Civil Society in Search of an Alternative Regionalism in ASEAN

Agriculture ministers of all the eight Saarc countries will meet in Dhaka on Wednesday to form Saarc Seed Bank and expedite making the Saarc Seed Bank functional. Officials involved in preparations for the meeting told The Daily Star yesterday the proposed structure of the seed bank has been finalised, and it will be mooted at a senior officials’ meeting on Tuesday. Read the full article here.

Building PeopleOriented and Participatory. Alternative Regionalism Models in Southeast Asia: An Exploratory Study. Read the full document here.

Building PeopleOriented and Participatory. Alternative Regionalism Models in Southeast Asia: An Exploratory Study. Read the full document here.

The so-called alternative regionalism is becoming a popular concept of late particularly given the increasing role and importance of non-governmental element, medicine or civil society, generic also commonly referred to as the track-three, in the institutional development and community building of Southeast Asia. Despite the widespread use of the terms, there is yet a common understanding amongst relevant actors in the regionalisation process as to what alternative regionalism actually entails of. For most of mainstream regionalists, on the one hand, alternative regionalism today is associated with the move from the old, or first wave of, regionalism to the new, or second wave, of regionalism, where regionalism now takes place in a multipolar world order, emerges as a spontaneous process, open and outward in character and involves a multidimensional processes.3 On the other hand, the so-called progressive regionalists,
including those of leftist-oriented activists and scholars, argue that the idea of alternative regionalism is well-rooted in the Latin American model of regionalism, which emerges as a response to the domination of Western imperialism. Read the full document here.

Integración popular

What is the Initiative People’s Agenda for Alternative Regionalisms?

The People’s Agenda for Alternative Regionalisms is an effort to promote cross-fertilisation of experiences on regional alternatives among social movements and civil society organisations from Asia, Africa, Latin America and Europe. It aims to contribute to the understanding of alternative regional integration as a key strategy to struggle against neoliberal globalisation and to broaden the base among key social actors for political debate and action around regional integration.

Specifically, it aims to build trans-regional processes to develop the concept of “people’s integration”, articulate the development of new analyses and insights on key regional issues, expose the problems of neoliberal regional integration and the limits of the export-led integration model, share and develop joint tactics and strategies for critical engagement with regional integration processes as well as the development of people’s alternatives.

The initiative People’s Agenda for Alternative Regionalisms, draws from the work and relates to regional alliances such as Hemispheric Social Alliance (Latin America), Southern African People’s Solidarity Network- SAPSN (Southern Africa), Solidarity for Asian People’s Advocacy – SAPA (South East Asia), People’s SAARC (South Asia) as well as organisations and networks in Europe, including Transnational Institute (TNI), that struggle for “Another Europe”.

Ultimately, PAAR aims to support these and other networks in their efforts to RECLAIM the regions, RECREATE the processes of regional integration and ADVANCE people-centered regional alternatives.

VIANA, rx
André Rego; BARROS, Pedro Silva; CALIXTRE, ask André Bojikian (Org.) Governança global e integração da América do Sul . Brasília : Ipea, 2011. 314 p. : il., gráfs.

Estuda os impactos da globalização sobre a integração sul-americana. Explica como os países da América Latina puderam encaminhar uma concepção própria de integração regional, com a experiência do Mercosul. Trata do novo processo de integração voltado para a constituição de políticas públicas e compartilhamento de experiências, sobretudo no âmbito das políticas sociais.

Descargue el libro aqui
 
INTRODUÇÃO
Theotônio dos Santos
 
CAPÍTULO 1 UNIPOLARIDADE E MULTIPOLARIDADE: NOVAS ESTRUTURAS NA GEOPOLÍTICA INTERNACIONAL E OS BRICS
Franklin Trein
 
CAPÍTULO 2 INTEGRAÇÃO SUL-AMERICANA: OPORTUNIDADES E DESAFIOS PARA UMA MAIOR PARTICIPAÇÃO
DO CONTINENTE NA GOV ERNANÇA GLOBAL
Walter Antonio Desiderá Neto
 
CAPÍTULO 3 A América Latina e a Economia Mundial: Conjuntura, Desenvolvimento e Prospectiva
Carlos Eduardo Martins
 
CAPÍTULO 4 OU INVENTAMOS OU ERRAMOS – ENCRUZIL HADAS DA INTEGRAÇÃO REGIONAL SUL-AMERICANA
Carlos Walter Porto-Gonçalves
 
CAPÍTULO 5 ALÉM DA CIRCUNSTÂNCIA: CAMINHOS DA INTEGRAÇÃO SUL-AMERICANA – DO MERCOSUL À UNASUL
André Bojikian Calixtre e Pedro Silva Barros
 
CAPÍTULO 6 RECURSOS NATURAIS E A GEOPOLÍTICA DA INTEGRAÇÃO SUL-AMERICANA
Monica Bruckmann
 
CAPÍTULO 7 O BANCO DO SUL – ARQUITETURA INSTITUCIONAL E PROCESSO DE NEGOCIAÇÃO DENTRO DE UMA ESTRATÉGIA ALTERNATIVA DE DESENVOLVIM ENTO NA AMÉRICA DO SUL
Marcelo Dias Carcanholo
 
CAPÍTULO 8 A PETROBRAS NA AMÉRICA DO SUL
Luiz Fernando Sanná Pinto

VIANA, ambulance ambulance André Rego; BARROS, Pedro Silva; CALIXTRE, André Bojikian (Org.) Governança global e integração da América do Sul . Brasília : Ipea, 2011. 314 p. : il., gráfs.

Estuda os impactos da globalização sobre a integração sul-americana. Explica como os países da América Latina puderam encaminhar uma concepção própria de integração regional, com a experiência do Mercosul. Trata do novo processo de integração voltado para a constituição de políticas públicas e compartilhamento de experiências, sobretudo no âmbito das políticas sociais.

 

Descargue el libro aqui
 
INTRODUÇÃO
Theotônio dos Santos
CAPÍTULO 1 UNIPOLARIDADE E MULTIPOLARIDADE: NOVAS ESTRUTURAS NA GEOPOLÍTICA INTERNACIONAL E OS BRICS
Franklin Trein
CAPÍTULO 2 INTEGRAÇÃO SUL-AMERICANA: OPORTUNIDADES E DESAFIOS PARA UMA MAIOR PARTICIPAÇÃO
DO CONTINENTE NA GOV ERNANÇA GLOBAL
Walter Antonio Desiderá Neto
CAPÍTULO 3 A América Latina e a Economia Mundial: Conjuntura, Desenvolvimento e Prospectiva
Carlos Eduardo Martins
CAPÍTULO 4 OU INVENTAMOS OU ERRAMOS – ENCRUZIL HADAS DA INTEGRAÇÃO REGIONAL SUL-AMERICANA
Carlos Walter Porto-Gonçalves
CAPÍTULO 5 ALÉM DA CIRCUNSTÂNCIA: CAMINHOS DA INTEGRAÇÃO SUL-AMERICANA – DO MERCOSUL À UNASUL
André Bojikian Calixtre e Pedro Silva Barros
CAPÍTULO 6 RECURSOS NATURAIS E A GEOPOLÍTICA DA INTEGRAÇÃO SUL-AMERICANA
Monica Bruckmann
CAPÍTULO 7 O BANCO DO SUL – ARQUITETURA INSTITUCIONAL E PROCESSO DE NEGOCIAÇÃO DENTRO DE UMA ESTRATÉGIA ALTERNATIVA DE DESENVOLVIM ENTO NA AMÉRICA DO SUL
Marcelo Dias Carcanholo
CAPÍTULO 8 A PETROBRAS NA AMÉRICA DO SUL
Luiz Fernando Sanná Pinto

VIANA, drugstore André Rego; BARROS, Pedro Silva; CALIXTRE, André Bojikian (Org.) Governança global e integração da América do Sul . Brasília : Ipea, 2011. 314 p. : il., gráfs.

Estuda os impactos da globalização sobre a integração sul-americana. Explica como os países da América Latina puderam encaminhar uma concepção própria de integração regional, com a experiência do Mercosul. Trata do novo processo de integração voltado para a constituição de políticas públicas e compartilhamento de experiências, sobretudo no âmbito das políticas sociais.

 

Descargue el libro aqui
 
INTRODUÇÃO
Theotônio dos Santos
CAPÍTULO 1 UNIPOLARIDADE E MULTIPOLARIDADE: NOVAS ESTRUTURAS NA GEOPOLÍTICA INTERNACIONAL E OS BRICS
Franklin Trein
CAPÍTULO 2 INTEGRAÇÃO SUL-AMERICANA: OPORTUNIDADES E DESAFIOS PARA UMA MAIOR PARTICIPAÇÃO
DO CONTINENTE NA GOV ERNANÇA GLOBAL
Walter Antonio Desiderá Neto
CAPÍTULO 3 A América Latina e a Economia Mundial: Conjuntura, Desenvolvimento e Prospectiva
Carlos Eduardo Martins
CAPÍTULO 4 OU INVENTAMOS OU ERRAMOS – ENCRUZIL HADAS DA INTEGRAÇÃO REGIONAL SUL-AMERICANA
Carlos Walter Porto-Gonçalves
CAPÍTULO 5 ALÉM DA CIRCUNSTÂNCIA: CAMINHOS DA INTEGRAÇÃO SUL-AMERICANA – DO MERCOSUL À UNASUL
André Bojikian Calixtre e Pedro Silva Barros
CAPÍTULO 6 RECURSOS NATURAIS E A GEOPOLÍTICA DA INTEGRAÇÃO SUL-AMERICANA
Monica Bruckmann
CAPÍTULO 7 O BANCO DO SUL – ARQUITETURA INSTITUCIONAL E PROCESSO DE NEGOCIAÇÃO DENTRO DE UMA ESTRATÉGIA ALTERNATIVA DE DESENVOLVIM ENTO NA AMÉRICA DO SUL
Marcelo Dias Carcanholo
CAPÍTULO 8 A PETROBRAS NA AMÉRICA DO SUL
Luiz Fernando Sanná Pinto

VIANA, André Rego; BARROS, Pedro Silva; CALIXTRE, André Bojikian (Org.) Governança global e integração da América do Sul . Brasília : Ipea, 2011. 314 p. : il., gráfs.

Estuda os impactos da globalização sobre a integração sul-americana. Explica como os países da América Latina puderam encaminhar uma concepção própria de integração regional, com a experiência do Mercosul. Trata do novo processo de integração voltado para a constituição de políticas públicas e compartilhamento de experiências, sobretudo no âmbito das políticas sociais.

 

Descargue el libro aqui
 
INTRODUÇÃO
Theotônio dos Santos
CAPÍTULO 1 UNIPOLARIDADE E MULTIPOLARIDADE: NOVAS ESTRUTURAS NA GEOPOLÍTICA INTERNACIONAL E OS BRICS
Franklin Trein
CAPÍTULO 2 INTEGRAÇÃO SUL-AMERICANA: OPORTUNIDADES E DESAFIOS PARA UMA MAIOR PARTICIPAÇÃO
DO CONTINENTE NA GOV ERNANÇA GLOBAL
Walter Antonio Desiderá Neto
CAPÍTULO 3 A América Latina e a Economia Mundial: Conjuntura, Desenvolvimento e Prospectiva
Carlos Eduardo Martins
CAPÍTULO 4 OU INVENTAMOS OU ERRAMOS – ENCRUZIL HADAS DA INTEGRAÇÃO REGIONAL SUL-AMERICANA
Carlos Walter Porto-Gonçalves
CAPÍTULO 5 ALÉM DA CIRCUNSTÂNCIA: CAMINHOS DA INTEGRAÇÃO SUL-AMERICANA – DO MERCOSUL À UNASUL
André Bojikian Calixtre e Pedro Silva Barros
CAPÍTULO 6 RECURSOS NATURAIS E A GEOPOLÍTICA DA INTEGRAÇÃO SUL-AMERICANA
Monica Bruckmann
CAPÍTULO 7 O BANCO DO SUL – ARQUITETURA INSTITUCIONAL E PROCESSO DE NEGOCIAÇÃO DENTRO DE UMA ESTRATÉGIA ALTERNATIVA DE DESENVOLVIM ENTO NA AMÉRICA DO SUL
Marcelo Dias Carcanholo
CAPÍTULO 8 A PETROBRAS NA AMÉRICA DO SUL
Luiz Fernando Sanná Pinto

VIANA, unhealthy André Rego; BARROS, health Pedro Silva; CALIXTRE, André Bojikian (Org.) Governança global e integração da América do Sul . Brasília : Ipea, 2011. 314 p. : il., gráfs.

Estuda os impactos da globalização sobre a integração sul-americana. Explica como os países da América Latina puderam encaminhar uma concepção própria de integração regional, com a experiência do Mercosul. Trata do novo processo de integração voltado para a constituição de políticas públicas e compartilhamento de experiências, sobretudo no âmbito das políticas sociais.

 

Descargue el libro aqui
 
INTRODUÇÃO
Theotônio dos Santos
 
CAPÍTULO 1 UNIPOLARIDADE E MULTIPOLARIDADE: NOVAS ESTRUTURAS NA GEOPOLÍTICA INTERNACIONAL E OS BRICS
Franklin Trein
 
CAPÍTULO 2 INTEGRAÇÃO SUL-AMERICANA: OPORTUNIDADES E DESAFIOS PARA UMA MAIOR PARTICIPAÇÃO
DO CONTINENTE NA GOV ERNANÇA GLOBAL
Walter Antonio Desiderá Neto
 
CAPÍTULO 3 A América Latina e a Economia Mundial: Conjuntura, Desenvolvimento e Prospectiva
Carlos Eduardo Martins
 
CAPÍTULO 4 OU INVENTAMOS OU ERRAMOS – ENCRUZIL HADAS DA INTEGRAÇÃO REGIONAL SUL-AMERICANA
Carlos Walter Porto-Gonçalves
 
CAPÍTULO 5 ALÉM DA CIRCUNSTÂNCIA: CAMINHOS DA INTEGRAÇÃO SUL-AMERICANA – DO MERCOSUL À UNASUL
André Bojikian Calixtre e Pedro Silva Barros
 
CAPÍTULO 6 RECURSOS NATURAIS E A GEOPOLÍTICA DA INTEGRAÇÃO SUL-AMERICANA
Monica Bruckmann
 
CAPÍTULO 7 O BANCO DO SUL – ARQUITETURA INSTITUCIONAL E PROCESSO DE NEGOCIAÇÃO DENTRO DE UMA ESTRATÉGIA ALTERNATIVA DE DESENVOLVIM ENTO NA AMÉRICA DO SUL
Marcelo Dias Carcanholo
 
CAPÍTULO 8 A PETROBRAS NA AMÉRICA DO SUL
Luiz Fernando Sanná Pinto

VIANA, view André Rego; BARROS, prostate Pedro Silva; CALIXTRE, buy André Bojikian (Org.) Governança global e integração da América do Sul . Brasília : Ipea, 2011. 314 p. : il., gráfs.

Estuda os impactos da globalização sobre a integração sul-americana. Explica como os países da América Latina puderam encaminhar uma concepção própria de integração regional, com a experiência do Mercosul. Trata do novo processo de integração voltado para a constituição de políticas públicas e compartilhamento de experiências, sobretudo no âmbito das políticas sociais.

Descargue el libro aqui
 
INTRODUÇÃO
Theotônio dos Santos
 
CAPÍTULO 1 UNIPOLARIDADE E MULTIPOLARIDADE: NOVAS ESTRUTURAS NA GEOPOLÍTICA INTERNACIONAL E OS BRICS
Franklin Trein
 
CAPÍTULO 2 INTEGRAÇÃO SUL-AMERICANA: OPORTUNIDADES E DESAFIOS PARA UMA MAIOR PARTICIPAÇÃO
DO CONTINENTE NA GOV ERNANÇA GLOBAL
Walter Antonio Desiderá Neto
 
CAPÍTULO 3 A América Latina e a Economia Mundial: Conjuntura, Desenvolvimento e Prospectiva
Carlos Eduardo Martins
 
CAPÍTULO 4 OU INVENTAMOS OU ERRAMOS – ENCRUZIL HADAS DA INTEGRAÇÃO REGIONAL SUL-AMERICANA
Carlos Walter Porto-Gonçalves
 
CAPÍTULO 5 ALÉM DA CIRCUNSTÂNCIA: CAMINHOS DA INTEGRAÇÃO SUL-AMERICANA – DO MERCOSUL À UNASUL
André Bojikian Calixtre e Pedro Silva Barros
 
CAPÍTULO 6 RECURSOS NATURAIS E A GEOPOLÍTICA DA INTEGRAÇÃO SUL-AMERICANA
Monica Bruckmann
 
CAPÍTULO 7 O BANCO DO SUL – ARQUITETURA INSTITUCIONAL E PROCESSO DE NEGOCIAÇÃO DENTRO DE UMA ESTRATÉGIA ALTERNATIVA DE DESENVOLVIM ENTO NA AMÉRICA DO SUL
Marcelo Dias Carcanholo
 
CAPÍTULO 8 A PETROBRAS NA AMÉRICA DO SUL
Luiz Fernando Sanná Pinto

The Charter of Social Movements of the Americas, nurse approved in Belem do Para during the World Social Forum, pilule constitutes an initiative that deserves all the attention and support of the movements, networks, and organizations committed to the present and to the future of our peoples.  The charter calls for integration from below, using as a reference the principles of ALBA (The Bolivarian Alternative for Latin America and the Caribbean).

 

Read the full article here.

La Carta de los Movimientos Sociales de las Américas aprobada en Belem de Pará en el Foro Social Mundial, healing constituye una iniciativa que merece toda la atención y apoyo de los movimientos, see redes y organizaciones comprometidos con el presente y el futuro de nuestros pueblos.  En ella se llama a una integración desde abajo tomando los principios del ALBA (Alternativa Bolivariana para América Latina y el Caribe) como referente.


Lea el articulo completo aqui

Peoples' Integration

Global crises, regional solutions

Perspectives from Asia, Africa, Latin America and Europe

Can regional integration offer a way out of the current economic, climate, food and energy crises? In this video documentary, activists from across the globe* argue that regional integration is the only viable response to these crises.

 CHAPTERS
1 – Why are the regions relevant in a context of global crises?
* No country can face the crises on its own
* Regional Integration: Breaking the dependence from global markets

* Alternative Regional integration: towards a different development model
* People-Centred regional integration: much more than economic cooperation
2 – What issues are best dealt with at regional level?
3 –Reclaiming the regions: the role of social actors

 

You can jump from chapter to chapter clicking on the arrows at the bottom of the video.


 

Video Documentary | 26 minutes | April 2012

Produced by: Transnational Institute, in cooperation with Focus on the Global South and Hemispheric Social Alliance. This video is part of the Initiative People’s Agenda for Alternative Regionalisms (PAAR) – http://www.alternative-regionalisms.org/

Interviews and Script: Cecilia Olivet

Video editing and animations: Ricardo Santos

If you would like to order a copy, contact ceciliaolivet@tni.org


* LIST OF ACTIVISTS THAT CONTRIBUTED TO THE VIDEO

Brid Brennan (Transnational Institute, The Netherlands), Charles Santiago (Member of Parliament, Malaysia), Demba Moussa Dembele (African Forum on Alternatives, Senegal), Dot Keet (South Africa), Edilberto Saucedo (Central Nacional de Organizaciones Campesinas, Indigenas y Populares, Paraguay), Enrique Daza (Secretario Ejecutivo, Alianza Social Continental, Colombia), Francisca Rodríguez (ANAMURI/CLOC, Chile), Gonzalo Berron (Confederación Sindical de las Americas/Alianza Social Continental, Brasil), Graciela Rodríguez (IGTN/REBRIP, Brazil), Hector de la Cueva (Red Mexicana de Accion Frente al Libre Comercio, México), Juan Gonzalez (Central de Trabajadores Argentinos CTA, Argentina), Lodwick Chizarura (SEATINI, Zimbabwe), Maria Elena Saludas (ATTAC, Argentina), Marika Frangakis (Nicos Poulantzas Institute and EuroMemo Group, Greece), Meena Menon (Focus on the Global South, India), Nalu Faria (Marcha Mundial de las Mujeres, Brazil), Narciso Castillo (Central Nacional de Trabajadores, Paraguay), Natalia Carrau (REDES – Amigos de la Tierra, Uruguay), Pablo Bertinat (Cono Sur Sustenable, Argentina), Pezo Mateo-Phiri (Southern Africa People’s Solidarity Network SAPSN, Zambia), Ranga Machemedze (SEATINI, Zimbawe), Roberto Colman (Sindicato de Trabajadores de la ANDE/Coordinadora Soberanía Energética, Paraguay), Tetteh Hormeku  (Third World Network/African Trade Network, Ghana), Thomas Wallgren (Philosopher/Social Activist, Finland), Walden Bello (Member of Parliament, Philippines), Yap Swee Seng (FORUM-ASIA, Thailand)

Global crises, regional solutions

Perspectives from Asia, mind Africa, site Latin America and Europe

Can regional integration offer a way out of the current economic, climate, food and energy crises? In this video documentary, activists from across the globe* argue that regional integration is the only viable response to these crises.

 CHAPTERS
1 – Why are the regions relevant in a context of global crises?
* No country can face the crises on its own
* Regional Integration: Breaking the dependence from global markets

* Alternative Regional integration: towards a different development model
* People-Centred regional integration: much more than economic cooperation
2 – What issues are best dealt with at regional level?
3 –Reclaiming the regions: the role of social actors


 

Video Documentary | 26 minutes | April 2012

Produced by: Transnational Institute, in cooperation with Focus on the Global South and Hemispheric Social Alliance. This video is part of the Initiative People’s Agenda for Alternative Regionalisms (PAAR) – http://www.alternative-regionalisms.org/

Interviews and Script: Cecilia Olivet

Video editing and animations: Ricardo Santos

If you would like to order a copy, contact ceciliaolivet@tni.org


* LIST OF ACTIVISTS THAT CONTRIBUTED TO THE VIDEO

Brid Brennan (Transnational Institute, The Netherlands), Charles Santiago (Member of Parliament, Malaysia), Demba Moussa Dembele (African Forum on Alternatives, Senegal), Dot Keet (South Africa), Edilberto Saucedo (Central Nacional de Organizaciones Campesinas, Indigenas y Populares, Paraguay), Enrique Daza (Secretario Ejecutivo, Alianza Social Continental, Colombia), Francisca Rodríguez (ANAMURI/CLOC, Chile), Gonzalo Berron (Confederación Sindical de las Americas/Alianza Social Continental, Brasil), Graciela Rodríguez (IGTN/REBRIP, Brazil), Hector de la Cueva (Red Mexicana de Accion Frente al Libre Comercio, México), Juan Gonzalez (Central de Trabajadores Argentinos CTA, Argentina), Lodwick Chizarura (SEATINI, Zimbabwe), Maria Elena Saludas (ATTAC, Argentina), Marika Frangakis (Nicos Poulantzas Institute and EuroMemo Group, Greece), Meena Menon (Focus on the Global South, India), Nalu Faria (Marcha Mundial de las Mujeres, Brazil), Narciso Castillo (Central Nacional de Trabajadores, Paraguay), Natalia Carrau (REDES – Amigos de la Tierra, Uruguay), Pablo Bertinat (Cono Sur Sustenable, Argentina), Pezo Mateo-Phiri (Southern Africa People’s Solidarity Network SAPSN, Zambia), Ranga Machemedze (SEATINI, Zimbawe), Roberto Colman (Sindicato de Trabajadores de la ANDE/Coordinadora Soberanía Energética, Paraguay), Tetteh Hormeku  (Third World Network/African Trade Network, Ghana), Thomas Wallgren (Philosopher/Social Activist, Finland), Walden Bello (Member of Parliament, Philippines), Yap Swee Seng (FORUM-ASIA, Thailand)

Global crises, remedy regional solutions

Perspectives from Asia, Africa, nurse Latin America and Europe

Can regional integration offer a way out of the current economic, climate, food and energy crises? In this video documentary, activists from across the globe* argue that regional integration is the only viable response to these crises.

 CHAPTERS
1 – Why are the regions relevant in a context of global crises?
* No country can face the crises on its own
* Regional Integration: Breaking the dependence from global markets
* Alternative Regional integration: towards a different development model
* People-Centred regional integration: much more than economic cooperation
2 – What issues are best dealt with at regional level?
3 –Reclaiming the regions: the role of social actors


You can jump from chapter to chapter clicking on the arrows at the bottom of the video.

[embedplusvideo height=”300″ width=”430″ standard=”http://www.youtube.com/v/kvB7c7X5qUc?fs=1″ vars=”ytid=kvB7c7X5qUc&width=430&height=300&start=&stop=&hd=0&react=1&chapters=0,97,112,284,408,720,984,1264,1522&notes=1522%7eCredits” id=”ep6813″ /]

Video Documentary | 26 minutes | April 2012

Produced by: Transnational Institute, in cooperation with Focus on the Global South and Hemispheric Social Alliance. This video is part of the Initiative People’s Agenda for Alternative Regionalisms (PAAR) – http://www.alternative-regionalisms.org/

Interviews and Script: Cecilia Olivet

Video editing and animations: Ricardo Santos

If you would like to order a copy, contact ceciliaolivet@tni.org


* LIST OF ACTIVISTS THAT CONTRIBUTED TO THE VIDEO

Brid Brennan (Transnational Institute, The Netherlands), Charles Santiago (Member of Parliament, Malaysia), Demba Moussa Dembele (African Forum on Alternatives, Senegal), Dot Keet (South Africa), Edilberto Saucedo (Central Nacional de Organizaciones Campesinas, Indigenas y Populares, Paraguay), Enrique Daza (Secretario Ejecutivo, Alianza Social Continental, Colombia), Francisca Rodríguez (ANAMURI/CLOC, Chile), Gonzalo Berron (Confederación Sindical de las Americas/Alianza Social Continental, Brasil), Graciela Rodríguez (IGTN/REBRIP, Brazil), Hector de la Cueva (Red Mexicana de Accion Frente al Libre Comercio, México), Juan Gonzalez (Central de Trabajadores Argentinos CTA, Argentina), Lodwick Chizarura (SEATINI, Zimbabwe), Maria Elena Saludas (ATTAC, Argentina), Marika Frangakis (Nicos Poulantzas Institute and EuroMemo Group, Greece), Meena Menon (Focus on the Global South, India), Nalu Faria (Marcha Mundial de las Mujeres, Brazil), Narciso Castillo (Central Nacional de Trabajadores, Paraguay), Natalia Carrau (REDES – Amigos de la Tierra, Uruguay), Pablo Bertinat (Cono Sur Sustenable, Argentina), Pezo Mateo-Phiri (Southern Africa People’s Solidarity Network SAPSN, Zambia), Ranga Machemedze (SEATINI, Zimbawe), Roberto Colman (Sindicato de Trabajadores de la ANDE/Coordinadora Soberanía Energética, Paraguay), Tetteh Hormeku  (Third World Network/African Trade Network, Ghana), Thomas Wallgren (Philosopher/Social Activist, Finland), Walden Bello (Member of Parliament, Philippines), Yap Swee Seng (FORUM-ASIA, Thailand)

Global crises, regional solutions

Perspectives from Asia, view Africa, sovaldi Latin America and Europe

Can regional integration offer a way out of the current economic, climate, food and energy crises? In this video documentary, activists from across the globe* argue that regional integration is the only viable response to these crises.

 CHAPTERS
1 – Why are the regions relevant in a context of global crises?
* No country can face the crises on its own
* Regional Integration: Breaking the dependence from global markets

* Alternative Regional integration: towards a different development model
* People-Centred regional integration: much more than economic cooperation
2 – What issues are best dealt with at regional level?
3 –Reclaiming the regions: the role of social actors

 

You can jump from chapter to chapter clicking on the arrows at the bottom of the video.

 


 

Video Documentary | 26 minutes | April 2012

Produced by: Transnational Institute, in cooperation with Focus on the Global South and Hemispheric Social Alliance. This video is part of the Initiative People’s Agenda for Alternative Regionalisms (PAAR) – http://www.alternative-regionalisms.org/

Interviews and Script: Cecilia Olivet

Video editing and animations: Ricardo Santos

If you would like to order a copy, contact ceciliaolivet@tni.org


* LIST OF ACTIVISTS THAT CONTRIBUTED TO THE VIDEO

Brid Brennan (Transnational Institute, The Netherlands), Charles Santiago (Member of Parliament, Malaysia), Demba Moussa Dembele (African Forum on Alternatives, Senegal), Dot Keet (South Africa), Edilberto Saucedo (Central Nacional de Organizaciones Campesinas, Indigenas y Populares, Paraguay), Enrique Daza (Secretario Ejecutivo, Alianza Social Continental, Colombia), Francisca Rodríguez (ANAMURI/CLOC, Chile), Gonzalo Berron (Confederación Sindical de las Americas/Alianza Social Continental, Brasil), Graciela Rodríguez (IGTN/REBRIP, Brazil), Hector de la Cueva (Red Mexicana de Accion Frente al Libre Comercio, México), Juan Gonzalez (Central de Trabajadores Argentinos CTA, Argentina), Lodwick Chizarura (SEATINI, Zimbabwe), Maria Elena Saludas (ATTAC, Argentina), Marika Frangakis (Nicos Poulantzas Institute and EuroMemo Group, Greece), Meena Menon (Focus on the Global South, India), Nalu Faria (Marcha Mundial de las Mujeres, Brazil), Narciso Castillo (Central Nacional de Trabajadores, Paraguay), Natalia Carrau (REDES – Amigos de la Tierra, Uruguay), Pablo Bertinat (Cono Sur Sustenable, Argentina), Pezo Mateo-Phiri (Southern Africa People’s Solidarity Network SAPSN, Zambia), Ranga Machemedze (SEATINI, Zimbawe), Roberto Colman (Sindicato de Trabajadores de la ANDE/Coordinadora Soberanía Energética, Paraguay), Tetteh Hormeku  (Third World Network/African Trade Network, Ghana), Thomas Wallgren (Philosopher/Social Activist, Finland), Walden Bello (Member of Parliament, Philippines), Yap Swee Seng (FORUM-ASIA, Thailand)

Global crises, regional solutions

Perspectives from Asia, Africa, diagnosis Latin America and Europe

Can regional integration offer a way out of the current economic, climate, food and energy crises? In this video documentary, activists from across the globe* argue that regional integration is the only viable response to these crises.

 CHAPTERS
1 – Why are the regions relevant in a context of global crises?
* No country can face the crises on its own
* Regional Integration: Breaking the dependence from global markets

* Alternative Regional integration: towards a different development model
* People-Centred regional integration: much more than economic cooperation
2 – What issues are best dealt with at regional level?
3 –Reclaiming the regions: the role of social actors

You can jump from chapter to chapter clicking on the arrows at the bottom of the video. You will see the arrows, only after you start playing.

 


 

Video Documentary | 26 minutes | April 2012

Produced by: Transnational Institute, in cooperation with Focus on the Global South and Hemispheric Social Alliance. This video is part of the Initiative People’s Agenda for Alternative Regionalisms (PAAR) – http://www.alternative-regionalisms.org/

Interviews and Script: Cecilia Olivet

Video editing and animations: Ricardo Santos

If you would like to order a copy, contact ceciliaolivet@tni.org


* LIST OF ACTIVISTS THAT CONTRIBUTED TO THE VIDEO

Brid Brennan (Transnational Institute, The Netherlands), Charles Santiago (Member of Parliament, Malaysia), Demba Moussa Dembele (African Forum on Alternatives, Senegal), Dot Keet (South Africa), Edilberto Saucedo (Central Nacional de Organizaciones Campesinas, Indigenas y Populares, Paraguay), Enrique Daza (Secretario Ejecutivo, Alianza Social Continental, Colombia), Francisca Rodríguez (ANAMURI/CLOC, Chile), Gonzalo Berron (Confederación Sindical de las Americas/Alianza Social Continental, Brasil), Graciela Rodríguez (IGTN/REBRIP, Brazil), Hector de la Cueva (Red Mexicana de Accion Frente al Libre Comercio, México), Juan Gonzalez (Central de Trabajadores Argentinos CTA, Argentina), Lodwick Chizarura (SEATINI, Zimbabwe), Maria Elena Saludas (ATTAC, Argentina), Marika Frangakis (Nicos Poulantzas Institute and EuroMemo Group, Greece), Meena Menon (Focus on the Global South, India), Nalu Faria (Marcha Mundial de las Mujeres, Brazil), Narciso Castillo (Central Nacional de Trabajadores, Paraguay), Natalia Carrau (REDES – Amigos de la Tierra, Uruguay), Pablo Bertinat (Cono Sur Sustenable, Argentina), Pezo Mateo-Phiri (Southern Africa People’s Solidarity Network SAPSN, Zambia), Ranga Machemedze (SEATINI, Zimbawe), Roberto Colman (Sindicato de Trabajadores de la ANDE/Coordinadora Soberanía Energética, Paraguay), Tetteh Hormeku  (Third World Network/African Trade Network, Ghana), Thomas Wallgren (Philosopher/Social Activist, Finland), Walden Bello (Member of Parliament, Philippines), Yap Swee Seng (FORUM-ASIA, Thailand)

Global crises, salve healing regional solutions

Perspectives from Asia, ambulance Africa, illness Latin America and Europe

Can regional integration offer a way out of the current economic, climate, food and energy crises? In this video documentary, activists from across the globe* argue that regional integration is the only viable response to these crises.

 CHAPTERS
1 – Why are the regions relevant in a context of global crises?
* No country can face the crises on its own
* Regional Integration: Breaking the dependence from global markets

* Alternative Regional integration: towards a different development model
* People-Centred regional integration: much more than economic cooperation
2 – What issues are best dealt with at regional level?
3 –Reclaiming the regions: the role of social actors


You can jump from chapter to chapter clicking on the arrows at the bottom of the video. You will see the arrows, only after you start playing.

 

Video Documentary | 26 minutes | April 2012

Produced by: Transnational Institute, in cooperation with Focus on the Global South and Hemispheric Social Alliance. This video is part of the Initiative People’s Agenda for Alternative Regionalisms (PAAR) – http://www.alternative-regionalisms.org/

Interviews and Script: Cecilia Olivet

Video editing and animations: Ricardo Santos

If you would like to order a copy, contact ceciliaolivet@tni.org


* LIST OF ACTIVISTS THAT CONTRIBUTED TO THE VIDEO

Brid Brennan (Transnational Institute, The Netherlands), Charles Santiago (Member of Parliament, Malaysia), Demba Moussa Dembele (African Forum on Alternatives, Senegal), Dot Keet (South Africa), Edilberto Saucedo (Central Nacional de Organizaciones Campesinas, Indigenas y Populares, Paraguay), Enrique Daza (Secretario Ejecutivo, Alianza Social Continental, Colombia), Francisca Rodríguez (ANAMURI/CLOC, Chile), Gonzalo Berron (Confederación Sindical de las Americas/Alianza Social Continental, Brasil), Graciela Rodríguez (IGTN/REBRIP, Brazil), Hector de la Cueva (Red Mexicana de Accion Frente al Libre Comercio, México), Juan Gonzalez (Central de Trabajadores Argentinos CTA, Argentina), Lodwick Chizarura (SEATINI, Zimbabwe), Maria Elena Saludas (ATTAC, Argentina), Marika Frangakis (Nicos Poulantzas Institute and EuroMemo Group, Greece), Meena Menon (Focus on the Global South, India), Nalu Faria (Marcha Mundial de las Mujeres, Brazil), Narciso Castillo (Central Nacional de Trabajadores, Paraguay), Natalia Carrau (REDES – Amigos de la Tierra, Uruguay), Pablo Bertinat (Cono Sur Sustenable, Argentina), Pezo Mateo-Phiri (Southern Africa People’s Solidarity Network SAPSN, Zambia), Ranga Machemedze (SEATINI, Zimbawe), Roberto Colman (Sindicato de Trabajadores de la ANDE/Coordinadora Soberanía Energética, Paraguay), Tetteh Hormeku  (Third World Network/African Trade Network, Ghana), Thomas Wallgren (Philosopher/Social Activist, Finland), Walden Bello (Member of Parliament, Philippines), Yap Swee Seng (FORUM-ASIA, Thailand)

Task Force on ASEAN Migrant Workers

Immediate Release: 23 April 2012

ASEAN Framework Instrument is a must for the protection of the rights of migrant workers in the face of widespread migrant protests in Thailand

Recent strikes in two large international export processing companies in Thailand, prostate the Phatthana Seafood Co and Vita Food Factory, troche have again exposed harsh and exploitative realities of the lives of thousands of migrant workers, both document and undocumented, from Myanmar and Cambodia. These strikes also unveiled large scale involvement of unregulated and abusive trafficking agents and brokers in supplying labour to these and other factories across the ASEAN region. In recent days, strikes by migrant workers in Thailand are becoming more widespread as a result of employers seeking to avoid paying migrant workers higher wages in line with the recent  increase in Thailand’s minimum wage.

The Phattana seafood plant in Songkla and Vita food factory in Kanchanaburi employed some undocumented migrant workers, who were particularly vulnerable to abuses that could be classified as trafficking. Even those documented migrant workers in Phattana who came to Thailand through formal channels alleged that the company confiscated their passports, forced them into a situation of debt bondage and paid them barely enough to secure adequate food for their survival.   These are clear violations of Thai labor law as well as the contracts the migrant workers signed when they were recruited by manpower agencies in Cambodia and Myanmar. 
 
The Vita Food Factory in Kanchanaburi employs 7,000 workers, mostly from Myanmar, and approximately 1,000 are undocumented. The documented workers with work permits paid brokers 5,500 baht for those documents although the official fee is 3,800 baht. More than 4,000 migrant workers protested at the pineapple factory (Vita Food) demanding an increase in their  daily wage to bring it into compliance with the recently increased minimum wage. The workers allege that the employer withheld food allowances and changed payment terms in an effort to reduce payments to workers under the increased minimum wage enacted by the Royal Thai Government (RTG) starting from 1st April 2012.

