percepção, grupos de mulheres dos quatro países membros do bloco, vem conseguindo construir uma forte relação e integração entre si e em relação aos mecanismos e processos em curso do Mercosul. Foram abertas algumas portas para a participação desses grupos, mas assim como acontece com o movimento sindical, precisa-se de maior vontade política para que questões sociais passem a integrar as estratégias de desenvolvimento do bloco.

 

O movimento de mulheres pretende sensibilizar os atores sociais na luta pela garantia da cidadania e da igualdade de oportunidades entre homens e mulheres nos diferentes âmbitos de negociação do Mercosul. No contexto da liberalização comercial, trabalham as relações desiguais entre norte-sul, a divisão sexual e internacional do trabalho, e contra os interesses das corporações transnacionais.

 

Desde o ano de 1995 foram realizados seminários “Mulher e Mercosul”, onde foram apresentadas análises sobre a situação da mulher no trabalho e as legislações comparativas, realizadas propostas nas áreas legislativas, políticas públicas e especialmente para as articulações regionais. Participantes do FCES, as feministas reivindicaram sua participação nos subgrupos da Saúde; da Indústria; e do Trabalho, Emprego e Seguridade Social e conseguiram instaurar a Reunião Especializada da Mulher – na qual participam Ministras ou autoridades dos órgãos governamentais competentes em políticas para as mulheres e grupos da sociedade civil. Este ano aconteceu o seminário “Mercosul, Sociedade Civil e Direitos Humanos” que contou com a participação dos grupos feministas entre outros atores sociais na esfera institucional do Mercosul, organizado pelo Observatório de políticas de Direitos Humanos do bloco. Esses exemplos sinalizam para a existência de um caminho iniciado e que deve ser percorrido, mas que se precisa de mais iniciativas para que os objetivos sejam alcançados.

 

Outra representação, que vem trabalhando também com temas referentes aos acordos de liberalização comercial, são os movimentos que se relacionam à defesa da agricultura familiar. Tal movimento para atuar nos temas reativos ao Mercosul e ALCA, se fortalece através da articulação conjunta entre a Confederação Nacional dos Trabalhadores na Agricultura, Frente Sul da Agricultura Familiar, Movimento dos Trabalhadores Sem Terra, Movimento dos Pequenos Agricultores, Movimento dos Atingidos por Barragens, Movimento das Mulheres Trabalhadoras Rurais, Via Campesina, Coordenadora das Organizações dos Agricultores Familiares entre outros. Além das organizações voltadas para o tema da agricultura familiar, o movimento busca o apoio e a integração com as Centrais Sindicais e com organizações e outros movimentos da sociedade civil.

 

Fazendo frente a liderança dos interesses da grande agricultura comercial dos países do Mercosul, nas negociações dos acordos de liberalização comercial, o movimento dos agricultores familiares assumem um importante papel em defesa da segurança alimentar, reforma agrária, proteção ambiental, fortalecimento da agricultura campesina e familiar. Ainda, suas reivindicações vão em direção a um processo de integração que levem em conta a participação da sociedade civil, justiça social e o aumento da qualidade de vida das populações rurais.

 

Reconhecida a relevância deste movimento no âmbito do Mercosul, o governo brasileiro – por iniciativa do Ministério de Desenvolvimento Agrário – propôs ao Grupo de Mercado Comum (GMC) do Mercosul, a primeira sessão da Reunião Especializada de Agricultura Familiar (REAF). A reunião aconteceu em 2004 e seu objetivo foi pensar políticas específicas para a agricultura familiar e a inclusão do tema na pauta do bloco. Na segunda reunião foram recomendadas ao GMC, e estabelecidas entre os representantes, prioridades de desenvolvimento no seguro agrícola e em créditos de financiamento, e regras para a implementação de políticas comuns quanto ao tratamento especial e diferenciado da agricultura familiar. Também foi instituída a construção de uma política comum de gênero.

As reuniões especializadas constituem um importante canal de diálogo entre os governos, e a sociedade civil. Adicionando o Fórum Consultivo Econômico e Social, e alguns Subgrupos às Reuniões Especializadas, podemos considerar que estão sendo abertos canais de participação da sociedade civil na estrutura do Mercosul e que por mérito desta participação, alguns importantes logros foram conseguidos neste processo. Ainda há muito a ser considerado, mais o caminho começa a ser esboçado, faltando ainda a vontade efetiva dos governos de colocarem as questões sociais como prioridades no processo de integração.

 

Algumas Idéias Sobre Dificuldades e Possibilidades

 

Apesar da participação efetiva e da tentativa sistemática de abrir novos espaços de discussão e participação no interior do bloco, os movimentos sociais se confrontam permanentemente com uma lógica de integração centrada na visão de predomínio de aspectos não apenas econômicos, mas de uma economia dominada pela hegemonia dos interesses financeiros, onde a liberalização comercial aparece como a contraface da desregulamentação financeira, buscando pela obtenção de saldos em divisas, manter a normalidade aparente dos fluxos financeiros.

 

Se ao longo dos anos 90 isso foi explícito e defendido de forma clara pelos governos da época agora, embora ainda prevalecente, não aparece de forma tão aberta. A explicação básica para esse novo comportamento parece ser que a sucessão de crises financeiras a partir de meados da década passada levou a um comportamento muito mais pragmático dos agentes negociadores, que passavam a ter o livre comércio e a abertura não como um fim em si mesmo, como se desses processos pudesse resultar quase que automaticamente um mundo de maior eficiência e melhor funcionamento para todos, mas como a possibilidade de fazerem crescer um saldo que aparece como a única esperança de seguirem tentando manter a normalidade dos fluxos financeiros, ou diminuírem a sua vulnerabilidade face à volatilidade desses mesmos fluxos financeiros.

O processo de integração visto desta forma tem enormes dificuldades em se sustentar, posto que na sua própria busca está a raiz dos conflitos que permeiam o processo. Se no passado os estados nacionais da região competiam eventualmente por mercados para seus produtos primários, ou por capitais de investimento direto para alavancarem seus processos (nacionais) de industrialização por substituição de importações, agora competem por capitais financeiros, pela obtenção dos saldos que lhe permitam manter a tranqüilidade destes capitais e honrar seus compromissos externos com credores e aplicadores.

 

Mais do que isso, esse processo não é apenas conflitivo entre os vários países, mas conflitivo também com os movimentos sociais no interior de cada país, e de difícil capacidade de hegemonizar essas sociedades enquanto projeto de futuro em ambiente democrático (10).

Assim, a questão essencial que era capaz de sensibilizar os movimentos sociais organizados no início do processo de discussão da integração na segunda metade dos anos 80 – a capacidade de, a partir da integração, ser possível gerar uma forma alternativa de desenvolvimento, sem subordinação no cenário internacional, e capaz de ser social, regional e ambientalmente sustentável – permanece colocada para os movimentos, e sua persistência motiva uma adesão crítica e parcial aos instrumentos do processo de integração em curso. Como se viu anteriormente, a suposição aqui é que essa incapacidade de gestação de uma alternativa de desenvolvimento com estas características não é apenas uma dificuldade para o processo de integração, ela segue colocada como uma dificuldade para a efetivação da própria democracia na região.

 

Assim, do ponto de vista dos movimentos sociais, parece muito difícil discutir de forma substantiva um processo de integração com democracia e participação social, sem que temas como soberania, bem estar social, redução de desigualdades e sustentabilidade ambiental possam estar também colocados, que aparentemente é o que se nos oferece à discussão mantendo-se as premissas do modelo de integração guiado pela abertura comercial e hegemonia financeira. Discutir e avançar substancialmente no processo de integração significa, deste ponto de vista, rediscutir as próprias premissas do modelo. Ou seguir fazendo a discussão de forma crítica e parcial, como vem sendo feito até o momento presente.