Most migrants from Thailand’s neighbouring countries enter Thailand without documentation, but they are permitted to work temporarily in a “pending deportation” status set out by the Royal Thai Government (RTG). In recent years, many of these workers have become regularised and there has been an increase in legal import of workers into Thailand as well.  But the TFAMW continues however to be deeply concerned for the more then 2 million migrants from Myanmar, Cambodia and Laos working in Thailand in exploitative conditions. We urge the RTG to investigate abuses against migrants, ensure pay and working conditions meet all applicable labour laws, and play a positive role in assisting negotiations with protesting migrant workers in any and all factories where workers are protesting in Thailand at this time.

Unilateral and Bilateral policies are ineffective and weak in implementation

The TFAMW urges Thailand to recognize and take action to solve these problems facing Cambodian and Myanmar workers living and working in Thailand. 

Ø       The RTG, and especially the Ministry of Labor, should significantly increase penalties against employers who seize migrant workers’ identity documents and should publicly campaign among Thai employers to ensure that they understand confiscation/holding of documents will not be tolerated.
Ø       The RTG’s Ministry of Labor should carry out a comprehensive investigation of the situation in Phatthana seafood and Vita food factories, and make that report public.
Ø       Thailand should ensure effective implementation of the 2008 Anti-Trafficking Law and improve coordination with Cambodia and Myanmar governments and civil society advocates in cases of cross-border trafficking, including reinvigorating the implementation of the bilateral anti-trafficking agreements with Cambodia and Myanmar. 
Ø       Thailand should ensure the effective operation of five additional new nationality verification centers based in Thailand which will enable Myanmar migrant workers to regularize their status. However, urgent solutions must be devised to also protect the rights of the more than one million undocumented Myanmar migrants working within Thailand
Ø       Thailand should conduct a comprehensive public relations campaign to inform employers of migrant workers that they must comply with increased minimum wage provisions and scrupulously follow all aspects of Thai labor law. 
Ø       Thailand should ensure that migrant workers are permitted to join and receive benefits from the Workman’s Compensation Fund, and order the Social Security Officer (SSO) to ensure all are treated equally, regardless of national origin, in receipt of benefits. 

Regional Framework Instrument to ensure basic human and labour rights are respected

ASEAN urgently needs to adopt a binding Regional Framework Instrument on the Protection and Promotion of the Rights of Migrant Workers, and include ASEAN civil society groups on discussions about the Framework Instrument.  The ASEAN Declaration on the Protection and Promotion of the Rights of Migrant Workers, which was adopted  at the 12th ASEAN Summit in 2007 in Cebu, the Philippines, clearly urges (in article 22 of the Declaration) that the ASEAN governments to negotiate and elaborate an ASEAN Framework Instrument.  However, to date, this Framework Instrument effort has been slowed by obstructionist tactics of labour receiving countries, and raises serious concerns about the commitment of labor-receiving countries to protect migrant workers’ rights. 

As ASEAN evolves into an integrated economic community in 2015, a major challenge will be to draft, agree, and effectively implement a legally binding ASEAN Framework Instrument on the Protection and Promotion of the Rights of Migrant Workers.

The 2007 ASEAN Declaration details the responsibilities of ASEAN Member States to protect and promote the rights of migrant workers and members of their families during the entire migration process. ASEAN Member States are also required to consult and cooperate with a view to promoting decent, humane, productive, dignified and remunerative employment for migrant workers. This is affirmed in the Roadmap for an ASEAN Community (2009-2015).

The ASEAN Committee of Migrant Workers (ACMW) had their Drafting Meeting on the ASEAN Framework Instrument (Agreement) in Singapore on 3-4 April 2012. The ASEAN Summit Chairman’s Statement noted:  “59. We welcomed the convening of the 22nd ASEAN Labour Ministers Meeting (ALMM) in May 2012, in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. We tasked the ASEAN Labour Ministers to continue their work to implement the ASEAN Declaration on the Protection and Promotion of the Rights of Migrant Workers, including to take a phased approach in the development of an ASEAN Instrument on the Protection and Promotion of the Rights of Migrant Workers in the region, starting by focusing on issues which are comfortable with ASEAN Member States, in line with existing national law and/or policies, and in accordance with Cebu Declaration”.  The ACMW drafting team has phrased future discussion as follows: a) on documented migrant workers (2012), b) undocumented migrant workers (2013) and c) the legal character of the instrument (2015).

As ASEAN moves towards its goal of economic integration by 2015, it is both important and timely that these processes to draft an agreement to protect for migrant workers moves forward rapidly also. The TFAMW believes that a mutually beneficial agreement can be reached among ASEAN member states which will ensure that migrant workers are given a fair deal, their rights are protected and they are provided with effective protection mechanisms, in accordance with the vision of ASEAN as a sharing and caring community in which all persons are valued.

The TFAMW believes that respect for the fundamental human rights of migrant workers is central to the protection of their labour rights and welfare. TFAMW encourages the ACMW Drafting Team to consider the proposal of ASEAN civil society organizations for a comprehensive and binding ASEAN Instrument on the Protection and Promotion of the Rights of Migrant Workers. The TFAMW Civil Society proposal, drawn up in a participatory manner with dozens of civil society groups coming out, contains possible elements for the government proposed ASEAN Framework Instrument for the Protection and Promotion of the Rights of Migrant Workers. The drafting team of the ACMW should be encouraged to refer to our Framework Instrument frequently in forthcoming deliberations and to freely use the recommendations made therein.

Full Resource Book: Civil Society Proposal: ASEAN Framework Instrument on the Protection and Promotion of the Rights of Migrant Workers
http://www.workersconnection.org/resources/Resources_72/book_tf-amw_feb2010.pdf

For further information:

Sinapan Samydorai, Convener – Task Force on ASEAN Migrant Workers
website: http://www.workersconnection.org
Email: samysd@yahoo.com
Mobile: + 65 9479 1906

The Charter of Social Movements of the Americas, diagnosis approved in Belem do Para during the World Social Forum, decease constitutes an initiative that deserves all the attention and support of the movements, prescription networks, and organizations committed to the present and to the future of our peoples.  The charter calls for integration from below, using as a reference the principles of ALBA (The Bolivarian Alternative for Latin America and the Caribbean).

 

Read the full article here.

Movimientos sociales del Sur: ALBA, UNASUR y Mercosur

Graciela Rodriguez

International trade has changed profoundly during the current decade, especially after the failure of the 4th Ministerial Meeting of the World Trade Organization – WTO, held in Cancun – Mexico in 2003. The meeting ended with no real progress, fundamentally due to the “revolution of the poor”, as it was named the attitude of countries that decide to bring negotiations to a halt by not approving the final declaration proposal which in little changed the situation of Northern market access for developing countries, since it maintained the historical high levels of agricultural subsidies specially for the European Union and the United States. From then on there has been very little progress in this area
and the Doha Round, which started in 2001, is still paralysed, specially after the G4 failure (USA, EU, India and Brazil) gathered in Potsdam, June 2007, in a meeting that despite all official efforts and appeal did not manage to re-gear the negotiating agenda.


Download PDF

Graciela Rodriguez

International trade has changed profoundly during the current decade, thumb especially after the failure of the 4th Ministerial Meeting of the World Trade Organization – WTO, held in Cancun – Mexico in 2003. The meeting ended with no real progress, fundamentally due to the “revolution of the poor”, as it was named the attitude of countries that decide to bring negotiations to a halt by not approving the final declaration proposal which in little changed the situation of Northern market access for developing countries, since it maintained the historical high levels of agricultural subsidies specially for the European Union and the United States. From then on there has been very little progress in this area
and the Doha Round, which started in 2001, is still paralysed, specially after the G4 failure (USA, EU, India and Brazil) gathered in Potsdam, June 2007, in a meeting that despite all official efforts and appeal did not manage to re-gear the negotiating agenda.


Download PDF

Graciela Rodriguez

O comércio internacional mudou profundamente na década atual, especialmente depois de fracassada a IV Reunião Ministerial da Organização Mundial do Comércio – OMC, em Cancun – México, em 2003. Essa reunião terminou sem avanços devido fundamentalmente à “revolução dos pobres”, tal como foi chamada a atitude dos países que decidiram travar as negociações ao não aprovar a proposta de declaração final. Esta, pouco mudava a situação de acesso aos mercados do Norte para os países em desenvolvimento, já que permitia manter os níveis historicamente elevados de subsídios à produção agrícola, especialmente na UE e nos EUA. A partir dali muito pouco se avançou nesse âmbito e a Rodada de Doha, iniciada em 2001, continua paralisada, especialmente depois do fracasso do G4 (EUA, EU, Índia e Brasil) reunido em Postdam, em Junho de 2007, numa reunião que apesar dos apelos e esforços oficiais não conseguiu a retomada da Agenda negociadora.
>Descargar PDF

<!– @page { margin: 0.79in } P { margin-bottom: 0.08in } –>

Edgardo Lander

¿Integración de qué? ¿Para quién? La consideración de los proyectos de integración latinoamericanos exige formularse algunas interrogantes vitales. ¿Integración para quién? ¿Para las los sectores privilegiados de estas sociedades? ¿Para que los capitales, sean nacionales o transnacionales, puedan moverse libremente en todo el continente? ¿O, por el contrario, para los pueblos, para las mayorías empobrecidas, excluidas, subordinadas?

 

No hay nada en la idea de integración que en sí mismo podamos considerar como favorable para el futuro de los pueblos del continente. No basta con que sea una integración latinoamericana o sudamericana para que corresponda a los intereses populares. Todo depende del modelo de integración en cuestión. ¿Quiénes lo impulsan? ¿Para qué? ¿Para quién? ¿En función de qué intereses y de que valores se diseña? Dependiendo de la respuesta a estas interrogantes, la integración puede afianzar las relaciones de dominación actualmente hegemónicas, o puede contribuir a abrir rendijas para socavarlas.

¿Un proyecto de integración orientado a abrir aún más estas economías para someterlas a los dictados de los dueños del capital? ¿O una integración defensiva que tenga como meta conquistar espacios de autonomía y soberanía para definir políticas públicas y opciones económicas propias? En otras palabras, ¿una integración que contribuya a desdibujar aún más los espacios y territorios del ejercicio de la soberanía democrática de los pueblos, o una integración orientada a recuperar lo que siglos de colonialismo y políticas imperiales le han arrebatado y continúan arrebatando a los pueblos del continente?

¿Una integración orientada por los valores del individualismo posesivo, de la competencia de todos contra todos, en la cual se garantice el éxito de los más fuertes sobre la base de la explotación y exclusión de los más débiles, esto es, una integración que acentúe las inaceptables desigualdades actuales? ¿O una integración guiada por los valores de la igualdad, de la participación, la pluralidad, la solidaridad, la comunidad, una integración que reconozca, valore y haga posible el despliegue de la extraordinaria variedad de modos de vida de los pueblos de nuestro continente?

¿Una integración que sin límite alguno explote los recursos naturales, convirtiéndolos en mercancías exportables para generar los excedentes requeridos para pagar la deuda externa? ¿O una integración que se oriente a la recuperación y construcción de otras formas de ser los humanos parte de la naturaleza, que no la considere como un enemigo a ser sometido, controlado, explotado y por ende destruido?

¿Una integración pensada como área de libre comercio, concebida principalmente como la construcción de un espacio económico de libre circulación de mercancías y capitales? ¿O una integración geopolítica concebida como parte de los procesos de resistencia al orden global que busca imponer la política unilateral e imperial del capital transnacional y del gobierno de los Estados Unidos? El ALCA

El principal proyecto estratégico del gobierno de Estados Unidos hacia el continente americano en su conjunto durante los últimos diez años ha sido el ALCA o Área de Libre Comercio de las Américas. Mediante este acuerdo de alcance continental, Estados Unidos y sus empresas han buscado consolidar, profundizar y hacer irreversibles las políticas de ajuste estructural de las últimas décadas, pretendiendo establecer de una vez por todas la prioridad absoluta de los derechos del capital sobre los derechos de la gente.

Mediante la constitucionalización del orden neoliberal en un pacto supranacional de obligatorio cumplimento, se aspira a acotar drásticamente los ámbitos de la soberanía y del ejercicio de la democracia y la regulación social, concebidas todas como trabas ilegítimas al pleno y libre despliegue y movimiento del capital.

Hasta hace poco más de dos años, las negociaciones avanzaban en forma aparentemente indetenible. Gobiernos sumisos en todo el continente negociaban textos secretos a espaldas de sus pueblos, y parecía inevitable que para la fecha prevista, esto es, para finales del año 2004, se concluyeran la negociación y revisión del texto de manera que este pudiese ser ratificado en 2005. Sin embargo, a partir del año 2002 las cosas comenzaron a cambiar.

Los movimientos y organizaciones sociales de la resistencia al ALCA, especialmente mediante su articulación en la Alianza Social Continental, lograron sacar el debate del ámbito acotado de una negociación entre expertos en comercio internacional para colocarla en el terreno del debate y la movilización pública.

Organizaciones sindicales, indígenas, ecologistas, campesinas, de mujeres y académicas en todo el continente logran converger en una resistencia crecientemente organizada y capaz de grandes movilizaciones. Cada una de las principales reuniones de los negociadores del acuerdo pasó a estar acompañada de masivas protestas (Québec, Buenos Aires, Quito, Miami). Los cambios políticos representados por la elección de Chávez, Lula y Kirchner introdujeron perspectivas y posturas negociadoras no previstas.

En la reunión del Comité de Negociaciones Comerciales (CNC) celebrada en San Salvador en julio de 2003 se reconoce por primera vez, en la propia mesa de negociaciones, que estas están severamente estancadas. Se realizaron sucesivos intentos de salvar el acuerdo mediante un tratado más diluido (Alca light) o por la vía de un ALCA de dos niveles que permitiese a los gobiernos más comprometidos con el modelo de libre comercio preservar el contenido del proyecto original, facultando a otros gobiernos el asumir compromisos menores. Buscando destrancar las negociaciones, los Estados Unidos convocaron sucesivas “reuniones informales” entre diferentes grupos de países.

Persistieron los desacuerdos. Finalmente, en contra de todos los pronósticos, lo que no parecía posible es hoy un hecho. La resistencia continental ha derrotado al ALCA, quizás definitivamente. Desde comienzos del año 2003 no se ha llevado a cabo ninguna reunión formal. De hecho, aunque esto no se admita públicamente, las negociaciones han sido pospuestas en forma indefinida [1].

Diversas organizaciones del continente han sugerido que el 1 de enero de 2005, fecha en que se suponía que estuviese listo el acuerdo, sea celebrado como el día del triunfo de los movimientos populares de las Américas contra el ALCA. En estos tiempos neoliberales no son muchas las victorias populares: hay que celebrarlas. Los Tratados de Libre Comercio (TLCs)

El descarrilamiento del ALCA representa sin duda una victoria para la resistencia al proyecto imperial de libre comercio. Sin embargo, la agenda estratégica del gobierno de Estados Unidos hacia el continente no ha sido derrotada: avanza por otras vías. Dado que las dificultades en las negociaciones del ALCA las enfrentaba principalmente con tres países -Brasil, Argentina y Venezuela- el gobierno de Estados Unidos optó por continuar negociaciones vía TLCs con prácticamente todos los demás países. Negoció y firmó un TLC con Chile, concluyó las negociaciones con Centroamérica, y está en lo que se supone que es la fase final de las negociaciones con Colombia, Ecuador y Perú.

Dado el fraccionamiento de la resistencia y las posturas más amigables (tanto al libre comercio como al gobierno de Estados Unidos) de los gobiernos en cuestión, en estos acuerdos se radicaliza la agenda neoliberal. No sólo se va más allá de los acuerdos de la Organización Mundial de Comercio (OMC), sino incluso de lo previsto en los borradores del ALCA. La extraordinaria disparidad entre las partes de estas negociaciones queda ilustrada en el contenido, por ejemplo, de los capítulos sobre propiedad intelectual y agricultura del TLC andino, acuerdos que de aprobarse en su versión actual tendrían impactos catastróficos sobre la salud y la alimentación de los pueblos.

Estados Unidos ha exigido el patentamiento de plantas y animales (¡definidos como inventos!), así como de procedimientos diagnósticos, terapéuticos y quirúrgicos. Reafirmando una vez más que considera más importante las ganancias de sus transnacionales farmacéuticas que la salud pública, además de diversas medidas destinadas a impedir la utilización de medicamentes genéricos exige que se deje sin efecto la Declaración Relativa al Acuerdo sobre ADPIC [2] de Doha (2001), que autoriza cierta flexibilidad en la interpretación de los derechos de propiedad intelectual de los medicamentos y permite a los países miembros de la OMC “proteger la salud pública y, en particular, promover el acceso a los medicamentos para todos”.

En las negociaciones sobre agricultura Estados Unidos exige la eliminación de todos los instrumentos de protección y fomento agrícola utilizados por los países andinos (bandas de precios, cuotas de importación, etc.), a la vez que se niega en forma categórica a siquiera discutir sus opulentos subsidios agrícolas. Esta combinación no puede conducir sino a la devastación de la agricultura andina, a socavar las condiciones de la seguridad alimentaria y a la expulsión de millones de personas del campo.

A pesar de la firme oposición popular y de las masivas movilizaciones de organizaciones sociales y políticas centroamericanas y andinas [3], no ha sido posible hasta el momento frenar estas negociaciones.

MERCOSUR y la Comunidad Andina de Naciones

¿Constituyen hoy el MERCOSUR o la Comunidad Andina de Naciones (CAN) alternativas a este modelo de integración y desarrollo? La integración no puede pensarse como algo diferente a los proyectos nacionales, diferente a las sociedades que se prefiguran al interior de cada Estado-nación. Los proyectos de integración del continente dependen de los procesos políticos, de las estructuras productivas, de las correlaciones de fuerza existentes tanto global y regionalmente como al interior de cada uno de los países participantes.

Los actuales proyectos y prácticas de integración en América Latina se dan con estructuras productivas y condiciones políticas e ideológicas muy diferentes a las existentes cuando se debatía la integración latinoamericana en los ‘60 y ‘70. Como resultado de las dictaduras militares y de la aplicación sistemática de las políticas neoliberales de ajuste estructural, estas sociedades han cambiado profundamente tanto en su estructura productiva como en su tejido social. Como consecuencia de la represión, la desindustrialización y las reformas laborales, el movimiento sindical se encuentra extraordinariamente reducido y debilitado, y la mayor parte de los nuevos empleos se crean en el llamado sector informal.

El peso de empresarios cuya producción se orientaba prioritariamente al mercado interno ha igualmente declinado. La propiedad de la tierra se encuentra aún más concentrada que hace tres décadas. Los sectores más dinámicos de las economías del continente -los que tienen igualmente hoy mayor incidencia política, mayor capacidad de tener impacto sobre las políticas públicas- son los sectores triunfantes de estas transformaciones económicas. Son principalmente los grupos financieros, los de los servicios -como las telecomunicaciones- y los exportadores de productos primarios: en el caso del Cono Sur, principalmente el sector agroindustrial.

Estos sectores están controlados o asociados estrechamente con el capital transnacional, sus beneficios dependen de la apertura económica, de la desregulación, de las privatizaciones y del acceso a los mercados internacionales. Constituyen las fuerzas dinámicas internas detrás de las políticas del libre comercio.

El sentido común neoliberal hoy hegemónico, y los intereses de estos sectores que resultaron beneficiados de las transformaciones políticas y de la estructura económica producidas en las últimas tres décadas, condicionan las orientaciones básicas de los proyectos de integración que hoy operan y se negocian en todo el continente. Es posible constatar incluso que la razón fundamental por la cual los gobiernos de Brasil y Argentina pusieron una resistencia tan firme al ALCA tuvo que ver principalmente con el hecho de que los beneficios que esperaban estos sectores no estaban siendo garantizados suficientemente en la negociación.

No se trata de desconocer que estos gobiernos no han tenido posiciones únicas y que han existido tensiones entre visiones más orientadas hacia el libre comercio y visiones que reivindican mayor autonomía para el impulso de políticas públicas nacionales. Sin embargo, y más allá de los discursos, fue precisamente el hecho de que el ALCA no garantizaba un mayor acceso de los productos de la agroindustria del MERCOSUR al mercado de Estados Unidos, y que el gobierno de dicho país no estaba dispuesto a siquiera considerar la reducción de los subsidios a su producción agrícola, la verdadera razón por la cual se trancaron las negociaciones del ALCA.

El único gobierno participante en las negociaciones que formuló cuestionamientos conceptuales, políticos y doctrinarios fundamentales a cada una de las dimensiones del modelo de integración propuesto por el gobierno de Estados Unidos a través del ALCA fue el de Venezuela.

Esos mismos intereses han estado impulsando las negociaciones del MERCOSUR con la Unión Europea. De acuerdo a denuncias formuladas por las principales organizaciones sociales del Cono Sur [4], a cambio de un acceso limitado de los productos de la agroindustria del MERCOSUR al mercado de la Unión Europea, los negociadores del MERCOSUR están realizando concesiones que tendrían efectos nocivos sobre la agricultura familiar, limitarían la capacidad de los Estados para tener políticas industriales autónomas, y convertirían en mercancías áreas tan críticas como los denominados “servicios culturales” y “servicios ambientales”.

Se habrían ofrecido igualmente preferencias a la Unión Europea para las compras del Sector Público. No hay razón alguna por la cual se pueda suponer que las transnacionales basadas en Europa puedan tener efectos más benignos o sean menos rapaces que las estadounidenses, ni para asumir que los gobiernos europeos sean menos agresivos en la defensa de los intereses de sus corporaciones. Cualquier ilusión en este sentido quedó desmentida con la reciente crisis argentina. La Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones

Los gobiernos de Sudamérica celebran lo que denominan un nuevo momento histórico en el continente, la realización del sueño de Bolívar: la creación de la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones. ¿Podrá este acuerdo convertirse efectivamente en un punto de partida para nuevos proyectos económicos y geopolíticos alternativos a los modelos hegemónicos?

La retórica de la Declaración del Cusco, firmada por los presidentes o cancilleres de 12 países sudamericanos [5], parecería efectivamente apuntar en una nueva dirección. Predomina en esta un lenguaje diferente a la prioritaria del libre comercio que ha sido hegemónica durante los últimos lustros.

Partiendo de la “historia compartida y solidaria de nuestras naciones”, se reivindica “una identidad sudamericana compartida y valores comunes, tales como: la democracia, la solidaridad, los derechos humanos, la libertad, la justicia social, el respeto a la integridad territorial, a la diversidad, la no discriminación y la afirmación de su autonomía, la igualdad soberana de los Estados y la solución pacífica de controversias”.

Se reconoce que no es suficiente con el desarrollo económico, y que se requieren estrategias que junto a “una conciencia ambiental responsable y el reconocimiento de asimetrías en el desarrollo de sus países, aseguren una más justa y equitativa distribución del ingreso, el acceso a la educación, la cohesión y la inclusión social, así como la preservación del medio ambiente y la promoción del desarrollo sostenible”.

Se enfatiza un “compromiso esencial con la lucha contra la pobreza, la eliminación del hambre, la generación de empleo decente y el acceso de todos a la salud y a la educación como herramientas fundamentales para el desarrollo de los pueblos”. En el terreno internacional se apela a “los valores de la paz y la seguridad internacionales, a partir de la afirmación de la vigencia del derecho internacional y de un multilateralismo renovado y democrático que integre decididamente y de manera eficaz el desarrollo económico y social en la agenda mundial”.

Desde el punto de vista institucional, se afirma a la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones como proyecto que trasciende un área de libre comercio, acordándose que se va a “desarrollar un espacio sudamericano integrado en lo político, social, económico, ambiental y de infraestructura, que fortalezca la identidad propia de América del Sur y que contribuya, a partir de una perspectiva subregional y, en articulación con otras experiencias de integración regional, al fortalecimiento de América Latina y el Caribe y le otorgue una mayor gravitación y representación en los foros internacionales”.

De acuerdo al texto, se trata de un proyecto de integración de los pueblos. Se afirma: “Nuestra convicción en el sentido que la realización de los valores e intereses compartidos que nos unen, además de comprometer a los Gobiernos, sólo encontrará viabilidad en la medida que los pueblos asuman el rol protagónico que les corresponde en este proceso. La integración sudamericana es y debe ser una integración de los pueblos”.

Más allá de temas cruciales que están ausentes en el texto, como el de la deuda externa, y el de las relaciones de este proyecto con los acuerdos de libre comercio firmados o en proceso de negociación con Estados Unidos y la Unión Europea, ¿puede esperarse que los actuales gobiernos sudamericanos (los firmantes de la Declaración del Cusco) sean consecuentes con estas declaraciones de intención? ¿Se trata de un lenguaje destinado al público de galería, o es la expresión de una nueva voluntad política de los gobiernos sudamericanos?

Más que descartar de antemano la Declaración del Cusco como pura retórica y a la decisión de crear la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones como una mera formalidad, es conveniente analizar este proceso en la potencialidad que podría ofrecer para convertirse en un nuevo terreno de pugnas y tensiones entre diferentes visiones y diferentes fuerzas sociales en torno al futuro de América Latina. ¿Pretenden los gobiernos firmantes de la declaración (o algunos de ellos) adecuar las orientaciones de sus políticas públicas a los objetivos declarados de la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones?

Lo que resulta evidente es que hay flagrantes contradicciones entre los objetivos y metas formulados en esta declaración y el rumbo principal que hoy asumen las políticas públicas en la mayoría de los países sudamericanos. Los objetivos formulados en la Declaración del Cusco no son, de modo alguno, compatibles con las políticas públicas y orientaciones económicas que, gracias a la deuda externa, los organismos financieros internacionales continúan imponiendo en todo el continente. ¿Pueden los movimientos sociales y políticos populares del continente aprovechar estas tensiones para formular e impulsar propuestas contrahegemónicas?

¿Qué sentido tiene que los gobiernos andinos que hoy negocian un TLC con Estados Unidos, proyecto que constituye una severa amenaza a la salud, educación, alimentación y el ambiente de dichos países, se comprometan a garantizar la salud, la educación, la alimentación de sus pueblos, así como la preservación del ambiente? ¿Qué sentido tiene la reivindicación del derecho a un empleo decente cuando las políticas de apertura, privatización y desregulación, la desindustrialización, la flexibilidad laboral y las reformas de la legislación laboral impulsadas por estos mismos gobiernos continúan deteriorando y precarizando sistemáticamente las condiciones del empleo? ¿Para qué proclamar la autonomía e igualdad soberana de los Estados mientras se están negociando acuerdos comerciales que limitan cada vez más el ejercicio de la soberanía? ¿Por qué hablar de la equitativa distribución del ingreso, y de la cohesión y la inclusión social, si la experiencia confirma que las actuales políticas de predominio dogmático del libre comercio no conducen sino a la desintegración social y al incremento de las desigualdades sociales? ¿Qué sentido tiene destacar la importancia de la preservación del medio ambiente y la promoción del desarrollo sostenible si -como es evidente por ejemplo en el caso de Brasil- las actuales políticas de prioridad de las exportaciones primarias orientadas a generar un excedente en la balanza comercial para pagar la deuda externa requieren una sobreexplotación depredadora y no sostenible de los recursos naturales? ¿Qué tipo de infraestructura va a acompañar este proceso de integración? ¿Continuará la prioridad en la inversión en infraestructura orientada a facilitar las exportaciones y consolidar el modelo de crecimiento hacia afuera, la economía de puertos? ¿Pondrá esta infraestructura a la Amazonía y sus recursos a la disposición de las empresas transnacionales?6. ¿Podrá por el contrario dársele prioridad a las exigencias de un desarrollo endógeno, de ampliación de los mercados internos continentales y de la efectiva integración de los pueblos? ¿Será posible avanzar en la dirección de un modelo alternativo de integración cuando se está incorporando a la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones, en forma acrítica, la base jurídica y normativa que el MERCOSUR y la Comunidad Andina de Naciones fueron armando durante los lustros recientes de hegemonía neoliberal?

La retórica latinoamericanista, la reivindicación de la soberanía y la democracia, así como de los derechos de los pueblos, podría bajar la guardia de los movimientos sociales y políticos populares en torno a las negociaciones entre los gobiernos del continente mientras mantienen una actitud vigilante ante los acuerdos negociados con potencias extracontinentales (ALCA, TLCs, MERCOSUR-UE). No hay, sin embargo, nada en la idea de integración sudamericana que en sí misma, por su propia condición de ser latina o sudamericana, sea necesariamente más favorable a los intereses de los pueblos. Todo depende, como se señaló al comienzo de este texto, de los modelos de integración en juego.

Se abre con la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones un nuevo terreno de lucha continental. El destino de este proyecto de integración y la respuesta a la cuestión básica de si puede o no llegar a ser favorable a los intereses populares, más que del contenido de sus textos fundantes, dependerá del resultado de las luchas sociales y políticas, de la capacidad de las fuerzas populares para revertir las tendencias políticas y económicas hoy hegemónicas en la mayor parte del continente.

¿Será posible convertir a la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones en un nuevo terreno capaz de articular en forma efectiva las luchas de los pueblos del continente por la soberanía, la democracia, la igualdad, la pluralidad cultural? ¿Podrá este nuevo proyecto integrador jugar un papel en la resistencia a la hegemonía imperial de Estados Unidos?

Son estos nuevos retos y nuevas interrogantes que confronta hoy la lucha popular latinoamericana.

Edgardo Lander Sociólogo, profesor titular de la UCV Ver los artículos de Edgardo Lander

[1] Han circulado, sin embargo, rumores de acuerdo a los cuales los co-presidentes de la fase final de las negociaciones del ALCA, el Embajador Robert Zoellick de Estados Unidos y el Canciller de Brasil, Celso Amorim, tendrían previsto reunirse en el mes de enero de 2005 para explorar las posibilidades de un reinicio de las negociaciones. Mientras han estado absolutamente suspendidas todas las negociaciones sustantivas, ha continuado la pugna entre las ciudades candidatas a ser sede permanente del acuerdo

[2] Aspectos de Propiedad Intelectual Relacionados con el Comercio, mejor conocido por sus siglas en inglés: TRIPS.

[3] Ver, por ejemplo, la declaración conjunta de las cuatro centrales de trabajadores colombianas: Declaración frente al tratado de libre comercio con Estados Unidos y el tema laboral, Bogotá, 3 de diciembre 2004. En Red Colombiana de Acción Frente al Libre Comercio (Recalca)

[4] Autoconvocatoria No al ALCA (Argentina), “Acuerdo Unión Europea-MERCOSUR: ganancias para pocos, amenaza para la mayoría”

[5] Declaración del Cusco sobre la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones, Cumbre Presidencial Sudamericana, Cusco, 8 de diciembre de 2004. Los países firmantes de esta declaración son: Argentina, Bolivia, Brasil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Guyana, Paraguay, Perú, Surinam, Uruguay y Venezuela

 

bilaterals.org

Gonzalo Berrón – Investigador del Núcleo de Pesquisa de Relações Internacionais da USP, malady Brasil

Más que en ninguna otra región del continente Americano, y de América Latina en particular, los movimientos y organizaciones sociales que históricamente han enfrentado al libre comercio y la globalización neoliberal en el Cono Sur se encuentran ante el desafío que les impone el complejo escenario de la integración regional. A riesgo de ser esquemático, considero que son el ALBA, el Mercosur y la Unasur los tres procesos que interpelan de forma directa la acción de los actores sociales de esta parte del continente.

 

Esta geografía laberíntica que presenta la superposición – pero no la contradicción – de los procesos genera situaciones inéditas: ninguno de los países del Mercosur forma parte del ALBA, sin embargo el movimiento social que viene impulsando la mayor movilización social a favor de este proceso, el MST, es justamente de Brasil. A su vez, Venezuela, el motor del ALBA, aún aguarda la decisión de los senadores paraguayos y brasileños para tornarse miembro pleno del Mercosur. La UNASUR, una idea que impulsara el presidente conservador Fernando Henrique Cardoso de Brasil, fue luego abrazada como propia por el presidente Lula y su asesor dilecto Marco Aurélio Garcia, y finalmente por el gobierno de Evo Morales, la expresión más cabal del cambio político en la región. Por fin, resulta llamativo que no se identifiquen con el ALBA países como Argentina, que recibiera un salvataje millonario de Venezuela, o Brasil, que comparte con ese país, por ejemplo, el proyecto energético de la refinería Abreu e Lima en el estado de Pernambuco, iniciativas binacionales que perfectamente podrían caer bajo la denominación “ALBA-TCP”. También Paraguay y Uruguay tienen en marcha iniciativas similares con Venezuela, sin embargo, ninguno de los gobiernos del Mercosur habla del ALBA, o ha hecho muestras de querer sumarse al bloque siendo que tal acción no sería de ninguna forma incompatible con la normativa ni del Mercosur ni del ALBA. Los conflictos se producen al interior de los bloques, y no como dinámica competitiva entre los mismos.

 

Este enmarañado cuadro, desde la visión de los movimientos sociales, se completa con el fin de las negociaciones del ALCA, en la Cumbre de las Américas de Mar del Plata (noviembre de 2005), que significó el fin, como todos sabemos, de la lucha contra lo que era identificado como la encarnación de las ansias imperialistas de los Estados Unidos en América Latina y el Caribe. Muerto el ALCA, los movimientos sociales de la región se volvieron, en lo que consideraron un viraje lógico, hacia los escenarios y las iniciativas de integración regional. Mientras en otras regiones la resistencia contra el libre comercio continuó de forma muy activa contra los TLCs con los EUA y luego contra los AdAs con Europa, en el Mercosur la amenaza del libre comercio se restringió a una cada vez más lánguida negociación de la Ronda de Doha en la OMC.

 

UNASUR y movimientos

La relación UNASUR movimientos sociales fue estimulada por dos dinámicas. Por una lado, la UNASUR se presentaba como la iniciativa de integración regional más amplia en términos de extensión geográfica y de número de países, así como en relación a la cantidad de “nuevos gobiernos”. Esta extensión favorecía una dinámica también más abarcadora para la articulación de los movimientos sociales, y el hecho de que en el 2006 aún fuera una “cáscara vacía” lo hacía también atractivo, pues se estimaba que junto con el grupo de presidentes próximos al ideario – u origen – de los movimientos existiría una gran chance para proponer y participar. Por otro lado, la asunción de la Secretaría de UNASUR por parte de Bolivia y el impulso que el gobierno de Evo Morales le quiso dar a éste proceso en medio de la crisis de la CAN, llevaron a una aproximación fuerte con quienes otrora fueran sus compañeros de lucha a nivel continental, que se expresó en la Cumbre Social por la Integración de los Pueblos realizada en Cochabamba, en diciembre de 2006, como actividad simultánea a la cumbre de Presidentes de la UNASUR.

 

Esto generó una relación estrecha entre movimientos y organizaciones sociales y el proceso de la UNASUR. En este contexto, también se discutió originalmente la idea del Banco del Sur que había sido igualmente transformada en objeto de lucha por parte de las organizaciones sociales de la región, así como, por la negativa, la necesidad de interactuar con una instancia que heredaba de la etapa anterior la iniciativa del IIRSA, para denunciar y presionar de forma más eficiente sobre este plan de infraestructura pergeñado de espaldas a los pueblos del América del Sur y con el fin último de proveer energía, caminos y comunicaciones para un modelo de desarrollo que, tal como asistimos en estos días de crisis global, se demuestra impropio para traer justicia social y ambiental a nuestros pueblos.

 

La UNASUR siguió siendo vista como un proceso con potencial de cambio al que los actores sociales acompañaban. La Cumbre Energética en Isla Margarita (17 de abril de 2007) fue motivo para consolidar una posición de las organizaciones en esta materia. La declaración oficial ya dejaba entrever el debate petroleo/etanol y fuentes renovables de energía, así como una velada puja de las estatales venezolana y brasileña. En su texto, sin embargo, mantuvo un espíritu progresista ratificando el papel de las empresas nacionales en el contexto de la entonces aún reciente nacionalización de los hidrocarburos en Bolivia. Durante la Secretaría Boliviana de la UNASUR se mantuvo esa impronta, incluso se realizaron consultas con organizaciones sociales a fin de discutir los mecanismos de participación que podría adoptar la institucionalidad a ser creada con el tratado que por entonces estaba en construcción. En mayo de 2008 se firma el tratado que constituye la UNASUR con status de bloque de países a nivel internacional y con un perfil cuyo foco se distancia de lo estrictamente económico para “construir, de manera participativa y consensuada, un espacio de integración y unión en lo cultural, social, económico y político entre sus pueblos, otorgando prioridad al diálogo político, las políticas sociales, la educación, la energía, la infraestructura, el financiamiento y el medio ambiente, entre otros, con miras a eliminar la desigualdad socioeconómica, lograr la inclusión social y la participación ciudadana, fortalecer la democracia y reducir las asimetrías en el marco del fortalecimiento de la soberanía e independencia de los Estados.” (Tratado Constitutivo de la Unión de Naciones Sudamericana, 6 de mayo de 2008). El ímpetu de la firma del Tratado, sin embargo, fue opacado por la salida de la Secretaría de Bolivia hacia Chile en medio de una disputa áspera que incluyó vetos explícitos de unos países a otros para la designación del Secretario del bloque. Esta sensación sólo sería interrumpida por el excelente papel que jugó la UNASUR en cortar la escalada de sabotajes e intentos golpistas al gobierno Evo Morales, así como en el proceso posterior de investigación de la masacre perpetrada por grupos armados comandados por el prefecto de Pando. Finalmente, en estos días, el Consejo de Defensa Sudamericana (“CDS”, como ya es llamado por los ministros de defensa de la región), que funciona como una instancia de coordinación de los ministros de defensa del bloque, aprobó un plan de acción que “prevê a adoção de uma doutrina política comum, o inventário da atual capacidade militar de todos e o monitoramento dos gastos do setor” y que podría transformarse en una “alianza militar defensiva regional”, lo que dificultaría, o por lo menos ejercería un contrapeso, a la actuación militar estadounidense en la región.

 

Mercosur y movimientos

Una parte significativa de los movimientos sociales del Cono Sur buscaron, a la salida de la lucha contra el ALCA, construir un “sujeto social” regional que orientase su actuación a los problemas más acuciantes a nivel regional y a nivel de cada país en relación a la región o a alguno de sus países miembros. En este sentido se inicia en julio de 2006, en Córdoba, un proceso semestral de Cumbre de los Pueblos del Sur – sólo interrumpiéndose en diciembre de 2006, pues por entonces se realizaba la Cumbre de Cochabamba – que a la fecha cuenta con la realización de cumbres en Córdoba, Asunción, Montevideo, Posadas/Tucumán y Salvador de Bahía.

 

Más allá de la generación de esta dinámica de Cumbres, sin embargo, han existido dificultades para coordinar acciones/campañas conjuntas sobre temas específicos. Estas dificultades devienen del hecho de que las dinámicas nacionales siguen aún siendo muy fuertes, pues el movimiento aún identifica la lucha prioritaria como siendo una que se define en el ámbito nacional, y en ese sentido problemas que tienen una eminente configuración regional (energía, agua, medio ambiente, modelo agropecuario, mecanismos financieros, e incluso comercio), aparecen aún como siendo tratados prioritariamente con estrategias nacionales. El hecho de existir redes y actores sociales fuertes en relación a alguno de estos temas no ha sido suficiente como para desencadenar campañas de carácter regional, o bien las mismas no han superado la instancia de las declaraciones conjuntas y enfrentan dificultades en la implementación concreta. Recién en los últimos tiempos, y después de varias tentativas, se comienza a articular un movimiento que, a partir de las demandas paraguayas sobre Itaipú, propone regionalizar la lucha iniciada por la Coordinación Nacional por la Soberanía y la Integración Energética (CNSIE) desde el Paraguay. Esta experiencia, en caso de que resulte exitosa, podrá abrir la puerta a nuevas acciones que tengan como blanco a los gobiernos de la región, y que se propongan realizar el debate en favor de un destino progresista para el Bloque.

 

Este último punto es clave para entender el debate enunciado al comienzo de estas notas, y con las cuales podemos entrar en la relación de los movimientos sociales de la región del Cono Sur y el ALBA. El Mercosur, por muchos años, fue o ignorado estratégicamente por los movimientos y organizaciones sociales que de forma conjunta se opusieron al libre comercio en la región, o bien caracterizado como una expresión más del proyecto neoliberal a ser combatida. Sólo el movimiento sindical participó del debate público y las instancias formales de interlocución desde los albores de la institucionalización del Mercosur. Ahora, con el fin del ALCA, y en medio a lo que fuera caracterizado como una coyuntura política distinta, este espacio más amplio y heterogéneo de movimientos realiza un viraje hacia el debate de la integración regional. Este viraje, que no fue fácil y que, como expliqué más arriba aún está en construcción en términos de marco político para la acción, encontró en expresiones tales como “integración de los pueblos” o “integración popular” una formulación para expresar esta nueva voluntad política en la coyuntura de cambio y oportunidad que se abría con los nuevos gobiernos conectados por su origen o sus opciones a la lucha popular. Sin embargo, en lo táctico, implicó la opción de unos por impulsar el proceso del ALBA, que funciona como faro de las ideas de cambio en materia de integración popular y cuya promoción tiene por objetivo alterar la correlación de fuerzas tanto en el plano de la hegemonía, como en el de los hechos, para torcer el rumbo de los procesos de integración regional – los demás – hacia un horizonte albeano. La segunda opción táctica recoge la trayectoria del movimiento sindical en relación a su intervención en el debate público sobre Mercosur, así como la experiencia acumulada en el debate técnico y político de la negociación de los acuerdos de libre comercio y decide entablar también el debate con el proceso oficial de la negociación del Mercosur. Desde una perspectiva política muy próxima, que reconoce la importancia del ALBA como la experiencia de lo nuevo, y la necesidad táctica de discutir el sentido de la integración en procesos reales como el Mercosur.

 

ALBA y movimientos de los países extra ALBA

Fundamentalmente en Brasil opera la separación táctica descrita arriba, que permite la discusión programática acerca de la “integración popular” o “integración de los pueblos” en el plano de la construcción contrahegemónica, pero que impide la acción conjunta en el escenario Mercosur. Y que, sin embargo, y a pesar de su carácter extra-regional, convergen en la interlocución hacia el proceso ALBA. El impulso que ha tomado la iniciativa del MST en torno al ALBA sin dudas es un elemento que dinamizará el debate sobre los contenidos concretos de la integración de los pueblos o popular y debe dialogar con el esfuerzo que muchas organizaciones han venido realizando a partir de la Cumbre de Cochabamba en el marco de la Alianza Social Continental.

 

Por otro lado, es necesario afinar el proceso de dialogo oficial de los movimientos sociales con el proceso ALBA. Aquí se ha logrado realizar encuentros y actos públicos en ocasiones esporádicas, que generalmente coinciden con Cumbres de Presidentes o Foros Sociales, y que han sido útiles para estrechar el vínculo pero poco eficientes para tratar los temas en profundidad. Esta es una cuestión que queda pendiente en la perspectiva de ampliación de iniciativas y proyectos del ALBA en una dimensión de la complementariedad no convencional en la que se pueden establecer acuerdos de cooperación entre movimientos sociales de un país con gobiernos de otros.

 

Notas finales

La proliferación de iniciativas comunes entre los gobiernos de la región – salvo aquellos que de forma activa y militante pregonan soluciones neoliberales y conservadoras evidentemente demodés – en un marco de compatibilidad y cierta, hasta podríamos decir, armonía nos alienta a pensar que la profundización de la integración con un sentido progresista por parte de los gobiernos podría ser posible. Sin embargo, las diferencias en estilo de liderazgos y la persistencia de ciertos nacionalismos soberanistas, van a seguir siendo obstáculos para una integración profunda, incluso en este contexto de proliferación de gobiernos distintos de aquellos que hacían del alineamiento incondicional a las políticas de Washington. En este contexto, la convergencia estratégica y la complementariedad táctica de los movimientos y organizaciones sociales en torno a la integración es urgente y está llamada a cumplir un papel central en este debate y en la lucha política hacia la integración de los pueblos del Sur.

Según noticia de Radio Nacional de Venezuela-RNV, del 17 de marzo de 2009, la República Federativa de Brasil espera la visita del presidente Hugo Chávez a la nación sureña el próximo 26 de mayo, para definir proyectos estratégicos en las áreas de petroquímica, salud, educación y turismo. Así lo afirmó el gobernador del estado de Bahía, Jaques Wagner, en el Palacio de Miraflores, tras culminar una reunión con el jefe de Estado venezolano.

Folha de São Paulo, 11 de março de 2009 “Proposto inicialmente como simples fórum de debates, o CDS (Conselho de Defesa Sul-Americano) pode tomar a forma de uma aliança militar defensiva regional. Os 12 ministros da Defesa sul-americanos aprovaram ontem, em Santiago, plano de ação que prevê a adoção de uma doutrina política comum, o inventário da atual capacidade militar de todos e o monitoramento dos gastos do setor, como antecipado pela Folha”.

Para una referencia sobre éste debate puede accederse al sitio de Brasil de Fato, donde se está publicando una serie de “Cartas paraguaias” escritas por Roberto Colman, miembro de la CNSIE www.brasildefato.com.b

“Este proceso de integración de movimientos y organizaciones sociales, impulsa los principios del ALBA, y a su vez quiere promover diversos mecanismos y potencialidades que ofrece el ALBA, para potenciar la integración latinoamericana desde los pueblos.” Carta de los Movimientos Sociales de las Américas, Belém, 30 de Enero de 2009.

El Movimiento de Trabajadores sin Tierra que ha impulsado ésta perspectiva del ALBA co-convoca regularmente junto con la Marcha Mundial de las Mujeres a las reuniones de planificación en las que participan organizaciones como la Red Braileira Pela Integração dos Povos que tiene un papel activo en la dinámica del escenario de debate público con el Mercosur.

La integración regional, una oportunidad frente a la crisis

Nosotros, representantes de movimientos sociales, sindicales y de organizaciones de la sociedad civil de América Latina, África, Asia y Europa, reunidos en Asunción para discutir la vital importancia de las respuestas regionales a la crisis global actual, instamos a los Jefes de Estado reunidos en Asunción para la Cumbre del Mercosur a tomar una decisión contundente de avanzar en la implementación de modalidades para la cooperación orientada a un verdadero desarrollo al servicio de los pueblos de nuestras regiones.
Estas nuevas modalidades deben, en primer lugar, revisar de manera fundamental los términos injustos del acuerdo de Itaipu firmados décadas atrás por gobiernos dictatoriales de Brasil y Paraguay. La energía es el principal recurso del Paraguay para diseñar un desarrollo sustentable que responda a la necesidad de mejoramiento de la calidad de vida de su pueblo. Los movimientos sociales y el gobierno de Paraguay han demandado el derecho soberano de su país, traducido en la libre disponibilidad y el precio justo, sobre el 50% de la energía producida en Itaipu y Yacyreta, y la revisión de la deuda contraída para la construcción de estas represas. Consideramos estas demandas como justas.
Sobre la base de esta caso altamente significativo y con el objetivo de asegurar que este tipo de mega-proyectos, basados en relaciones de poder desiguales entre países vecinos, no sean en el futuro replicados en ninguna de nuestras respectivas regiones, llamamos a la creación urgente de marcos regionales elaborados conjuntamente y basados en principios de equidad que regulen este tipo de proyectos conjuntos. Estos, en vez, deben incluir el involucramiento activo y los aportes de las fuerzas sociales y de trabajadores organizadas de todas las respectivas regiones.
Fue en este espíritu de cooperación que la conferencia incluyo la participación de parlamentarios de varios países de las distintas regiones, y el dialogo directo con representantes gubernamentales del Mercosur. Algunos de los temas claves que se discutieron incluyeron: :
* La urgente necesidad que los gobiernos creen instrumentos financieros regionales tales como Bancos regionales de desarrollo para defender sus economías y sus pueblos de los efectos destructivos del capitalismo globalizado neoliberal.
* El reconocimiento de que la integración regional debe estar basada en principios de solidaridad y programas de complementariedad que reconozcan las asimetrías en términos de tamaños, recursos, y niveles de desarrollo de los países participantes para transformar el modelo de desarrollo hacia un sistema productivo mas balanceado y sostenible entre todos los países, localidades y pueblos.
* En este contexto, la estratégica importancia de tomar una posición firme y activa para revertir el golpe de estado en Honduras y la restauración del gobierno legalmente elegido, desplazado por las fuerzas anti-democráticas que actuaron no solo en contra del Gobierno de Zelaya sino también con el objetivo de revertir las tendencias progresistas en la región buscando mantener el sistema de acumulación del capital, favoreciendo los intereses de las transnacionales de Estados Unidos y la Unión Europea.
* La imperativa urgencia de encontrar modalidades y medios de hacer efectiva la participación de los movimientos sociales, comunidades, trabajadores y trabajadoras para avanzar estrategias de integración regional, en una perspectiva holística, sustentable y de verdadera soberanía desde los pueblos.
Vemos este momento como una coyuntura histórica para el mundo cuando la crisis ha expuesto el funcionamiento fundamentalmente inestable y los efectos peligrosos del sistema capitalista global. Es también una oportunidad para desafiar el régimen económico-político global dominante y para avanzar alternativas enfocadas en las necesidades de los pueblos y la preservación del medio ambiente. Tenemos confianza que los pueblos de América Latina y algunos de sus gobiernos jugaran un papel significativo en la formulación y evolución de alternativas regionales, junto con todas las regiones y pueblos del mundo, que respondan a los intereses de nuestro planeta y nuestro futuro común.

Third World Network-Africa, sickness Volume 3 Number 1 May 2009

>Download PDF

Content
– FALL-OUT FROM EPA NEGOTIATIONS: Africa on the brink of
disintergration // pages 1-4
– UNCTAD PUBLIC SYPOSIUM: Regionalism – the south’s exit
strategy from global crises // pages 4-6
– EPA Negiations-Regional State of Play // pages 6-9
– Advocacy File // pages 9-11
– Dateline Africa // pages 12-13
– Global Round-Up // pages 13-15
– Notice Board
page 15

Third World Network-Africa, sovaldi seek Volume 3 Number 1 May 2009

>Download PDF

Hemispheric Social Alliance

March 2009

The crisis as a unique opportunity

The current economic crisis is systemic in nature and marks the demise of the neoliberal model of development and globalization. It is imperative that we build concrete alternatives to this model, until recently, had been artificially sustained by a bubble of multiple speculative operations. We must also reflect on the fact that this pattern of functioning of the world economy in general, and of the financial system in particular, has come to an end. In this context, Latin American countries have before them a historical opportunity for advancing towards a just and sustainable model of development for the region.

When proposing solutions to the crisis, we have the advantage of not having to confront the model while in its full force, as it has obviously reached its limits. Indeed, this is where opportunity lies, as such a broad space for proposing and constructing alternatives was not as visible a short while ago, nor was it expected to appear – especially in the world of “laissez faire – laissez passer”, of the dominant neoliberal “pensée unique” and “the end of history”.

The current crisis exposes the failure of a system full of promises, yet incapable of fulfilling them. The women and men excluded by capital’s policies have lost faith in the “free trade” myth and the current hegemonic model of production and management of natural and energy resources.

Why regional integration is a solution

Regional integration appears today as an alternative that will enable countries in the region to overcome the global economic crisis by creating dynamic economic relations and ties of solidarity among themselves.

– The global market crisis and the limits of domestic markets

The global markets have suffered a collapse and lost their capacity to generate dynamism for the economies in the region, which, in recent years, had gaily navigated the waves created by spectacular increases in food and livestock, mineral and energy commodity prices. The impacts of the crisis are already becoming visible in our countries, demonstrating that the improvements in some macroeconomic indicators, which had been achieved through this type of insertion into the world economy, have not been sufficient to produce structural changes to the development model. That is, the model has not become one of increased sectoral homogeneity, with a dynamic internal market based on the consumption of those at the “bottom of the pyramid”; diversified exports in terms of both products and trading partners; improved job and product quality; and greater social and environmental justice.

There is no guarantee that the economic situation after the crisis will be one of great liquidity of capital and credit, as there was in recent years. Therefore, national governments must face the dilemma of either waiting for the global crisis to pass and when it does, try to slowly recuperate the dynamism in sales of traditional export products on the international market, knowing that the chances of this happening are low; or pursuing limited nationalist solutions that are constrained by the lack of resources and markets most countries in the region face when acting alone.

– Energy, food and water for all

Latin America – as a region – has abundant water, environmental, social, cultural, mineral and energy resources, as well as considerable technological development capacities. Its chances of attaining food, water and energy sovereignty are greater than other regions of the planet. There are public and private enterprises that own infrastructure and could be brought into the regional integration process. Finally, there are governments and social movements in the region that share a reasonable level of political solidarity with regards to the integration process.

When faced with the dilemma posed by the current crisis, then, regional integration appears as a viable and important alternative, as a possibility of moving towards a new development model that is more sustainable and just than the one that has been implanted in our countries until now.

Regional integration, as conceived by the people in the region, offers greater opportunities for our countries. It proposes that the principle of solidarity replace savage competition and the free market, which – as we well know and the crisis has clearly demonstrated – lead neither to balance nor justice, as some theorists claimed it would. The peoples1’ integration would be founded on the principles of complementarity and solidarity and would focus on attaining more socially and economically equitable and just societies. The ultimate objective would be to ensure that system works to benefit all men and women in a holistic manner.

Non-traditional experiences in integration, like the ALBA (Alternativa Bolivariana para las Américas or Bolivarian Alternative for the Americas, in English), show that complementarity and solidarity between our countries can satisfy the needs of our population in a much more rational and efficient way than intra-regional competition, free trade or having the market act as the system’s only regulatory mechanism.

Processes of integration in the region and the dispute for a popular and sustainable integration model

While looking at the various integration processes in the Americas, one can say that, on the bright side, they have evolved slowly – so slow that they appearing to be paralysed. One cannot deny that some progressive measures have been taken in Mercosur: for example, the incorporation of concerns about the existing asymmetries within the block and incipient efforts to create funds for addressing this problem. The same can be said for changes in political institutions and the advances in the Union of South American Nations, or UNASUR (its abbreviation in Spanish). However, in more concrete terms, the processes’ potential to improve the quality of living of the peoples and workers in our region is far from becoming reality.

On the down side, one can observe the subjugation of these processes to neoliberal thought through the adoption of the “open regionalism” model. The application of this model has left grave marks on the Andean Community (CAN), Central America and the Caribbean. Encouraged by the promotion of indiscriminate competition – both within and between trading blocks – and the signing of bilateral free trade agreements with Europe and the United States, open regionalism has reduced integration to its commercial aspects (trade), thereby eroding possibilities to develop the other dimensions of integration. Nothing indicates that this type of integration has benefitted the societies of these countries.

In other words, when one observes the lengthy experience of regional integration processes in the Americas – some having lasted for over 40 years – and takes into consideration the path they have followed until now, it is not clear that regional integration could potentially benefit our people. What is evident, though, is that the rhetoric of political commitment to integration has often been confronted, in practice, with the adoption of solutions that give priority to national political or economic interests. Collective actions and solutions are relegated to a secondary plane, as governments have been unwilling to assume the so-called short-term “costs” of integration.

To overcome the political dimension of this problem, the pursuit of the consolidation of national sovereignty must be understood within the framework of a common commitment to deepening democracy and the autonomy of the region; an example of this is UNASUR’s recent intervention in conflicts in Bolivia. In this sense, consistent and sustained commitment of governments to the integration processes is fundamental. Such a commitment must be expressed through the building of solid institutions that function according to policies and common actions developed while truly exercising shared and genuine sovereignty.

It is undeniable that what has made an alternative form of integration possible and feasible is the fact that in many countries, the State has recuperated its ability to promote productive and social development or has made significant progress in this area. This is why we must insist that the alternative model of integration we pursue is not incompatible, but rather complementary to the defence of and advances in national sovereignty. This does not imply defending strict nationalism, but rather a possible path towards integration between nations – nations that are not simply victims of imperialist plans, but rather sovereign nations with national development projects. These projects must be articulated on a regional level.

Latin America, the new geopolitical situation and the construction of a new regionally based model of development

Regional integration can play a key role in this new historical context, especially when we consider two fundamental strategic perspectives that have widened in recent years:

– Countries in the region want to define their own role in the multi-polar world that is emerging, in spite of the growing difficulties caused by the U.S. government’s unilateralism. They are unable to assume this role on their own,

  • – No single country, not even the most powerful ones, acting isolatedly will be able to implement dynamics that differ from those driven by the globalized world market. In other words, to be “post-neoliberal”, national development processes must be linked to regional integration.
  • – However, to move forward in this direction, the integration process must be seen as part of a transition towards an alternative model of production and consumption that overcomes the limits of the current development model.

The crisis and the limits it imposes on the possibility of maintaining the status quo should compel us to overcome existing weaknesses and to develop the new dynamism that institutional developments must promote. These efforts must be linked to the need to respond to the crisis with an autonomous and alternative development project for the region – that is, one that has been emancipated from the interests of current world powers.

Defining the path that will lead us to the type of regional integration we propose:

  • A regionally organized and regulated production strategy
    First and foremost, this strategy must be radically different from providing support for major companies that are seeking to acquire at the regional level the strength they need to compete in the global market. This type of integration only results in increasing capital’s mobility and profits. This strategy has been promoted in the region for over a decade, through proposals such as the Free Trade Agreement of the Americas (FTAA) and the Initiative for the Integration of Regional Infrastructure in South America (IIRSA), as well as the push for progressive liberalization during negotiations at the World Trade Organization (WTO). These companies will soon attempt to reactivate this process, which could advance freely and rapidly if it is not confronted by an integration project based on solidarity that serves as a political and economic counterproposal. This is not, however, the kind of integration we want.



    To construct regional integration as an alternative to the crisis, we must focus our attention on two essential elements. First, one important task for the on-going process of building alternative regional institutions should be the regulation of these companies’ operations at the regional level, taking into account social, cultural, environmental and other interests. Second, it is fundamental that the production chains in the region be restructured according to a new scale of the companies’ operations at the regional level. This must be done in a way that ensures that their expansion is not seen as an attempt to reaffirm hegemonies and the power of some countries over others, but rather as one possible way of generating economic dynamism, employment and wealth for the entire region.

  • Overcoming asymmetries as a short-, medium- and long-term objective
    One of the priorities of the integration process should be to overcome asymmetries between countries and within the countries of the region, creating integrated production systems as well as production, service and trade circuits in which everyone may become integrated. The fundamental objective would be to use this process to generate dynamic development opportunities for regions and countries that are currently experiencing difficulties or suffering from stagnation. Given the historical accumulation of fragilities of entire regions and countries in Latin America, we should first adopt specific policies that seek to compensate existing asymmetries in the short run, namely in the area of social development, in a way that reduces the differences and, at the same time, allows these regions to develop their ability to take advantage of dynamic opportunities in the process.
  • Regional technical and cultural production
    Incentives could and should be provided for important elements, due to their capacity to propel the regional development process and to increase the visibility and popularity of our alternatives. They also have potential to generate dynamism and to contribute to finding solutions for specific problems in the region.



    One such element is the integration of centres of technological development and cultural production/broadcasting in the region. In several countries, there already exist centres for technological development (specialized or generic) in various fields ranging from agriculture and livestock to the aeronautic and pharmaceutical industries, among others. There is no reason not to integrate these centres. We should do so in order to take advantage of their synergies and use the resources generated in the region for the benefit of all of Latin America. The same can be said for the region’s enormous potential in audiovisual production and sports, and its even greater potential for development, which only the creation of a new scale of consumption derived from an expanded regional market could provide.

    Furthermore, this proposal must be defended during negotiations in the WTO and with other trading blocks (like the EU) on “Rules of Origin”. The major powers specifically use these rules to stop small countries and emerging economies from coordinating their productive activities with the goal of exporting to markets outside of the region.

  • Small and medium enterprises as a priority
    Another element is providing general or sector-based incentives for the development of small and medium enterprises (SMEs). SMEs could be stimulated by the integrated development of regional markets. They could also operate in a range of fields – from software development to tourism (e.g. a network small hostels or hotels) – and take advantage of the region’s diversity in cultures and environments. Small and medium enterprises offer real potential in terms of job creation. Moreover, by linking them to the regional integration process – that is, one that truly supports development – they could lend significant social legitimacy to the process.
  • Regional food sovereignty and support for family farming in small and medium production units
    The viability of certain local and regional items produced by family and peasant farmers is compromised by the limits of consumption in these regions and in some countries. Therefore, the creation of a regional market could help to guarantee the viability of a more diversified production of agricultural products. This production must differ from the homogeneity of the products and productive processes that are typical of agribusiness, with its highly concentrated and transnationalized commercialization structure and technological packages. The distribution of these products could also gain momentum and promote regional gastronomy, gastronomic tourism and other activities that could generate economic dynamism and foster cultural integration.
  • Facilitate intra-regional public transportation with the people as a priority
    Integrating the region’s transportation infrastructure is another fundamental element that would contribute to the regional integration process. It must take advantage of the diversity of existing modes of transportation and take into account local solutions for addressing environmental and climate issues. It must also consider regional perspectives for technological production and development and the possibility of creating regional public enterprises. Here, we need to think big, as problems in long-distance transportation cannot be resolved by building more highways. Why not think of reactivating and integrating local and regional railway systems? Why not think of integrating sea and river transportation by taking advantage of what already exists? Why not think of creating a regional airline company that makes the integration of a network of medium-size cities in the region feasibly by using small- and medium-size planes that the aeronautic industry in the region already has the potential to produce.. We are not talking about an abstract problem, but rather one that every Latin American who has attempted to travel or transport cargo within the region has faced. It is important that we consider the impact of these processes in each country. We must also reaffirm strong support for the improvement of public transportation in urban centres, as a way to discourage the use of individual means of transport that have impacts on the demand for energy.
  • Regional financial integration
    The debate about the Banco del Sur brought to light the political challenges and different perspectives that exist in various countries. But it also showed the enormous potential and the need to develop a regional financial system that could simultaneously regulate finances on the regional level and protect economies in the region and the regional economy from external shocks. It should also create one or more mechanisms for fostering regional development and allow for a dynamic process of exchange between the Latin American economies, which does not mean sanctioning, through the use of currency, the power of the central capitalist economies. In other words, it should allow for the creation of a regional currency or a system in which a common unit of reference (that does not necessarily aim to make a common currency feasible) would be used in the region. Rather than acting as restrictions, the difficulties and financial turbulence should serve as a motive for intensifying discussion on and actions aimed at moving forward with the process of regional regulation and financial development.
  • Regional energy solidarity and complementarity
    Difficulties in regulating potential energy generation through regional agreements should have led to the consolidation of a regional public entity that regulates and promotes an integrated energy system. Moving beyond limited national interests, efforts to render energy generation feasible at the regional level must promote the use of all alternative sources, so that production methods are the least harmful as possible to the environment while, at the same time, ensure the satisfaction of a new pattern of production and consumption that will be established by an alternative regional development process. Reducing distances between producers and consumers to decrease the amount of energy used to transport products could be one of the many initiatives that would help to consolidate a new energy model. Fundamentally, this new model must be based on the premise of energy sovereignty and solidarity, on striving for increased efficiency and the diversification of energy sources, namely renewable ones.
  • A new model for participation and transparency
    Political and social sectors in favour of deepening Latin American integration processes must come together to reflect on what the appropriate mechanisms for civil participation are. We must avoid reproducing the logic inherited from the 1990s. In this sense, in order to promote the consolidation of democracy, mechanisms of social participation must be effective channels of dialogue and for advancing proposals through which througsocial movements and organized civil society (made up of diverse political actors, including members of political parties and parliament) may express their needs and views on sensitive issues. For example, in the case of productive or infrastructure projects that have different kinds of territorial and environmental impacts, we need to develop a methodology that guarantees real participation in the decision-making process. This methodology must go beyond the logic of “presenting environmental impact studies”, which capital has learned to manipulate for its benefit. It must guarantee that the decisions made take into account the collective interests of those directly affected by the projects, social license (as foreseen by the U.N. International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, ESCR, art.1, paragraph 2.), the redistribution of the project’s benefits and its concrete contributions in terms of reducing poverty.

Constructing integration for and by the Peoples

The essence and the motor of a new regional development model must be: the integration of millions of Latin American women and men into a new system of consumption and production that generates wealth and employment, allows for the expansion of the market in the region, builds an alternative development process and strives to drastically reduce all kinds of inequalities that exist among the people in the region.

In the same way we have already stated that we must overcome asymmetries between countries and within countries in the region, we must also assume a commitment to reducing social inequalities between the peoples and within the peoples. Here, we, the social movements, are proposing the transformation – of the socioeconomic development model – by transforming ourselves; that is to say – we conceive the integration of diverse social subjects within our peoples as the starting point for the integration of the peoples. As such, the integration of the peoples – of our nations – must not only be “based on the political transformation for the peoples”, but also based on the social transformation of the people. We conceive this process as an opportunity to advance in the transition towards another model of production and consumption, which requires new forms of organizing social, community and labour relations.

Transforming weakness into strength, needs into potential for development, inequalities to be overcome into possibilities for transformation and technological development, respect for cultural differences into the driving force of the regional integration process, even in economic terms. This is to be the engine of an alternative we can build so that – far beyond the haziness and the turbulence of the current economic crisis – we may see our real potential for creating a different and better world in Latin America and the Caribbean. We can then integrate this new world with other regions that must also take advantage of and develop their own possibilities.

Today, we, the social movements, when addressing the current global crisis or the combination of specific crises, have the historical opportunity of contributing towards what could be the beginning of the final stage of an exhausted system, which has been backed into a corner. We must go beyond merely responding to the crisis, caused by the inherent contradictions of the system itself, and move towards a real confrontation between the included and the excluded. This will only be possible if we are able to build an alternative productive matrix that allows us to live well and enjoy the good life.


Edgardo Lander

No hay nada en la idea de integración que en sí mismo podamos considerar como favorable para el futuro de los pueblos del continente. No basta con que sea una integración latinoamericana o sudamericana para que corresponda a los intereses populares. Todo depende del modelo de integración en cuestión. ¿Quiénes lo impulsan? ¿Para qué? ¿Para quién? ¿En función de qué intereses y de que valores se diseña? Dependiendo de la respuesta a estas interrogantes,la integración puede afianzar las relaciones de dominación actualmente hegemónicas, physician o puede contribuir a abrir rendijas para socavarlas.

¿Un proyecto de integración orientado a abrir aún más estas economías para someterlas a los dictados de los dueños del capital? ¿O una integración defensiva que tenga como meta conquistar espacios de autonomía y soberanía para definir políticas públicas y opciones económicas propias? En otras palabras, treat ¿una integración que contribuya a desdibujar aún más los espacios y territorios del ejercicio de la soberanía democrática de los pueblos, o una integración orientada a recuperar lo que siglos de colonialismo y políticas imperiales le han arrebatado y continúan arrebatando a los pueblos del continente?

¿Una integración orientada por los valores del individualismo posesivo, de la competencia de todos contra todos, en la cual se garantice el éxito de los más fuertes sobre la base de la explotación y exclusión de los más débiles, esto es, una integración que acentúe las inaceptables desigualdades actuales? ¿O una integración guiada por los valores de la igualdad, de la participación, la pluralidad, la solidaridad, la comunidad, una integración que reconozca, valore y haga posible el despliegue de la extraordinaria variedad de modos de vida de los pueblos de nuestro continente?

¿Una integración que sin límite alguno explote los recursos naturales, convirtiéndolos en mercancías exportables para generar los excedentes requeridos para pagar la deuda externa? ¿O una integración que se oriente a la recuperación y construcción de otras formas de ser los humanos parte de la naturaleza, que no la considere como un enemigo a ser sometido, controlado, explotado y por ende destruido?

¿Una integración pensada como área de libre comercio, concebida principalmente como la construcción de un espacio económico de libre circulación de mercancías y capitales? ¿O una integración geopolítica concebida como parte de los procesos de resistencia al orden global que busca imponer la política unilateral e imperial del capital transnacional y del gobierno de los Estados Unidos? El ALCA

El principal proyecto estratégico del gobierno de Estados Unidos hacia el continente americano en su conjunto durante los últimos diez años ha sido el ALCA o Área de Libre Comercio de las Américas. Mediante este acuerdo de alcance continental, Estados Unidos y sus empresas han buscado consolidar, profundizar y hacer irreversibles las políticas de ajuste estructural de las últimas décadas, pretendiendo establecer de una vez por todas la prioridad absoluta de los derechos del capital sobre los derechos de la gente.

Mediante la constitucionalización del orden neoliberal en un pacto supranacional de obligatorio cumplimento, se aspira a acotar drásticamente los ámbitos de la soberanía y del ejercicio de la democracia y la regulación social, concebidas todas como trabas ilegítimas al pleno y libre despliegue y movimiento del capital.

Hasta hace poco más de dos años, las negociaciones avanzaban en forma aparentemente indetenible. Gobiernos sumisos en todo el continente negociaban textos secretos a espaldas de sus pueblos, y parecía inevitable que para la fecha prevista, esto es, para finales del año 2004, se concluyeran la negociación y revisión del texto de manera que este pudiese ser ratificado en 2005. Sin embargo, a partir del año 2002 las cosas comenzaron a cambiar.

Los movimientos y organizaciones sociales de la resistencia al ALCA, especialmente mediante su articulación en la Alianza Social Continental, lograron sacar el debate del ámbito acotado de una negociación entre expertos en comercio internacional para colocarla en el terreno del debate y la movilización pública.

Organizaciones sindicales, indígenas, ecologistas, campesinas, de mujeres y académicas en todo el continente logran converger en una resistencia crecientemente organizada y capaz de grandes movilizaciones. Cada una de las principales reuniones de los negociadores del acuerdo pasó a estar acompañada de masivas protestas (Québec, Buenos Aires, Quito, Miami). Los cambios políticos representados por la elección de Chávez, Lula y Kirchner introdujeron perspectivas y posturas negociadoras no previstas.

En la reunión del Comité de Negociaciones Comerciales (CNC) celebrada en San Salvador en julio de 2003 se reconoce por primera vez, en la propia mesa de negociaciones, que estas están severamente estancadas. Se realizaron sucesivos intentos de salvar el acuerdo mediante un tratado más diluido (Alca light) o por la vía de un ALCA de dos niveles que permitiese a los gobiernos más comprometidos con el modelo de libre comercio preservar el contenido del proyecto original, facultando a otros gobiernos el asumir compromisos menores. Buscando destrancar las negociaciones, los Estados Unidos convocaron sucesivas “reuniones informales” entre diferentes grupos de países.

Persistieron los desacuerdos. Finalmente, en contra de todos los pronósticos, lo que no parecía posible es hoy un hecho. La resistencia continental ha derrotado al ALCA, quizás definitivamente. Desde comienzos del año 2003 no se ha llevado a cabo ninguna reunión formal. De hecho, aunque esto no se admita públicamente, las negociaciones han sido pospuestas en forma indefinida [1].

Diversas organizaciones del continente han sugerido que el 1 de enero de 2005, fecha en que se suponía que estuviese listo el acuerdo, sea celebrado como el día del triunfo de los movimientos populares de las Américas contra el ALCA. En estos tiempos neoliberales no son muchas las victorias populares: hay que celebrarlas. Los Tratados de Libre Comercio (TLCs)

El descarrilamiento del ALCA representa sin duda una victoria para la resistencia al proyecto imperial de libre comercio. Sin embargo, la agenda estratégica del gobierno de Estados Unidos hacia el continente no ha sido derrotada: avanza por otras vías. Dado que las dificultades en las negociaciones del ALCA las enfrentaba principalmente con tres países -Brasil, Argentina y Venezuela- el gobierno de Estados Unidos optó por continuar negociaciones vía TLCs con prácticamente todos los demás países. Negoció y firmó un TLC con Chile, concluyó las negociaciones con Centroamérica, y está en lo que se supone que es la fase final de las negociaciones con Colombia, Ecuador y Perú.

Dado el fraccionamiento de la resistencia y las posturas más amigables (tanto al libre comercio como al gobierno de Estados Unidos) de los gobiernos en cuestión, en estos acuerdos se radicaliza la agenda neoliberal. No sólo se va más allá de los acuerdos de la Organización Mundial de Comercio (OMC), sino incluso de lo previsto en los borradores del ALCA. La extraordinaria disparidad entre las partes de estas negociaciones queda ilustrada en el contenido, por ejemplo, de los capítulos sobre propiedad intelectual y agricultura del TLC andino, acuerdos que de aprobarse en su versión actual tendrían impactos catastróficos sobre la salud y la alimentación de los pueblos.

Estados Unidos ha exigido el patentamiento de plantas y animales (¡definidos como inventos!), así como de procedimientos diagnósticos, terapéuticos y quirúrgicos. Reafirmando una vez más que considera más importante las ganancias de sus transnacionales farmacéuticas que la salud pública, además de diversas medidas destinadas a impedir la utilización de medicamentes genéricos exige que se deje sin efecto la Declaración Relativa al Acuerdo sobre ADPIC [2] de Doha (2001), que autoriza cierta flexibilidad en la interpretación de los derechos de propiedad intelectual de los medicamentos y permite a los países miembros de la OMC “proteger la salud pública y, en particular, promover el acceso a los medicamentos para todos”.

En las negociaciones sobre agricultura Estados Unidos exige la eliminación de todos los instrumentos de protección y fomento agrícola utilizados por los países andinos (bandas de precios, cuotas de importación, etc.), a la vez que se niega en forma categórica a siquiera discutir sus opulentos subsidios agrícolas. Esta combinación no puede conducir sino a la devastación de la agricultura andina, a socavar las condiciones de la seguridad alimentaria y a la expulsión de millones de personas del campo.

A pesar de la firme oposición popular y de las masivas movilizaciones de organizaciones sociales y políticas centroamericanas y andinas [3], no ha sido posible hasta el momento frenar estas negociaciones.

MERCOSUR y la Comunidad Andina de Naciones

¿Constituyen hoy el MERCOSUR o la Comunidad Andina de Naciones (CAN) alternativas a este modelo de integración y desarrollo? La integración no puede pensarse como algo diferente a los proyectos nacionales, diferente a las sociedades que se prefiguran al interior de cada Estado-nación. Los proyectos de integración del continente dependen de los procesos políticos, de las estructuras productivas, de las correlaciones de fuerza existentes tanto global y regionalmente como al interior de cada uno de los países participantes.

Los actuales proyectos y prácticas de integración en América Latina se dan con estructuras productivas y condiciones políticas e ideológicas muy diferentes a las existentes cuando se debatía la integración latinoamericana en los ‘60 y ‘70. Como resultado de las dictaduras militares y de la aplicación sistemática de las políticas neoliberales de ajuste estructural, estas sociedades han cambiado profundamente tanto en su estructura productiva como en su tejido social. Como consecuencia de la represión, la desindustrialización y las reformas laborales, el movimiento sindical se encuentra extraordinariamente reducido y debilitado, y la mayor parte de los nuevos empleos se crean en el llamado sector informal.

El peso de empresarios cuya producción se orientaba prioritariamente al mercado interno ha igualmente declinado. La propiedad de la tierra se encuentra aún más concentrada que hace tres décadas. Los sectores más dinámicos de las economías del continente -los que tienen igualmente hoy mayor incidencia política, mayor capacidad de tener impacto sobre las políticas públicas- son los sectores triunfantes de estas transformaciones económicas. Son principalmente los grupos financieros, los de los servicios -como las telecomunicaciones- y los exportadores de productos primarios: en el caso del Cono Sur, principalmente el sector agroindustrial.

Estos sectores están controlados o asociados estrechamente con el capital transnacional, sus beneficios dependen de la apertura económica, de la desregulación, de las privatizaciones y del acceso a los mercados internacionales. Constituyen las fuerzas dinámicas internas detrás de las políticas del libre comercio.