 

Notas:

  1. Aliança Social Continental, “Alternativa para las Américas”, disponível em www.asc-hsa.org, com atualizações.

  2. O pensamento econômico liberal hegemônico reafirma permanentemente a convicção de que o livre comércio e o livre fluxo de capitais podem, juntos, gerar um ambiente econômico capaz de estimular o desenvolvimento e responder às demandas sociais. No entanto, não costuma responder à objeção de que o comércio não pode ser livre para países que precisam enfrentar o peso dos encargos da dívida externa e das remessas relacionadas à liberalização dos fluxos financeiros, e que obrigam à necessidade de geração de enormes superávits comerciais. Para estes, o comércio internacional acaba aparecendo como uma obrigação, e não como uma estratégia possível, uma opção. Em geral, a pressão sobre os países menos desenvolvidos é no sentido de que se integrem mais no fluxo internacional de comércio, para tornar possíveis as transferências financeiras relacionadas aos pagamentos de dívidas e outros passivos externos”. (MINEIRO, A.S., “Da Alca Light” aos Impasses de Puebla: Alca, Agricultura e Contradições”, em ActionAid Brasil e REBRIP, Negociações Comerciais Internacionais na Era Lula – criação do G-20 e embates entre o agronegócio e a agricultura familiar, Rio de Janeiro, Nov. 2004, p. 74.

  3. No âmbito oficial, vale lembrar, por exemplo, a Ata para Integração Argentino-Brasileira, de meados de 1986, que instituía o Programa de Integração e Cooperação Econômica (PICE).

  4. A taxa de juros norte-americana expressa na prime-rate passa de cerca de 7,5% em 1979 a cerca de 21% em 1982.

  5. Atualmente, representa as centrais sindicais da Argentina (CGT e CTA), do Brasil (CGT, CUT e FS), do Chile (CUT), do Paraguai (CUT) e do Uruguai (PIT/ CNT).

  6. CASTRO VIEIRA, J de. Dinâmica Polieconômica do Mercosul, frente à Globalização. Tese de Doutorado. Brasília, UNB/Centro de Pesquisa e Pós Graduação sobre América Latina e o Caribe, 2001.

  7. Apud WANDERLEY, L. E. W., “Mercosul e Sociedade Civil”. São Paulo em Perspectiva, 16(1): 67-73, 2002.

  8. MELLO, F. (org.), “Fórum Continental: atores sociais e políticos nos processos de integração”. São Paulo, 2000.

  9. Idem.

  10. “Outra hipótese central baseia-se na proposição de que sem a resolução da questão social o processo de integração regional padece de substantividade e a democracia não se sustenta. Partindo da concepção dominante que desvincula o plano econômico do político e social, que cogita em crescimento econômico na lógica do mercado e ignora o desenvolvimento humano e sustentável, que contrapõe os atores tecnoburocratas e os político-sociais, que leva os governantes e setores empresariais, em geral, a descurarem do social, encarando-o como algo subordinado ou efeito automático do econômico, que usa o social como tema retórico, não há uma preocupação verdadeira no encaminhamento das questões sociais. Daí os embates permanentes com trabalhadores organizados e crises sucessivas nos países do Bloco, nos quais as condições sociais existentes são de extrema perversidade e vulnerabilidade.”, WANDERLEY (2002), op. cit:. 67.

<!– @page { margin: 0.79in } P { margin-bottom: 0in; text-align: justify } P.western { font-family: “Times New Roman”, case serif; so-language: es-MX } –>

Adhemar S. Mineiro e Clarisse Castro

 

Introdução

 

A percepção do processo de integração representado pelo Mercosul não pode ser vista como uniforme do ponto de vista dos movimentos sociais brasileiros. De fato, ao longo do período que vai da segunda metade dos anos 80 até a metade da primeira década deste novo século, online dependendo do setor social com o qual se esteja em diálogo, se poderá perceber estas visões diferenciadas.

 

Do ponto de vista dos movimentos sociais, o processo de integração que surge no debate ao final dos anos 80 vem dentro de um pacote de discussões que implicava debater o que fazer com os espaços de democratização que iam sendo conquistados, e ao mesmo tempo confrontar as políticas de ajuste (patrocinada especialmente pelas instituições financeiras multilaterais, como o Fundo Monetário Internacional, o Banco Mundial e o Banco Interamericano de Desenvolvimento) relativas ao enfrentamento da questão das dívidas externas dos países da região, que eram o centro da polêmica naquele momento. Essa não era a perspectiva dos governos, e desta forma o processo de integração foi visto com cada vez menos interesse por parte dos movimentos.

 

Da mesma forma, a predominância de uma visão liberal de integração ao longo dos anos 90, fruto de governos quase sempre também hegemonizados por esta perspectiva, e de um processo de integração guiado apenas pela reestruturação produtiva das grandes empresas transnacionais à escala mundial (e, portanto, também continental, o que envolvia pelo menos, na maior parte das vezes, os dois principais parceiros do Mercosul, Argentina e Brasil) e pela busca de oportunidades de negócios é visto como um processo hostil, e que tem como reação por parte dos movimentos sociais o seu afastamento da discussão substantiva do processo de integração em curso ou, em um caso muito específico, que é o das organizações sindicais representando trabalhadores atingidos diretamente pelo processo de reestruturação produtiva das empresas transnacionais, a tentativa de resistir e influir neste processo, negociando de alguma forma.

 

As crises sucessivas na segunda metade dos anos 90, decorrentes dos processos estruturais de liberalização financeira levados adiante nos países da região ao longo daquela década, o processo de discussão internacional sobre uma ainda maior liberalização, a partir da criação da Organização Mundial do Comércio em 1995, com, e em decorrência de, a conclusão da Rodada Uruguai de discussões do GATT, e a instalação do processo negociador para a criação da Área de Livre Comércio das Américas (ALCA), com o acirramento das resistências dos movimentos sociais no nível internacional, dos quais a resistência em Seattle e a própria estruturação do Fórum Social Mundial, como evento e como processo de discussão, na seqüência, levaram a um recomeço de discussão não propriamente do processo real de negociação que se travava no Mercosul, mas especialmente da possibilidade de colocar este processo de integração regional como uma alternativa, com a alteração de sua natureza, dos processos de integração então em curso.

 

Essa ainda é a situação hoje, embora o novo governo instalado a partir de 2003 tenha tornado o processo de discussão mais transparente, e aberto alguns canais para a rediscussão da essência do processo de integração. O próprio funcionamento do Mercosul como bloco nos processos de negociação como o para a eventual criação da ALCA, ou as negociações bi-regionais com a União Européia forçam as instâncias oficiais a pensarem mais o próprio processo de integração do Mercosul dentro de uma perspectiva que é a de acertos sobre o desenvolvimento regional.

Apesar de insuficiente, esse processo de discussão novo pode significar finalmente pensar a integração dos quatro países do bloco, e talvez outros, dentro de uma perspectiva alternativa que possa ajudar a superar os entraves historicamente desenhados por países que nunca conseguiram pensar a alternativa da integração como uma efetiva possibilidade de futuro (vale ressaltar que no momento em que nos encontramos, o Mercosul é talvez a mais estruturada dessas possibilidades, mas existem discussões sobre a constituição da Comunidade Sul-Americana de Nações, ou a proposta da Alternativa Bolivariana para as Américas – ALBA -, patrocinada pelo governo venezuelano e também por vários movimentos sociais de todo continente, ou ainda, fora do âmbito dos estados nacionais da região, a proposta de integração desenhada na “Alternativa para as Américas”, no bojo da reflexão das entidades e movimentos sociais da região participantes da Aliança Social Continental(1). Isto porque as estratégias de desenvolvimento oficiais até aqui levadas adiante envolveram uma estratégia de integração primário-exportadora, como fornecedor de insumos minerais ou agropecuários aos países capitalistas centrais, como no período pré-2a. Guerra Mundial, ou estratégias mais autárquicas, buscando a constituição de uma indústria nacional através de processos também nacionais de substituição de importações, e portanto, naturalmente endógenos e entrópicos nestes casos. Em ambas as estratégias, a integração não é uma alternativa, mas ao contrário, ambos os modelos se confrontam com a possibilidade da integração, pois os países são concorrentes por mercados, no primeiro caso, ou por capitais, no segundo caso, e portanto, existem nestas duas situações conflitos efetivos de interesses entre eles que, mais que impedir a integração como alternativa, a colocam como contradição.