El sentido común neoliberal hoy hegemónico, y los intereses de estos sectores que resultaron beneficiados de las transformaciones políticas y de la estructura económica producidas en las últimas tres décadas, condicionan las orientaciones básicas de los proyectos de integración que hoy operan y se negocian en todo el continente. Es posible constatar incluso que la razón fundamental por la cual los gobiernos de Brasil y Argentina pusieron una resistencia tan firme al ALCA tuvo que ver principalmente con el hecho de que los beneficios que esperaban estos sectores no estaban siendo garantizados suficientemente en la negociación.

No se trata de desconocer que estos gobiernos no han tenido posiciones únicas y que han existido tensiones entre visiones más orientadas hacia el libre comercio y visiones que reivindican mayor autonomía para el impulso de políticas públicas nacionales. Sin embargo, y más allá de los discursos, fue precisamente el hecho de que el ALCA no garantizaba un mayor acceso de los productos de la agroindustria del MERCOSUR al mercado de Estados Unidos, y que el gobierno de dicho país no estaba dispuesto a siquiera considerar la reducción de los subsidios a su producción agrícola, la verdadera razón por la cual se trancaron las negociaciones del ALCA.

El único gobierno participante en las negociaciones que formuló cuestionamientos conceptuales, políticos y doctrinarios fundamentales a cada una de las dimensiones del modelo de integración propuesto por el gobierno de Estados Unidos a través del ALCA fue el de Venezuela.

Esos mismos intereses han estado impulsando las negociaciones del MERCOSUR con la Unión Europea. De acuerdo a denuncias formuladas por las principales organizaciones sociales del Cono Sur [4], a cambio de un acceso limitado de los productos de la agroindustria del MERCOSUR al mercado de la Unión Europea, los negociadores del MERCOSUR están realizando concesiones que tendrían efectos nocivos sobre la agricultura familiar, limitarían la capacidad de los Estados para tener políticas industriales autónomas, y convertirían en mercancías áreas tan críticas como los denominados “servicios culturales” y “servicios ambientales”.

Se habrían ofrecido igualmente preferencias a la Unión Europea para las compras del Sector Público. No hay razón alguna por la cual se pueda suponer que las transnacionales basadas en Europa puedan tener efectos más benignos o sean menos rapaces que las estadounidenses, ni para asumir que los gobiernos europeos sean menos agresivos en la defensa de los intereses de sus corporaciones. Cualquier ilusión en este sentido quedó desmentida con la reciente crisis argentina. La Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones

Los gobiernos de Sudamérica celebran lo que denominan un nuevo momento histórico en el continente, la realización del sueño de Bolívar: la creación de la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones. ¿Podrá este acuerdo convertirse efectivamente en un punto de partida para nuevos proyectos económicos y geopolíticos alternativos a los modelos hegemónicos?

La retórica de la Declaración del Cusco, firmada por los presidentes o cancilleres de 12 países sudamericanos [5], parecería efectivamente apuntar en una nueva dirección. Predomina en esta un lenguaje diferente a la prioritaria del libre comercio que ha sido hegemónica durante los últimos lustros.

Partiendo de la “historia compartida y solidaria de nuestras naciones”, se reivindica “una identidad sudamericana compartida y valores comunes, tales como: la democracia, la solidaridad, los derechos humanos, la libertad, la justicia social, el respeto a la integridad territorial, a la diversidad, la no discriminación y la afirmación de su autonomía, la igualdad soberana de los Estados y la solución pacífica de controversias”.

Se reconoce que no es suficiente con el desarrollo económico, y que se requieren estrategias que junto a “una conciencia ambiental responsable y el reconocimiento de asimetrías en el desarrollo de sus países, aseguren una más justa y equitativa distribución del ingreso, el acceso a la educación, la cohesión y la inclusión social, así como la preservación del medio ambiente y la promoción del desarrollo sostenible”.

Se enfatiza un “compromiso esencial con la lucha contra la pobreza, la eliminación del hambre, la generación de empleo decente y el acceso de todos a la salud y a la educación como herramientas fundamentales para el desarrollo de los pueblos”. En el terreno internacional se apela a “los valores de la paz y la seguridad internacionales, a partir de la afirmación de la vigencia del derecho internacional y de un multilateralismo renovado y democrático que integre decididamente y de manera eficaz el desarrollo económico y social en la agenda mundial”.

Desde el punto de vista institucional, se afirma a la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones como proyecto que trasciende un área de libre comercio, acordándose que se va a “desarrollar un espacio sudamericano integrado en lo político, social, económico, ambiental y de infraestructura, que fortalezca la identidad propia de América del Sur y que contribuya, a partir de una perspectiva subregional y, en articulación con otras experiencias de integración regional, al fortalecimiento de América Latina y el Caribe y le otorgue una mayor gravitación y representación en los foros internacionales”.

De acuerdo al texto, se trata de un proyecto de integración de los pueblos. Se afirma: “Nuestra convicción en el sentido que la realización de los valores e intereses compartidos que nos unen, además de comprometer a los Gobiernos, sólo encontrará viabilidad en la medida que los pueblos asuman el rol protagónico que les corresponde en este proceso. La integración sudamericana es y debe ser una integración de los pueblos”.

Más allá de temas cruciales que están ausentes en el texto, como el de la deuda externa, y el de las relaciones de este proyecto con los acuerdos de libre comercio firmados o en proceso de negociación con Estados Unidos y la Unión Europea, ¿puede esperarse que los actuales gobiernos sudamericanos (los firmantes de la Declaración del Cusco) sean consecuentes con estas declaraciones de intención? ¿Se trata de un lenguaje destinado al público de galería, o es la expresión de una nueva voluntad política de los gobiernos sudamericanos?

Más que descartar de antemano la Declaración del Cusco como pura retórica y a la decisión de crear la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones como una mera formalidad, es conveniente analizar este proceso en la potencialidad que podría ofrecer para convertirse en un nuevo terreno de pugnas y tensiones entre diferentes visiones y diferentes fuerzas sociales en torno al futuro de América Latina. ¿Pretenden los gobiernos firmantes de la declaración (o algunos de ellos) adecuar las orientaciones de sus políticas públicas a los objetivos declarados de la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones?

Lo que resulta evidente es que hay flagrantes contradicciones entre los objetivos y metas formulados en esta declaración y el rumbo principal que hoy asumen las políticas públicas en la mayoría de los países sudamericanos. Los objetivos formulados en la Declaración del Cusco no son, de modo alguno, compatibles con las políticas públicas y orientaciones económicas que, gracias a la deuda externa, los organismos financieros internacionales continúan imponiendo en todo el continente. ¿Pueden los movimientos sociales y políticos populares del continente aprovechar estas tensiones para formular e impulsar propuestas contrahegemónicas?

¿Qué sentido tiene que los gobiernos andinos que hoy negocian un TLC con Estados Unidos, proyecto que constituye una severa amenaza a la salud, educación, alimentación y el ambiente de dichos países, se comprometan a garantizar la salud, la educación, la alimentación de sus pueblos, así como la preservación del ambiente? ¿Qué sentido tiene la reivindicación del derecho a un empleo decente cuando las políticas de apertura, privatización y desregulación, la desindustrialización, la flexibilidad laboral y las reformas de la legislación laboral impulsadas por estos mismos gobiernos continúan deteriorando y precarizando sistemáticamente las condiciones del empleo? ¿Para qué proclamar la autonomía e igualdad soberana de los Estados mientras se están negociando acuerdos comerciales que limitan cada vez más el ejercicio de la soberanía? ¿Por qué hablar de la equitativa distribución del ingreso, y de la cohesión y la inclusión social, si la experiencia confirma que las actuales políticas de predominio dogmático del libre comercio no conducen sino a la desintegración social y al incremento de las desigualdades sociales? ¿Qué sentido tiene destacar la importancia de la preservación del medio ambiente y la promoción del desarrollo sostenible si -como es evidente por ejemplo en el caso de Brasil- las actuales políticas de prioridad de las exportaciones primarias orientadas a generar un excedente en la balanza comercial para pagar la deuda externa requieren una sobreexplotación depredadora y no sostenible de los recursos naturales? ¿Qué tipo de infraestructura va a acompañar este proceso de integración? ¿Continuará la prioridad en la inversión en infraestructura orientada a facilitar las exportaciones y consolidar el modelo de crecimiento hacia afuera, la economía de puertos? ¿Pondrá esta infraestructura a la Amazonía y sus recursos a la disposición de las empresas transnacionales?6. ¿Podrá por el contrario dársele prioridad a las exigencias de un desarrollo endógeno, de ampliación de los mercados internos continentales y de la efectiva integración de los pueblos? ¿Será posible avanzar en la dirección de un modelo alternativo de integración cuando se está incorporando a la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones, en forma acrítica, la base jurídica y normativa que el MERCOSUR y la Comunidad Andina de Naciones fueron armando durante los lustros recientes de hegemonía neoliberal?

La retórica latinoamericanista, la reivindicación de la soberanía y la democracia, así como de los derechos de los pueblos, podría bajar la guardia de los movimientos sociales y políticos populares en torno a las negociaciones entre los gobiernos del continente mientras mantienen una actitud vigilante ante los acuerdos negociados con potencias extracontinentales (ALCA, TLCs, MERCOSUR-UE). No hay, sin embargo, nada en la idea de integración sudamericana que en sí misma, por su propia condición de ser latina o sudamericana, sea necesariamente más favorable a los intereses de los pueblos. Todo depende, como se señaló al comienzo de este texto, de los modelos de integración en juego.

Se abre con la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones un nuevo terreno de lucha continental. El destino de este proyecto de integración y la respuesta a la cuestión básica de si puede o no llegar a ser favorable a los intereses populares, más que del contenido de sus textos fundantes, dependerá del resultado de las luchas sociales y políticas, de la capacidad de las fuerzas populares para revertir las tendencias políticas y económicas hoy hegemónicas en la mayor parte del continente.

¿Será posible convertir a la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones en un nuevo terreno capaz de articular en forma efectiva las luchas de los pueblos del continente por la soberanía, la democracia, la igualdad, la pluralidad cultural? ¿Podrá este nuevo proyecto integrador jugar un papel en la resistencia a la hegemonía imperial de Estados Unidos?

Son estos nuevos retos y nuevas interrogantes que confronta hoy la lucha popular latinoamericana.

Edgardo Lander Sociólogo, profesor titular de la UCV Ver los artículos de Edgardo Lander

[1] Han circulado, sin embargo, rumores de acuerdo a los cuales los co-presidentes de la fase final de las negociaciones del ALCA, el Embajador Robert Zoellick de Estados Unidos y el Canciller de Brasil, Celso Amorim, tendrían previsto reunirse en el mes de enero de 2005 para explorar las posibilidades de un reinicio de las negociaciones. Mientras han estado absolutamente suspendidas todas las negociaciones sustantivas, ha continuado la pugna entre las ciudades candidatas a ser sede permanente del acuerdo

[2] Aspectos de Propiedad Intelectual Relacionados con el Comercio, mejor conocido por sus siglas en inglés: TRIPS.

[3] Ver, por ejemplo, la declaración conjunta de las cuatro centrales de trabajadores colombianas: Declaración frente al tratado de libre comercio con Estados Unidos y el tema laboral, Bogotá, 3 de diciembre 2004. En Red Colombiana de Acción Frente al Libre Comercio (Recalca)

[4] Autoconvocatoria No al ALCA (Argentina), “Acuerdo Unión Europea-MERCOSUR: ganancias para pocos, amenaza para la mayoría”

[5] Declaración del Cusco sobre la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones, Cumbre Presidencial Sudamericana, Cusco, 8 de diciembre de 2004. Los países firmantes de esta declaración son: Argentina, Bolivia, Brasil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Guyana, Paraguay, Perú, Surinam, Uruguay y Venezuela

Fuente: www.bilaterals.org

Edgardo Lander
No hay nada en la idea de integración que en sí mismo podamos considerar como favorable para el futuro de los pueblos del continente. No basta con que sea una integración latinoamericana o sudamericana para que corresponda a los intereses populares. Todo depende del modelo de integración en cuestión. ¿Quiénes lo impulsan? ¿Para qué? ¿Para quién? ¿En función de qué intereses y de que valores se diseña? Dependiendo de la respuesta a estas interrogantes, ed la integración puede afianzar las relaciones de dominación actualmente hegemónicas, help o puede contribuir a abrir rendijas para socavarlas.
¿Un proyecto de integración orientado a abrir aún más estas economías para someterlas a los dictados de los dueños del capital? ¿O una integración defensiva que tenga como meta conquistar espacios de autonomía y soberanía para definir políticas públicas y opciones económicas propias? En otras palabras, ¿una integración que contribuya a desdibujar aún más los espacios y territorios del ejercicio de la soberanía democrática de los pueblos, o una integración orientada a recuperar lo que siglos de colonialismo y políticas imperiales le han arrebatado y continúan arrebatando a los pueblos del continente?
¿Una integración orientada por los valores del individualismo posesivo, de la competencia de todos contra todos, en la cual se garantice el éxito de los más fuertes sobre la base de la explotación y exclusión de los más débiles, esto es, una integración que acentúe las inaceptables desigualdades actuales? ¿O una integración guiada por los valores de la igualdad, de la participación, la pluralidad, la solidaridad, la comunidad, una integración que reconozca, valore y haga posible el despliegue de la extraordinaria variedad de modos de vida de los pueblos de nuestro continente?
¿Una integración que sin límite alguno explote los recursos naturales, convirtiéndolos en mercancías exportables para generar los excedentes requeridos para pagar la deuda externa? ¿O una integración que se oriente a la recuperación y construcción de otras formas de ser los humanos parte de la naturaleza, que no la considere como un enemigo a ser sometido, controlado, explotado y por ende destruido?
¿Una integración pensada como área de libre comercio, concebida principalmente como la construcción de un espacio económico de libre circulación de mercancías y capitales? ¿O una integración geopolítica concebida como parte de los procesos de resistencia al orden global que busca imponer la política unilateral e imperial del capital transnacional y del gobierno de los Estados Unidos? El ALCA
El principal proyecto estratégico del gobierno de Estados Unidos hacia el continente americano en su conjunto durante los últimos diez años ha sido el ALCA o Área de Libre Comercio de las Américas. Mediante este acuerdo de alcance continental, Estados Unidos y sus empresas han buscado consolidar, profundizar y hacer irreversibles las políticas de ajuste estructural de las últimas décadas, pretendiendo establecer de una vez por todas la prioridad absoluta de los derechos del capital sobre los derechos de la gente.
Mediante la constitucionalización del orden neoliberal en un pacto supranacional de obligatorio cumplimento, se aspira a acotar drásticamente los ámbitos de la soberanía y del ejercicio de la democracia y la regulación social, concebidas todas como trabas ilegítimas al pleno y libre despliegue y movimiento del capital.
Hasta hace poco más de dos años, las negociaciones avanzaban en forma aparentemente indetenible. Gobiernos sumisos en todo el continente negociaban textos secretos a espaldas de sus pueblos, y parecía inevitable que para la fecha prevista, esto es, para finales del año 2004, se concluyeran la negociación y revisión del texto de manera que este pudiese ser ratificado en 2005. Sin embargo, a partir del año 2002 las cosas comenzaron a cambiar.
Los movimientos y organizaciones sociales de la resistencia al ALCA, especialmente mediante su articulación en la Alianza Social Continental, lograron sacar el debate del ámbito acotado de una negociación entre expertos en comercio internacional para colocarla en el terreno del debate y la movilización pública.
Organizaciones sindicales, indígenas, ecologistas, campesinas, de mujeres y académicas en todo el continente logran converger en una resistencia crecientemente organizada y capaz de grandes movilizaciones. Cada una de las principales reuniones de los negociadores del acuerdo pasó a estar acompañada de masivas protestas (Québec, Buenos Aires, Quito, Miami). Los cambios políticos representados por la elección de Chávez, Lula y Kirchner introdujeron perspectivas y posturas negociadoras no previstas.
En la reunión del Comité de Negociaciones Comerciales (CNC) celebrada en San Salvador en julio de 2003 se reconoce por primera vez, en la propia mesa de negociaciones, que estas están severamente estancadas. Se realizaron sucesivos intentos de salvar el acuerdo mediante un tratado más diluido (Alca light) o por la vía de un ALCA de dos niveles que permitiese a los gobiernos más comprometidos con el modelo de libre comercio preservar el contenido del proyecto original, facultando a otros gobiernos el asumir compromisos menores. Buscando destrancar las negociaciones, los Estados Unidos convocaron sucesivas “reuniones informales” entre diferentes grupos de países.
Persistieron los desacuerdos. Finalmente, en contra de todos los pronósticos, lo que no parecía posible es hoy un hecho. La resistencia continental ha derrotado al ALCA, quizás definitivamente. Desde comienzos del año 2003 no se ha llevado a cabo ninguna reunión formal. De hecho, aunque esto no se admita públicamente, las negociaciones han sido pospuestas en forma indefinida [1].
Diversas organizaciones del continente han sugerido que el 1 de enero de 2005, fecha en que se suponía que estuviese listo el acuerdo, sea celebrado como el día del triunfo de los movimientos populares de las Américas contra el ALCA. En estos tiempos neoliberales no son muchas las victorias populares: hay que celebrarlas. Los Tratados de Libre Comercio (TLCs)
El descarrilamiento del ALCA representa sin duda una victoria para la resistencia al proyecto imperial de libre comercio. Sin embargo, la agenda estratégica del gobierno de Estados Unidos hacia el continente no ha sido derrotada: avanza por otras vías. Dado que las dificultades en las negociaciones del ALCA las enfrentaba principalmente con tres países -Brasil, Argentina y Venezuela- el gobierno de Estados Unidos optó por continuar negociaciones vía TLCs con prácticamente todos los demás países. Negoció y firmó un TLC con Chile, concluyó las negociaciones con Centroamérica, y está en lo que se supone que es la fase final de las negociaciones con Colombia, Ecuador y Perú.
Dado el fraccionamiento de la resistencia y las posturas más amigables (tanto al libre comercio como al gobierno de Estados Unidos) de los gobiernos en cuestión, en estos acuerdos se radicaliza la agenda neoliberal. No sólo se va más allá de los acuerdos de la Organización Mundial de Comercio (OMC), sino incluso de lo previsto en los borradores del ALCA. La extraordinaria disparidad entre las partes de estas negociaciones queda ilustrada en el contenido, por ejemplo, de los capítulos sobre propiedad intelectual y agricultura del TLC andino, acuerdos que de aprobarse en su versión actual tendrían impactos catastróficos sobre la salud y la alimentación de los pueblos.
Estados Unidos ha exigido el patentamiento de plantas y animales (¡definidos como inventos!), así como de procedimientos diagnósticos, terapéuticos y quirúrgicos. Reafirmando una vez más que considera más importante las ganancias de sus transnacionales farmacéuticas que la salud pública, además de diversas medidas destinadas a impedir la utilización de medicamentes genéricos exige que se deje sin efecto la Declaración Relativa al Acuerdo sobre ADPIC [2] de Doha (2001), que autoriza cierta flexibilidad en la interpretación de los derechos de propiedad intelectual de los medicamentos y permite a los países miembros de la OMC “proteger la salud pública y, en particular, promover el acceso a los medicamentos para todos”.
En las negociaciones sobre agricultura Estados Unidos exige la eliminación de todos los instrumentos de protección y fomento agrícola utilizados por los países andinos (bandas de precios, cuotas de importación, etc.), a la vez que se niega en forma categórica a siquiera discutir sus opulentos subsidios agrícolas. Esta combinación no puede conducir sino a la devastación de la agricultura andina, a socavar las condiciones de la seguridad alimentaria y a la expulsión de millones de personas del campo.
A pesar de la firme oposición popular y de las masivas movilizaciones de organizaciones sociales y políticas centroamericanas y andinas [3], no ha sido posible hasta el momento frenar estas negociaciones.
MERCOSUR y la Comunidad Andina de Naciones
¿Constituyen hoy el MERCOSUR o la Comunidad Andina de Naciones (CAN) alternativas a este modelo de integración y desarrollo? La integración no puede pensarse como algo diferente a los proyectos nacionales, diferente a las sociedades que se prefiguran al interior de cada Estado-nación. Los proyectos de integración del continente dependen de los procesos políticos, de las estructuras productivas, de las correlaciones de fuerza existentes tanto global y regionalmente como al interior de cada uno de los países participantes.
Los actuales proyectos y prácticas de integración en América Latina se dan con estructuras productivas y condiciones políticas e ideológicas muy diferentes a las existentes cuando se debatía la integración latinoamericana en los ‘60 y ‘70. Como resultado de las dictaduras militares y de la aplicación sistemática de las políticas neoliberales de ajuste estructural, estas sociedades han cambiado profundamente tanto en su estructura productiva como en su tejido social. Como consecuencia de la represión, la desindustrialización y las reformas laborales, el movimiento sindical se encuentra extraordinariamente reducido y debilitado, y la mayor parte de los nuevos empleos se crean en el llamado sector informal.
El peso de empresarios cuya producción se orientaba prioritariamente al mercado interno ha igualmente declinado. La propiedad de la tierra se encuentra aún más concentrada que hace tres décadas. Los sectores más dinámicos de las economías del continente -los que tienen igualmente hoy mayor incidencia política, mayor capacidad de tener impacto sobre las políticas públicas- son los sectores triunfantes de estas transformaciones económicas. Son principalmente los grupos financieros, los de los servicios -como las telecomunicaciones- y los exportadores de productos primarios: en el caso del Cono Sur, principalmente el sector agroindustrial.
Estos sectores están controlados o asociados estrechamente con el capital transnacional, sus beneficios dependen de la apertura económica, de la desregulación, de las privatizaciones y del acceso a los mercados internacionales. Constituyen las fuerzas dinámicas internas detrás de las políticas del libre comercio.
El sentido común neoliberal hoy hegemónico, y los intereses de estos sectores que resultaron beneficiados de las transformaciones políticas y de la estructura económica producidas en las últimas tres décadas, condicionan las orientaciones básicas de los proyectos de integración que hoy operan y se negocian en todo el continente. Es posible constatar incluso que la razón fundamental por la cual los gobiernos de Brasil y Argentina pusieron una resistencia tan firme al ALCA tuvo que ver principalmente con el hecho de que los beneficios que esperaban estos sectores no estaban siendo garantizados suficientemente en la negociación.
No se trata de desconocer que estos gobiernos no han tenido posiciones únicas y que han existido tensiones entre visiones más orientadas hacia el libre comercio y visiones que reivindican mayor autonomía para el impulso de políticas públicas nacionales. Sin embargo, y más allá de los discursos, fue precisamente el hecho de que el ALCA no garantizaba un mayor acceso de los productos de la agroindustria del MERCOSUR al mercado de Estados Unidos, y que el gobierno de dicho país no estaba dispuesto a siquiera considerar la reducción de los subsidios a su producción agrícola, la verdadera razón por la cual se trancaron las negociaciones del ALCA.
El único gobierno participante en las negociaciones que formuló cuestionamientos conceptuales, políticos y doctrinarios fundamentales a cada una de las dimensiones del modelo de integración propuesto por el gobierno de Estados Unidos a través del ALCA fue el de Venezuela.
Esos mismos intereses han estado impulsando las negociaciones del MERCOSUR con la Unión Europea. De acuerdo a denuncias formuladas por las principales organizaciones sociales del Cono Sur [4], a cambio de un acceso limitado de los productos de la agroindustria del MERCOSUR al mercado de la Unión Europea, los negociadores del MERCOSUR están realizando concesiones que tendrían efectos nocivos sobre la agricultura familiar, limitarían la capacidad de los Estados para tener políticas industriales autónomas, y convertirían en mercancías áreas tan críticas como los denominados “servicios culturales” y “servicios ambientales”.
Se habrían ofrecido igualmente preferencias a la Unión Europea para las compras del Sector Público. No hay razón alguna por la cual se pueda suponer que las transnacionales basadas en Europa puedan tener efectos más benignos o sean menos rapaces que las estadounidenses, ni para asumir que los gobiernos europeos sean menos agresivos en la defensa de los intereses de sus corporaciones. Cualquier ilusión en este sentido quedó desmentida con la reciente crisis argentina. La Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones
Los gobiernos de Sudamérica celebran lo que denominan un nuevo momento histórico en el continente, la realización del sueño de Bolívar: la creación de la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones. ¿Podrá este acuerdo convertirse efectivamente en un punto de partida para nuevos proyectos económicos y geopolíticos alternativos a los modelos hegemónicos?
La retórica de la Declaración del Cusco, firmada por los presidentes o cancilleres de 12 países sudamericanos [5], parecería efectivamente apuntar en una nueva dirección. Predomina en esta un lenguaje diferente a la prioritaria del libre comercio que ha sido hegemónica durante los últimos lustros.
Partiendo de la “historia compartida y solidaria de nuestras naciones”, se reivindica “una identidad sudamericana compartida y valores comunes, tales como: la democracia, la solidaridad, los derechos humanos, la libertad, la justicia social, el respeto a la integridad territorial, a la diversidad, la no discriminación y la afirmación de su autonomía, la igualdad soberana de los Estados y la solución pacífica de controversias”.
Se reconoce que no es suficiente con el desarrollo económico, y que se requieren estrategias que junto a “una conciencia ambiental responsable y el reconocimiento de asimetrías en el desarrollo de sus países, aseguren una más justa y equitativa distribución del ingreso, el acceso a la educación, la cohesión y la inclusión social, así como la preservación del medio ambiente y la promoción del desarrollo sostenible”.
Se enfatiza un “compromiso esencial con la lucha contra la pobreza, la eliminación del hambre, la generación de empleo decente y el acceso de todos a la salud y a la educación como herramientas fundamentales para el desarrollo de los pueblos”. En el terreno internacional se apela a “los valores de la paz y la seguridad internacionales, a partir de la afirmación de la vigencia del derecho internacional y de un multilateralismo renovado y democrático que integre decididamente y de manera eficaz el desarrollo económico y social en la agenda mundial”.
Desde el punto de vista institucional, se afirma a la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones como proyecto que trasciende un área de libre comercio, acordándose que se va a “desarrollar un espacio sudamericano integrado en lo político, social, económico, ambiental y de infraestructura, que fortalezca la identidad propia de América del Sur y que contribuya, a partir de una perspectiva subregional y, en articulación con otras experiencias de integración regional, al fortalecimiento de América Latina y el Caribe y le otorgue una mayor gravitación y representación en los foros internacionales”.
De acuerdo al texto, se trata de un proyecto de integración de los pueblos. Se afirma: “Nuestra convicción en el sentido que la realización de los valores e intereses compartidos que nos unen, además de comprometer a los Gobiernos, sólo encontrará viabilidad en la medida que los pueblos asuman el rol protagónico que les corresponde en este proceso. La integración sudamericana es y debe ser una integración de los pueblos”.
Más allá de temas cruciales que están ausentes en el texto, como el de la deuda externa, y el de las relaciones de este proyecto con los acuerdos de libre comercio firmados o en proceso de negociación con Estados Unidos y la Unión Europea, ¿puede esperarse que los actuales gobiernos sudamericanos (los firmantes de la Declaración del Cusco) sean consecuentes con estas declaraciones de intención? ¿Se trata de un lenguaje destinado al público de galería, o es la expresión de una nueva voluntad política de los gobiernos sudamericanos?
Más que descartar de antemano la Declaración del Cusco como pura retórica y a la decisión de crear la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones como una mera formalidad, es conveniente analizar este proceso en la potencialidad que podría ofrecer para convertirse en un nuevo terreno de pugnas y tensiones entre diferentes visiones y diferentes fuerzas sociales en torno al futuro de América Latina. ¿Pretenden los gobiernos firmantes de la declaración (o algunos de ellos) adecuar las orientaciones de sus políticas públicas a los objetivos declarados de la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones?
Lo que resulta evidente es que hay flagrantes contradicciones entre los objetivos y metas formulados en esta declaración y el rumbo principal que hoy asumen las políticas públicas en la mayoría de los países sudamericanos. Los objetivos formulados en la Declaración del Cusco no son, de modo alguno, compatibles con las políticas públicas y orientaciones económicas que, gracias a la deuda externa, los organismos financieros internacionales continúan imponiendo en todo el continente. ¿Pueden los movimientos sociales y políticos populares del continente aprovechar estas tensiones para formular e impulsar propuestas contrahegemónicas?
¿Qué sentido tiene que los gobiernos andinos que hoy negocian un TLC con Estados Unidos, proyecto que constituye una severa amenaza a la salud, educación, alimentación y el ambiente de dichos países, se comprometan a garantizar la salud, la educación, la alimentación de sus pueblos, así como la preservación del ambiente? ¿Qué sentido tiene la reivindicación del derecho a un empleo decente cuando las políticas de apertura, privatización y desregulación, la desindustrialización, la flexibilidad laboral y las reformas de la legislación laboral impulsadas por estos mismos gobiernos continúan deteriorando y precarizando sistemáticamente las condiciones del empleo? ¿Para qué proclamar la autonomía e igualdad soberana de los Estados mientras se están negociando acuerdos comerciales que limitan cada vez más el ejercicio de la soberanía? ¿Por qué hablar de la equitativa distribución del ingreso, y de la cohesión y la inclusión social, si la experiencia confirma que las actuales políticas de predominio dogmático del libre comercio no conducen sino a la desintegración social y al incremento de las desigualdades sociales? ¿Qué sentido tiene destacar la importancia de la preservación del medio ambiente y la promoción del desarrollo sostenible si -como es evidente por ejemplo en el caso de Brasil- las actuales políticas de prioridad de las exportaciones primarias orientadas a generar un excedente en la balanza comercial para pagar la deuda externa requieren una sobreexplotación depredadora y no sostenible de los recursos naturales? ¿Qué tipo de infraestructura va a acompañar este proceso de integración? ¿Continuará la prioridad en la inversión en infraestructura orientada a facilitar las exportaciones y consolidar el modelo de crecimiento hacia afuera, la economía de puertos? ¿Pondrá esta infraestructura a la Amazonía y sus recursos a la disposición de las empresas transnacionales?6. ¿Podrá por el contrario dársele prioridad a las exigencias de un desarrollo endógeno, de ampliación de los mercados internos continentales y de la efectiva integración de los pueblos? ¿Será posible avanzar en la dirección de un modelo alternativo de integración cuando se está incorporando a la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones, en forma acrítica, la base jurídica y normativa que el MERCOSUR y la Comunidad Andina de Naciones fueron armando durante los lustros recientes de hegemonía neoliberal?
La retórica latinoamericanista, la reivindicación de la soberanía y la democracia, así como de los derechos de los pueblos, podría bajar la guardia de los movimientos sociales y políticos populares en torno a las negociaciones entre los gobiernos del continente mientras mantienen una actitud vigilante ante los acuerdos negociados con potencias extracontinentales (ALCA, TLCs, MERCOSUR-UE). No hay, sin embargo, nada en la idea de integración sudamericana que en sí misma, por su propia condición de ser latina o sudamericana, sea necesariamente más favorable a los intereses de los pueblos. Todo depende, como se señaló al comienzo de este texto, de los modelos de integración en juego.
Se abre con la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones un nuevo terreno de lucha continental. El destino de este proyecto de integración y la respuesta a la cuestión básica de si puede o no llegar a ser favorable a los intereses populares, más que del contenido de sus textos fundantes, dependerá del resultado de las luchas sociales y políticas, de la capacidad de las fuerzas populares para revertir las tendencias políticas y económicas hoy hegemónicas en la mayor parte del continente.
¿Será posible convertir a la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones en un nuevo terreno capaz de articular en forma efectiva las luchas de los pueblos del continente por la soberanía, la democracia, la igualdad, la pluralidad cultural? ¿Podrá este nuevo proyecto integrador jugar un papel en la resistencia a la hegemonía imperial de Estados Unidos?
Son estos nuevos retos y nuevas interrogantes que confronta hoy la lucha popular latinoamericana.
Edgardo Lander Sociólogo, profesor titular de la UCV Ver los artículos de Edgardo Lander
[1] Han circulado, sin embargo, rumores de acuerdo a los cuales los co-presidentes de la fase final de las negociaciones del ALCA, el Embajador Robert Zoellick de Estados Unidos y el Canciller de Brasil, Celso Amorim, tendrían previsto reunirse en el mes de enero de 2005 para explorar las posibilidades de un reinicio de las negociaciones. Mientras han estado absolutamente suspendidas todas las negociaciones sustantivas, ha continuado la pugna entre las ciudades candidatas a ser sede permanente del acuerdo
[2] Aspectos de Propiedad Intelectual Relacionados con el Comercio, mejor conocido por sus siglas en inglés: TRIPS.
[3] Ver, por ejemplo, la declaración conjunta de las cuatro centrales de trabajadores colombianas: Declaración frente al tratado de libre comercio con Estados Unidos y el tema laboral, Bogotá, 3 de diciembre 2004. En Red Colombiana de Acción Frente al Libre Comercio (Recalca)
[4] Autoconvocatoria No al ALCA (Argentina), “Acuerdo Unión Europea-MERCOSUR: ganancias para pocos, amenaza para la mayoría”
[5] Declaración del Cusco sobre la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones, Cumbre Presidencial Sudamericana, Cusco, 8 de diciembre de 2004. Los países firmantes de esta declaración son: Argentina, Bolivia, Brasil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Guyana, Paraguay, Perú, Surinam, Uruguay y Venezuela
Fuente:www.bilaterals.org

Edgardo Lander, healing ADITAL

La Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones

Los gobiernos de Sudamérica celebran lo que denominan un nuevo momento histórico en el continente, la realización del sueño de Bolívar: la creación de la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones. ¿Podrá este acuerdo convertirse efectivamente en un punto de partida para nuevos proyectos económicos y geopolíticos alternativos a los modelos hegemónicos?

La retórica de la Declaración del Cusco, firmada por los presidentes o cancilleres de 12 países sudamericanos5, parecería efectivamente apuntar en una nueva dirección. Predomina en esta un lenguaje diferente a la prioritaria del libre comercio que ha sido hegemónica durante los últimos lustros. Partiendo de la “historia compartida y solidaria de nuestras naciones”, se reivindica “una identidad sudamericana compartida y valores comunes, tales como: la democracia, la solidaridad, los derechos humanos, la libertad, la justicia social, el respeto a la integridad territorial, a la diversidad, la no discriminación y la afirmación de su autonomía, la igualdad soberana de los Estados y la solución pacífica de controversias”. Se reconoce que no es suficiente con el desarrollo económico, y que se requieren estrategias que junto a “una conciencia ambiental responsable y el reconocimiento de asimetrías en el desarrollo de sus países, aseguren una más justa y equitativa distribución del ingreso, el acceso a la educación, la cohesión y la inclusión social, así como la preservación del medio ambiente y la promoción del desarrollo sostenible”.

Se enfatiza un “compromiso esencial con la lucha contra la pobreza, la eliminación del hambre, la generación de empleo decente y el acceso de todos a la salud y a la educación como herramientas fundamentales para el desarrollo de los pueblos”. En el terreno internacional se apela a “los valores de la paz y la seguridad internacionales, a partir de la afirmación de la vigencia del derecho internacional y de un multilateralismo renovado y democrático que integre decididamente y de manera eficaz el desarrollo económico y social en la agenda mundial”.

Desde el punto de vista institucional, se afirma a la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones como proyecto que trasciende un área de libre comercio, acordándose que se va a “desarrollar un espacio sudamericano integrado en lo político, social, económico, ambiental y de infraestructura, que fortalezca la identidad propia de América del Sur y que contribuya, a partir de una perspectiva subregional y, en articulación con otras experiencias de integración regional, al fortalecimiento de América Latina y el Caribe y le otorgue una mayor gravitación y representación en los foros internacionales”.

De acuerdo al texto, se trata de un proyecto de integración de los pueblos. Se afirma: “Nuestra convicción en el sentido que la realización de los valores e intereses compartidos que nos unen, además de comprometer a los Gobiernos, sólo encontrará viabilidad en la medida que los pueblos asuman el rol protagónico que les corresponde en este proceso. La integración sudamericana es y debe ser una integración de los pueblos”.

Más allá de temas cruciales que están ausentes en el texto, como el de la deuda externa, y el de las relaciones de este proyecto con los acuerdos de libre comercio firmados o en proceso de negociación con Estados Unidos y la Unión Europea, ¿puede esperarse que los actuales gobiernos sudamericanos (los firmantes de la Declaración del Cusco) sean consecuentes con estas declaraciones de intención? ¿Se trata de un lenguaje destinado al público de galería, o es la expresión de una nueva voluntad política de los gobiernos sudamericanos?

Más que descartar de antemano la Declaración del Cusco como pura retórica y a la decisión de crear la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones como una mera formalidad, es conveniente analizar este proceso en la potencialidad que podría ofrecer para convertirse en un nuevo terreno de pugnas y tensiones entre diferentes visiones y diferentes fuerzas sociales en torno al futuro de América Latina. ¿Pretenden los gobiernos firmantes de la declaración (o algunos de ellos) adecuar las orientaciones de sus políticas públicas a los objetivos declarados de la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones?

Lo que resulta evidente es que hay flagrantes contradicciones entre los objetivos y metas formulados en esta declaración y el rumbo principal que hoy asumen las políticas públicas en la mayoría de los países sudamericanos. Los objetivos formulados en la Declaración del Cusco no son, de modo alguno, compatibles con las políticas públicas y orientaciones económicas que, gracias a la deuda externa, los organismos financieros internacionales continúan imponiendo en todo el continente. ¿Pueden los movimientos sociales y políticos populares del continente aprovechar estas tensiones para formular e impulsar propuestas contrahegemónicas?