 

Neste momento, portanto, se o objetivo é pensar a integração como possibilidade e como alternativa, é importante buscar escapar de seguir trabalhando com a lógica que um modelo de liberalização financeira, ainda predominante nos países da região, coloca, especialmente a partir das crises da segunda metade dos anos 90, da constituição de saldos comerciais como um elemento de obtenção de divisas para seguir honrando dívidas e garantias à livre movimentação dos capitais. Esse tipo de modelo segue acirrando o conflito entre os países (que, nesta situação, passam a competidores por divisas), fazendo com que a integração seja vista apenas do ponto de vista possibilidade de obtenção destas mesmas divisas (2), acirrando o conflito e forçando novamente um modelo contraditório com a própria integração em si.

 

Democratização e Dívida: As Discussões nos Anos 80 e a Percepção da Integração

 

Os debates que levaram à formulação da idéia recente de integração dos países do Cone Sul, na segunda metade dos anos 80, especialmente dos pontos de vista de Argentina e Brasil (3), tinham na raiz dois elementos aparentemente centrais: a reestruturação produtiva dos grandes grupos transnacionais atuando na região e a busca destas empresas por ganhos de localização e escala e, de outro lado e não menos importante, a busca dos governos novos, que representavam forças do processo de redemocratização da região, em curso neste período, por alternativas de desenvolvimento que pudessem se viabilizar como um caminho diverso das políticas de ajuste estrutural ao pagamento da dívida externa que se constituíam como situação padrão na condução macroeconômica desses países ao longo daquela década, a partir da elevação das taxas de juros por parte dos EUA, com o Governo Reagan (4), e a escassez de capitais que se seguiu no cenário financeiro internacional para a renegociação de dívidas magnificadas por políticas de endividamento externo levadas adiante nos anos 70 por governos ditatoriais na região.

 

Deixando de lado a primeira destas raízes, pois embora com capacidade de influenciar pesadamente a condução de políticas de Estado, o centro de seu processo de definição estava fora da região, nas matrizes destes grupos, é importante centrar a discussão aqui no segundo elemento, a busca por uma alternativa de desenvolvimento.

 

Isso envolve retornar à dura discussão ao longo dos anos 80, quando de um lado o conjunto dos movimentos sociais organizados, e muitas vezes setores dos próprios governos, se confrontavam com as limitações que as políticas de ajuste ao pagamento das dívidas externas acordadas entre os governos da região e as instituições financeiras multilaterais, FMI e Banco Mundial à frente. Esta situação, com elementos comuns nos dois principais parceiros do Mercosul, dá o pano de fundo não apenas para a busca de alternativas, mas também para uma aproximação nova entre os movimentos organizados nos dois países em busca de forças para enfrentar a visão de ajuste via geração de mega-superávits no comércio exterior e compressão do mercado interno patrocinada pelas instituições financeiras multilaterais.

 

Para os movimentos sociais, entender a dinâmica do endividamento (resultantes de processos diferentes em Brasil e Argentina), mas sobretudo a crise da dívida externa, explicitada a partir da moratória mexicana no começo da década e o início das negociações dos acordos referentes à dívida externa com as instituições financeiras multilaterais e a estruturação das chamadas “políticas de ajuste estrutural” leva a uma aproximação face à hostilidade que estas políticas representavam às demandas democráticas apresentadas pelos movimentos sociais ao longo dos processos de redemocratização. Na dinâmica do endividamento em si muitas vezes se apresentavam grandes projetos, com enormes conseqüências negativas sobre o meio-ambiente e na grande maioria das vezes sobre as populações por eles diretamente atingidas, patrocinados especialmente por instituições multilaterais de fomento, como o Banco Mundial e o Banco Interamericano de Desenvolvimento, que funcionavam para ir criando canais de aproximação entre os movimentos sociais dos vários países (defensores do meio ambiente, atingidos por barragens, populações indígenas e outras populações tradicionais, pequena agricultura familiar, entre outros). Por outro lado, os parâmetros das chamadas “políticas de ajuste” acordadas com aquelas instituições previam cortes orçamentários e limitadores ao crescimento econômico, quando não resultavam (como na maioria das vezes) em estagnação e processos recessivos, com enormes efeitos negativos sobre a maioria das populações, em especial os trabalhadores menos organizados, os idosos, os jovens e as mulheres (vale lembrar que uma das conseqüências das políticas de ajuste foi a explosão inflacionária em vários países). Assim, o entendimento dos processos e a resistência organizada dos movimentos sociais em cada país às políticas de ajuste ajudavam a criar laços entre as organizações sociais dos vários países da região.

 

Para os governos de Argentina e Brasil na segunda metade dos anos 80 (governos dos presidentes Alfonsín, na Argentina, e Sarney, no Brasil), estruturados com o processo de redemocratização de seus países, a tentativa de atuação em conjunto no primeiro momento, e de integração, no momento seguinte, aparecia como uma forma de resolver a um dilema que era colocado e discutido na época: o de que a democratização deveria poder representar uma melhoria geral e efetiva das condições de vida das populações desses países, ou poderia rapidamente ver erodida a sua base social frente a uma população que se organizava e apresentava demandas. Do ponto de vista dos governos, a integração aparecia então como uma possibilidade de alternativa (como se apresentaram em algum momento planos heterodoxos de estabilização nos dois países, como o Plano Austral, na Argentina, e o Plano Cruzado, no Brasil) ou pura e simplesmente como uma forma de aumentar o poder de barganha dos países frente aos comitês negociadores formados pelos seus credores (a idéia de um cartel de devedores, nunca efetivado, para poder negociar com o cartel dos credores, este efetivo e capitaneado pelos principais bancos, era uma idéia que vez por outra voltava a tona, e exigia uma confiança e capacidade de articulação de interesses e diplomática que inexistia no período).

 

Assim, e de forma insipiente, o processo de integração entre Argentina e Brasil, e que depois veria a ele incorporados Uruguai e Paraguai, aparecia como uma possibilidade de uma maior articulação defensiva, mas também de construção de um novo tipo de desenvolvimento (que fosse na sua essência a contraposição às políticas de ajuste), com crescimento econômico e políticas macroeconômicas articuladas entre os quatro países, mas também como uma possibilidade de associar a essas políticas os objetivos de democracia, participação, redução de desigualdades, e sustentabilidade social e ambiental, que estavam na essência do conflito entre os movimentos sociais e as políticas de ajuste, e por isso essa possibilidade empolgou os movimentos organizados dos quatro países da região.

 

As Relações entre os Movimentos Sociais e entre estes e o Arcabouço Institucional

 

Vistos alguns dos aspectos que caracterizam e dificultam o processo de integração entre Mercosul, vale apresentar a relação entre os movimentos sociais, organizações da sociedade civil e sindicatos dos países membros, e também apresentar a relação destes atores através da estrutura organizacional que foi sendo definida no Mercosul. Neste sentido, destaca-se o papel do Movimento Sindical, do Movimento de Mulheres, do Movimento dos Trabalhadores Rurais, das Organizações Não-Governamentais que lidam principalmente com temas fronteiriços, além da importância das Redes e Articulações da sociedade civil focadas no livre comércio.

 

Em quase quinze anos, desde que o Tratado de Assunção foi firmado, os temas econômico-comerciais conduziram a agenda do Mercosul, colocando alguns objetivos essenciais para o processo de integração regional em segundo plano, como por exemplo, o incentivo ao desenvolvimento científico e tecnológico, preservação do meio ambiente, difusão cultural, educação e saúde. Apesar desta constatação, estabeleceram-se iniciativas e pequenos avanços foram alcançados, sobretudo em aspectos que interagem com questões fronteiriças e relacionadas ao trabalho. Tais avanços foram discutidos principalmente, no âmbito das reuniões especializadas e no Fórum Consultivo Econômico e Social (FCES) – instâncias na qual as ações participativas da sociedade civil são institucionalizadas.

 

O movimento sindical, com destaque para a Coordenadora de Centrais Sindicais do Cone Sul (CCSCS) (5), foi fundamental para a evolução da participação da sociedade civil na estrutura do Mercosul e no debate sociolaboral dos países membros. A própria história da Coordenadora e suas reivindicações, mostram como se constituiu este processo de participação, que levando em consideração as outras esferas sociais, teve uma maior visibilidade. Desta maneira, cabe apresentar um pequeno histórico de sua formação e desenvolvimento.

 

A CCSCS foi fundada em 1986 com o objetivo de defender a democracia e formular ação conjunta contra a dívida externa. No final de 1990 define como prioridade de trabalho a necessidade de desempenhar um papel protagonista na integração econômica e social do Cone Sul. A partir de 1991 aprova em diversos encontros anuais documentos analíticos contendo importantes reivindicações, das quais podemos destacar a Criação do Subgrupo de Relações do Trabalho (e instituído pelo bloco em 1992), a adoção de uma Carta de Direitos Fundamentais para o Mercosul e a criação de um fórum de representação da sociedade civil, para fortalecer a participação desta na construção do Mercosul. Esta última reivindicação é apresentada no ano de 1994, mesma ocasião em que se apresenta o Protocolo de Ouro Preto criando o Fórum Consultivo Econômico e Social do Mercosul (FCES).

 

O FCES vai ser oficialmente instituído em 1996, mesmo ano em que, a Coordenadora, como participante ativa do Fórum, consegue incluir o Direito a Iniciativa (direito de apresentar propostas ao Grupo Mercado Comum por iniciativa própria e não apenas quando consultado) e apresentar um projeto de um instrumento de proteção aos direitos trabalhistas, que foi discutido posteriormente em forma tripartidária e aprovado como a Declaração Sociolaboral do Mercosul. Esta declaração permite uma maior visibilidade dos efeitos da integração comercial e da ação das empresas uma vez que estabelece mecanismos que podem viabilizar a negociação coletiva e um espaço de solução de conflito entre os segmentos econômicos, sociais e entre os países (6).

 

Apesar de tais conquistas serem consideradas um progresso na participação mais ativa das representações dos trabalhadores no processo de negociação do Mercosul, é preciso criar mecanismos efetivos que ampliem a influência do FCES nas definições de políticas nos setores produtivo e social. Deveriam ainda ser priorizadas as questões sociais no âmbito do arcabouço institucional do Mercosul – desta forma, seriam dados passos essenciais no sentido de contemplar o que o Tratado de Assunção menciona: o objetivo de integração seria alcançado através do desenvolvimento e a estabilização econômica com “justiça social”.

 

No que se refere à influência e participação do Fórum, chamamos à atenção para as manifestações de seus representantes nos anos que seguiram a sua criação. Estas tinham o objetivo de relembrar aos Presidentes da importância de se efetivarem as consultas, tendo em vista a finalidade e o espírito em que o Fórum foi criado: “O FCES poderá cumprir com seu papel de agente consultivo se for devidamente consultado dentro de um processo onde disponha das devidas informações e condições para a elaboração de sua Recomendação, situação que até o momento não ocorreu (Ata da VI Reunião Plenária do FCES)” (7).

 

Mesmo sem representatividade efetiva nas instâncias responsáveis pelo processo decisório no Mercosul, as organizações da sociedade civil e os movimentos sociais dos quatro países membros se articulam, elaboram declarações conjuntas e desenvolvem atividades integradas. Anualmente, são realizados diversos encontros, seminários e atividades sobre temáticas especificas dos movimentos, ou fóruns mais amplos que abarcam temas sociais gerais comuns aos quatro países do Mercosul e da América Latina como um todo. O Fórum Social Mundial, Fórum das Américas e encontro “O Mercosul que Queremos”- idealizado pelas Organizações Sindicais e Sociais do Mercosul, com destaque para a Aliança Social Continental e CCSCS – são alguns exemplos de iniciativas da sociedade civil no sentido de promoverem a integração, pensarem conjuntamente ações para enfrentarem os problemas sociais e ainda pressionarem seus governos para que suas críticas sejam ouvidas e suas reivindicações incorporadas.

 

Não há dúvidas que os tratados de integração regional – não conduzidos por uma agenda neoliberal e em favor das transnacionais – podem trazer benefícios aos povos envolvidos, porém este processo deve contar com a participação efetiva e a aceitação das sociedades. Dessa maneira a informação e a mobilização da sociedade civil dos países envolvidos são essenciais para que as cláusulas trabalhistas, sociais e democráticas incluídas nos acordos de liberalização comercial sejam cumpridas e priorizadas.

 

Os movimentos sociais da região se fortalecem no cenário em que o Mercosul se volta para uma agenda externa pautada no livre comércio. O Mercosul foi concebido dentro do princípio de integração regional aberta, não se limitando a incrementar o comércio entre os países que o integram, mas prevendo relações com os grandes blocos econômicos existentes. No ano seguinte à assinatura do Tratado de Assunção, formalizou-se o vínculo com a União Européia, através do Acordo Bilateral de Cooperação Interinstitucional, porém é somente em meados dos anos noventa que se dá ênfase à agenda externa do Mercosul.

 

As Redes, Alianças de organizações da sociedade civil e movimentos sociais surgem na segunda metade dos anos noventa como resistência aos processos de negociação em curso da ALCA e do acordo bi-regional Mercosul–União Européia e contra as políticas neoliberais impostas às sociedades. A Aliança Social Continental (ASC) pode ser citada como exemplo de integração entre diferentes tipos de organizações e movimentos sociais do continente, buscam alternativas de integração regional que vão efetivamente além das questões econômico-comerciais, que garantam os direitos dos cidadãos e sejam baseados na “implementação e coordenação de políticas nacionais e regionais de desenvolvimento econômico e inclusão social (8)”. É através da bandeira de “não aceitação de nenhum acordo que, a pretexto de promover o livre comercio, represente uma ameaça ainda maior ao meio ambiente, aos direitos humanos, a igualdade das mulheres, direitos sociais e trabalhistas” (9), que a ASC se forma e luta contra a ALCA e qualquer acordo que não representem ganhos sociais países que ela representa.

Com esta percepção, grupos de mulheres dos quatro países membros do bloco, vem conseguindo construir uma forte relação e integração entre si e em relação aos mecanismos e processos em curso do Mercosul. Foram abertas algumas portas para a participação desses grupos, mas assim como acontece com o movimento sindical, precisa-se de maior vontade política para que questões sociais passem a integrar as estratégias de desenvolvimento do bloco.

 

O movimento de mulheres pretende sensibilizar os atores sociais na luta pela garantia da cidadania e da igualdade de oportunidades entre homens e mulheres nos diferentes âmbitos de negociação do Mercosul. No contexto da liberalização comercial, trabalham as relações desiguais entre norte-sul, a divisão sexual e internacional do trabalho, e contra os interesses das corporações transnacionais.