¿Qué sentido tiene que los gobiernos andinos que hoy negocian un TLC con Estados Unidos, proyecto que constituye una severa amenaza a la salud, educación, alimentación y el ambiente de dichos países, se comprometan a garantizar la salud, la educación, la alimentación de sus pueblos, así como la preservación del ambiente? ¿Qué sentido tiene la reivindicación del derecho a un empleo decente cuando las políticas de apertura, privatización y desregulación, la desindustrialización, la flexibilidad laboral y las reformas de la legislación laboral impulsadas por estos mismos gobiernos continúan deteriorando y precarizando sistemáticamente las condiciones del empleo? ¿Para qué proclamar la autonomía e igualdad soberana de los Estados mientras se están negociando acuerdos comerciales que limitan cada vez más el ejercicio de la soberanía? ¿Por qué hablar de la equitativa distribución del ingreso, y de la cohesión y la inclusión social, si la experiencia confirma que las actuales políticas de predominio dogmático del libre comercio no conducen sino a la desintegración social y al incremento de las desigualdades sociales? ¿Qué sentido tiene destacar la importancia de la preservación del medio ambiente y la promoción del desarrollo sostenible si -como es evidente por ejemplo en el caso de Brasil- las actuales políticas de prioridad de las exportaciones primarias orientadas a generar un excedente en la balanza comercial para pagar la deuda externa requieren una sobreexplotación depredadora y no sostenible de los recursos naturales? ¿Qué tipo de infraestructura va a acompañar este proceso de integración? ¿Continuará la prioridad en la inversión en infraestructura orientada a facilitar las exportaciones y consolidar el modelo de crecimiento hacia afuera, la economía de puertos? ¿Pondrá esta infraestructura a la Amazonía y sus recursos a la disposición de las empresas transnacionales?6. ¿Podrá por el contrario dársele prioridad a las exigencias de un desarrollo endógeno, de ampliación de los mercados internos continentales y de la efectiva integración de los pueblos? ¿Será posible avanzar en la dirección de un modelo alternativo de integración cuando se está incorporando a la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones, en forma acrítica, la base jurídica y normativa que el MERCOSUR y la Comunidad Andina de Naciones fueron armando durante los lustros recientes de hegemonía neoliberal?

La retórica latinoamericanista, la reivindicación de la soberanía y la democracia, así como de los derechos de los pueblos, podría bajar la guardia de los movimientos sociales y políticos populares en torno a las negociaciones entre los gobiernos del continente mientras mantienen una actitud vigilante ante los acuerdos negociados con potencias extracontinentales (ALCA, TLCs, MERCOSUR-UE). No hay, sin embargo, nada en la idea de integración sudamericana que en sí misma, por su propia condición de ser latina o sudamericana, sea necesariamente más favorable a los intereses de los pueblos. Todo depende, como se señaló al comienzo de este texto, de los modelos de integración en juego. Se abre con la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones un nuevo terreno de lucha continental. El destino de este proyecto de integración y la respuesta a la cuestión básica de si puede o no llegar a ser favorable a los intereses populares, más que del contenido de sus textos fundantes, dependerá del resultado de las luchas sociales y políticas, de la capacidad de las fuerzas populares para revertir las tendencias políticas y económicas hoy hegemónicas en la mayor parte del continente.

¿Será posible convertir a la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones en un nuevo terreno capaz de articular en forma efectiva las luchas de los pueblos del continente por la soberanía, la democracia, la igualdad, la pluralidad cultural? ¿Podrá este nuevo proyecto integrador jugar un papel en la resistencia a la hegemonía imperial de Estados Unidos?

Son estos nuevos retos y nuevas interrogantes que confronta hoy la lucha popular latinoamericana.

Notas

5 Declaración del Cusco sobre la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones, Cumbre Presidencial Sudamericana, Cusco, 8 de diciembre de 2004. Los países firmantes de esta declaración son: Argentina, Bolivia, Brasil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Guyana, Paraguay, Perú, Surinam, Uruguay y Venezuela

6 Decisiones fundamentales para el futuro de Sudamérica, con consecuencias a largo plazo para los modelos productivos y de integración continental (energía, transporte, telecomunicaciones), están siendo tomadas, en lo fundamental, al margen del debate público, en el contexto del IIRSA, Iniciativa para la Integración de la Infraestructura Regional Sudamericana, que tiene su origen en la Primera Cumbre de Presidentes de América del Sur celebrada Brasilia en el año 2000, y que agrupa a los mismos 12 países que han acordado la creación de la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones. Está previsto que sus proyectos sean financiados por los gobiernos, el sector privado e instituciones financieras multilaterales como el Banco Interamericano de Desarrollo (BID), la Corporación Andina de Fomento (CAF), el Fondo Financiero para el Desarrollo de la Cuenca del Plata (FONPLATA) y el Banco Mundial. El discurso de Enrique Iglesias en dicha cumbre presidencial debe servir de llamado de alerta respecto al tipo de proyecto de infraestructura al cual estos organismos financieros le otorgarán prioridad. La concepción de la integración que defiende el BID aparece sintetizada en los siguientes términos: “La integración regional es siempre una tarea desafiante, y los primeros esfuerzos de América Latina y el Caribe en los años de posguerra encontraron obstáculos muy importantes. Afortunadamente, algunos de estos obstáculos tradicionales han sido sustancialmente superados en años más recientes. El proceso de reforma de las estructuras económicas en los países de América Latina y el Caribe, que el Banco viene apoyando activamente, ha hecho que nuestras economías sean más receptivas a la integración regional, a partir de condiciones macroeconómicas más estables, la apertura unilateral de nuestras economías, la reducción de la intervención directa estatal en los mercados y un ambiente más favorable a la iniciativa privada” http://www.caf.com/view/index.asp?ms=8&pageMs=10180

[1] El presente artículo fue publicado en el Nº 15 de la revista OSAL (Observatorio Social de América Latina), CLACSO, Buenos Aires.

Edgardo Lander es socio del Transnational Institute y Profesor de la Escuela de Sociología de la Universidad Central de Venezuela

Andres Musacchio

Las teorías económicas tradicionales proponen un modelo de interpretación de los procesos de integración que permite analizarlos con un conjunto de herramientas standard, mediante las cuales se los reduce a un conjunto de elementos comunes a todos ellos. De allí que las diferencias entre las diversas experiencias quedan reducidas a una cuestión de grado, click que alude a la profundidad que cada una de ellas ha alcanzado. Sin embargo, stuff este tipo de análisis oculta las profundas diferencias en las estructuras económicas y sociales que los motivan.
>Descargar PDF

Alianza Social Continental

marzo 2009

English

Esta crisis es una oportunidad única

La crisis económica actual tiene fundamentos sistémicos y marca el agotamiento del modelo de desarrollo y globalización de tipo neoliberal. Es necesario construir alternativas concretas frente a tal modelo, illness que venía funcionando sobre una burbuja de múltiples operaciones especulativas. Debe reflexionarse sobre el fin del patrón de funcionamiento de la economía mundial, en general y del sistema financiero, en particular. Al respecto, los países de A.L. están frente a una oportunidad histórica de avanzar hacia un modelo de desarrollo justo y sustentable en la región.

La salida a la crisis no se hará contra un modelo en pleno funcionamiento, puesto que es evidente que éste está agotado y es aquí donde yace tal oportunidad, pues aparece un espacio de proposición y construcción amplio que no era tan visible y esperado algún tiempo atrás, en el mundo del laissez faire – laissez passer, en el mundo del “pensamiento único neoliberal” y del “fin de la historia”.

La crisis en curso expresa la quiebra de un sistema lleno de promesas, que ha mostrado su incapacidad de cumplirlas. El mito del “libre comercio” y el actual modelo hegemónico de producción y gestión de los recursos naturales y energéticos ya no convencen a las mujeres y hombres, quienes han sido excluidos por estas políticas impulsadas por el gran capital.

Por qué la integración regional es una salida

La integración regional aparece hoy como una alternativa para que los países de la región superen la crisis económica global a través de la creación de lazos económicos, dinámicos y solidarios entre ellos.

– Crisis de mercado global y límites de los mercados domésticos

En primer lugar, los mercados globales sufrieron un colapso y perdieron su capacidad de generar dinamismo en las economías de la región, que en los últimos dos añosnavegaron animadamente por las olas de la subida vertiginosa de los precios de las commodities agropecuarias, minerales y energéticas. Inclusive, los impactos de esta crisis que ya se han manifestado en nuestros países, evidencian que las mejoras en algunos indicadores macroeconómicos, logradas mediante este tipo de inserción, no han sido suficientes para producir un cambio estructural del modelo de desarrollo. Es decir, un modelo con mayor homogeneidad sectorial, un mercado interno basado en el consumo de la “base de la pirámide”, exportación diversificada en productos y destinos, calidad de los empleos y los productos generados y mayor justicia social y ambiental.

Por otro lado, no hay garantías de que el panorama económico posterior a la crisis sea el de un mundo con gran liquidez de capitales y de crédito, como el que tuvimos en los últimos años. Por eso, los gobiernos nacionales se ven obligados a construir una propuesta para enfrentar el dilema de esperar a que pase la crisis mundial y, con esto, intentar retomar lentamente el dinamismo de las ventas de los productos de exportación tradicional en el mercado internacional, conscientes de que las probabilidades de que esto ocurra son pocas; o buscar construir limitadas salidas nacionales dentro de los límites de recursos y mercados de la mayor parte de los países de la región.

– Energía, alimentos y agua para todos

América Latina – como región –dispone de abundantes recursos hídricos, bienes ambientales, sociales, culturales, energéticos, minerales y una importante capacidad de desarrollo tecnológico; tiene más posibilidades de autonomía alimentaria, hídrica y energética en comparación con otras regiones del planeta; posee infraestructura en empresas públicas y privadas, que podrían involucrarse en el proceso de construcción de la integración regional; dispone, finalmente, de gobiernos y movimientos sociales con un razonable grado de solidaridad política frente a la perspectiva de integración.

Frente al dilema de la crisis actual, la integración regional aparece como una alternativa viable e importante, como posibilidad de caminar hacia un nuevo modelo de desarrollo, más sustentable y justo que el que hasta hoy fue delineado en nuestros países.

La Integración regional pensada desde los pueblos de la región ofrece mayores oportunidades para nuestros países, pues puede sobreponer el principio de la solidaridad al de la competencia salvaje y el libre mercado, que como sabemos, y bien lo ha demostrado esta crisis, ni lleva al equilibrio ni apunta a la justicia, como pretenden algunos teóricos. Esta integración tendrá que estar fundada en los principios de la complementariedad y solidaridad, y enfocada como resultante hacia el alcance de sociedad más justas y equitativas económica y socialmente, donde el beneficio de los hombres y mujeres de manera integral, sean el objetivo supremo.

Experiencias no tradicionales de integración como el ALBA apuntan a la complementariedad y la solidaridad entre nuestros países para la satisfacción de las necesidades de nuestra población de forma mucho más racional e eficiente que la competencia intra-regional, el libre comercio o el mercado como único mecanismo de regulación.

Los procesos de integración en la región y la disputa por un modelo de integración popular y sustentable.

En el mejor de los casos, el escenario de los procesos de integración en las Américas muestra una evolución lenta que lindera con la parálisis. Algunos avances progresistas en el Mercosur son innegables, como por ejemplo la incorporación formal de la preocupación por las asimetrías existentes en el bloque y la embrionaria creación de fondos para tratar el problema. Se puede hacer un balance similar del establecimiento político y los avances de la UNASUR. Sin embargo, en términos sustantivos, la potencialidad para mejorar la calidad de vida de nuestros pueblos y de los trabajadores en nuestras regiones aún está distante de una realidad.

En el peor de los casos, se observa la funcionalización de los procesos a la lógica neoliberal a través de la adopción del modelo de “regionalismo abierto” cuya aplicación ha dejado huellas enormes en la CAN, América Central y el Caribe. Incentivado mediante la promoción de la competencia indiscriminada hacia dentro y hacia fuera de los bloques y la firma de tratados bilaterales de libre comercio con Europa y Estados Unidos, esta reducción de la integración regional a una mera integración comercial sólo ha erosionado la posibilidad de profundizar otras dimensiones de la integración y nada indica que haya sido beneficiosa para la sociedades de estos países en su conjunto.

Es decir, al observar la extensa experiencia de los procesos de integración regional en las Américas – más de 40 años en algunos casos – no es evidente que la misma, por el camino que hasta ahora ha transitado, tenga un potencial benéfico para nuestros pueblos. Es evidente, en cambio, que la retórica del compromiso político con la integración se ha confrontado frecuentemente en la práctica con soluciones que han dado prioridad a intereses políticos o económicos nacionales, relegando las acciones y soluciones comunes, ante los llamados “costos” de corto plazo de la integración.

Para superar la dimensión política de este problema, la búsqueda de la consolidación de las soberanías nacionales debe ser entendida en el marco del compromiso conjunto de profundización de la democracia y de la autonomía de la región; como ocurrió en el caso de la intervención de UNASUR en la elucidación de los conflictos en Bolivia. En este sentido, el compromiso consistente y sostenido de los gobiernos para tales procesos integradores se tornan piezas fundamentales. Dicho compromiso debe expresarse en la construcción de una institucionalidad sólida, que funcione con políticas y acciones comunes en un verdadero ejercicio de soberanía compartida y real.

No se puede negar que lo que ha hecho posible y viable una integración alternativa es que en muchos países los Estados han recuperado la capacidad de promover el desarrollo productivo y social o han avanzado mucho en ese sentido. Por esta razón, debemos insistir en que esa integración alternativa que buscamos no es incompatible sino complementaria con la defensa y avances en la soberanía nacional. No es la defensa de un nacionalismo estrecho, sino de la posibilidad de un camino hacia la integración entre naciones, que no son simplemente víctimas de los designios de los imperios, sino naciones soberanas que tienen proyectos nacionales de desarrollo, que deben ser articulados regionalmente.

Latinoamérica, la nueva geopolítica y la construcción de un nuevo modelo de desarrollo con base regional.

La integración regional es clave para dos perspectivas estratégicas fundamentales que se abrieron con esta nueva coyuntura histórica:


  • Los países de la región quieren jugar un papel propio en un mundo multipolar que se desarrolla a pesar de las crecientes dificultades del unilateralismo del gobierno de los EUA; ese papel no lo conseguirían separadamente,
  • Cada país aisladamente, incluso los más grandes, no tendría condiciones de implementar dinámicas diferentes a las impulsadas por el mercado mundial globalizado, es decir, los procesos de desarrollo nacional si se quieren pos-neoliberales, necesariamente pasan por la integración regional.
  • Sin embargo, para que una integración camine en ese sentido, es necesario asociar el proceso de integración a uno de transición hacia otro modelo de producción y consumo que supere los límites del actual modelo de desarrollo

La crisis y los límites que ella impone con el fin de mantener el status quo deben ser el motor para la superación de las debilidades hoy existentes y el nuevo dinamismo que las construcciones institucionales deben promover, ligado a la necesidad de responder a la crisis desde un proyecto autónomo y alternativo de desarrollo para la región, es decir, emancipado de los intereses de las potencias centrales.

Cuál es entonces la salida para la integración regional de la que hablamos.


  • Una estrategia productiva organizada y regulada regionalmente
    Antes que nada, debe ser radicalmente diferente al apoyo a las actividades de las grandes empresas, que buscan ganar en el espacio regional la musculatura necesaria para competir e insertarse en el mercado global. El resultado de este tipo de integración es el favorecimiento del aumento de la movilidad y las ganancias del gran capital; estrategia que conocimos durante la década pasada, a través de propuestas como el ALCA y el IIRSA y el empeño por la liberalización progresiva que orienta las negociaciones en la OMC. Aunque estas empresas van a intentar en breve reavivar este movimiento, que podrá caminar libremente si no enfrenta un proyecto de integración solidario que sirva de contrapunto político y económico, esta no es la integración que queremos.


    Esto debe llamar la atención sobre dos elementos importantes para la construcción de la integración regional como alternativa a la crisis. El primero es que una tarea importante de una institucionalidad regional alternativa en proceso de creación, debe ser la regulación de la operación de esas empresas en la escala regional, teniendo en cuenta los intereses sociales, culturales, ambientales y otros. Además, es fundamental estructurar las cadenas de producción en el conjunto de la región a partir de la nueva escala de operación de esas empresas en un ambiente regional, de modo que su expansión no sea vista como un proceso de afirmación de hegemonías y de poderes de algunos países sobre otros, sino como la posibilidad de generación de dinamismo económico, empleo y riqueza en toda la región.

  • La superación de las asimetrías como objetivo de corto, medio y largo plazo
    Una de las prioridades del proceso de integración debe ser la superación de las asimetrías entre los países y dentro de los países de la región: crear sistemas de producción integrados, circuitos de producción, servicios y comercio a los cuales todos puedan integrarse, con el objetivo fundamental de utilizar este proceso para generar oportunidades dinámicas de desarrollo para las regiones y países que hoy presentan más dificultades o se encuentran estancados. Dada la acumulación histórica de fragilidades de regiones y países enteros en América Latina, este proceso debe ser completado, en un primer momento, con políticas específicas que busquen compensar en el corto plazo las asimetrías hoy existentes, principalmente en lo que se refiere al desarrollo social, de forma tal que se reduzcan las diferencias al mismo tiempo que se desarrolla en estas regiones la capacidad de aprovechar las oportunidades dinámicas del proceso.
  • Producción regional de tecnología y cultura
    Hay importantes aspectos que pueden ser incentivados, y que deberían serlo, por su capacidad de impulsar el proceso de desarrollo regional, por la popularización y por el dinamismo que pueden generar, más allá de contribuir con la búsqueda de soluciones a problemas específicos en la región.


    Uno de ellos es la integración de los centros de producción de tecnología y producción/difusión cultural de la región. En diversos países de la región existen espacios de generación de tecnología, especializada o genérica, en diversas áreas (de agricultura y ganadería, pasando por medicamentos hasta industria aeronáutica entre otras). No hay una razón para no integrar esos centros, aprovechando sus sinergias, a través de recursos estimulados en la región, haciendo que las ganancias devenidas de este proceso puedan ser utilizadas en toda América Latina. Lo mismo cuenta para la enorme producción audiovisual, el potencial deportivo, y la capacidad aún mayor, que sólo la creación de una escala de consumo derivada de un mercado ampliado regional puede proporcionar.

    Esta propuesta, además, debe ser defendida en las negociaciones de la OMC y otras negociaciones con otros bloques -como es el caso de la UE- sobre “Normas de Origen”, que son específicamente utilizadas por las grandes potencias para impedir la articulación productiva de los pequeños países y economías emergentes con destino a terceros mercados.

  • Prioridad a las pequeñas y medianas empresas
    Otro punto es el incentivo general o sectorial al desarrollo de pequeñas y medianas empresas, que puede ser estimulado por el desarrollo integrado de los mercados regionales. Desde el desarrollo de software hasta la industria de turismo basada en un esquema de pequeñas posadas, aprovechando la diversidad de ambientes y culturas existentes en la región. Las empresas pequeñas o medianas presentan un potencial efectivo de generación de empleos, pero además de eso, acoplarlas al proceso de integración regional – y de un proceso de integración que alimente el desarrollo – podría dar una enorme legitimidad social al proceso.
  • Soberanía alimentaria regional y estímulo a la agricultura familiar en pequeñas y medias unidades de producción
    La viabilidad de algunos productos locales y regionales de la agricultura familiar y campesina choca con los límites del consumo en esas regiones y en algunos países. Por eso, la creación de un mercado regional podría servir para viabilizar una producción agrícola más diversificada, que escapase a la homogeneidad de los productos y procesos de producción tan característica del agronegocio, con sus paquetes tecnológicos y su estructura de comercialización, ambos concentrados e internacionalizados. La difusión de productos puede al mismo tiempo ganar impulso y empujar la gastronomía regional, el turismo gastronómico, y otros aspectos generadores de dinamismo económico e integración cultural.
  • Facilitar el transporte colectivo intra regional con prioridad en las personas
    La integración de la infraestructura de transportes de la región, aprovechando la diversidad de opciones, las posibilidades locales de superar los dilemas ambientales y climáticos y las perspectivas de la producción y desarrollo tecnológico, además de la posible construcción de empresas públicas regionales es otro eje fundamental que puede dar soporte a un proceso integrado regional. Aquí es necesario pensar en grande, pues el problema del transporte en largas distancias no se resuelve con la difusión del transporte rodoviario. Por qué no pensar la reactivación e integración de los sistemas ferroviarios locales y de un sistema ferroviario regional? Por qué no pensar en la integración del transporte marítimo y fluvial aprovechando lo que ya existe? Por qué no pensar en la creación de una compañía aérea regional que permita y viabilice la integración de una red de ciudades medianas de la región, con aeronaves de pequeño y medio porte que el potencial de producción aeronáutica existente en la región permite? No estamos hablando de ningún problema abstracto, sino de un problema que probablemente todo latinoamericano que intentó moverse, o mover una carga por el interior de la región ya enfrentó. Es importante considerar el impacto de estos procesos en cada país, lo que significa reafirmar, también, una opción clara por el fortalecimiento del transporte colectivo en los centros urbanos, como forma de desestimular el uso de medios individuales que impactan en la demanda energética.
  • Integración financiera regional
    El proceso de discusión en torno al Banco del Sur mostró las dificultades políticas y las diferentes perspectivas entre los diversos países de la región. Pero mostró también el enorme potencial y las necesidades de desarrollo de un sistema financiero regional que pueda, simultáneamente, regular las finanzas en el ámbito regional y proteger las economías de la región y la economía regional de los shocks externos, crear uno o más mecanismos de fomento al desarrollo regional y permitir un proceso de intercambio dinámico entre las economías de Latinoamérica que no pase por sancionar, a través de la utilización de sus monedas, al poder de las economías centrales del capitalismo – o sea, permitir la creación de una moneda regional, o un sistema en el que una unidad común de referencia, sin necesariamente viabilizar una moneda común, pueda ser utilizada en la región. Las dificultades y la turbulencia financiera, más que una restricción, deberían servir para incrementar las discusiones y acciones orientadas a transitar este proceso de regulación y de desarrollo financiero regional.
  • Solidaridad y complementariedad energética regional
    Las dificultades en la regulación de la generación potencial de energía a través de acuerdos regionales deberían haber conllevado a la consolidación de un ente público regional que regule e impulse un sistema energético integrado. Más allá de los intereses nacionales limitados, la viabilización de la generación de energía en el ámbito regional debe promover el aprovechamiento de todas las alternativas, de modo que la producción sea lo menos nociva posible del medio ambiente y, al mismo tiempo, permita atender a un nuevo patrón de consumo y producción articulado con el proceso de desarrollo regional. La reducción de las distancias entre la producción y el consumo, reduciendo el gasto de energía con el transporte de los productos podría ser una de las muchas iniciativas para cimentar un nuevo patrón energético que, fundamentalmente, debería estar basado en la premisa de la soberanía y solidaridad energética, buscando la eficiencia, la diversificación de las fuentes y el foco en energías renovables.
  • Un nuevo patrón de participación y transparencia
    Es necesario pensar de manera conjunta entre sectores políticos y sociales afines a la profundización de los procesos de integración latinoamericana, cuáles son los mecanismos idóneos para no reproducir lógicas heredadas de la década del 90, en términos de participación de la ciudadanía. En este sentido, los mecanismos de participación social tienen que ser canales de diálogo y proposición que convoquen y expresen las necesidades y sensibilidades de los movimientos sociales y de los diversos actores y actrices políticos, como partidos y parlamentos, que conforman la sociedad civil organizada, impulsando así la consolidación de la democracia. Por ejemplo, en el caso de los proyectos productivos o de infraestructura que tienen diferentes tipos de impactos territoriales y ambientales, es necesario construir una metodología de participación real en la toma de decisiones que supere la lógica de la “presentación de estudios de impacto ambiental” hoy instrumentalizada por el capital, para garantizar que habrá toma de decisiones en función de los intereses colectivos de los directamente afectados, licencia social (prevista en el Pacto Internacional de Derechos Económicos, Sociales y Culturales de las Naciones Unidas, DESC en su art. 1, inc. 2), repartición de los beneficios e impactos concretos en términos de abatimiento de la pobreza.

La construcción de la integración de y para los pueblos

Ésta, en definitiva, debe ser la esencia y el motor de un nuevo modelo de desarrollo regional, la integración de decenas de millones de latinoamericanas y latinoamericanos a un nuevo patrón de consumo y producción, generador de riqueza y empleo, que permita impulsar el mercado de la región y construir un proceso diferenciado de desarrollo, buscando reducir drásticamente las desigualdades de toda naturaleza, existentes entre las poblaciones de la región.

Pero así como decimos que debemos superar las asimetrías entre los países y dentro de los países de la región, también debemos asumir el compromiso con la reducción de las desigualdades sociales entre los pueblos y dentro de los pueblos. De aquí, que los movimientos sociales nos planteamos la transformación alternativa – del modelo socioeconómico de desarrollo – transformándonos; es decir, que la integración de los pueblos la concebimos partiendo desde la integración de los sujetos sociales diversos dentro de los pueblos. Por ello, la integración de los pueblos – de nuestras naciones – debería ser hecha, no sólo “desde la transformación política para los pueblos”, sino necesariamente con la transformación social desde los pueblos. Entendiendo este proceso como la oportunidad de avanzar en uno de transición hacia otro modelo de producción y consumo, que implica nuevas formas de organización de relaciones sociales, comunitarias y del trabajo.

Transformar debilidad en fuerza, carencias en potencial de desarrollo, desigualdades a ser superadas en posibilidades de transformación y desarrollo tecnológico, el respeto a las diferencias culturales en potencial de impulso, inclusive económico, del proceso de integración regional. Éste es el motor de una alternativa que puede ser construida para que, más allá de la bruma y de las turbulencias de la crisis económica actual, se pueda vislumbrar el potencial real de creación de un mundo diferente y mejor en Latinoamérica y el Caribe y, a partir de allí, integrarlo necesariamente a otras regiones que también deberán aprovechar y desarrollar sus posibilidades.

Hoy los movimientos sociales, frente a la actual crisis global o a la combinación de crisis especificas, tenemos la oportunidad histórica de contribuir a lo que pudiera ser el inicio de la etapa final de un sistema agotado y acorralado, superando la mera respuesta a una crisis desarrollada por las propias contradicciones del sistema que la ha engendrado, con el enfrentamiento real entre incluidos y excluidos.. Este camino sólo será posible en la medida en que podamos construir otra matriz productiva para el desarrollo del vivir bien o el buen vivir.

Alianza Social Continental

marzo 2009

English

Esta crisis es una oportunidad única

La crisis económica actual tiene fundamentos sistémicos y marca el agotamiento del modelo de desarrollo y globalización de tipo neoliberal. Es necesario construir alternativas concretas frente a tal modelo, doctor que venía funcionando sobre una burbuja de múltiples operaciones especulativas. Debe reflexionarse sobre el fin del patrón de funcionamiento de la economía mundial, en general y del sistema financiero, en particular. Al respecto, los países de A.L. están frente a una oportunidad histórica de avanzar hacia un modelo de desarrollo justo y sustentable en la región.

La salida a la crisis no se hará contra un modelo en pleno funcionamiento, puesto que es evidente que éste está agotado y es aquí donde yace tal oportunidad, pues aparece un espacio de proposición y construcción amplio que no era tan visible y esperado algún tiempo atrás, en el mundo del laissez faire – laissez passer, en el mundo del “pensamiento único neoliberal” y del “fin de la historia”.

La crisis en curso expresa la quiebra de un sistema lleno de promesas, que ha mostrado su incapacidad de cumplirlas. El mito del “libre comercio” y el actual modelo hegemónico de producción y gestión de los recursos naturales y energéticos ya no convencen a las mujeres y hombres, quienes han sido excluidos por estas políticas impulsadas por el gran capital.

Por qué la integración regional es una salida

La integración regional aparece hoy como una alternativa para que los países de la región superen la crisis económica global a través de la creación de lazos económicos, dinámicos y solidarios entre ellos.

– Crisis de mercado global y límites de los mercados domésticos

En primer lugar, los mercados globales sufrieron un colapso y perdieron su capacidad de generar dinamismo en las economías de la región, que en los últimos dos añosnavegaron animadamente por las olas de la subida vertiginosa de los precios de las commodities agropecuarias, minerales y energéticas. Inclusive, los impactos de esta crisis que ya se han manifestado en nuestros países, evidencian que las mejoras en algunos indicadores macroeconómicos, logradas mediante este tipo de inserción, no han sido suficientes para producir un cambio estructural del modelo de desarrollo. Es decir, un modelo con mayor homogeneidad sectorial, un mercado interno basado en el consumo de la “base de la pirámide”, exportación diversificada en productos y destinos, calidad de los empleos y los productos generados y mayor justicia social y ambiental.

Por otro lado, no hay garantías de que el panorama económico posterior a la crisis sea el de un mundo con gran liquidez de capitales y de crédito, como el que tuvimos en los últimos años. Por eso, los gobiernos nacionales se ven obligados a construir una propuesta para enfrentar el dilema de esperar a que pase la crisis mundial y, con esto, intentar retomar lentamente el dinamismo de las ventas de los productos de exportación tradicional en el mercado internacional, conscientes de que las probabilidades de que esto ocurra son pocas; o buscar construir limitadas salidas nacionales dentro de los límites de recursos y mercados de la mayor parte de los países de la región.

– Energía, alimentos y agua para todos

América Latina – como región –dispone de abundantes recursos hídricos, bienes ambientales, sociales, culturales, energéticos, minerales y una importante capacidad de desarrollo tecnológico; tiene más posibilidades de autonomía alimentaria, hídrica y energética en comparación con otras regiones del planeta; posee infraestructura en empresas públicas y privadas, que podrían involucrarse en el proceso de construcción de la integración regional; dispone, finalmente, de gobiernos y movimientos sociales con un razonable grado de solidaridad política frente a la perspectiva de integración.

Frente al dilema de la crisis actual, la integración regional aparece como una alternativa viable e importante, como posibilidad de caminar hacia un nuevo modelo de desarrollo, más sustentable y justo que el que hasta hoy fue delineado en nuestros países.

La Integración regional pensada desde los pueblos de la región ofrece mayores oportunidades para nuestros países, pues puede sobreponer el principio de la solidaridad al de la competencia salvaje y el libre mercado, que como sabemos, y bien lo ha demostrado esta crisis, ni lleva al equilibrio ni apunta a la justicia, como pretenden algunos teóricos. Esta integración tendrá que estar fundada en los principios de la complementariedad y solidaridad, y enfocada como resultante hacia el alcance de sociedad más justas y equitativas económica y socialmente, donde el beneficio de los hombres y mujeres de manera integral, sean el objetivo supremo.

Experiencias no tradicionales de integración como el ALBA apuntan a la complementariedad y la solidaridad entre nuestros países para la satisfacción de las necesidades de nuestra población de forma mucho más racional e eficiente que la competencia intra-regional, el libre comercio o el mercado como único mecanismo de regulación.

Los procesos de integración en la región y la disputa por un modelo de integración popular y sustentable.

En el mejor de los casos, el escenario de los procesos de integración en las Américas muestra una evolución lenta que lindera con la parálisis. Algunos avances progresistas en el Mercosur son innegables, como por ejemplo la incorporación formal de la preocupación por las asimetrías existentes en el bloque y la embrionaria creación de fondos para tratar el problema. Se puede hacer un balance similar del establecimiento político y los avances de la UNASUR. Sin embargo, en términos sustantivos, la potencialidad para mejorar la calidad de vida de nuestros pueblos y de los trabajadores en nuestras regiones aún está distante de una realidad.

En el peor de los casos, se observa la funcionalización de los procesos a la lógica neoliberal a través de la adopción del modelo de “regionalismo abierto” cuya aplicación ha dejado huellas enormes en la CAN, América Central y el Caribe. Incentivado mediante la promoción de la competencia indiscriminada hacia dentro y hacia fuera de los bloques y la firma de tratados bilaterales de libre comercio con Europa y Estados Unidos, esta reducción de la integración regional a una mera integración comercial sólo ha erosionado la posibilidad de profundizar otras dimensiones de la integración y nada indica que haya sido beneficiosa para la sociedades de estos países en su conjunto.

Es decir, al observar la extensa experiencia de los procesos de integración regional en las Américas – más de 40 años en algunos casos – no es evidente que la misma, por el camino que hasta ahora ha transitado, tenga un potencial benéfico para nuestros pueblos. Es evidente, en cambio, que la retórica del compromiso político con la integración se ha confrontado frecuentemente en la práctica con soluciones que han dado prioridad a intereses políticos o económicos nacionales, relegando las acciones y soluciones comunes, ante los llamados “costos” de corto plazo de la integración.

Para superar la dimensión política de este problema, la búsqueda de la consolidación de las soberanías nacionales debe ser entendida en el marco del compromiso conjunto de profundización de la democracia y de la autonomía de la región; como ocurrió en el caso de la intervención de UNASUR en la elucidación de los conflictos en Bolivia. En este sentido, el compromiso consistente y sostenido de los gobiernos para tales procesos integradores se tornan piezas fundamentales. Dicho compromiso debe expresarse en la construcción de una institucionalidad sólida, que funcione con políticas y acciones comunes en un verdadero ejercicio de soberanía compartida y real.

No se puede negar que lo que ha hecho posible y viable una integración alternativa es que en muchos países los Estados han recuperado la capacidad de promover el desarrollo productivo y social o han avanzado mucho en ese sentido. Por esta razón, debemos insistir en que esa integración alternativa que buscamos no es incompatible sino complementaria con la defensa y avances en la soberanía nacional. No es la defensa de un nacionalismo estrecho, sino de la posibilidad de un camino hacia la integración entre naciones, que no son simplemente víctimas de los designios de los imperios, sino naciones soberanas que tienen proyectos nacionales de desarrollo, que deben ser articulados regionalmente.

Latinoamérica, la nueva geopolítica y la construcción de un nuevo modelo de desarrollo con base regional.

La integración regional es clave para dos perspectivas estratégicas fundamentales que se abrieron con esta nueva coyuntura histórica:

  • Los países de la región quieren jugar un papel propio en un mundo multipolar que se desarrolla a pesar de las crecientes dificultades del unilateralismo del gobierno de los EUA; ese papel no lo conseguirían separadamente,
  • Cada país aisladamente, incluso los más grandes, no tendría condiciones de implementar dinámicas diferentes a las impulsadas por el mercado mundial globalizado, es decir, los procesos de desarrollo nacional si se quieren pos-neoliberales, necesariamente pasan por la integración regional.
  • Sin embargo, para que una integración camine en ese sentido, es necesario asociar el proceso de integración a uno de transición hacia otro modelo de producción y consumo que supere los límites del actual modelo de desarrollo

La crisis y los límites que ella impone con el fin de mantener el status quo deben ser el motor para la superación de las debilidades hoy existentes y el nuevo dinamismo que las construcciones institucionales deben promover, ligado a la necesidad de responder a la crisis desde un proyecto autónomo y alternativo de desarrollo para la región, es decir, emancipado de los intereses de las potencias centrales.

Cuál es entonces la salida para la integración regional de la que hablamos.

  • Una estrategia productiva organizada y regulada regionalmente
    Antes que nada, debe ser radicalmente diferente al apoyo a las actividades de las grandes empresas, que buscan ganar en el espacio regional la musculatura necesaria para competir e insertarse en el mercado global. El resultado de este tipo de integración es el favorecimiento del aumento de la movilidad y las ganancias del gran capital; estrategia que conocimos durante la década pasada, a través de propuestas como el ALCA y el IIRSA y el empeño por la liberalización progresiva que orienta las negociaciones en la OMC. Aunque estas empresas van a intentar en breve reavivar este movimiento, que podrá caminar libremente si no enfrenta un proyecto de integración solidario que sirva de contrapunto político y económico, esta no es la integración que queremos.

    Esto debe llamar la atención sobre dos elementos importantes para la construcción de la integración regional como alternativa a la crisis. El primero es que una tarea importante de una institucionalidad regional alternativa en proceso de creación, debe ser la regulación de la operación de esas empresas en la escala regional, teniendo en cuenta los intereses sociales, culturales, ambientales y otros. Además, es fundamental estructurar las cadenas de producción en el conjunto de la región a partir de la nueva escala de operación de esas empresas en un ambiente regional, de modo que su expansión no sea vista como un proceso de afirmación de hegemonías y de poderes de algunos países sobre otros, sino como la posibilidad de generación de dinamismo económico, empleo y riqueza en toda la región.

  • La superación de las asimetrías como objetivo de corto, medio y largo plazo
    Una de las prioridades del proceso de integración debe ser la superación de las asimetrías entre los países y dentro de los países de la región: crear sistemas de producción integrados, circuitos de producción, servicios y comercio a los cuales todos puedan integrarse, con el objetivo fundamental de utilizar este proceso para generar oportunidades dinámicas de desarrollo para las regiones y países que hoy presentan más dificultades o se encuentran estancados. Dada la acumulación histórica de fragilidades de regiones y países enteros en América Latina, este proceso debe ser completado, en un primer momento, con políticas específicas que busquen compensar en el corto plazo las asimetrías hoy existentes, principalmente en lo que se refiere al desarrollo social, de forma tal que se reduzcan las diferencias al mismo tiempo que se desarrolla en estas regiones la capacidad de aprovechar las oportunidades dinámicas del proceso.
  • Producción regional de tecnología y cultura
    Hay importantes aspectos que pueden ser incentivados, y que deberían serlo, por su capacidad de impulsar el proceso de desarrollo regional, por la popularización y por el dinamismo que pueden generar, más allá de contribuir con la búsqueda de soluciones a problemas específicos en la región.

    Uno de ellos es la integración de los centros de producción de tecnología y producción/difusión cultural de la región. En diversos países de la región existen espacios de generación de tecnología, especializada o genérica, en diversas áreas (de agricultura y ganadería, pasando por medicamentos hasta industria aeronáutica entre otras). No hay una razón para no integrar esos centros, aprovechando sus sinergias, a través de recursos estimulados en la región, haciendo que las ganancias devenidas de este proceso puedan ser utilizadas en toda América Latina. Lo mismo cuenta para la enorme producción audiovisual, el potencial deportivo, y la capacidad aún mayor, que sólo la creación de una escala de consumo derivada de un mercado ampliado regional puede proporcionar.