 

Desde o ano de 1995 foram realizados seminários “Mulher e Mercosul”, onde foram apresentadas análises sobre a situação da mulher no trabalho e as legislações comparativas, realizadas propostas nas áreas legislativas, políticas públicas e especialmente para as articulações regionais. Participantes do FCES, as feministas reivindicaram sua participação nos subgrupos da Saúde; da Indústria; e do Trabalho, Emprego e Seguridade Social e conseguiram instaurar a Reunião Especializada da Mulher – na qual participam Ministras ou autoridades dos órgãos governamentais competentes em políticas para as mulheres e grupos da sociedade civil. Este ano aconteceu o seminário “Mercosul, Sociedade Civil e Direitos Humanos” que contou com a participação dos grupos feministas entre outros atores sociais na esfera institucional do Mercosul, organizado pelo Observatório de políticas de Direitos Humanos do bloco. Esses exemplos sinalizam para a existência de um caminho iniciado e que deve ser percorrido, mas que se precisa de mais iniciativas para que os objetivos sejam alcançados.

 

Outra representação, que vem trabalhando também com temas referentes aos acordos de liberalização comercial, são os movimentos que se relacionam à defesa da agricultura familiar. Tal movimento para atuar nos temas reativos ao Mercosul e ALCA, se fortalece através da articulação conjunta entre a Confederação Nacional dos Trabalhadores na Agricultura, Frente Sul da Agricultura Familiar, Movimento dos Trabalhadores Sem Terra, Movimento dos Pequenos Agricultores, Movimento dos Atingidos por Barragens, Movimento das Mulheres Trabalhadoras Rurais, Via Campesina, Coordenadora das Organizações dos Agricultores Familiares entre outros. Além das organizações voltadas para o tema da agricultura familiar, o movimento busca o apoio e a integração com as Centrais Sindicais e com organizações e outros movimentos da sociedade civil.

 

Fazendo frente a liderança dos interesses da grande agricultura comercial dos países do Mercosul, nas negociações dos acordos de liberalização comercial, o movimento dos agricultores familiares assumem um importante papel em defesa da segurança alimentar, reforma agrária, proteção ambiental, fortalecimento da agricultura campesina e familiar. Ainda, suas reivindicações vão em direção a um processo de integração que levem em conta a participação da sociedade civil, justiça social e o aumento da qualidade de vida das populações rurais.

 

Reconhecida a relevância deste movimento no âmbito do Mercosul, o governo brasileiro – por iniciativa do Ministério de Desenvolvimento Agrário – propôs ao Grupo de Mercado Comum (GMC) do Mercosul, a primeira sessão da Reunião Especializada de Agricultura Familiar (REAF). A reunião aconteceu em 2004 e seu objetivo foi pensar políticas específicas para a agricultura familiar e a inclusão do tema na pauta do bloco. Na segunda reunião foram recomendadas ao GMC, e estabelecidas entre os representantes, prioridades de desenvolvimento no seguro agrícola e em créditos de financiamento, e regras para a implementação de políticas comuns quanto ao tratamento especial e diferenciado da agricultura familiar. Também foi instituída a construção de uma política comum de gênero.

As reuniões especializadas constituem um importante canal de diálogo entre os governos, e a sociedade civil. Adicionando o Fórum Consultivo Econômico e Social, e alguns Subgrupos às Reuniões Especializadas, podemos considerar que estão sendo abertos canais de participação da sociedade civil na estrutura do Mercosul e que por mérito desta participação, alguns importantes logros foram conseguidos neste processo. Ainda há muito a ser considerado, mais o caminho começa a ser esboçado, faltando ainda a vontade efetiva dos governos de colocarem as questões sociais como prioridades no processo de integração.

 

Algumas Idéias Sobre Dificuldades e Possibilidades

 

Apesar da participação efetiva e da tentativa sistemática de abrir novos espaços de discussão e participação no interior do bloco, os movimentos sociais se confrontam permanentemente com uma lógica de integração centrada na visão de predomínio de aspectos não apenas econômicos, mas de uma economia dominada pela hegemonia dos interesses financeiros, onde a liberalização comercial aparece como a contraface da desregulamentação financeira, buscando pela obtenção de saldos em divisas, manter a normalidade aparente dos fluxos financeiros.

 

Se ao longo dos anos 90 isso foi explícito e defendido de forma clara pelos governos da época agora, embora ainda prevalecente, não aparece de forma tão aberta. A explicação básica para esse novo comportamento parece ser que a sucessão de crises financeiras a partir de meados da década passada levou a um comportamento muito mais pragmático dos agentes negociadores, que passavam a ter o livre comércio e a abertura não como um fim em si mesmo, como se desses processos pudesse resultar quase que automaticamente um mundo de maior eficiência e melhor funcionamento para todos, mas como a possibilidade de fazerem crescer um saldo que aparece como a única esperança de seguirem tentando manter a normalidade dos fluxos financeiros, ou diminuírem a sua vulnerabilidade face à volatilidade desses mesmos fluxos financeiros.

O processo de integração visto desta forma tem enormes dificuldades em se sustentar, posto que na sua própria busca está a raiz dos conflitos que permeiam o processo. Se no passado os estados nacionais da região competiam eventualmente por mercados para seus produtos primários, ou por capitais de investimento direto para alavancarem seus processos (nacionais) de industrialização por substituição de importações, agora competem por capitais financeiros, pela obtenção dos saldos que lhe permitam manter a tranqüilidade destes capitais e honrar seus compromissos externos com credores e aplicadores.

 

Mais do que isso, esse processo não é apenas conflitivo entre os vários países, mas conflitivo também com os movimentos sociais no interior de cada país, e de difícil capacidade de hegemonizar essas sociedades enquanto projeto de futuro em ambiente democrático (10).

Assim, a questão essencial que era capaz de sensibilizar os movimentos sociais organizados no início do processo de discussão da integração na segunda metade dos anos 80 – a capacidade de, a partir da integração, ser possível gerar uma forma alternativa de desenvolvimento, sem subordinação no cenário internacional, e capaz de ser social, regional e ambientalmente sustentável – permanece colocada para os movimentos, e sua persistência motiva uma adesão crítica e parcial aos instrumentos do processo de integração em curso. Como se viu anteriormente, a suposição aqui é que essa incapacidade de gestação de uma alternativa de desenvolvimento com estas características não é apenas uma dificuldade para o processo de integração, ela segue colocada como uma dificuldade para a efetivação da própria democracia na região.

 

Assim, do ponto de vista dos movimentos sociais, parece muito difícil discutir de forma substantiva um processo de integração com democracia e participação social, sem que temas como soberania, bem estar social, redução de desigualdades e sustentabilidade ambiental possam estar também colocados, que aparentemente é o que se nos oferece à discussão mantendo-se as premissas do modelo de integração guiado pela abertura comercial e hegemonia financeira. Discutir e avançar substancialmente no processo de integração significa, deste ponto de vista, rediscutir as próprias premissas do modelo. Ou seguir fazendo a discussão de forma crítica e parcial, como vem sendo feito até o momento presente.

 

Notas:

  1. Aliança Social Continental, “Alternativa para las Américas”, disponível em www.asc-hsa.org, com atualizações.

  2. O pensamento econômico liberal hegemônico reafirma permanentemente a convicção de que o livre comércio e o livre fluxo de capitais podem, juntos, gerar um ambiente econômico capaz de estimular o desenvolvimento e responder às demandas sociais. No entanto, não costuma responder à objeção de que o comércio não pode ser livre para países que precisam enfrentar o peso dos encargos da dívida externa e das remessas relacionadas à liberalização dos fluxos financeiros, e que obrigam à necessidade de geração de enormes superávits comerciais. Para estes, o comércio internacional acaba aparecendo como uma obrigação, e não como uma estratégia possível, uma opção. Em geral, a pressão sobre os países menos desenvolvidos é no sentido de que se integrem mais no fluxo internacional de comércio, para tornar possíveis as transferências financeiras relacionadas aos pagamentos de dívidas e outros passivos externos”. (MINEIRO, A.S., “Da Alca Light” aos Impasses de Puebla: Alca, Agricultura e Contradições”, em ActionAid Brasil e REBRIP, Negociações Comerciais Internacionais na Era Lula – criação do G-20 e embates entre o agronegócio e a agricultura familiar, Rio de Janeiro, Nov. 2004, p. 74.

  3. No âmbito oficial, vale lembrar, por exemplo, a Ata para Integração Argentino-Brasileira, de meados de 1986, que instituía o Programa de Integração e Cooperação Econômica (PICE).

  4. A taxa de juros norte-americana expressa na prime-rate passa de cerca de 7,5% em 1979 a cerca de 21% em 1982.

  5. Atualmente, representa as centrais sindicais da Argentina (CGT e CTA), do Brasil (CGT, CUT e FS), do Chile (CUT), do Paraguai (CUT) e do Uruguai (PIT/ CNT).

  6. CASTRO VIEIRA, J de. Dinâmica Polieconômica do Mercosul, frente à Globalização. Tese de Doutorado. Brasília, UNB/Centro de Pesquisa e Pós Graduação sobre América Latina e o Caribe, 2001.

  7. Apud WANDERLEY, L. E. W., “Mercosul e Sociedade Civil”. São Paulo em Perspectiva, 16(1): 67-73, 2002.

  8. MELLO, F. (org.), “Fórum Continental: atores sociais e políticos nos processos de integração”. São Paulo, 2000.

  9. Idem.

  10. “Outra hipótese central baseia-se na proposição de que sem a resolução da questão social o processo de integração regional padece de substantividade e a democracia não se sustenta. Partindo da concepção dominante que desvincula o plano econômico do político e social, que cogita em crescimento econômico na lógica do mercado e ignora o desenvolvimento humano e sustentável, que contrapõe os atores tecnoburocratas e os político-sociais, que leva os governantes e setores empresariais, em geral, a descurarem do social, encarando-o como algo subordinado ou efeito automático do econômico, que usa o social como tema retórico, não há uma preocupação verdadeira no encaminhamento das questões sociais. Daí os embates permanentes com trabalhadores organizados e crises sucessivas nos países do Bloco, nos quais as condições sociais existentes são de extrema perversidade e vulnerabilidade.”, WANDERLEY (2002), op. cit:. 67.

European Social Forum

Another Europe is possible: this is the horizon created by the anti-neoliberal social movements, generic creating a new stage in constructing a Europe of peoples.


Introduction

The French and Dutch “No” to the “Treaty Adopting a European Constitution” revealed the failure of European neoliberal construction, anti-democratic and patriarchal, resulting in trade-offs between States without the peoples’ intervention. The elites claimed to be exercising a power invested in them, but which had not been conferred on them. The democratic deficit that has characterized the current construction of Europe has to be filled.

European mobilizations during the first years ofthe 21st century against the war, neoliberalism, sexism and racism, against the destruction of democratic and social rights and the privatization of public services and demanding the guarantee of universal rights, have opened the way to elaborating a project of a “Charter of Principles for Another Europe”, which we wish to submit for public discussion. The Principles of Another Europe are all equally important and have as their basis:
- equal dignity between persons and the inviolability of each person to be respected by all institutions;
- peace, freedom, justice and security as individual and collective assets;
- equality between all, first and foremost, the parity between men and women, by guaranteeing difference and diversities;
- democracy ensuring equal representation and participation;
- European citizenship based on place of residence;
- social rights, the right to work and rights at work, the only solution in order to eliminate poverty, different forms of exclusion, and impoverishment;
- a socially equitable economy, based on solidarity, sustainable life, and democracy
- peoples’ freedom and citizen’ freedom.

Europe is not the same as the European Union: the process of enlargement by means of neoliberal policies is provoking in the east, but also in the west, unemployment, poverty, exclusion and is nourishing different forms of chauvinism.

The construction of the European Communities and of the European Union has has been characterized by the weight assigned to governments, to an unelected authority,the european commision, the central role of the market-place, the right to open competition and to transnational corporations, around which economic and social relations, as well as the institutions themselves, have been structured. From now on we are faced with an ”economic constitution” – the laws of the market-place are at the core of Treaties, prevail over democratic political decisions – in clear opposition to the founding principles of the constitutional Charters of the 20th century.

On the contrary, one must affirm the priority of fundamental social rights and of political and cultural rights, which require another economy to realise commonly-shared natural assets – land, water, air, energy – and public services. There has to be a recommitment to a vast process of social re-appropriation – new forms of social property – in order to satisfy all the social needs and permit a democratic development that can be ecologically sustained.

The Europe that we want is founded on the primacy of the rights of all and on the fundamental principle of direct participation by the citizens in public and collective decision-making. Europe must be a union of peoples freely associated together, grounded in constitutional democracy and a public space stretching beyond national borders, characterized by democracy at every level.

1. Europe and the World

The other Europe is founded on peace and the recognition of universal diversity. It rejects all strategies of economic or military domination and all forms of racism and chauvinism.

The other Europe contributes towards building world peace: it recognizes and promotes cultural and historical differences, in a framework of the equality of individual and collective rights and of universal human rights. So the new roots of Europe are consequently of “mixed blood” – a mixture of diverse national and ethic origins, thanks largely to the contribution of migrants: violence against migrants in the name of institutional borders is unacceptable.

Europe’s historical colonial experience, both internal and external, characterized by political and social domination, the plunder of resources, by wars leaving millions of victims, imposes on Europe responsibilities with respect to the economic and social conditions of most of the world, particularly the South, but also Eastern Europe.

The principle of solidarity and respect must guide relations between countries within the European space and all other countries. Europe has to act, conscious of a common interest, in advancing global social and economic rights.

Europe supports the right of peoples to decide their own futures and to make their own choices in economic, social, cultural and environmental matters. Europe commits itself to guaranteeing the sovereignty of each people over its natural resources and its immediate environment.

The human right to development is unalienable, to the same extent as other fundamental rights. The Europe we want participates in the creation of a new international economic order which answers to this requirement and, in this context, cooperates in a way that recognizes the disparity of conditions and promotes the necessary equality of rights.

The cancellation of the external debt of poor countries is a necessary elementary and immediate measure.

Economic agreements must include recognition and reciprocal application of human rights according to the regulations and international conventions.

Europe supports the project of taxing international capital transfers and is opposed to their free circulation. It supports the creation of regional economic relations that are opposed to the logics of neoliberalism.

Another Europe rejects the law of the “free market” and the existence of a dominant “commercial right” which results from this. The body of the international law is unique, valid for all States, international financial, economic, social and political institutions. The other Europe acts to integrate all existing international institutions within the framework of a democratized and radically-reformed United Nations.

2. Peace and security

Europe is founded on peace and on a security that is the result of social justice between the communities and the peoples.

Our Europe rejects war as a means for solving international conflicts and recognizes peace as a fundamental right of human beings and peoples.

Our Europe takes an active role in the defence and promotion of the universal values as the conditions for lasting peace: dignity, freedom, equality between all human beings, social, economic and democratic human rights.

Our Europe is committed to building peace through struggling against all forms of discrimination, injustice, exploitation, exclusion and threat, using international law, political negotiations and diplomacy as its fundamental instruments. It rejects all attempts coming from within or without aimed at transforming Europe into a military power on a global scale.

The Europe we want recognizes the right of all peoples to self-determination, respecting and guaranteeing the rights of minorities and their diversities, provided that they respect fundamental rights. As a result of this right, peoples must be free to decide about their political autonomy and their sovereignty in the economic, social and cultural spheres.