    Esta propuesta, además, debe ser defendida en las negociaciones de la OMC y otras negociaciones con otros bloques -como es el caso de la UE- sobre “Normas de Origen”, que son específicamente utilizadas por las grandes potencias para impedir la articulación productiva de los pequeños países y economías emergentes con destino a terceros mercados.

  • Prioridad a las pequeñas y medianas empresas
    Otro punto es el incentivo general o sectorial al desarrollo de pequeñas y medianas empresas, que puede ser estimulado por el desarrollo integrado de los mercados regionales. Desde el desarrollo de software hasta la industria de turismo basada en un esquema de pequeñas posadas, aprovechando la diversidad de ambientes y culturas existentes en la región. Las empresas pequeñas o medianas presentan un potencial efectivo de generación de empleos, pero además de eso, acoplarlas al proceso de integración regional – y de un proceso de integración que alimente el desarrollo – podría dar una enorme legitimidad social al proceso.
  • Soberanía alimentaria regional y estímulo a la agricultura familiar en pequeñas y medias unidades de producción
    La viabilidad de algunos productos locales y regionales de la agricultura familiar y campesina choca con los límites del consumo en esas regiones y en algunos países. Por eso, la creación de un mercado regional podría servir para viabilizar una producción agrícola más diversificada, que escapase a la homogeneidad de los productos y procesos de producción tan característica del agronegocio, con sus paquetes tecnológicos y su estructura de comercialización, ambos concentrados e internacionalizados. La difusión de productos puede al mismo tiempo ganar impulso y empujar la gastronomía regional, el turismo gastronómico, y otros aspectos generadores de dinamismo económico e integración cultural.
  • Facilitar el transporte colectivo intra regional con prioridad en las personas
    La integración de la infraestructura de transportes de la región, aprovechando la diversidad de opciones, las posibilidades locales de superar los dilemas ambientales y climáticos y las perspectivas de la producción y desarrollo tecnológico, además de la posible construcción de empresas públicas regionales es otro eje fundamental que puede dar soporte a un proceso integrado regional. Aquí es necesario pensar en grande, pues el problema del transporte en largas distancias no se resuelve con la difusión del transporte rodoviario. Por qué no pensar la reactivación e integración de los sistemas ferroviarios locales y de un sistema ferroviario regional? Por qué no pensar en la integración del transporte marítimo y fluvial aprovechando lo que ya existe? Por qué no pensar en la creación de una compañía aérea regional que permita y viabilice la integración de una red de ciudades medianas de la región, con aeronaves de pequeño y medio porte que el potencial de producción aeronáutica existente en la región permite? No estamos hablando de ningún problema abstracto, sino de un problema que probablemente todo latinoamericano que intentó moverse, o mover una carga por el interior de la región ya enfrentó. Es importante considerar el impacto de estos procesos en cada país, lo que significa reafirmar, también, una opción clara por el fortalecimiento del transporte colectivo en los centros urbanos, como forma de desestimular el uso de medios individuales que impactan en la demanda energética.
  • Integración financiera regional
    El proceso de discusión en torno al Banco del Sur mostró las dificultades políticas y las diferentes perspectivas entre los diversos países de la región. Pero mostró también el enorme potencial y las necesidades de desarrollo de un sistema financiero regional que pueda, simultáneamente, regular las finanzas en el ámbito regional y proteger las economías de la región y la economía regional de los shocks externos, crear uno o más mecanismos de fomento al desarrollo regional y permitir un proceso de intercambio dinámico entre las economías de Latinoamérica que no pase por sancionar, a través de la utilización de sus monedas, al poder de las economías centrales del capitalismo – o sea, permitir la creación de una moneda regional, o un sistema en el que una unidad común de referencia, sin necesariamente viabilizar una moneda común, pueda ser utilizada en la región. Las dificultades y la turbulencia financiera, más que una restricción, deberían servir para incrementar las discusiones y acciones orientadas a transitar este proceso de regulación y de desarrollo financiero regional.
  • Solidaridad y complementariedad energética regional
    Las dificultades en la regulación de la generación potencial de energía a través de acuerdos regionales deberían haber conllevado a la consolidación de un ente público regional que regule e impulse un sistema energético integrado. Más allá de los intereses nacionales limitados, la viabilización de la generación de energía en el ámbito regional debe promover el aprovechamiento de todas las alternativas, de modo que la producción sea lo menos nociva posible del medio ambiente y, al mismo tiempo, permita atender a un nuevo patrón de consumo y producción articulado con el proceso de desarrollo regional. La reducción de las distancias entre la producción y el consumo, reduciendo el gasto de energía con el transporte de los productos podría ser una de las muchas iniciativas para cimentar un nuevo patrón energético que, fundamentalmente, debería estar basado en la premisa de la soberanía y solidaridad energética, buscando la eficiencia, la diversificación de las fuentes y el foco en energías renovables.
  • Un nuevo patrón de participación y transparencia
    Es necesario pensar de manera conjunta entre sectores políticos y sociales afines a la profundización de los procesos de integración latinoamericana, cuáles son los mecanismos idóneos para no reproducir lógicas heredadas de la década del 90, en términos de participación de la ciudadanía. En este sentido, los mecanismos de participación social tienen que ser canales de diálogo y proposición que convoquen y expresen las necesidades y sensibilidades de los movimientos sociales y de los diversos actores y actrices políticos, como partidos y parlamentos, que conforman la sociedad civil organizada, impulsando así la consolidación de la democracia. Por ejemplo, en el caso de los proyectos productivos o de infraestructura que tienen diferentes tipos de impactos territoriales y ambientales, es necesario construir una metodología de participación real en la toma de decisiones que supere la lógica de la “presentación de estudios de impacto ambiental” hoy instrumentalizada por el capital, para garantizar que habrá toma de decisiones en función de los intereses colectivos de los directamente afectados, licencia social (prevista en el Pacto Internacional de Derechos Económicos, Sociales y Culturales de las Naciones Unidas, DESC en su art. 1, inc. 2), repartición de los beneficios e impactos concretos en términos de abatimiento de la pobreza.

La construcción de la integración de y para los pueblos

Ésta, en definitiva, debe ser la esencia y el motor de un nuevo modelo de desarrollo regional, la integración de decenas de millones de latinoamericanas y latinoamericanos a un nuevo patrón de consumo y producción, generador de riqueza y empleo, que permita impulsar el mercado de la región y construir un proceso diferenciado de desarrollo, buscando reducir drásticamente las desigualdades de toda naturaleza, existentes entre las poblaciones de la región.

Pero así como decimos que debemos superar las asimetrías entre los países y dentro de los países de la región, también debemos asumir el compromiso con la reducción de las desigualdades sociales entre los pueblos y dentro de los pueblos. De aquí, que los movimientos sociales nos planteamos la transformación alternativa – del modelo socioeconómico de desarrollo – transformándonos; es decir, que la integración de los pueblos la concebimos partiendo desde la integración de los sujetos sociales diversos dentro de los pueblos. Por ello, la integración de los pueblos – de nuestras naciones – debería ser hecha, no sólo “desde la transformación política para los pueblos”, sino necesariamente con la transformación social desde los pueblos. Entendiendo este proceso como la oportunidad de avanzar en uno de transición hacia otro modelo de producción y consumo, que implica nuevas formas de organización de relaciones sociales, comunitarias y del trabajo.

Transformar debilidad en fuerza, carencias en potencial de desarrollo, desigualdades a ser superadas en posibilidades de transformación y desarrollo tecnológico, el respeto a las diferencias culturales en potencial de impulso, inclusive económico, del proceso de integración regional. Éste es el motor de una alternativa que puede ser construida para que, más allá de la bruma y de las turbulencias de la crisis económica actual, se pueda vislumbrar el potencial real de creación de un mundo diferente y mejor en Latinoamérica y el Caribe y, a partir de allí, integrarlo necesariamente a otras regiones que también deberán aprovechar y desarrollar sus posibilidades.

Hoy los movimientos sociales, frente a la actual crisis global o a la combinación de crisis especificas, tenemos la oportunidad histórica de contribuir a lo que pudiera ser el inicio de la etapa final de un sistema agotado y acorralado, superando la mera respuesta a una crisis desarrollada por las propias contradicciones del sistema que la ha engendrado, con el enfrentamiento real entre incluidos y excluidos.. Este camino sólo será posible en la medida en que podamos construir otra matriz productiva para el desarrollo del vivir bien o el buen vivir.

Alianza Social Continental

marzo 2009

Esta crisis es una oportunidad única

La crisis económica actual tiene fundamentos sistémicos y marca el agotamiento del modelo de desarrollo y globalización de tipo neoliberal. Es necesario construir alternativas concretas frente a tal modelo, que venía funcionando sobre una burbuja de múltiples operaciones especulativas. Debe reflexionarse sobre el fin del patrón de funcionamiento de la economía mundial, view en general y del sistema financiero, en particular. Al respecto, los países de A.L. están frente a una oportunidad histórica de avanzar hacia un modelo de desarrollo justo y sustentable en la región.

La salida a la crisis no se hará contra un modelo en pleno funcionamiento, puesto que es evidente que éste está agotado y es aquí donde yace tal oportunidad, pues aparece un espacio de proposición y construcción amplio que no era tan visible y esperado algún tiempo atrás, en el mundo del laissez faire – laissez passer, en el mundo del “pensamiento único neoliberal” y del “fin de la historia”.

La crisis en curso expresa la quiebra de un sistema lleno de promesas, que ha mostrado su incapacidad de cumplirlas. El mito del “libre comercio” y el actual modelo hegemónico de producción y gestión de los recursos naturales y energéticos ya no convencen a las mujeres y hombres, quienes han sido excluidos por estas políticas impulsadas por el gran capital.

Por qué la integración regional es una salida

La integración regional aparece hoy como una alternativa para que los países de la región superen la crisis económica global a través de la creación de lazos económicos, dinámicos y solidarios entre ellos.

– Crisis de mercado global y límites de los mercados domésticos

En primer lugar, los mercados globales sufrieron un colapso y perdieron su capacidad de generar dinamismo en las economías de la región, que en los últimos dos añosnavegaron animadamente por las olas de la subida vertiginosa de los precios de las commodities agropecuarias, minerales y energéticas. Inclusive, los impactos de esta crisis que ya se han manifestado en nuestros países, evidencian que las mejoras en algunos indicadores macroeconómicos, logradas mediante este tipo de inserción, no han sido suficientes para producir un cambio estructural del modelo de desarrollo. Es decir, un modelo con mayor homogeneidad sectorial, un mercado interno basado en el consumo de la “base de la pirámide”, exportación diversificada en productos y destinos, calidad de los empleos y los productos generados y mayor justicia social y ambiental.

Por otro lado, no hay garantías de que el panorama económico posterior a la crisis sea el de un mundo con gran liquidez de capitales y de crédito, como el que tuvimos en los últimos años. Por eso, los gobiernos nacionales se ven obligados a construir una propuesta para enfrentar el dilema de esperar a que pase la crisis mundial y, con esto, intentar retomar lentamente el dinamismo de las ventas de los productos de exportación tradicional en el mercado internacional, conscientes de que las probabilidades de que esto ocurra son pocas; o buscar construir limitadas salidas nacionales dentro de los límites de recursos y mercados de la mayor parte de los países de la región.

– Energía, alimentos y agua para todos

América Latina – como región –dispone de abundantes recursos hídricos, bienes ambientales, sociales, culturales, energéticos, minerales y una importante capacidad de desarrollo tecnológico; tiene más posibilidades de autonomía alimentaria, hídrica y energética en comparación con otras regiones del planeta; posee infraestructura en empresas públicas y privadas, que podrían involucrarse en el proceso de construcción de la integración regional; dispone, finalmente, de gobiernos y movimientos sociales con un razonable grado de solidaridad política frente a la perspectiva de integración.

Frente al dilema de la crisis actual, la integración regional aparece como una alternativa viable e importante, como posibilidad de caminar hacia un nuevo modelo de desarrollo, más sustentable y justo que el que hasta hoy fue delineado en nuestros países.

La Integración regional pensada desde los pueblos de la región ofrece mayores oportunidades para nuestros países, pues puede sobreponer el principio de la solidaridad al de la competencia salvaje y el libre mercado, que como sabemos, y bien lo ha demostrado esta crisis, ni lleva al equilibrio ni apunta a la justicia, como pretenden algunos teóricos. Esta integración tendrá que estar fundada en los principios de la complementariedad y solidaridad, y enfocada como resultante hacia el alcance de sociedad más justas y equitativas económica y socialmente, donde el beneficio de los hombres y mujeres de manera integral, sean el objetivo supremo.

Experiencias no tradicionales de integración como el ALBA apuntan a la complementariedad y la solidaridad entre nuestros países para la satisfacción de las necesidades de nuestra población de forma mucho más racional e eficiente que la competencia intra-regional, el libre comercio o el mercado como único mecanismo de regulación.

Los procesos de integración en la región y la disputa por un modelo de integración popular y sustentable.

En el mejor de los casos, el escenario de los procesos de integración en las Américas muestra una evolución lenta que lindera con la parálisis. Algunos avances progresistas en el Mercosur son innegables, como por ejemplo la incorporación formal de la preocupación por las asimetrías existentes en el bloque y la embrionaria creación de fondos para tratar el problema. Se puede hacer un balance similar del establecimiento político y los avances de la UNASUR. Sin embargo, en términos sustantivos, la potencialidad para mejorar la calidad de vida de nuestros pueblos y de los trabajadores en nuestras regiones aún está distante de una realidad.

En el peor de los casos, se observa la funcionalización de los procesos a la lógica neoliberal a través de la adopción del modelo de “regionalismo abierto” cuya aplicación ha dejado huellas enormes en la CAN, América Central y el Caribe. Incentivado mediante la promoción de la competencia indiscriminada hacia dentro y hacia fuera de los bloques y la firma de tratados bilaterales de libre comercio con Europa y Estados Unidos, esta reducción de la integración regional a una mera integración comercial sólo ha erosionado la posibilidad de profundizar otras dimensiones de la integración y nada indica que haya sido beneficiosa para la sociedades de estos países en su conjunto.

Es decir, al observar la extensa experiencia de los procesos de integración regional en las Américas – más de 40 años en algunos casos – no es evidente que la misma, por el camino que hasta ahora ha transitado, tenga un potencial benéfico para nuestros pueblos. Es evidente, en cambio, que la retórica del compromiso político con la integración se ha confrontado frecuentemente en la práctica con soluciones que han dado prioridad a intereses políticos o económicos nacionales, relegando las acciones y soluciones comunes, ante los llamados “costos” de corto plazo de la integración.

Para superar la dimensión política de este problema, la búsqueda de la consolidación de las soberanías nacionales debe ser entendida en el marco del compromiso conjunto de profundización de la democracia y de la autonomía de la región; como ocurrió en el caso de la intervención de UNASUR en la elucidación de los conflictos en Bolivia. En este sentido, el compromiso consistente y sostenido de los gobiernos para tales procesos integradores se tornan piezas fundamentales. Dicho compromiso debe expresarse en la construcción de una institucionalidad sólida, que funcione con políticas y acciones comunes en un verdadero ejercicio de soberanía compartida y real.

No se puede negar que lo que ha hecho posible y viable una integración alternativa es que en muchos países los Estados han recuperado la capacidad de promover el desarrollo productivo y social o han avanzado mucho en ese sentido. Por esta razón, debemos insistir en que esa integración alternativa que buscamos no es incompatible sino complementaria con la defensa y avances en la soberanía nacional. No es la defensa de un nacionalismo estrecho, sino de la posibilidad de un camino hacia la integración entre naciones, que no son simplemente víctimas de los designios de los imperios, sino naciones soberanas que tienen proyectos nacionales de desarrollo, que deben ser articulados regionalmente.

Latinoamérica, la nueva geopolítica y la construcción de un nuevo modelo de desarrollo con base regional.

La integración regional es clave para dos perspectivas estratégicas fundamentales que se abrieron con esta nueva coyuntura histórica:

  • Los países de la región quieren jugar un papel propio en un mundo multipolar que se desarrolla a pesar de las crecientes dificultades del unilateralismo del gobierno de los EUA; ese papel no lo conseguirían separadamente,
  • Cada país aisladamente, incluso los más grandes, no tendría condiciones de implementar dinámicas diferentes a las impulsadas por el mercado mundial globalizado, es decir, los procesos de desarrollo nacional si se quieren pos-neoliberales, necesariamente pasan por la integración regional.
  • Sin embargo, para que una integración camine en ese sentido, es necesario asociar el proceso de integración a uno de transición hacia otro modelo de producción y consumo que supere los límites del actual modelo de desarrollo

La crisis y los límites que ella impone con el fin de mantener el status quo deben ser el motor para la superación de las debilidades hoy existentes y el nuevo dinamismo que las construcciones institucionales deben promover, ligado a la necesidad de responder a la crisis desde un proyecto autónomo y alternativo de desarrollo para la región, es decir, emancipado de los intereses de las potencias centrales.

Cuál es entonces la salida para la integración regional de la que hablamos.

  • Una estrategia productiva organizada y regulada regionalmente
    Antes que nada, debe ser radicalmente diferente al apoyo a las actividades de las grandes empresas, que buscan ganar en el espacio regional la musculatura necesaria para competir e insertarse en el mercado global. El resultado de este tipo de integración es el favorecimiento del aumento de la movilidad y las ganancias del gran capital; estrategia que conocimos durante la década pasada, a través de propuestas como el ALCA y el IIRSA y el empeño por la liberalización progresiva que orienta las negociaciones en la OMC. Aunque estas empresas van a intentar en breve reavivar este movimiento, que podrá caminar libremente si no enfrenta un proyecto de integración solidario que sirva de contrapunto político y económico, esta no es la integración que queremos.



    Esto debe llamar la atención sobre dos elementos importantes para la construcción de la integración regional como alternativa a la crisis. El primero es que una tarea importante de una institucionalidad regional alternativa en proceso de creación, debe ser la regulación de la operación de esas empresas en la escala regional, teniendo en cuenta los intereses sociales, culturales, ambientales y otros. Además, es fundamental estructurar las cadenas de producción en el conjunto de la región a partir de la nueva escala de operación de esas empresas en un ambiente regional, de modo que su expansión no sea vista como un proceso de afirmación de hegemonías y de poderes de algunos países sobre otros, sino como la posibilidad de generación de dinamismo económico, empleo y riqueza en toda la región.

  • La superación de las asimetrías como objetivo de corto, medio y largo plazo
    Una de las prioridades del proceso de integración debe ser la superación de las asimetrías entre los países y dentro de los países de la región: crear sistemas de producción integrados, circuitos de producción, servicios y comercio a los cuales todos puedan integrarse, con el objetivo fundamental de utilizar este proceso para generar oportunidades dinámicas de desarrollo para las regiones y países que hoy presentan más dificultades o se encuentran estancados. Dada la acumulación histórica de fragilidades de regiones y países enteros en América Latina, este proceso debe ser completado, en un primer momento, con políticas específicas que busquen compensar en el corto plazo las asimetrías hoy existentes, principalmente en lo que se refiere al desarrollo social, de forma tal que se reduzcan las diferencias al mismo tiempo que se desarrolla en estas regiones la capacidad de aprovechar las oportunidades dinámicas del proceso.
  • Producción regional de tecnología y cultura
    Hay importantes aspectos que pueden ser incentivados, y que deberían serlo, por su capacidad de impulsar el proceso de desarrollo regional, por la popularización y por el dinamismo que pueden generar, más allá de contribuir con la búsqueda de soluciones a problemas específicos en la región.



    Uno de ellos es la integración de los centros de producción de tecnología y producción/difusión cultural de la región. En diversos países de la región existen espacios de generación de tecnología, especializada o genérica, en diversas áreas (de agricultura y ganadería, pasando por medicamentos hasta industria aeronáutica entre otras). No hay una razón para no integrar esos centros, aprovechando sus sinergias, a través de recursos estimulados en la región, haciendo que las ganancias devenidas de este proceso puedan ser utilizadas en toda América Latina. Lo mismo cuenta para la enorme producción audiovisual, el potencial deportivo, y la capacidad aún mayor, que sólo la creación de una escala de consumo derivada de un mercado ampliado regional puede proporcionar.

    Esta propuesta, además, debe ser defendida en las negociaciones de la OMC y otras negociaciones con otros bloques -como es el caso de la UE- sobre “Normas de Origen”, que son específicamente utilizadas por las grandes potencias para impedir la articulación productiva de los pequeños países y economías emergentes con destino a terceros mercados.

  • Prioridad a las pequeñas y medianas empresas
    Otro punto es el incentivo general o sectorial al desarrollo de pequeñas y medianas empresas, que puede ser estimulado por el desarrollo integrado de los mercados regionales. Desde el desarrollo de software hasta la industria de turismo basada en un esquema de pequeñas posadas, aprovechando la diversidad de ambientes y culturas existentes en la región. Las empresas pequeñas o medianas presentan un potencial efectivo de generación de empleos, pero además de eso, acoplarlas al proceso de integración regional – y de un proceso de integración que alimente el desarrollo – podría dar una enorme legitimidad social al proceso.
  • Soberanía alimentaria regional y estímulo a la agricultura familiar en pequeñas y medias unidades de producción
    La viabilidad de algunos productos locales y regionales de la agricultura familiar y campesina choca con los límites del consumo en esas regiones y en algunos países. Por eso, la creación de un mercado regional podría servir para viabilizar una producción agrícola más diversificada, que escapase a la homogeneidad de los productos y procesos de producción tan característica del agronegocio, con sus paquetes tecnológicos y su estructura de comercialización, ambos concentrados e internacionalizados. La difusión de productos puede al mismo tiempo ganar impulso y empujar la gastronomía regional, el turismo gastronómico, y otros aspectos generadores de dinamismo económico e integración cultural.
  • Facilitar el transporte colectivo intra regional con prioridad en las personas
    La integración de la infraestructura de transportes de la región, aprovechando la diversidad de opciones, las posibilidades locales de superar los dilemas ambientales y climáticos y las perspectivas de la producción y desarrollo tecnológico, además de la posible construcción de empresas públicas regionales es otro eje fundamental que puede dar soporte a un proceso integrado regional. Aquí es necesario pensar en grande, pues el problema del transporte en largas distancias no se resuelve con la difusión del transporte rodoviario. Por qué no pensar la reactivación e integración de los sistemas ferroviarios locales y de un sistema ferroviario regional? Por qué no pensar en la integración del transporte marítimo y fluvial aprovechando lo que ya existe? Por qué no pensar en la creación de una compañía aérea regional que permita y viabilice la integración de una red de ciudades medianas de la región, con aeronaves de pequeño y medio porte que el potencial de producción aeronáutica existente en la región permite? No estamos hablando de ningún problema abstracto, sino de un problema que probablemente todo latinoamericano que intentó moverse, o mover una carga por el interior de la región ya enfrentó. Es importante considerar el impacto de estos procesos en cada país, lo que significa reafirmar, también, una opción clara por el fortalecimiento del transporte colectivo en los centros urbanos, como forma de desestimular el uso de medios individuales que impactan en la demanda energética.
  • Integración financiera regional
    El proceso de discusión en torno al Banco del Sur mostró las dificultades políticas y las diferentes perspectivas entre los diversos países de la región. Pero mostró también el enorme potencial y las necesidades de desarrollo de un sistema financiero regional que pueda, simultáneamente, regular las finanzas en el ámbito regional y proteger las economías de la región y la economía regional de los shocks externos, crear uno o más mecanismos de fomento al desarrollo regional y permitir un proceso de intercambio dinámico entre las economías de Latinoamérica que no pase por sancionar, a través de la utilización de sus monedas, al poder de las economías centrales del capitalismo – o sea, permitir la creación de una moneda regional, o un sistema en el que una unidad común de referencia, sin necesariamente viabilizar una moneda común, pueda ser utilizada en la región. Las dificultades y la turbulencia financiera, más que una restricción, deberían servir para incrementar las discusiones y acciones orientadas a transitar este proceso de regulación y de desarrollo financiero regional.
  • Solidaridad y complementariedad energética regional
    Las dificultades en la regulación de la generación potencial de energía a través de acuerdos regionales deberían haber conllevado a la consolidación de un ente público regional que regule e impulse un sistema energético integrado. Más allá de los intereses nacionales limitados, la viabilización de la generación de energía en el ámbito regional debe promover el aprovechamiento de todas las alternativas, de modo que la producción sea lo menos nociva posible del medio ambiente y, al mismo tiempo, permita atender a un nuevo patrón de consumo y producción articulado con el proceso de desarrollo regional. La reducción de las distancias entre la producción y el consumo, reduciendo el gasto de energía con el transporte de los productos podría ser una de las muchas iniciativas para cimentar un nuevo patrón energético que, fundamentalmente, debería estar basado en la premisa de la soberanía y solidaridad energética, buscando la eficiencia, la diversificación de las fuentes y el foco en energías renovables.
  • Un nuevo patrón de participación y transparencia
    Es necesario pensar de manera conjunta entre sectores políticos y sociales afines a la profundización de los procesos de integración latinoamericana, cuáles son los mecanismos idóneos para no reproducir lógicas heredadas de la década del 90, en términos de participación de la ciudadanía. En este sentido, los mecanismos de participación social tienen que ser canales de diálogo y proposición que convoquen y expresen las necesidades y sensibilidades de los movimientos sociales y de los diversos actores y actrices políticos, como partidos y parlamentos, que conforman la sociedad civil organizada, impulsando así la consolidación de la democracia. Por ejemplo, en el caso de los proyectos productivos o de infraestructura que tienen diferentes tipos de impactos territoriales y ambientales, es necesario construir una metodología de participación real en la toma de decisiones que supere la lógica de la “presentación de estudios de impacto ambiental” hoy instrumentalizada por el capital, para garantizar que habrá toma de decisiones en función de los intereses colectivos de los directamente afectados, licencia social (prevista en el Pacto Internacional de Derechos Económicos, Sociales y Culturales de las Naciones Unidas, DESC en su art. 1, inc. 2), repartición de los beneficios e impactos concretos en términos de abatimiento de la pobreza.

La construcción de la integración de y para los pueblos

Ésta, en definitiva, debe ser la esencia y el motor de un nuevo modelo de desarrollo regional, la integración de decenas de millones de latinoamericanas y latinoamericanos a un nuevo patrón de consumo y producción, generador de riqueza y empleo, que permita impulsar el mercado de la región y construir un proceso diferenciado de desarrollo, buscando reducir drásticamente las desigualdades de toda naturaleza, existentes entre las poblaciones de la región.

Pero así como decimos que debemos superar las asimetrías entre los países y dentro de los países de la región, también debemos asumir el compromiso con la reducción de las desigualdades sociales entre los pueblos y dentro de los pueblos. De aquí, que los movimientos sociales nos planteamos la transformación alternativa – del modelo socioeconómico de desarrollo – transformándonos; es decir, que la integración de los pueblos la concebimos partiendo desde la integración de los sujetos sociales diversos dentro de los pueblos. Por ello, la integración de los pueblos – de nuestras naciones – debería ser hecha, no sólo “desde la transformación política para los pueblos”, sino necesariamente con la transformación social desde los pueblos. Entendiendo este proceso como la oportunidad de avanzar en uno de transición hacia otro modelo de producción y consumo, que implica nuevas formas de organización de relaciones sociales, comunitarias y del trabajo.

Transformar debilidad en fuerza, carencias en potencial de desarrollo, desigualdades a ser superadas en posibilidades de transformación y desarrollo tecnológico, el respeto a las diferencias culturales en potencial de impulso, inclusive económico, del proceso de integración regional. Éste es el motor de una alternativa que puede ser construida para que, más allá de la bruma y de las turbulencias de la crisis económica actual, se pueda vislumbrar el potencial real de creación de un mundo diferente y mejor en Latinoamérica y el Caribe y, a partir de allí, integrarlo necesariamente a otras regiones que también deberán aprovechar y desarrollar sus posibilidades.

Hoy los movimientos sociales, frente a la actual crisis global o a la combinación de crisis especificas, tenemos la oportunidad histórica de contribuir a lo que pudiera ser el inicio de la etapa final de un sistema agotado y acorralado, superando la mera respuesta a una crisis desarrollada por las propias contradicciones del sistema que la ha engendrado, con el enfrentamiento real entre incluidos y excluidos.. Este camino sólo será posible en la medida en que podamos construir otra matriz productiva para el desarrollo del vivir bien o el buen vivir.

Regional Integration: An Opportunity to Overcome the Crisis

Nosotros, representantes de movimientos sociales, sindicales y de organizaciones de la sociedad civil de América Latina, África, Asia y Europa, reunidos en Asunción para discutir la vital importancia de las respuestas regionales a la crisis global actual, instamos a los Jefes de Estado reunidos en Asunción para la Cumbre del Mercosur a tomar una decisión contundente de avanzar en la implementación de modalidades para la cooperación orientada a un verdadero desarrollo al servicio de los pueblos de nuestras regiones.
Estas nuevas modalidades deben, en primer lugar, revisar de manera fundamental los términos injustos del acuerdo de Itaipu firmados décadas atrás por gobiernos dictatoriales de Brasil y Paraguay. La energía es el principal recurso del Paraguay para diseñar un desarrollo sustentable que responda a la necesidad de mejoramiento de la calidad de vida de su pueblo. Los movimientos sociales y el gobierno de Paraguay han demandado el derecho soberano de su país, traducido en la libre disponibilidad y el precio justo, sobre el 50% de la energía producida en Itaipu y Yacyreta, y la revisión de la deuda contraída para la construcción de estas represas. Consideramos estas demandas como justas.
Sobre la base de esta caso altamente significativo y con el objetivo de asegurar que este tipo de mega-proyectos, basados en relaciones de poder desiguales entre países vecinos, no sean en el futuro replicados en ninguna de nuestras respectivas regiones, llamamos a la creación urgente de marcos regionales elaborados conjuntamente y basados en principios de equidad que regulen este tipo de proyectos conjuntos. Estos, en vez, deben incluir el involucramiento activo y los aportes de las fuerzas sociales y de trabajadores organizadas de todas las respectivas regiones.
Fue en este espíritu de cooperación que la conferencia incluyo la participación de parlamentarios de varios países de las distintas regiones, y el dialogo directo con representantes gubernamentales del Mercosur. Algunos de los temas claves que se discutieron incluyeron: :
* La urgente necesidad que los gobiernos creen instrumentos financieros regionales tales como Bancos regionales de desarrollo para defender sus economías y sus pueblos de los efectos destructivos del capitalismo globalizado neoliberal.
* El reconocimiento de que la integración regional debe estar basada en principios de solidaridad y programas de complementariedad que reconozcan las asimetrías en términos de tamaños, recursos, y niveles de desarrollo de los países participantes para transformar el modelo de desarrollo hacia un sistema productivo mas balanceado y sostenible entre todos los países, localidades y pueblos.
* En este contexto, la estratégica importancia de tomar una posición firme y activa para revertir el golpe de estado en Honduras y la restauración del gobierno legalmente elegido, desplazado por las fuerzas anti-democráticas que actuaron no solo en contra del Gobierno de Zelaya sino también con el objetivo de revertir las tendencias progresistas en la región buscando mantener el sistema de acumulación del capital, favoreciendo los intereses de las transnacionales de Estados Unidos y la Unión Europea.
* La imperativa urgencia de encontrar modalidades y medios de hacer efectiva la participación de los movimientos sociales, comunidades, trabajadores y trabajadoras para avanzar estrategias de integración regional, en una perspectiva holística, sustentable y de verdadera soberanía desde los pueblos.
Vemos este momento como una coyuntura histórica para el mundo cuando la crisis ha expuesto el funcionamiento fundamentalmente inestable y los efectos peligrosos del sistema capitalista global. Es también una oportunidad para desafiar el régimen económico-político global dominante y para avanzar alternativas enfocadas en las necesidades de los pueblos y la preservación del medio ambiente. Tenemos confianza que los pueblos de América Latina y algunos de sus gobiernos jugaran un papel significativo en la formulación y evolución de alternativas regionales, junto con todas las regiones y pueblos del mundo, que respondan a los intereses de nuestro planeta y nuestro futuro común.

Third World Network-Africa, sickness Volume 3 Number 1 May 2009

>Download PDF

Content
– FALL-OUT FROM EPA NEGOTIATIONS: Africa on the brink of
disintergration // pages 1-4
– UNCTAD PUBLIC SYPOSIUM: Regionalism – the south’s exit
strategy from global crises // pages 4-6
– EPA Negiations-Regional State of Play // pages 6-9
– Advocacy File // pages 9-11
– Dateline Africa // pages 12-13
– Global Round-Up // pages 13-15
– Notice Board
page 15

Third World Network-Africa, sovaldi seek Volume 3 Number 1 May 2009

>Download PDF

Hemispheric Social Alliance

March 2009

The crisis as a unique opportunity

The current economic crisis is systemic in nature and marks the demise of the neoliberal model of development and globalization. It is imperative that we build concrete alternatives to this model, until recently, had been artificially sustained by a bubble of multiple speculative operations. We must also reflect on the fact that this pattern of functioning of the world economy in general, and of the financial system in particular, has come to an end. In this context, Latin American countries have before them a historical opportunity for advancing towards a just and sustainable model of development for the region.

When proposing solutions to the crisis, we have the advantage of not having to confront the model while in its full force, as it has obviously reached its limits. Indeed, this is where opportunity lies, as such a broad space for proposing and constructing alternatives was not as visible a short while ago, nor was it expected to appear – especially in the world of “laissez faire – laissez passer”, of the dominant neoliberal “pensée unique” and “the end of history”.

The current crisis exposes the failure of a system full of promises, yet incapable of fulfilling them. The women and men excluded by capital’s policies have lost faith in the “free trade” myth and the current hegemonic model of production and management of natural and energy resources.

Why regional integration is a solution

Regional integration appears today as an alternative that will enable countries in the region to overcome the global economic crisis by creating dynamic economic relations and ties of solidarity among themselves.

– The global market crisis and the limits of domestic markets

The global markets have suffered a collapse and lost their capacity to generate dynamism for the economies in the region, which, in recent years, had gaily navigated the waves created by spectacular increases in food and livestock, mineral and energy commodity prices. The impacts of the crisis are already becoming visible in our countries, demonstrating that the improvements in some macroeconomic indicators, which had been achieved through this type of insertion into the world economy, have not been sufficient to produce structural changes to the development model. That is, the model has not become one of increased sectoral homogeneity, with a dynamic internal market based on the consumption of those at the “bottom of the pyramid”; diversified exports in terms of both products and trading partners; improved job and product quality; and greater social and environmental justice.

There is no guarantee that the economic situation after the crisis will be one of great liquidity of capital and credit, as there was in recent years. Therefore, national governments must face the dilemma of either waiting for the global crisis to pass and when it does, try to slowly recuperate the dynamism in sales of traditional export products on the international market, knowing that the chances of this happening are low; or pursuing limited nationalist solutions that are constrained by the lack of resources and markets most countries in the region face when acting alone.

– Energy, food and water for all

Latin America – as a region – has abundant water, environmental, social, cultural, mineral and energy resources, as well as considerable technological development capacities. Its chances of attaining food, water and energy sovereignty are greater than other regions of the planet. There are public and private enterprises that own infrastructure and could be brought into the regional integration process. Finally, there are governments and social movements in the region that share a reasonable level of political solidarity with regards to the integration process.

When faced with the dilemma posed by the current crisis, then, regional integration appears as a viable and important alternative, as a possibility of moving towards a new development model that is more sustainable and just than the one that has been implanted in our countries until now.

Regional integration, as conceived by the people in the region, offers greater opportunities for our countries. It proposes that the principle of solidarity replace savage competition and the free market, which – as we well know and the crisis has clearly demonstrated – lead neither to balance nor justice, as some theorists claimed it would. The peoples1’ integration would be founded on the principles of complementarity and solidarity and would focus on attaining more socially and economically equitable and just societies. The ultimate objective would be to ensure that system works to benefit all men and women in a holistic manner.

Non-traditional experiences in integration, like the ALBA (Alternativa Bolivariana para las Américas or Bolivarian Alternative for the Americas, in English), show that complementarity and solidarity between our countries can satisfy the needs of our population in a much more rational and efficient way than intra-regional competition, free trade or having the market act as the system’s only regulatory mechanism.

Processes of integration in the region and the dispute for a popular and sustainable integration model

While looking at the various integration processes in the Americas, one can say that, on the bright side, they have evolved slowly – so slow that they appearing to be paralysed. One cannot deny that some progressive measures have been taken in Mercosur: for example, the incorporation of concerns about the existing asymmetries within the block and incipient efforts to create funds for addressing this problem. The same can be said for changes in political institutions and the advances in the Union of South American Nations, or UNASUR (its abbreviation in Spanish). However, in more concrete terms, the processes’ potential to improve the quality of living of the peoples and workers in our region is far from becoming reality.

On the down side, one can observe the subjugation of these processes to neoliberal thought through the adoption of the “open regionalism” model. The application of this model has left grave marks on the Andean Community (CAN), Central America and the Caribbean. Encouraged by the promotion of indiscriminate competition – both within and between trading blocks – and the signing of bilateral free trade agreements with Europe and the United States, open regionalism has reduced integration to its commercial aspects (trade), thereby eroding possibilities to develop the other dimensions of integration. Nothing indicates that this type of integration has benefitted the societies of these countries.

In other words, when one observes the lengthy experience of regional integration processes in the Americas – some having lasted for over 40 years – and takes into consideration the path they have followed until now, it is not clear that regional integration could potentially benefit our people. What is evident, though, is that the rhetoric of political commitment to integration has often been confronted, in practice, with the adoption of solutions that give priority to national political or economic interests. Collective actions and solutions are relegated to a secondary plane, as governments have been unwilling to assume the so-called short-term “costs” of integration.