Our Europe recognizes the rights of individuals and peoples to resist oppression and injustices by all means that do not themselves result in the violation of universal human rights.

For this reason, our Europe supports the different initiatives to create an international system of justice capable of sanctioning States and all actors responsible for war-crimes.

Europe works for the active commitment of international institutions against any form of military, social or economic oppression and rejects as a matter of principle the use of military force. This is why it is in favour of the dissolution of NATO and of all other military alliances as well as in favour of the elimination of all foreign military bases throughout the world.

Europe rejects “humanitarian” and “preventative” war, since war can never solve problems; on the contrary, it only produces new violations of human rights and of international law. For the same reasons, it also rejects all forms of colonial and imperial domination.

Europe repudiates all use and production of nuclear arms, all weapons of mass destruction as well as torture, the death penalty, and all forms of degrading treatment. It is committed to disarmament and demilitarization, in order to construct an open and welcoming world and a society that ensures the free circulation and settlement of human beings.

In order to create the conditions necessary for a peaceful and democratic international order, our Europe will promote a global policy of cooperation for development, guaranteed by bilateral and multilateral treaties, reinforcing the political, economic and social rights of citizens and peoples.

Our Europe recognizes the rights of individuals and communities to a life free from all aggression, danger and threat: its security is a consequence of the security of others. For this reason it will install an enlarged common and interdependent system of security, displacing the notion of security of states, moving towards the security of human beings.

In the name of these principles, our Europe abstains from any threat or offensive action by acting to prevent conflicts, by promoting peaceful solutions and through the humanization of international relations.

3. For a Europe based on rights, against all forms of discrimination

Our Europe respects and guarantees through all its spheres the principle of the equality of citizens respecting their differences and diversities.

Europe recognizes as a fundamental value and guarantees the right to equal status and effective equality between men and women in all spheres of political, economic, social and private life as well as the freedom of sexual orientation.

Europe is against the commercialization of sexual relations and guarantees the rights of prostituted persons.

All citizens participate on an equal footing in political life. Political institutions adopt constraining measures to achieve the equal participation of women and men within institutions, decisional bodies, and political and social agencies and organizations.

Every person who resides on a long-standing basis in the territory of Europe obtains its citizenship with all the associated.

All public institutions must guarantee the human rights and freedoms of women and take action against all forms of patriarchy. Every woman, in every country, will have the liberty to control her body, notably the right to abortion, contraception, the choice of maternity and control over artificial fertilization.

Every woman will have the right yo choose how she conducts her private life (celibacy, marriage, cohabitation, divorce). Institutions must take action against all forms of patriarchy. They must commit themselves to ending all trafficking in human beings and slavery in all its forms.

Europe commits itself to act with determination against racism, antisemitism, islamophobia.

Public institutions take and promote all the initiatives required aimed at ending sexist violence against women and children, within and outside the family and call upon all countries to elaborate a framework law against violence perpetrated against women, together with effective measures for its implementation.

Europe is against the commercialization of sexual relations and guarantees their citizenship rights to prostituted persons.

Europe affirms the secularity of public institutions. It guarantees the dignity and freedom of conscience of all citizens regardless of their origins, opinion or beliefs, the freedom of individual and collective religious practices, insofar as these respect the rights of all citizens.

Europe recognizes the principle of the freedom of settlement and the free circulation of persons by guaranteeing this as a universal right. It guarantees the right to asylum. All peoples have the right to self-determination, while guaranteeing the fundamental rights of individuals.

Every person belonging to a national minority will have the right to select freely to be treated as such without any hindrance resulting from this choice or the exercise related to this choice.

The language-of-origin of school-children and students in public schools is respected and taken into account; its teaching is facilitated.

Public institutions contribute through their action to overcoming material, cultural, symbolic and linguistic barriers existing between peoples.

4. For a democratic Europe

The European Union is not today democratic. There is not a separation of powers: the Union’s executive organ is given legislative powers; the Council of the European Union (also known as the Council of Ministers) is a legislative organ, while it is at the same time a meeting-place of national executives.

We wish to affirm the primacy of the peoples, as the irreplaceable sources of democratic legitimacy and of citizens’ equal participation by men and by women, as the fundamental democratic principle in making decisions that concern them.

A democratic refounding process has to be set in motion, in which the peoples and citizens must play the principle role to construct a democratic and social Europe, in order for the political and citizens’ choices to take precedence over the laws of the market-place and of the profit motive.

The Europe that we are projecting will be a Union of Peoples , it will be built in the name , by and with its peoples, democratically organized at all levels.

The end of the democratic deficit of European institutions will begin when, within a political constitution of Europe, we are able to really proclaim “We, the Peoples of Europe” rather than “We, the States of Europe”.

The progressive passage from a Europe of States to a Europe of united peoples, organized in a truly creative way, must therefore be marked by political institutions that acquire their legitimacy through the will of the peoples, expressed directly through consultations or popular initiatives, or indirectly through the election of representative European assemblies, either with the participation of European citizens at the different levels (local, regional, national, etc.) or in the various political and social jurisdictions where collective decisions concerning them are made.

Our European constitutional democracy therefore constitutes a novel political entity. Political representation in the European space is a multi-level democracy and includes the representation of the peoples, of countries, of regions, of local communities. A transnational democracy is founded moreover on the non-hierarchical cooperation between these different levels. It follows that the structuring of the institutions must be founded on dialogue and cooperation between equals, rather than on the hierarchy between different political or jurisdictional, national and European authorities.

At each point, citizens intervene in the important political, economic and social decisions. For this, they elect and control their representatives. At each level of competence, the government organs are responsible to the representative institutions. They must exercise the legislative initiative and political control – in association with the citizens and national, regional and local institutions.

For a true democratic Europe, the right to information and the freedom of communication must be treated as fundamental collective and individual political rights. These guarantee their autonomy to communicate, to inform themselves, to develop freely as well as to participate on an equal footing in the information and communication networks in the European public sphere.

5. Socio-economic rights for all persons residing in Europe

Equal rights and solidarity are a pillar of our Europe. They guarantee the social cohesion of our societies. Socio-economic rights have been acquired through social mobilization and enshrined in the 1948 UN Declaration, by UN covenants on economic and social rights adopted in 1966, by the ILO Conventions, by the Turin 1961 European Social Charter, by the 1989 Community Charter on workers’ fundamental social rights, the CEDAW

The defence and development of socio-economic rights constitute one of the objectives of our Europe. Europe is, at all levels, jointly responsible as the real and effective guarantee of these rights, according to the principles of indivisibility and of universality. They form an integral part of the fundamental rights.

The rights declared must be subject to the jurisdiction of European and national courts. Any act by European institutions that violates the essential content of these rights must by subject to annulment by the European Court, as well as the non-application of these rights by national judicial bodies. Access to the judicial system is guaranteed, notably for persons with limited resources.

Respect of socio-economic rights is based on the following principles:
- the principle of social non-regression: no European decision may contravene what has been acquired and social rights as recognized by a national legislation.
- the principle of levelling upwards of norms allowing for the strengthening of legal protections accorded to workers rather than alignment with the lowest common denominator of national legislations. The application for all women in all countries of the European clause that is most favourable to them.

The basis of our Europe is the respect for the right and dignity of workers regardless of their working situation.

Equality, cooperation, solidarity, the democratic definition of needs and social rights are the dominant values of Europe. These replace competition and free-trade.

Every European citizen has the right to benefit from a quality of life that provides protection from poverty and exclusion and allows for the full participation in social and cultural life: this means the eradication of unemployment, of economic insecurity, of poverty and all forms of exclusion.

The common salary and revenue norms below which one cannot pass will be fixed in taking account of the degree of development and the gains that have been obtained in each country. Guaranteed individual minimum revenue, minimum salaries and a calendar for harmonization “upwards” of social rights will be defined In function of this.