To overcome the political dimension of this problem, the pursuit of the consolidation of national sovereignty must be understood within the framework of a common commitment to deepening democracy and the autonomy of the region; an example of this is UNASUR’s recent intervention in conflicts in Bolivia. In this sense, consistent and sustained commitment of governments to the integration processes is fundamental. Such a commitment must be expressed through the building of solid institutions that function according to policies and common actions developed while truly exercising shared and genuine sovereignty.

It is undeniable that what has made an alternative form of integration possible and feasible is the fact that in many countries, the State has recuperated its ability to promote productive and social development or has made significant progress in this area. This is why we must insist that the alternative model of integration we pursue is not incompatible, but rather complementary to the defence of and advances in national sovereignty. This does not imply defending strict nationalism, but rather a possible path towards integration between nations – nations that are not simply victims of imperialist plans, but rather sovereign nations with national development projects. These projects must be articulated on a regional level.

Latin America, the new geopolitical situation and the construction of a new regionally based model of development

Regional integration can play a key role in this new historical context, especially when we consider two fundamental strategic perspectives that have widened in recent years:

– Countries in the region want to define their own role in the multi-polar world that is emerging, in spite of the growing difficulties caused by the U.S. government’s unilateralism. They are unable to assume this role on their own,

  • – No single country, not even the most powerful ones, acting isolatedly will be able to implement dynamics that differ from those driven by the globalized world market. In other words, to be “post-neoliberal”, national development processes must be linked to regional integration.
  • – However, to move forward in this direction, the integration process must be seen as part of a transition towards an alternative model of production and consumption that overcomes the limits of the current development model.

The crisis and the limits it imposes on the possibility of maintaining the status quo should compel us to overcome existing weaknesses and to develop the new dynamism that institutional developments must promote. These efforts must be linked to the need to respond to the crisis with an autonomous and alternative development project for the region – that is, one that has been emancipated from the interests of current world powers.

Defining the path that will lead us to the type of regional integration we propose:

  • A regionally organized and regulated production strategy
    First and foremost, this strategy must be radically different from providing support for major companies that are seeking to acquire at the regional level the strength they need to compete in the global market. This type of integration only results in increasing capital’s mobility and profits. This strategy has been promoted in the region for over a decade, through proposals such as the Free Trade Agreement of the Americas (FTAA) and the Initiative for the Integration of Regional Infrastructure in South America (IIRSA), as well as the push for progressive liberalization during negotiations at the World Trade Organization (WTO). These companies will soon attempt to reactivate this process, which could advance freely and rapidly if it is not confronted by an integration project based on solidarity that serves as a political and economic counterproposal. This is not, however, the kind of integration we want.



    To construct regional integration as an alternative to the crisis, we must focus our attention on two essential elements. First, one important task for the on-going process of building alternative regional institutions should be the regulation of these companies’ operations at the regional level, taking into account social, cultural, environmental and other interests. Second, it is fundamental that the production chains in the region be restructured according to a new scale of the companies’ operations at the regional level. This must be done in a way that ensures that their expansion is not seen as an attempt to reaffirm hegemonies and the power of some countries over others, but rather as one possible way of generating economic dynamism, employment and wealth for the entire region.

  • Overcoming asymmetries as a short-, medium- and long-term objective
    One of the priorities of the integration process should be to overcome asymmetries between countries and within the countries of the region, creating integrated production systems as well as production, service and trade circuits in which everyone may become integrated. The fundamental objective would be to use this process to generate dynamic development opportunities for regions and countries that are currently experiencing difficulties or suffering from stagnation. Given the historical accumulation of fragilities of entire regions and countries in Latin America, we should first adopt specific policies that seek to compensate existing asymmetries in the short run, namely in the area of social development, in a way that reduces the differences and, at the same time, allows these regions to develop their ability to take advantage of dynamic opportunities in the process.
  • Regional technical and cultural production
    Incentives could and should be provided for important elements, due to their capacity to propel the regional development process and to increase the visibility and popularity of our alternatives. They also have potential to generate dynamism and to contribute to finding solutions for specific problems in the region.



    One such element is the integration of centres of technological development and cultural production/broadcasting in the region. In several countries, there already exist centres for technological development (specialized or generic) in various fields ranging from agriculture and livestock to the aeronautic and pharmaceutical industries, among others. There is no reason not to integrate these centres. We should do so in order to take advantage of their synergies and use the resources generated in the region for the benefit of all of Latin America. The same can be said for the region’s enormous potential in audiovisual production and sports, and its even greater potential for development, which only the creation of a new scale of consumption derived from an expanded regional market could provide.

    Furthermore, this proposal must be defended during negotiations in the WTO and with other trading blocks (like the EU) on “Rules of Origin”. The major powers specifically use these rules to stop small countries and emerging economies from coordinating their productive activities with the goal of exporting to markets outside of the region.

  • Small and medium enterprises as a priority
    Another element is providing general or sector-based incentives for the development of small and medium enterprises (SMEs). SMEs could be stimulated by the integrated development of regional markets. They could also operate in a range of fields – from software development to tourism (e.g. a network small hostels or hotels) – and take advantage of the region’s diversity in cultures and environments. Small and medium enterprises offer real potential in terms of job creation. Moreover, by linking them to the regional integration process – that is, one that truly supports development – they could lend significant social legitimacy to the process.
  • Regional food sovereignty and support for family farming in small and medium production units
    The viability of certain local and regional items produced by family and peasant farmers is compromised by the limits of consumption in these regions and in some countries. Therefore, the creation of a regional market could help to guarantee the viability of a more diversified production of agricultural products. This production must differ from the homogeneity of the products and productive processes that are typical of agribusiness, with its highly concentrated and transnationalized commercialization structure and technological packages. The distribution of these products could also gain momentum and promote regional gastronomy, gastronomic tourism and other activities that could generate economic dynamism and foster cultural integration.
  • Facilitate intra-regional public transportation with the people as a priority
    Integrating the region’s transportation infrastructure is another fundamental element that would contribute to the regional integration process. It must take advantage of the diversity of existing modes of transportation and take into account local solutions for addressing environmental and climate issues. It must also consider regional perspectives for technological production and development and the possibility of creating regional public enterprises. Here, we need to think big, as problems in long-distance transportation cannot be resolved by building more highways. Why not think of reactivating and integrating local and regional railway systems? Why not think of integrating sea and river transportation by taking advantage of what already exists? Why not think of creating a regional airline company that makes the integration of a network of medium-size cities in the region feasibly by using small- and medium-size planes that the aeronautic industry in the region already has the potential to produce.. We are not talking about an abstract problem, but rather one that every Latin American who has attempted to travel or transport cargo within the region has faced. It is important that we consider the impact of these processes in each country. We must also reaffirm strong support for the improvement of public transportation in urban centres, as a way to discourage the use of individual means of transport that have impacts on the demand for energy.
  • Regional financial integration
    The debate about the Banco del Sur brought to light the political challenges and different perspectives that exist in various countries. But it also showed the enormous potential and the need to develop a regional financial system that could simultaneously regulate finances on the regional level and protect economies in the region and the regional economy from external shocks. It should also create one or more mechanisms for fostering regional development and allow for a dynamic process of exchange between the Latin American economies, which does not mean sanctioning, through the use of currency, the power of the central capitalist economies. In other words, it should allow for the creation of a regional currency or a system in which a common unit of reference (that does not necessarily aim to make a common currency feasible) would be used in the region. Rather than acting as restrictions, the difficulties and financial turbulence should serve as a motive for intensifying discussion on and actions aimed at moving forward with the process of regional regulation and financial development.
  • Regional energy solidarity and complementarity
    Difficulties in regulating potential energy generation through regional agreements should have led to the consolidation of a regional public entity that regulates and promotes an integrated energy system. Moving beyond limited national interests, efforts to render energy generation feasible at the regional level must promote the use of all alternative sources, so that production methods are the least harmful as possible to the environment while, at the same time, ensure the satisfaction of a new pattern of production and consumption that will be established by an alternative regional development process. Reducing distances between producers and consumers to decrease the amount of energy used to transport products could be one of the many initiatives that would help to consolidate a new energy model. Fundamentally, this new model must be based on the premise of energy sovereignty and solidarity, on striving for increased efficiency and the diversification of energy sources, namely renewable ones.
  • A new model for participation and transparency
    Political and social sectors in favour of deepening Latin American integration processes must come together to reflect on what the appropriate mechanisms for civil participation are. We must avoid reproducing the logic inherited from the 1990s. In this sense, in order to promote the consolidation of democracy, mechanisms of social participation must be effective channels of dialogue and for advancing proposals through which througsocial movements and organized civil society (made up of diverse political actors, including members of political parties and parliament) may express their needs and views on sensitive issues. For example, in the case of productive or infrastructure projects that have different kinds of territorial and environmental impacts, we need to develop a methodology that guarantees real participation in the decision-making process. This methodology must go beyond the logic of “presenting environmental impact studies”, which capital has learned to manipulate for its benefit. It must guarantee that the decisions made take into account the collective interests of those directly affected by the projects, social license (as foreseen by the U.N. International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, ESCR, art.1, paragraph 2.), the redistribution of the project’s benefits and its concrete contributions in terms of reducing poverty.

Constructing integration for and by the Peoples

The essence and the motor of a new regional development model must be: the integration of millions of Latin American women and men into a new system of consumption and production that generates wealth and employment, allows for the expansion of the market in the region, builds an alternative development process and strives to drastically reduce all kinds of inequalities that exist among the people in the region.

In the same way we have already stated that we must overcome asymmetries between countries and within countries in the region, we must also assume a commitment to reducing social inequalities between the peoples and within the peoples. Here, we, the social movements, are proposing the transformation – of the socioeconomic development model – by transforming ourselves; that is to say – we conceive the integration of diverse social subjects within our peoples as the starting point for the integration of the peoples. As such, the integration of the peoples – of our nations – must not only be “based on the political transformation for the peoples”, but also based on the social transformation of the people. We conceive this process as an opportunity to advance in the transition towards another model of production and consumption, which requires new forms of organizing social, community and labour relations.

Transforming weakness into strength, needs into potential for development, inequalities to be overcome into possibilities for transformation and technological development, respect for cultural differences into the driving force of the regional integration process, even in economic terms. This is to be the engine of an alternative we can build so that – far beyond the haziness and the turbulence of the current economic crisis – we may see our real potential for creating a different and better world in Latin America and the Caribbean. We can then integrate this new world with other regions that must also take advantage of and develop their own possibilities.

Today, we, the social movements, when addressing the current global crisis or the combination of specific crises, have the historical opportunity of contributing towards what could be the beginning of the final stage of an exhausted system, which has been backed into a corner. We must go beyond merely responding to the crisis, caused by the inherent contradictions of the system itself, and move towards a real confrontation between the included and the excluded. This will only be possible if we are able to build an alternative productive matrix that allows us to live well and enjoy the good life.


Civil Society in Search of an Alternative Regionalism in ASEAN

Rosalba Icaza – (Institute of Social Studies, The Netherlands)
This contribution seeks to understand how changing patterns of power and governance affect the meanings and practices of citizenship in a globalising world. It does so by looking into local manifestations of regionalization and their dynamic interactions with collective experiences of women resistance to neo-liberal regionalism in Mexico.1 In particular, the paper looks at the poor record on transparency and accountability of North American official regionalism together with women organizing strategies in national and local arenas of governance opposing it.
>Download PDF

Eric Toussaint


La crisis económica y financiera internacional cuyo epicentro se halla en Estados Unidos tendría que ser aprovechada por los países latinoamericanos para construir una integración favorable a los pueblos y al mismo tiempo iniciar una desvinculación parcial.

Se debe aprender las lecciones del siglo XX para aplicarlas en este comienzo de siglo. Durante la década de los 1930 que siguió la crisis que estalló en Wall Street en 1929,
hubo 12 países de Latinoamérica que fueron directamente afectados y que, clinic capsule en consecuencia, suspendieron de manera prolongada el reembolso de sus deudas externas contraídas, principalmente, con banqueros de América del Norte y de Europa occidental. Algunos de ellos, como Brasil y México, impusieron a sus acreedores, diez años más tarde, una reducción de entre el 50 y el 90% de su deuda. México fue el que llevó más lejos las reformas económicas y sociales. Durante el gobierno de Lázaro Cárdenas, la industria del petróleo fue completamente nacionalizada sin que por ello los monopolios norteamericanos fueran indemnizados. Además, 16 millones de hectáreas fueron también nacionalizadas y retornadas en su mayor parte a la población indígena bajo la forma de bienes comunales. En el transcurso de los años treinta y hasta mediados de los sesenta, varios gobiernos latinoamericanos llevaron a cabo políticas públicas muy activas con el fin de conseguir un desarrollo parcialmente autocentrado, conocidas más tarde con el nombre de modelo de industrialización por substitución de importaciones (ISI). Por otra parte, a partir de 1959, la revolución cubana intentó dar un contenido socialista al proyecto bolivariano de integración latinoamericana. Este contenido socialista despuntaba ya en la revolución boliviana de 1952. Fue necesaria la brutal intervención estadounidense, apoyada por las clases dominantes y las fuerzas armadas locales, para terminar con el ciclo ascendente de emancipación social de este período. Bloqueo de Cuba desde 1962, junta militar en Brasil desde 1964, intervención estadounidense en Santo Domingo en 1965, dictadura de Banzer en Bolivia en 1971, golpe de Estado de Pinochet en Chile en 1973, instalación de las dictaduras en Uruguay y en Argentina. El modelo neoliberal fue puesto en práctica primero en Chile, con Pinochet y la ayuda intelectual de los Chicago boys de Milton Friedman, y luego se impuso en todo el continente, favorecido por la crisis de la deuda que estalló en
1982. A la caída de las dictaduras en los años ochenta, el modelo neoliberal continuó vigente gracias principalmente a la aplicación de los planes de ajuste estructural y del Consenso de Washington. Los gobiernos de Latinoamérica fueron incapaces de formar un frente común, y la mayoría aplicó con docilidad las recetas dictadas por el Banco Mundial y el FMI. Esto acabó produciendo un gran descontento popular y una recomposición de las fuerzas populares que condujo a un nuevo ciclo de elecciones de gobiernos de izquierda o de centro izquierda, comenzando por Chávez en 1998, que se comprometió a instaurar un modelo diferente basado en la justicia social.

En este comienzo del siglo, el proyecto bolivariano de integración de los pueblos de la región ha tenido un nuevo impulso. Si se quiere llevar más lejos este nuevo ciclo ascendente es necesario aprender las lecciones del pasado. Lo que le faltó, en particular, a Latinoamérica durante las décadas de 1940 a 1970 fue un auténtico proyecto de integración de las economías y de los pueblos combinado con una verdadera redistribución de la riqueza en favor de las clases trabajadoras. Ahora bien, es vital tener conciencia de que hoy en Latinoamérica existe una disputa entre dos proyectos de integración, que tienen un contenido de clase antagónico. Las clases capitalistas brasileña y argentina (las dos principales economías de América del Sur) son partidarias de una integración favorable a su dominación económica sobre el resto de la región. Los intereses de las empresas brasileñas, sobre todo, así como de las argentinas, son muy importantes en toda la región: petróleo y gas, grandes obras de infraestructuras, minería, metalurgia, agrobusiness, industrias alimentarias, etc. La construcción europea, basada en un mercado único dominado por el gran capital, es el modelo que quieren seguir. Las clases capitalistas brasileña y argentina quieren que los trabajadores de los diferentes países de la región compitan entre sí, para conseguir el máximo beneficio y ser competitivos en el mercado mundial. Desde el punto de vista de la izquierda, sería un trágico error recurrir a una política por etapas: apoyar una integración latinoamericana según el modelo europeo, dominada por el gran capital, con la ilusoria esperanza de darle más tarde un contenido socialmente emancipador. Tal apoyo implica ponerse al servicio de los intereses capitalistas. No hay que entrar en el juego de los capitalistas, intentando ser el más astuto y dejando que éstos dicten sus reglas.

El otro proyecto de integración, que se inscribe en el pensamiento bolivariano, quiere dar un contenido de justicia social a la integración. Esto implica la recuperación del control público sobre los recursos naturales de la región y sobre los grandes medios de producción, de crédito y de comercialización. Se debe nivelar por arriba las conquistas sociales de los trabajadores y de los pequeños productores, reduciendo al mismo tiempo las asimetrías entre las economías de la región. Hay que mejorar sustancialmente las vías de comunicación entre los países de la región, respetando rigurosamente el ambiente (por ejemplo, desarrollando el ferrocarril y otros medios de transporte colectivos antes que las autopistas). Hay que apoyar a los pequeños productores privados en numerosas actividades: agricultura, artesanado, comercio, servicios, etc. El proceso de emancipación social que persigue el proyecto bolivariano del siglo xxi pretende liberar la sociedad de la dominación capitalista apoyando las formas de propiedad que tienen una función social: pequeña propiedad privada, propiedad pública, propiedad cooperativa, propiedad comunal y colectiva, etc. Así mismo, la integración latinoamericana implica dotarse de una arquitectura financiera, jurídica y política común.

Se debe aprovechar la actual coyuntura internacional, favorable a los países en desarrollo exportadores de productos primarios antes de que la situación cambie. Los países de Latinoamérica han acumulado cerca de 400.000 millones de dólares en reservas de cambio. Es una suma no despreciable, que está en manos de los Bancos Centrales latinoamericanos, y que debe ser utilizada en el momento oportuno para favorecer la integración regional y blindar al continente frente a los efectos de la crisis económica y financiera que se desarrolla en América del Norte y Europa, y que amenaza a todo el planeta. Lamentablemente, no hay que hacerse ilusiones: Latinoamérica está en vías de perder un tiempo precioso, mientras los gobiernos prosiguen, más allá de la retórica, una política tradicional: firma de acuerdos bilaterales sobre inversiones, aceptación o continuación de negociaciones sobre ciertos tratados de libre comercio, utilización de las reservas de cambio para comprar bonos del Tesoro de Estados Unidos (es decir, prestarle capital a la potencia dominante) o credit default swaps cuyo mercado se ha hundido con Lehman Brothers, AIG, etc., pago anticipado al FMI, al Banco Mundial y al Club de París, aceptación del tribunal del Banco Mundial (CIADI) para resolver los diferendos con las transnacionales, continuación de las negociaciones comerciales en el marco de la agenda de Doha, mantenimiento de la ocupación militar de Haití. Después de un ruidoso y prometedor arranque en el 2007, las iniciativas anunciadas en materia de integración latinoamericana parecen haberse frenado en el 2008.

En cuanto al lanzamiento del Banco del Sur, éste lleva mucho retraso. Las discusiones no se profundizan. Hay que salir de la confusión y dar un contenido claramente progresista a esta nueva institución, cuya creación fue decidida en diciembre del 2007 por siete países de América del Sur. El Banco del Sur tiene que ser una institución democrática (un país, un voto) y transparente (auditoría externa). Antes que financiar con dinero público grandes proyectos de infraestructura, pocos respetuosos del ambiente, realizados por empresas privadas, cuyo objetivo es obtener el máximo beneficio, se debe apoyar los esfuerzos de los poderes públicos para promover políticas tales como la soberanía alimentaria, la reforma agraria, el desarrollo de la investigación en el campo de la salud y la implantación de una industria farmacéutica que produzca medicamentos genéricos de alta calidad; reforzar los medios de transporte colectivo ferroviario; utilizar energías alternativas para limitar el agotamiento de los recursos naturales; proteger el ambiente; desarrollar la integración de los sistemas de enseñanza…

Al contrario de lo que muchos creen, el problema de la deuda pública no se ha resuelto. Es verdad que la deuda pública externa se ha reducido, pero ha sido sustituida por una deuda pública interna que, en ciertos países, ha adquirido proporciones totalmente desmesuradas (Brasil, Colombia, Argentina, Nicaragua, Guatemala), a tal punto que desvía hacia el capital financiero parasitario una parte considerable del presupuesto del Estado. Es muy conveniente seguir el ejemplo de Ecuador, que estableció una comisión de auditoría integral de la deuda pública externa e interna, a fin de determinar la parte ilegítima, ilícita o ilegal de la misma. En un momento en el que, tras una serie de operaciones aventuradas, los grandes bancos y otras instituciones financieras privadas de Estados Unidos y de Europa borran unas deudas dudosas por un monto que supera largamente la deuda pública externa de Latinoamérica con ellos, hay que constituir un frente de países endeudados para obtener la anulación de la deuda.

Se debe auditar y controlar estrictamente a los bancos privados, porque corren el peligro de ser arrastrados por la crisis financiera internacional. Hay que evitar que el Estado sea llevado a nacionalizar las pérdidas de los bancos, como ya ha pasado tantas veces (Chile bajo Pinochet, México en 1995, Ecuador en 1999-2000, etc.). Si hay que nacionalizar unos bancos al borde de la bancarrota, esto debe hacerse sin indemnizaciones y ejerciendo el derecho de reparación (repetición) sobre el patrimonio de sus propietarios.

Por lo demás, han surgido numerosos litigios en estos últimos años entre los Estados de la región y multinacionales, tanto del Norte como del Sur. En lugar de remitirse al Centro Internacional de Resolución de Diferendos en materia de Inversiones (CIADI), que es parte del Banco Mundial, dominado por un puñado de países industrializados, los países de la región tendrían que seguir el ejemplo de Bolivia, que se ha retirado del mismo. Deberían crear un organismo regional para la resolución de litigios en cuestiones de inversiones. En materia jurídica, los Estados latinoamericanos deberían aplicar la doctrina Calvo y negarse a renunciar a su jurisdicción en casos de litigio con otro Estado o con empresas privadas. ¿Cómo se puede seguir firmando contratos de préstamos o contratos comerciales que prevén que, en caso de litigio, sólo son competentes las jurisdicciones de Estados Unidos, del Reino Unido o de otros países del Norte? Se trata de una renuncia inadmisible del ejercicio de la soberanía.

Es conveniente restablecer un control estricto de los movimientos de capitales y del cambio, a fin de evitar la fuga de capitales y los ataques especulativos contra las monedas de la región. Es necesario que los Estados que quieren materializar el proyecto bolivariano de integración latinoamericana para una mayor justicia social avancen hacia una moneda común.

Naturalmente, la integración debe tener una dimensión política: un Parlamento latinoamericano elegido por sufragio universal en cada uno de los países miembros, dotado de un poder legislativo real. En el marco de la construcción política, hay que evitar la repetición del mal ejemplo europeo, donde la Comisión Europea (o sea, el gobierno europeo) dispone de poderes exagerados con respecto al Parlamento. Hay que caminar hacia un proceso constituyente democrático a fin de adoptar una Constitución política común. En este caso también, se debe evitar reproducir el procedimiento antidemocrático seguido por la Comisión Europea para tratar de imponer un tratado constitucional elaborado sin la participación activa de la ciudadanía y sin someterlo a un referéndum en capa país miembro. Por el contrario, hay que seguir el ejemplo de las asambleas constituyentes de Venezuela (1999), Bolivia (2007) y Ecuador (2007-2008). Los importantes avances democráticos logrados en el curso de estos tres procesos tendrían que ser integrados en un proceso constituyente bolivariano.

Así mismo, es necesario reforzar las competencias de la Corte Latinoamericana de Justicia, en particular en materia de garantía del respeto de los derechos humanos que son indivisibles.

Hasta este momento, coexisten varios procesos de integración: Comunidad Andina de Naciones, Mercosur, Unasur, Caricom, Alba… Es importante evitar la dispersión y adoptar un proceso integrador con una definición político-social basada en la justicia social. Este proceso bolivariano debería reunir a todos los países de Latinoamérica (América del Sur, América Central y Caribe) que se adhieran a esta orientación. Es preferible comenzar la construcción común con un núcleo reducido y coherente, que con un conjunto heterogéneo de Estados cuyos gobiernos siguen orientaciones políticas sociales contradictorias, cuando no antagónicas.

La integración bolivariana debe ir acompañada de una desvinculación parcial del mercado capitalista mundial. Se trata de ir suprimiendo progresivamente las fronteras que separan los Estados que participan en el proyecto, reduciendo las asimetrías en los países miembros especialmente gracias a un mecanismo de transferencia de riqueza desde los Estados más «ricos» a los más «pobres». Esto permitirá ampliar considerablemente el mercado interior y favorecerá el desarrollo de los productores locales bajo diferentes formas de propiedad. Permitirá poner en vigencia el proceso de desarrollo (no sólo la industrialización) por sustitución de importaciones. Por descontado, ello implica el desarrollo, por ejemplo, de una política de soberanía alimentaria. Al mismo tiempo, el conjunto bolivariano constituido por los países miembros se desvinculará parcialmente del mercado capitalista mundial. En particular, esto implicará abrogar tratados bilaterales en materia de inversiones y de comercio. Los países miembros del grupo bolivariano también deberían retirarse de instituciones tales como el Banco Mundial, el FMI y la OMC, promoviendo al mismo tiempo la creación de nuevas instancias mundiales democráticas y respetuosas de los derechos humanos indivisibles.

Como se indicó antes, los Estados miembros del nuevo grupo bolivariano se dotarán de nuevas instituciones regionales, como el Banco del Sur, que desarrollarán relaciones de colaboración con otras instituciones similares constituidas por Estados de otras regiones del mundo.

Los Estados miembros del nuevo grupo bolivariano actuarán con el máximo número de terceros Estados por una reforma democrática radical del sistema de las Naciones Unidas, con el objetivo de hacer cumplir la Carta de la Organización de las Naciones Unidas y los numerosos instrumentos internacionales favorables a los derechos humanos, tales como el pacto internacional de derechos económicos, sociales y culturales (1966), la carta de los derechos y deberes de los Estados (1974), la declaración sobre el derecho al desarrollo (1986), la resolución sobre los derechos de los pueblos indígenas (2007). Igualmente, prestarán apoyo a la actividad de la Corte Penal Internacional y de la Corte Internacional de Justicia de la Haya. Favorecerán el entendimiento entre los Estados y los pueblos a fin de actuar para que se limite al máximo el cambio climático, ya que esto representa un terrible peligro para la humanidad.

By Eric Toussaint, try translated by Federico Fuentes



The economic and financial crisis, whose epicentre is found in the United States, has to be utilised by Latin American countries to build an integration favourable to the peoples and at the same initiate a partial delinking from the world capitalist market.[1]

We need to learn the lessons of the 20th century in order to apply them at the beginning of this century. During the decade of the 1930s that followed the crisis that exploded on Wall Street in 1929, 12 countries in Latin America suspended for a prolonged time repayment of their foreign debt, prinicipally to North American and western European bankers. Some of them, such as Brazil and Mexico, imposed on their creditors a reduction of between 50% and 90% of their debt some 10 years later.

Mexico was the one that went the furthest with its economic and social reforms. During the government of Lazaro Cardenas, the petroleum industry was completely nationalised without any compensation for the North American monopolies. Moreover, 16 million hectares of land were also nationalised and in large part handed over to the indigenous population.

During the 1930s and up until the middle of the 1960s, various Latin American governments carried out very active public policies with the aim of seeking a partially self-centred development, known later as the model of industrialisation via substitution of imports. On the other hand, beginning in 1959, the Cuban Revolution attempted to give a socialist content to the Bolivarian[2] project of Latin American integration. This socialist content began to appear in the Bolivian revolution of 1952.

Brutal US intervention, backed by the dominant classes and the local armed forces, was necessary to put an end to the ascending cycle of social emancipation during this period. The blockade of Cuba since 1962, the military junta in Brazil from 1964, US intervention in Santo Domingo in 1965, the Banzer dictatorship in Bolivia in 1971, the Pinochet coup in Chile in 1973, and installing dictatorships in Uruguay and Argentina. The neoliberal model was put in practice first in Chile with Pinochet, and with the intellectual guidance of the Chicago Boys of Milton Friedman, and afterwards was imposed on all the continent, aided by the debt crisis that exploded in 1982.

With the fall of the dictatorships in the 1980s, the neoliberal model continued in force, principally through the application of structural adjustments programs and the Washington Consensus. The governments of Latin America were incapable of forming a common front, and the majority applied the recipes dictated by the World Bank and the IMF in a docile manner. This ended up producing a large popular discontent and a recomposition of popular forces that led to a new cycle of elections of left or centre-left governments, beginning with Hugo Chavez in Venezuela in 1998, who committed himself to installing a different model based on social justice.

Two projects of integration

At the beginning of this century, the Bolivarian project of integration of the peoples of the region has gain new momentum. If we want this new ascending cycle to go further it is necessary to learn the lessons of the past. What was particularly missing in Latin America during the decades of the 1940s to the 1970s was an authentic project of integration of economies and peoples, combined with a real redistribution of wealth in favour of the working classes. We need to be conscious of the fact that in Latin America today there is a dispute between two projects of integration, that have an antagonistic class content. The capitalist classes of Brazil and Argentina (the two principal economies of South America) are partisans of an integration based on their economic domination over the rest of the region. The interests of Brazilian companies, above all, as well as Argentine ones, are very important in all the region: oil and gas, large infrastructure works, mining, metallurgy, agrobusiness, food industries, etc.

* * * *

Finding this article thought-provoking and useful?

Please subscribe free at http://www.feedblitz.com/f/?Sub=343373

Help Links stay afloat. Donate what you can by clicking HERE.

 

* * * *

The European construction, based on a single market dominated by big capital, is the model that they want to follow. The Brazilian and Argentine capitalist classes want the workers of the different countries in the region to compete among themselves in order to obtain maximum benefit and be competitive on the world market.

From the point of view of the left, it would be a tragic error to fall back on a policy of stages: support a model of Latin American integration according to the European model, dominated by big capital, with the illusionary hope of giving it a socially emancipatory content later on. Such support implies putting oneself at the service of capitalist interests. We do not have to involve ourselves in the capitalist’s games, trying to be more astute and letting them dictate the rules.

The other project of integration, that falls within Bolivarian framework, wants a social justice content to integration. This implies public control over natural resources in the region and over large means of production, credit and commercialisation. The levelling from above of the social conquests of the workers and small producers, at the same time as reducing the differences between the economies in the region. The substantial improvement of communication between countries of the region, rigorously respecting the environment (for example, developing railway lines and other means of collective transport before highways). Support for small private producers in numerous activities, agriculture, artisan, trade, services, etc. The process of social emancipation that the Bolivarian project of the 21st century is pursuing aims to liberate society from capitalist domination, supporting forms of property that have a social function: small private property, public property, cooperative property, communal and collective property, etc. At the same time, Latin American integration implies the creation of a common financial, judicial and political architecture.

Losing precious time

The current international conjuncture, favourable for developing countries that export primary products, needs to be utilised before the situation changes. The countries of Latin America have accumulated close to US$400,000 million in reserves. This is no small amount in the hands of Latin American central banks and which needs to be utilised at an opportune moment in order to help regional integration and shield the continent from the effects of the economic and financial crisis that is unfolding in North America and Europe, and that threatens the whole planet.

Unfortunately, we should not create illusions: Latin America is losing precious time, while governments, beyond the rhetoric, pursue a traditional policy of signing of bilateral agreements on investment, acceptance or continuation of negotiations over certain free trade agreements, utilisation of reserves to buy bonds from the US Treasury (that is, lending capital to the dominant power) or credit default swaps whose markets have collapsed with Lehman Brothers, AIG etc., advance payments to the IMF, World Bank and the Paris Club, acceptance of the World Bank tribunal – the International Centre for Settlement of Investment Disputes — as a way to resolve differences with transnational corporations, continuation of trade negotiations within the framework of the agenda of Doha, maintenance of the military occupation of Haiti. Following a loud and promising start in 2007, the initiatives announced in regards to Latin American integration seem to have come to a halt in 2008.

Bank of the South

In regards to the launching of the Bank of the South, this has already been delayed quite a bit. Discussions have not progressed. We have to get rid off any confusion and give a clearly progressive content to this new institution, whose creation was decided upon in December 2007 by seven countries in South America. The Bank of the South has to be a democratic institution (one country, one vote) and transparent (external auditing). Before using public money to finance large infrastructure projects that don’t respect the environment and which are carried out by private companies whose objectives are to obtain maximum benefit, we have to support the efforts of the public powers to promote policies such as food sovereignty, agrarian reform, the development of studies in the field of health, the establishment of a pharmaceutical industry that produces high-quality generic medications, collective rail-based means of transport, alternative energy to limit the impact on depleted natural resources, protection of the environment and the development of integrated education systems.

Cancel the debt

Contrary to what many think, the problem of the public debt has not been resolved. It is true that the external public debt has been reduced, but it has been replaced by an internal public debt that, in certain countries, has acquired totally huge proportions (Brazil, Colombia, Argentina, Nicaragua and Guatemala) to the point that it diverts a considerable part of the state budget towards parasitically financial capital.

It is very worthwhile following the example of Ecuador, which established an auditing commission to study the external and internal public debt, with the aim of determining the illegitimate, illicit and illegal parts of the debt. At a time when, following a series of adventurous operations, the large banks and other private financial institutions of the United States and Europe are wiping out dubious debts with an amount that by far surpasses the external public debt that Latin America owes them, we have to constitute a united front of indebted countries in order to obtain the cancellation of the debt.

Nationalise the banks without compensation

Private banks need to audited and strictly controlled, because they run the risk of being dragged down with the international financial crisis. We have to avoid a situation where the state ends up nationalising the losses of the banks, as has happened many times before (Chile under Pinochet, Mexico in 1995, Ecuador in 1999-2000, etc.). If some banks on the brink of bankruptcy have to be nationalised, this should be done without paying compensation.

Moreover, numerous litigation cases have emerged in the last few years between the states of the region and multinationals, from the North and the South. Rather that taking them to the ICSID, which is part of the World Bank dominated by a handful of industrialised countries, the countries of the region should follow the example of Bolivia, which has pulled out of the organisation. They should create a regional organisation for the resolution of litigation initiated by other countries or private companies. How can we continue to sign loan contracts or trade contracts that state, in the case of litigation, that the only jurisdictions that are valid are those of the US, United Kingdom or other countries of the North? We are dealing here with an inadmissible renouncement of sovereignty.

It is worthwhile establishing strict control over capital movements and exchange rates, with the goal of avoiding capital flight and speculative attacks against currencies in the region. For the states that want to make the Bolivarian project of Latin American integration for greater social justice a reality, it is necessary to advance towards a common currency.

Integration has a political dimension

Naturally, integration has to have a political dimension: a Latin American parliament elected by universal suffrage in each one of the member countries, equipped with a real legislative power. Within the framework of political construction, we have to avoid repeating the bad example of Europe, where the European Commission (that is, the European government) has exaggerated powers in regards to the parliament. We have to move towards a democratic constituent process with the goal of adopting a common political constitution.

We also have to avoid reproducing the anti-democratic procedure followed by the European Commission that attempts to impose a constitutional treaty elaborated without the active participation of citizens and without submitting it to a referendum in each member country. On the contrary, we have to follow the example of the constituent assemblies of Venezuela (1999), Bolivia (2007) and Ecuador (2007-8). The important democratic advances achieved in the course of these three processes will have to be integrated into the Bolivarian constituent process.

Likewise, it is necessary to strengthen the powers of the Latin American Court of Justice, particularly in matters regarding the guaranteeing for the respect of inalienable human rights.

Until now, various processes of integration coexist: the Community of Andean Nations, Mercosur, Unasur, Caricom, Alba. It is important to avoid dispersion and adopt a integration process with a social-political definition based on social justice. This Bolivarian process should bring together all the countries in South America, Central America and the Caribbean that adhere to this orientation. It is preferable to commence this common construction with a reduced and coherent nucleus, rather than with a heterogeneous set of states whose governments follow contradictory, if not antagonistic, social policies.

Partial delinking from the world capitalist market

Bolivarian integration should be accompanied with a partial delinking from the world capitalist market. We are dealing with trying to progressively erase the borders that separate the states that participate in the project, reducing the asymmetries between the member countries, especially thanks to a mechanism of transfer of wealth from the “richer’’ states to the “poorer’’.

This will allow for the considerable expansion of the internal market and will favour the development of local producers under different forms of property. It will allow for the putting into action of a process of development (not only industrialisation) with substitution of imports. Of course, this implies the development, for example, of a policy of food sovereignty. At the same time, the Bolivarian project made up of various member countries will partially delink itself from the world capitalist market. This means, in particular, the repealing of bilateral treaties in areas of investment and trade. The member countries of the Bolivarian group should also pull out of institutions such as the World Bank, the IMF and the World Trade Orgaisation (WTO), at the same time as promoting new democratic global institutions that respect inalienable human rights.

As was mentioned before, the member states of the new Bolivarian group would equip themselves with new regional institutions, such as the Bank of the South, which would develop collaborative relations with other similar institutions created by states from other regions in the world.

The member states of the new Bolivarian group will act with the maximum number of third states in favour of a radical democratic reform of the United Nations, with the objective of ensuring compliance with the United Nations Charter and the numerous international instruments that defend human rights, such as the international pact on economic, social and cultural rights (1996), the charter on the rights and responsibilities of states (1974), the declaration on the right to development (1986), the resolution on the rights of indigenous people (2007). Equally, it would lend support to the activities of the International Criminal Court and the International Court of Justice in The Hague. It would act in favour of reaching understandings between states and peoples with the goal of acting to limit climate change as much as possible, given that this represents a terrible danger for humanity.

[Eric Toussaint is from the Committee for the Abolition of the Third World Debt. Translated from the Spanish version by Federic Fuentes for Links International Journal of Socialist Renewal.]

 


[1] Paper presented in Caracas on October 8, 2008, presented during the international Responses from the South to the World Economic Crisis seminar, held at the Venezuelan School of Planning. The other speakers on the panel were: Hugo Chavez, president of the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela, Haiman El Troudi, minister of planning (Venezuela), Claudio Katz, Economist of the Left (Argentina) and Pedro Paez, minister of economic coordination (Ecuador). The entire conference was broadcast live by Venezuelan state television.

[2] Simón Bolívar (1783-1830) was one of the first to try and unify the countries of Latin America with the aim of creating a single independent nation. He led the struggle to liberate Venezuela, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru and Bolivia from Spanish domination. He is considered to be a hero, and his name is well recognised across Latin America.