The right to a job and an income must be applied while prohibiting all forms of discrimination based on religion, sex, sexual orientation, political opinions or country of origin. The principle of “equal pay for equal work” must become a reality.

Everyone has the right to freely choose their job.

Self-employed workers (tradesmen, peasants) also have this right to revenue guarantees, to training, to working conditions, to democratic representation.

The reduction in working time will be an objective throughout Europe, starting with the generalization of the 35-hour work-week.

Europe acts at all levels to ensure that stable labour contracts without fixed duration become the norm throughout Europe.

All workers will be protected against lay-offs. Any arbitrary firing of workers is prohibited. The right of share-holders to close enterprises just for their own profit will be prohibited. Any project of laying off workers must be accompanied by guarantees for the workers in terms of training, income maintenance and the return to work.

Night work is prohibited to minors under the age of 18 and is only authorized in sectors where it is essential.

Europe recognizes social dialogue, trade-union freedom and the right to form associations as among its fundamental values. All workers have:
- the right to collective negotiation at the level of the company, of their occupational category, at the national or European levels;
- the right to approve the collective agreements that concern them;
- the right to strike, including for motives of solidarity and political motives, at the local, national and European levels. Lock-outs are prohibited.

Fair representation and democracy in the work-place and in the trade-unions constitute fundamental rights at all levels. Workers’ and trade-union representation, democratically elected at the European level, is one element of European democracy.

A European Enterprise Council (EEC) has to exist within all companies with establishments in several different States. The EEC has the right to information, to preliminary consultation as well as the right to intervene in management decisions concerning the size of the labour force, working conditions and the economic choices of the company. To guarantee the same rights to all, companies subcontracting work will be responsible for the workers employed by their subcontractors.

Social security, unemployment benefits and pensions will reflect, both in how they function and how they are financed, a public logic based on solidarity, as opposed to recourse to individualized systems tied to the market-place (pension funds, private insurance, etc.) The public system (social security) will have to guarantee a decent standard of living for all, whatever the contingencies may be.

In order to guarantee the effective respect for the rights presented in this Charter, Europe must establish appropriate political, economic and social policies, at all levels. Particularly, fiscal and social dumping will end with the harmonization of fiscal policies and a public services policy that is no longer subject to competition.

6. Public services for access to rights

Defending public services must be at the heart of proposals for another Europe.

Public services, despite the different ways in which they may be organized in different countries, must not be answerable to competition from the private sector and the profit motive. They must assure the satisfaction of fundamental rights and the access of all to the humanity’s common assets.
Public services must entail the public, democratic management of these resources. They must cede to a process of social re-appropriation, by satisfying the needs of persons by setting up a process to define these needs in the spheres in which public services operate. This concerns equally health, education, housing and transportation, as well as all the modern means of communications.

The commercialization and impoverishment of knowledge, of education and of research must stop.

Education must be considered as a guaranteed fundamental right for all, contributing to real cultural development for everyone. Europe must supp
- permit the social and cultural emancipation of all and breaks free of our society’s inegalitarian schema; the educational system must support social inclusion and avoid social selection. It must not create discrimination based on origins, on social classes, or physical abilities or gender. School-children from immigrant families, those suffering from physical handicaps or persons who suffer social exclusion must all be integrated in the regular educational system and not be separated through the existence of different educational trajectories.
- promote the active participation of school-children during their studies as well as respect the different learning time needed by each child to succeed.
- develop a critical spirit and exclude all forms of proselytizing.

Education must guarantee students’, teachers’ and researchers’ complete independence in what is taught and the research they conduct, and must not be constrained by the logic of short-term utility. Research must receive sufficient public funding to carry out its tasks (the production and dissemination of knowledge, training and, via research, expertise).

Health is a right
- The health-care system must be public, free and available to all. It must respect the physical and psychological integrity of citizens and the health-care personnel.
- All medical personnel and citizens must be involved in the institutions that manage the health system. The institutions must in particular give priority to the active participation of citizens in managing the health-care system.

For a real right to housing for all Everyone must be able to have access to real housing, thanks to public housing authorities that are given the financial and legal resources enabling them to promote massive policies of construction of social housing and to combat speculation in real estate and land prices.

7. The right to a sustainable environment

The logic of neoliberalism is by its nature wasteful and predatory. Today’s technologies would be able to cover the basic needs of the whole humankind.

Instead, financial capital groups create artificial needs (by subliminal advertising) in countries with the buying power, thus exploiting human and natural resources everywhere. The Third World is the most vulnerable, more than 15,000 children die every day of hunger and curable diseases.

The irreversible anthropogenic climate change is the most acute danger for the Earth, as well as a global social catastrophe.

Vision of a new lifestyle
There is an absolute necessity for Europe to change towards a new lifestyle of sustainable production and consumption. Saving materials and energy, radical change from using fossil fuels to renewable resources, severing economic growth from the increased transportation of goods, assuring chemical and biological safety and halting the loss of biodiversity – these are not a choice but a necessity.

People’s vital interests of people and health must be put above the interests of corporations and financial groups repeating endlessly the “loss of competitiveness” – which in fact only means increasing their already enormous profits. European nations should not compete through social, economical and environmental dumping but work together for the change towards sustainability: we have to pass nature and society to future generations in a state no worse than we inherited from our ancestors.

The first steps towards this end are: internalization of “external costs” (for any use of natural resources, polluting and waste dumping), environmental tax reform, including the Tobin tax, and introducing sets of indicators to measure sustainability instead of today’s single indicator, gross national product (GDP), which says nothing about the quality of life.

The new sets have to be composed of economic, environmental and social indicators.

A new radically different conception of development must be adopted: economical in its use of natural resources, ecological, respectful of the environment, centred on the development of human capabilities and respecting cultural diversity, protection of the natural environment and maritime safety.

Also new forms of mobility should save energy by supporting public transport over individual ones, giving preference to railways over road and air transport as well as avoiding unnecessary transport of goods, e.g, by introducing tolls and taxing fuels for air and ship transportation.

Alternative transport must be facilitated through a combination of walking and cycling with the public transit..

Natural resources, shared assets of humanity.
Natural resources must not become subject to intellectual property rights or patents. Remaining outside the private and commercial domains, they must be managed by public policies and involve citizens’ participation. They must remain beyond the scope of commercial treaties.

Water is a common asset and access to safe drinking water is a fundamental right to which all must have access. Water distribution must be provided by public institutions and its management must include the participation by citizens.

Energy consumption must undergo radical changes. New choices are required around the following principles: increased economies in the use of energy, diversification of sources and priority to renewable and sustainable resources. To economize energy, non-polluting transportation must be encouraged and public transportation developed.

Similarly, the habitat must respect strict ecological norms. Environmental risks must be factored into public health policies. Regulations must clearly control polluting industries, in particular concerning the production and commercialization of chemical substances.

Public institutions must guarantee, as a fundamental individual right, food that is healthy to eat and in sufficient quantity

In the face of multinational corporations exploiting peasants, it is necessary to develop and apply public regulations in order to discourage their practices. On the contrary, support must be provided for non-polluting agricultural systems, labour-intensive rather than capital-intensive, as well as closed distribution circuits. Polluting agricultural practices must be discouraged. Production of GM products must be prohibited (except in a context that is strictly confined to basic research).

The principle of food sovereignty, that is the right to decide one’s own agricultural and food policies, must be respected for all regions of the world and for all countries. The countries of Europe therefore have a particular responsibility in developing their agricultural policies and in their commercial treaties with countries in the South. These agricultural and commercial policies must take a fundamental new direction to respect the principle of food sovereignty.

Peace, equality, justice, freedom, democracy, social and fundamental rights! For another Europe, for another world founded on solidarity, a sustainable environment!


Download the Charter