By Eric Toussaint, treat translated by Federico Fuentes



The economic and financial crisis, whose epicentre is found in the United States, has to be utilised by Latin American countries to build an integration favourable to the peoples and at the same initiate a partial delinking from the world capitalist market.[1]

We need to learn the lessons of the 20th century in order to apply them at the beginning of this century. During the decade of the 1930s that followed the crisis that exploded on Wall Street in 1929, 12 countries in Latin America suspended for a prolonged time repayment of their foreign debt, prinicipally to North American and western European bankers. Some of them, such as Brazil and Mexico, imposed on their creditors a reduction of between 50% and 90% of their debt some 10 years later.

Mexico was the one that went the furthest with its economic and social reforms. During the government of Lazaro Cardenas, the petroleum industry was completely nationalised without any compensation for the North American monopolies. Moreover, 16 million hectares of land were also nationalised and in large part handed over to the indigenous population.

During the 1930s and up until the middle of the 1960s, various Latin American governments carried out very active public policies with the aim of seeking a partially self-centred development, known later as the model of industrialisation via substitution of imports. On the other hand, beginning in 1959, the Cuban Revolution attempted to give a socialist content to the Bolivarian[2] project of Latin American integration. This socialist content began to appear in the Bolivian revolution of 1952.

Brutal US intervention, backed by the dominant classes and the local armed forces, was necessary to put an end to the ascending cycle of social emancipation during this period. The blockade of Cuba since 1962, the military junta in Brazil from 1964, US intervention in Santo Domingo in 1965, the Banzer dictatorship in Bolivia in 1971, the Pinochet coup in Chile in 1973, and installing dictatorships in Uruguay and Argentina. The neoliberal model was put in practice first in Chile with Pinochet, and with the intellectual guidance of the Chicago Boys of Milton Friedman, and afterwards was imposed on all the continent, aided by the debt crisis that exploded in 1982.

With the fall of the dictatorships in the 1980s, the neoliberal model continued in force, principally through the application of structural adjustments programs and the Washington Consensus. The governments of Latin America were incapable of forming a common front, and the majority applied the recipes dictated by the World Bank and the IMF in a docile manner. This ended up producing a large popular discontent and a recomposition of popular forces that led to a new cycle of elections of left or centre-left governments, beginning with Hugo Chavez in Venezuela in 1998, who committed himself to installing a different model based on social justice.

Two projects of integration

At the beginning of this century, the Bolivarian project of integration of the peoples of the region has gain new momentum. If we want this new ascending cycle to go further it is necessary to learn the lessons of the past. What was particularly missing in Latin America during the decades of the 1940s to the 1970s was an authentic project of integration of economies and peoples, combined with a real redistribution of wealth in favour of the working classes. We need to be conscious of the fact that in Latin America today there is a dispute between two projects of integration, that have an antagonistic class content. The capitalist classes of Brazil and Argentina (the two principal economies of South America) are partisans of an integration based on their economic domination over the rest of the region. The interests of Brazilian companies, above all, as well as Argentine ones, are very important in all the region: oil and gas, large infrastructure works, mining, metallurgy, agrobusiness, food industries, etc.

* * * *

Finding this article thought-provoking and useful?

Please subscribe free at http://www.feedblitz.com/f/?Sub=343373

Help Links stay afloat. Donate what you can by clicking HERE.

 

* * * *

The European construction, based on a single market dominated by big capital, is the model that they want to follow. The Brazilian and Argentine capitalist classes want the workers of the different countries in the region to compete among themselves in order to obtain maximum benefit and be competitive on the world market.

From the point of view of the left, it would be a tragic error to fall back on a policy of stages: support a model of Latin American integration according to the European model, dominated by big capital, with the illusionary hope of giving it a socially emancipatory content later on. Such support implies putting oneself at the service of capitalist interests. We do not have to involve ourselves in the capitalist’s games, trying to be more astute and letting them dictate the rules.

The other project of integration, that falls within Bolivarian framework, wants a social justice content to integration. This implies public control over natural resources in the region and over large means of production, credit and commercialisation. The levelling from above of the social conquests of the workers and small producers, at the same time as reducing the differences between the economies in the region. The substantial improvement of communication between countries of the region, rigorously respecting the environment (for example, developing railway lines and other means of collective transport before highways). Support for small private producers in numerous activities, agriculture, artisan, trade, services, etc. The process of social emancipation that the Bolivarian project of the 21st century is pursuing aims to liberate society from capitalist domination, supporting forms of property that have a social function: small private property, public property, cooperative property, communal and collective property, etc. At the same time, Latin American integration implies the creation of a common financial, judicial and political architecture.

Losing precious time

The current international conjuncture, favourable for developing countries that export primary products, needs to be utilised before the situation changes. The countries of Latin America have accumulated close to US$400,000 million in reserves. This is no small amount in the hands of Latin American central banks and which needs to be utilised at an opportune moment in order to help regional integration and shield the continent from the effects of the economic and financial crisis that is unfolding in North America and Europe, and that threatens the whole planet.

Unfortunately, we should not create illusions: Latin America is losing precious time, while governments, beyond the rhetoric, pursue a traditional policy of signing of bilateral agreements on investment, acceptance or continuation of negotiations over certain free trade agreements, utilisation of reserves to buy bonds from the US Treasury (that is, lending capital to the dominant power) or credit default swaps whose markets have collapsed with Lehman Brothers, AIG etc., advance payments to the IMF, World Bank and the Paris Club, acceptance of the World Bank tribunal – the International Centre for Settlement of Investment Disputes — as a way to resolve differences with transnational corporations, continuation of trade negotiations within the framework of the agenda of Doha, maintenance of the military occupation of Haiti. Following a loud and promising start in 2007, the initiatives announced in regards to Latin American integration seem to have come to a halt in 2008.

Bank of the South

In regards to the launching of the Bank of the South, this has already been delayed quite a bit. Discussions have not progressed. We have to get rid off any confusion and give a clearly progressive content to this new institution, whose creation was decided upon in December 2007 by seven countries in South America. The Bank of the South has to be a democratic institution (one country, one vote) and transparent (external auditing). Before using public money to finance large infrastructure projects that don’t respect the environment and which are carried out by private companies whose objectives are to obtain maximum benefit, we have to support the efforts of the public powers to promote policies such as food sovereignty, agrarian reform, the development of studies in the field of health, the establishment of a pharmaceutical industry that produces high-quality generic medications, collective rail-based means of transport, alternative energy to limit the impact on depleted natural resources, protection of the environment and the development of integrated education systems.

Cancel the debt

Contrary to what many think, the problem of the public debt has not been resolved. It is true that the external public debt has been reduced, but it has been replaced by an internal public debt that, in certain countries, has acquired totally huge proportions (Brazil, Colombia, Argentina, Nicaragua and Guatemala) to the point that it diverts a considerable part of the state budget towards parasitically financial capital.

It is very worthwhile following the example of Ecuador, which established an auditing commission to study the external and internal public debt, with the aim of determining the illegitimate, illicit and illegal parts of the debt. At a time when, following a series of adventurous operations, the large banks and other private financial institutions of the United States and Europe are wiping out dubious debts with an amount that by far surpasses the external public debt that Latin America owes them, we have to constitute a united front of indebted countries in order to obtain the cancellation of the debt.

Nationalise the banks without compensation

Private banks need to audited and strictly controlled, because they run the risk of being dragged down with the international financial crisis. We have to avoid a situation where the state ends up nationalising the losses of the banks, as has happened many times before (Chile under Pinochet, Mexico in 1995, Ecuador in 1999-2000, etc.). If some banks on the brink of bankruptcy have to be nationalised, this should be done without paying compensation.

Moreover, numerous litigation cases have emerged in the last few years between the states of the region and multinationals, from the North and the South. Rather that taking them to the ICSID, which is part of the World Bank dominated by a handful of industrialised countries, the countries of the region should follow the example of Bolivia, which has pulled out of the organisation. They should create a regional organisation for the resolution of litigation initiated by other countries or private companies. How can we continue to sign loan contracts or trade contracts that state, in the case of litigation, that the only jurisdictions that are valid are those of the US, United Kingdom or other countries of the North? We are dealing here with an inadmissible renouncement of sovereignty.

It is worthwhile establishing strict control over capital movements and exchange rates, with the goal of avoiding capital flight and speculative attacks against currencies in the region. For the states that want to make the Bolivarian project of Latin American integration for greater social justice a reality, it is necessary to advance towards a common currency.

Integration has a political dimension

Naturally, integration has to have a political dimension: a Latin American parliament elected by universal suffrage in each one of the member countries, equipped with a real legislative power. Within the framework of political construction, we have to avoid repeating the bad example of Europe, where the European Commission (that is, the European government) has exaggerated powers in regards to the parliament. We have to move towards a democratic constituent process with the goal of adopting a common political constitution.

We also have to avoid reproducing the anti-democratic procedure followed by the European Commission that attempts to impose a constitutional treaty elaborated without the active participation of citizens and without submitting it to a referendum in each member country. On the contrary, we have to follow the example of the constituent assemblies of Venezuela (1999), Bolivia (2007) and Ecuador (2007-8). The important democratic advances achieved in the course of these three processes will have to be integrated into the Bolivarian constituent process.

Likewise, it is necessary to strengthen the powers of the Latin American Court of Justice, particularly in matters regarding the guaranteeing for the respect of inalienable human rights.

Until now, various processes of integration coexist: the Community of Andean Nations, Mercosur, Unasur, Caricom, Alba. It is important to avoid dispersion and adopt a integration process with a social-political definition based on social justice. This Bolivarian process should bring together all the countries in South America, Central America and the Caribbean that adhere to this orientation. It is preferable to commence this common construction with a reduced and coherent nucleus, rather than with a heterogeneous set of states whose governments follow contradictory, if not antagonistic, social policies.

Partial delinking from the world capitalist market

Bolivarian integration should be accompanied with a partial delinking from the world capitalist market. We are dealing with trying to progressively erase the borders that separate the states that participate in the project, reducing the asymmetries between the member countries, especially thanks to a mechanism of transfer of wealth from the “richer’’ states to the “poorer’’.

This will allow for the considerable expansion of the internal market and will favour the development of local producers under different forms of property. It will allow for the putting into action of a process of development (not only industrialisation) with substitution of imports. Of course, this implies the development, for example, of a policy of food sovereignty. At the same time, the Bolivarian project made up of various member countries will partially delink itself from the world capitalist market. This means, in particular, the repealing of bilateral treaties in areas of investment and trade. The member countries of the Bolivarian group should also pull out of institutions such as the World Bank, the IMF and the World Trade Orgaisation (WTO), at the same time as promoting new democratic global institutions that respect inalienable human rights.

As was mentioned before, the member states of the new Bolivarian group would equip themselves with new regional institutions, such as the Bank of the South, which would develop collaborative relations with other similar institutions created by states from other regions in the world.

The member states of the new Bolivarian group will act with the maximum number of third states in favour of a radical democratic reform of the United Nations, with the objective of ensuring compliance with the United Nations Charter and the numerous international instruments that defend human rights, such as the international pact on economic, social and cultural rights (1996), the charter on the rights and responsibilities of states (1974), the declaration on the right to development (1986), the resolution on the rights of indigenous people (2007). Equally, it would lend support to the activities of the International Criminal Court and the International Court of Justice in The Hague. It would act in favour of reaching understandings between states and peoples with the goal of acting to limit climate change as much as possible, given that this represents a terrible danger for humanity.

[Eric Toussaint is from the Committee for the Abolition of the Third World Debt. Translated from the Spanish version by Federic Fuentes for Links International Journal of Socialist Renewal.]

 


[1] Paper presented in Caracas on October 8, 2008, presented during the international Responses from the South to the World Economic Crisis seminar, held at the Venezuelan School of Planning. The other speakers on the panel were: Hugo Chavez, president of the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela, Haiman El Troudi, minister of planning (Venezuela), Claudio Katz, Economist of the Left (Argentina) and Pedro Paez, minister of economic coordination (Ecuador). The entire conference was broadcast live by Venezuelan state television.

[2] Simón Bolívar (1783-1830) was one of the first to try and unify the countries of Latin America with the aim of creating a single independent nation. He led the struggle to liberate Venezuela, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru and Bolivia from Spanish domination. He is considered to be a hero, and his name is well recognised across Latin America.

Eric Toussaint


La crisis económica y financiera internacional cuyo epicentro se halla en Estados Unidos tendría que ser aprovechada por los países latinoamericanos para construir una integración favorable a los pueblos y al mismo tiempo iniciar una desvinculación parcial.

Se debe aprender las lecciones del siglo XX para aplicarlas en este comienzo de siglo. Durante la década de los 1930 que siguió la crisis que estalló en Wall Street en 1929, shop hubo 12 países de Latinoamérica que fueron directamente afectados y que, en consecuencia, suspendieron de manera prolongada el reembolso de sus deudas externas contraídas, principalmente, con banqueros de América del Norte y de Europa occidental. Algunos de ellos, como Brasil y México, impusieron a sus acreedores, diez años más tarde, una reducción de entre el 50 y el 90% de su deuda. México fue el que llevó más lejos las reformas económicas y sociales. Durante el gobierno de Lázaro Cárdenas, la industria del petróleo fue completamente nacionalizada sin que por ello los monopolios norteamericanos fueran indemnizados. Además, 16 millones de hectáreas fueron también nacionalizadas y retornadas en su mayor parte a la población indígena bajo la forma de bienes comunales. En el transcurso de los años treinta y hasta mediados de los sesenta, varios gobiernos latinoamericanos llevaron a cabo políticas públicas muy activas con el fin de conseguir un desarrollo parcialmente autocentrado, conocidas más tarde con el nombre de modelo de industrialización por substitución de importaciones (ISI). Por otra parte, a partir de 1959, la revolución cubana intentó dar un contenido socialista al proyecto bolivariano de integración latinoamericana. Este contenido socialista despuntaba ya en la revolución boliviana de 1952. Fue necesaria la brutal intervención estadounidense, apoyada por las clases dominantes y las fuerzas armadas locales, para terminar con el ciclo ascendente de emancipación social de este período. Bloqueo de Cuba desde 1962, junta militar en Brasil desde 1964, intervención estadounidense en Santo Domingo en 1965, dictadura de Banzer en Bolivia en 1971, golpe de Estado de Pinochet en Chile en 1973, instalación de las dictaduras en Uruguay y en Argentina. El modelo neoliberal fue puesto en práctica primero en Chile, con Pinochet y la ayuda intelectual de los Chicago boys de Milton Friedman, y luego se impuso en todo el continente, favorecido por la crisis de la deuda que estalló en 1982. A la caída de las dictaduras en los años ochenta, el modelo neoliberal continuó vigente gracias principalmente a la aplicación de los planes de ajuste estructural y del Consenso de Washington. Los gobiernos de Latinoamérica fueron incapaces de formar un frente común, y la mayoría aplicó con docilidad las recetas dictadas por el Banco Mundial y el FMI. Esto acabó produciendo un gran descontento popular y una recomposición de las fuerzas populares que condujo a un nuevo ciclo de elecciones de gobiernos de izquierda o de centro izquierda, comenzando por Chávez en 1998, que se comprometió a instaurar un modelo diferente basado en la justicia social.

En este comienzo del siglo, el proyecto bolivariano de integración de los pueblos de la región ha tenido un nuevo impulso. Si se quiere llevar más lejos este nuevo ciclo ascendente es necesario aprender las lecciones del pasado. Lo que le faltó, en particular, a Latinoamérica durante las décadas de 1940 a 1970 fue un auténtico proyecto de integración de las economías y de los pueblos combinado con una verdadera redistribución de la riqueza en favor de las clases trabajadoras. Ahora bien, es vital tener conciencia de que hoy en Latinoamérica existe una disputa entre dos proyectos de integración, que tienen un contenido de clase antagónico. Las clases capitalistas brasileña y argentina (las dos principales economías de América del Sur) son partidarias de una integración favorable a su dominación económica sobre el resto de la región. Los intereses de las empresas brasileñas, sobre todo, así como de las argentinas, son muy importantes en toda la región: petróleo y gas, grandes obras de infraestructuras, minería, metalurgia, agrobusiness, industrias alimentarias, etc. La construcción europea, basada en un mercado único dominado por el gran capital, es el modelo que quieren seguir. Las clases capitalistas brasileña y argentina quieren que los trabajadores de los diferentes países de la región compitan entre sí, para conseguir el máximo beneficio y ser competitivos en el mercado mundial. Desde el punto de vista de la izquierda, sería un trágico error recurrir a una política por etapas: apoyar una integración latinoamericana según el modelo europeo, dominada por el gran capital, con la ilusoria esperanza de darle más tarde un contenido socialmente emancipador. Tal apoyo implica ponerse al servicio de los intereses capitalistas. No hay que entrar en el juego de los capitalistas, intentando ser el más astuto y dejando que éstos dicten sus reglas.

El otro proyecto de integración, que se inscribe en el pensamiento bolivariano, quiere dar un contenido de justicia social a la integración. Esto implica la recuperación del control público sobre los recursos naturales de la región y sobre los grandes medios de producción, de crédito y de comercialización. Se debe nivelar por arriba las conquistas sociales de los trabajadores y de los pequeños productores, reduciendo al mismo tiempo las asimetrías entre las economías de la región. Hay que mejorar sustancialmente las vías de comunicación entre los países de la región, respetando rigurosamente el ambiente (por ejemplo, desarrollando el ferrocarril y otros medios de transporte colectivos antes que las autopistas). Hay que apoyar a los pequeños productores privados en numerosas actividades: agricultura, artesanado, comercio, servicios, etc. El proceso de emancipación social que persigue el proyecto bolivariano del siglo xxi pretende liberar la sociedad de la dominación capitalista apoyando las formas de propiedad que tienen una función social: pequeña propiedad privada, propiedad pública, propiedad cooperativa, propiedad comunal y colectiva, etc. Así mismo, la integración latinoamericana implica dotarse de una arquitectura financiera, jurídica y política común.

Se debe aprovechar la actual coyuntura internacional, favorable a los países en desarrollo exportadores de productos primarios antes de que la situación cambie. Los países de Latinoamérica han acumulado cerca de 400.000 millones de dólares en reservas de cambio. Es una suma no despreciable, que está en manos de los Bancos Centrales latinoamericanos, y que debe ser utilizada en el momento oportuno para favorecer la integración regional y blindar al continente frente a los efectos de la crisis económica y financiera que se desarrolla en América del Norte y Europa, y que amenaza a todo el planeta. Lamentablemente, no hay que hacerse ilusiones: Latinoamérica está en vías de perder un tiempo precioso, mientras los gobiernos prosiguen, más allá de la retórica, una política tradicional: firma de acuerdos bilaterales sobre inversiones, aceptación o continuación de negociaciones sobre ciertos tratados de libre comercio, utilización de las reservas de cambio para comprar bonos del Tesoro de Estados Unidos (es decir, prestarle capital a la potencia dominante) o credit default swaps cuyo mercado se ha hundido con Lehman Brothers, AIG, etc., pago anticipado al FMI, al Banco Mundial y al Club de París, aceptación del tribunal del Banco Mundial (CIADI) para resolver los diferendos con las transnacionales, continuación de las negociaciones comerciales en el marco de la agenda de Doha, mantenimiento de la ocupación militar de Haití. Después de un ruidoso y prometedor arranque en el 2007, las iniciativas anunciadas en materia de integración latinoamericana parecen haberse frenado en el 2008.

En cuanto al lanzamiento del Banco del Sur, éste lleva mucho retraso. Las discusiones no se profundizan. Hay que salir de la confusión y dar un contenido claramente progresista a esta nueva institución, cuya creación fue decidida en diciembre del 2007 por siete países de América del Sur. El Banco del Sur tiene que ser una institución democrática (un país, un voto) y transparente (auditoría externa). Antes que financiar con dinero público grandes proyectos de infraestructura, pocos respetuosos del ambiente, realizados por empresas privadas, cuyo objetivo es obtener el máximo beneficio, se debe apoyar los esfuerzos de los poderes públicos para promover políticas tales como la soberanía alimentaria, la reforma agraria, el desarrollo de la investigación en el campo de la salud y la implantación de una industria farmacéutica que produzca medicamentos genéricos de alta calidad; reforzar los medios de transporte colectivo ferroviario; utilizar energías alternativas para limitar el agotamiento de los recursos naturales; proteger el ambiente; desarrollar la integración de los sistemas de enseñanza…

Al contrario de lo que muchos creen, el problema de la deuda pública no se ha resuelto. Es verdad que la deuda pública externa se ha reducido, pero ha sido sustituida por una deuda pública interna que, en ciertos países, ha adquirido proporciones totalmente desmesuradas (Brasil, Colombia, Argentina, Nicaragua, Guatemala), a tal punto que desvía hacia el capital financiero parasitario una parte considerable del presupuesto del Estado. Es muy conveniente seguir el ejemplo de Ecuador, que estableció una comisión de auditoría integral de la deuda pública externa e interna, a fin de determinar la parte ilegítima, ilícita o ilegal de la misma. En un momento en el que, tras una serie de operaciones aventuradas, los grandes bancos y otras instituciones financieras privadas de Estados Unidos y de Europa borran unas deudas dudosas por un monto que supera largamente la deuda pública externa de Latinoamérica con ellos, hay que constituir un frente de países endeudados para obtener la anulación de la deuda.

Se debe auditar y controlar estrictamente a los bancos privados, porque corren el peligro de ser arrastrados por la crisis financiera internacional. Hay que evitar que el Estado sea llevado a nacionalizar las pérdidas de los bancos, como ya ha pasado tantas veces (Chile bajo Pinochet, México en 1995, Ecuador en 1999-2000, etc.). Si hay que nacionalizar unos bancos al borde de la bancarrota, esto debe hacerse sin indemnizaciones y ejerciendo el derecho de reparación (repetición) sobre el patrimonio de sus propietarios.

Por lo demás, han surgido numerosos litigios en estos últimos años entre los Estados de la región y multinacionales, tanto del Norte como del Sur. En lugar de remitirse al Centro Internacional de Resolución de Diferendos en materia de Inversiones (CIADI), que es parte del Banco Mundial, dominado por un puñado de países industrializados, los países de la región tendrían que seguir el ejemplo de Bolivia, que se ha retirado del mismo. Deberían crear un organismo regional para la resolución de litigios en cuestiones de inversiones. En materia jurídica, los Estados latinoamericanos deberían aplicar la doctrina Calvo y negarse a renunciar a su jurisdicción en casos de litigio con otro Estado o con empresas privadas. ¿Cómo se puede seguir firmando contratos de préstamos o contratos comerciales que prevén que, en caso de litigio, sólo son competentes las jurisdicciones de Estados Unidos, del Reino Unido o de otros países del Norte? Se trata de una renuncia inadmisible del ejercicio de la soberanía.

Es conveniente restablecer un control estricto de los movimientos de capitales y del cambio, a fin de evitar la fuga de capitales y los ataques especulativos contra las monedas de la región. Es necesario que los Estados que quieren materializar el proyecto bolivariano de integración latinoamericana para una mayor justicia social avancen hacia una moneda común.

Naturalmente, la integración debe tener una dimensión política: un Parlamento latinoamericano elegido por sufragio universal en cada uno de los países miembros, dotado de un poder legislativo real. En el marco de la construcción política, hay que evitar la repetición del mal ejemplo europeo, donde la Comisión Europea (o sea, el gobierno europeo) dispone de poderes exagerados con respecto al Parlamento. Hay que caminar hacia un proceso constituyente democrático a fin de adoptar una Constitución política común. En este caso también, se debe evitar reproducir el procedimiento antidemocrático seguido por la Comisión Europea para tratar de imponer un tratado constitucional elaborado sin la participación activa de la ciudadanía y sin someterlo a un referéndum en capa país miembro. Por el contrario, hay que seguir el ejemplo de las asambleas constituyentes de Venezuela (1999), Bolivia (2007) y Ecuador (2007-2008). Los importantes avances democráticos logrados en el curso de estos tres procesos tendrían que ser integrados en un proceso constituyente bolivariano.

Así mismo, es necesario reforzar las competencias de la Corte Latinoamericana de Justicia, en particular en materia de garantía del respeto de los derechos humanos que son indivisibles.

Hasta este momento, coexisten varios procesos de integración: Comunidad Andina de Naciones, Mercosur, Unasur, Caricom, Alba… Es importante evitar la dispersión y adoptar un proceso integrador con una definición político-social basada en la justicia social. Este proceso bolivariano debería reunir a todos los países de Latinoamérica (América del Sur, América Central y Caribe) que se adhieran a esta orientación. Es preferible comenzar la construcción común con un núcleo reducido y coherente, que con un conjunto heterogéneo de Estados cuyos gobiernos siguen orientaciones políticas sociales contradictorias, cuando no antagónicas.

La integración bolivariana debe ir acompañada de una desvinculación parcial del mercado capitalista mundial. Se trata de ir suprimiendo progresivamente las fronteras que separan los Estados que participan en el proyecto, reduciendo las asimetrías en los países miembros especialmente gracias a un mecanismo de transferencia de riqueza desde los Estados más «ricos» a los más «pobres». Esto permitirá ampliar considerablemente el mercado interior y favorecerá el desarrollo de los productores locales bajo diferentes formas de propiedad. Permitirá poner en vigencia el proceso de desarrollo (no sólo la industrialización) por sustitución de importaciones. Por descontado, ello implica el desarrollo, por ejemplo, de una política de soberanía alimentaria. Al mismo tiempo, el conjunto bolivariano constituido por los países miembros se desvinculará parcialmente del mercado capitalista mundial. En particular, esto implicará abrogar tratados bilaterales en materia de inversiones y de comercio. Los países miembros del grupo bolivariano también deberían retirarse de instituciones tales como el Banco Mundial, el FMI y la OMC, promoviendo al mismo tiempo la creación de nuevas instancias mundiales democráticas y respetuosas de los derechos humanos indivisibles.

Como se indicó antes, los Estados miembros del nuevo grupo bolivariano se dotarán de nuevas instituciones regionales, como el Banco del Sur, que desarrollarán relaciones de colaboración con otras instituciones similares constituidas por Estados de otras regiones del mundo.

Los Estados miembros del nuevo grupo bolivariano actuarán con el máximo número de terceros Estados por una reforma democrática radical del sistema de las Naciones Unidas, con el objetivo de hacer cumplir la Carta de la Organización de las Naciones Unidas y los numerosos instrumentos internacionales favorables a los derechos humanos, tales como el pacto internacional de derechos económicos, sociales y culturales (1966), la carta de los derechos y deberes de los Estados (1974), la declaración sobre el derecho al desarrollo (1986), la resolución sobre los derechos de los pueblos indígenas (2007). Igualmente, prestarán apoyo a la actividad de la Corte Penal Internacional y de la Corte Internacional de Justicia de la Haya. Favorecerán el entendimiento entre los Estados y los pueblos a fin de actuar para que se limite al máximo el cambio climático, ya que esto representa un terrible peligro para la humanidad.

Eric Toussaint


La crisis económica y financiera internacional cuyo epicentro se halla en Estados Unidos tendría que ser aprovechada por los países latinoamericanos para construir una integración favorable a los pueblos y al mismo tiempo iniciar una desvinculación parcial.

Se debe aprender las lecciones del siglo XX para aplicarlas en este comienzo de siglo. Durante la década de los 1930 que siguió la crisis que estalló en Wall Street en 1929, prostate
hubo 12 países de Latinoamérica que fueron directamente afectados y que, hospital en consecuencia, suspendieron de manera prolongada el reembolso de sus deudas externas contraídas, principalmente, con banqueros de América del Norte y de Europa occidental. Algunos de ellos, como Brasil y México, impusieron a sus acreedores, diez años más tarde, una reducción de entre el 50 y el 90% de su deuda. México fue el que llevó más lejos las reformas económicas y sociales. Durante el gobierno de Lázaro Cárdenas, la industria del petróleo fue completamente nacionalizada sin que por ello los monopolios norteamericanos fueran indemnizados. Además, 16 millones de hectáreas fueron también nacionalizadas y retornadas en su mayor parte a la población indígena bajo la forma de bienes comunales. En el transcurso de los años treinta y hasta mediados de los sesenta, varios gobiernos latinoamericanos llevaron a cabo políticas públicas muy activas con el fin de conseguir un desarrollo parcialmente autocentrado, conocidas más tarde con el nombre de modelo de industrialización por substitución de importaciones (ISI). Por otra parte, a partir de 1959, la revolución cubana intentó dar un contenido socialista al proyecto bolivariano de integración latinoamericana. Este contenido socialista despuntaba ya en la revolución boliviana de 1952. Fue necesaria la brutal intervención estadounidense, apoyada por las clases dominantes y las fuerzas armadas locales, para terminar con el ciclo ascendente de emancipación social de este período. Bloqueo de Cuba desde 1962, junta militar en Brasil desde 1964, intervención estadounidense en Santo Domingo en 1965, dictadura de Banzer en Bolivia en 1971, golpe de Estado de Pinochet en Chile en 1973, instalación de las dictaduras en Uruguay y en Argentina. El modelo neoliberal fue puesto en práctica primero en Chile, con Pinochet y la ayuda intelectual de los Chicago boys de Milton Friedman, y luego se impuso en todo el continente, favorecido por la crisis de la deuda que estalló en
1982. A la caída de las dictaduras en los años ochenta, el modelo neoliberal continuó vigente gracias principalmente a la aplicación de los planes de ajuste estructural y del Consenso de Washington. Los gobiernos de Latinoamérica fueron incapaces de formar un frente común, y la mayoría aplicó con docilidad las recetas dictadas por el Banco Mundial y el FMI. Esto acabó produciendo un gran descontento popular y una recomposición de las fuerzas populares que condujo a un nuevo ciclo de elecciones de gobiernos de izquierda o de centro izquierda, comenzando por Chávez en 1998, que se comprometió a instaurar un modelo diferente basado en la justicia social.

En este comienzo del siglo, el proyecto bolivariano de integración de los pueblos de la región ha tenido un nuevo impulso. Si se quiere llevar más lejos este nuevo ciclo ascendente es necesario aprender las lecciones del pasado. Lo que le faltó, en particular, a Latinoamérica durante las décadas de 1940 a 1970 fue un auténtico proyecto de integración de las economías y de los pueblos combinado con una verdadera redistribución de la riqueza en favor de las clases trabajadoras. Ahora bien, es vital tener conciencia de que hoy en Latinoamérica existe una disputa entre dos proyectos de integración, que tienen un contenido de clase antagónico. Las clases capitalistas brasileña y argentina (las dos principales economías de América del Sur) son partidarias de una integración favorable a su dominación económica sobre el resto de la región. Los intereses de las empresas brasileñas, sobre todo, así como de las argentinas, son muy importantes en toda la región: petróleo y gas, grandes obras de infraestructuras, minería, metalurgia, agrobusiness, industrias alimentarias, etc. La construcción europea, basada en un mercado único dominado por el gran capital, es el modelo que quieren seguir. Las clases capitalistas brasileña y argentina quieren que los trabajadores de los diferentes países de la región compitan entre sí, para conseguir el máximo beneficio y ser competitivos en el mercado mundial. Desde el punto de vista de la izquierda, sería un trágico error recurrir a una política por etapas: apoyar una integración latinoamericana según el modelo europeo, dominada por el gran capital, con la ilusoria esperanza de darle más tarde un contenido socialmente emancipador. Tal apoyo implica ponerse al servicio de los intereses capitalistas. No hay que entrar en el juego de los capitalistas, intentando ser el más astuto y dejando que éstos dicten sus reglas.

El otro proyecto de integración, que se inscribe en el pensamiento bolivariano, quiere dar un contenido de justicia social a la integración. Esto implica la recuperación del control público sobre los recursos naturales de la región y sobre los grandes medios de producción, de crédito y de comercialización. Se debe nivelar por arriba las conquistas sociales de los trabajadores y de los pequeños productores, reduciendo al mismo tiempo las asimetrías entre las economías de la región. Hay que mejorar sustancialmente las vías de comunicación entre los países de la región, respetando rigurosamente el ambiente (por ejemplo, desarrollando el ferrocarril y otros medios de transporte colectivos antes que las autopistas). Hay que apoyar a los pequeños productores privados en numerosas actividades: agricultura, artesanado, comercio, servicios, etc. El proceso de emancipación social que persigue el proyecto bolivariano del siglo xxi pretende liberar la sociedad de la dominación capitalista apoyando las formas de propiedad que tienen una función social: pequeña propiedad privada, propiedad pública, propiedad cooperativa, propiedad comunal y colectiva, etc. Así mismo, la integración latinoamericana implica dotarse de una arquitectura financiera, jurídica y política común.

Se debe aprovechar la actual coyuntura internacional, favorable a los países en desarrollo exportadores de productos primarios antes de que la situación cambie. Los países de Latinoamérica han acumulado cerca de 400.000 millones de dólares en reservas de cambio. Es una suma no despreciable, que está en manos de los Bancos Centrales latinoamericanos, y que debe ser utilizada en el momento oportuno para favorecer la integración regional y blindar al continente frente a los efectos de la crisis económica y financiera que se desarrolla en América del Norte y Europa, y que amenaza a todo el planeta. Lamentablemente, no hay que hacerse ilusiones: Latinoamérica está en vías de perder un tiempo precioso, mientras los gobiernos prosiguen, más allá de la retórica, una política tradicional: firma de acuerdos bilaterales sobre inversiones, aceptación o continuación de negociaciones sobre ciertos tratados de libre comercio, utilización de las reservas de cambio para comprar bonos del Tesoro de Estados Unidos (es decir, prestarle capital a la potencia dominante) o credit default swaps cuyo mercado se ha hundido con Lehman Brothers, AIG, etc., pago anticipado al FMI, al Banco Mundial y al Club de París, aceptación del tribunal del Banco Mundial (CIADI) para resolver los diferendos con las transnacionales, continuación de las negociaciones comerciales en el marco de la agenda de Doha, mantenimiento de la ocupación militar de Haití. Después de un ruidoso y prometedor arranque en el 2007, las iniciativas anunciadas en materia de integración latinoamericana parecen haberse frenado en el 2008.

En cuanto al lanzamiento del Banco del Sur, éste lleva mucho retraso. Las discusiones no se profundizan. Hay que salir de la confusión y dar un contenido claramente progresista a esta nueva institución, cuya creación fue decidida en diciembre del 2007 por siete países de América del Sur. El Banco del Sur tiene que ser una institución democrática (un país, un voto) y transparente (auditoría externa). Antes que financiar con dinero público grandes proyectos de infraestructura, pocos respetuosos del ambiente, realizados por empresas privadas, cuyo objetivo es obtener el máximo beneficio, se debe apoyar los esfuerzos de los poderes públicos para promover políticas tales como la soberanía alimentaria, la reforma agraria, el desarrollo de la investigación en el campo de la salud y la implantación de una industria farmacéutica que produzca medicamentos genéricos de alta calidad; reforzar los medios de transporte colectivo ferroviario; utilizar energías alternativas para limitar el agotamiento de los recursos naturales; proteger el ambiente; desarrollar la integración de los sistemas de enseñanza…

Al contrario de lo que muchos creen, el problema de la deuda pública no se ha resuelto. Es verdad que la deuda pública externa se ha reducido, pero ha sido sustituida por una deuda pública interna que, en ciertos países, ha adquirido proporciones totalmente desmesuradas (Brasil, Colombia, Argentina, Nicaragua, Guatemala), a tal punto que desvía hacia el capital financiero parasitario una parte considerable del presupuesto del Estado. Es muy conveniente seguir el ejemplo de Ecuador, que estableció una comisión de auditoría integral de la deuda pública externa e interna, a fin de determinar la parte ilegítima, ilícita o ilegal de la misma. En un momento en el que, tras una serie de operaciones aventuradas, los grandes bancos y otras instituciones financieras privadas de Estados Unidos y de Europa borran unas deudas dudosas por un monto que supera largamente la deuda pública externa de Latinoamérica con ellos, hay que constituir un frente de países endeudados para obtener la anulación de la deuda.

Se debe auditar y controlar estrictamente a los bancos privados, porque corren el peligro de ser arrastrados por la crisis financiera internacional. Hay que evitar que el Estado sea llevado a nacionalizar las pérdidas de los bancos, como ya ha pasado tantas veces (Chile bajo Pinochet, México en 1995, Ecuador en 1999-2000, etc.). Si hay que nacionalizar unos bancos al borde de la bancarrota, esto debe hacerse sin indemnizaciones y ejerciendo el derecho de reparación (repetición) sobre el patrimonio de sus propietarios.

Por lo demás, han surgido numerosos litigios en estos últimos años entre los Estados de la región y multinacionales, tanto del Norte como del Sur. En lugar de remitirse al Centro Internacional de Resolución de Diferendos en materia de Inversiones (CIADI), que es parte del Banco Mundial, dominado por un puñado de países industrializados, los países de la región tendrían que seguir el ejemplo de Bolivia, que se ha retirado del mismo. Deberían crear un organismo regional para la resolución de litigios en cuestiones de inversiones. En materia jurídica, los Estados latinoamericanos deberían aplicar la doctrina Calvo y negarse a renunciar a su jurisdicción en casos de litigio con otro Estado o con empresas privadas. ¿Cómo se puede seguir firmando contratos de préstamos o contratos comerciales que prevén que, en caso de litigio, sólo son competentes las jurisdicciones de Estados Unidos, del Reino Unido o de otros países del Norte? Se trata de una renuncia inadmisible del ejercicio de la soberanía.

Es conveniente restablecer un control estricto de los movimientos de capitales y del cambio, a fin de evitar la fuga de capitales y los ataques especulativos contra las monedas de la región. Es necesario que los Estados que quieren materializar el proyecto bolivariano de integración latinoamericana para una mayor justicia social avancen hacia una moneda común.

Naturalmente, la integración debe tener una dimensión política: un Parlamento latinoamericano elegido por sufragio universal en cada uno de los países miembros, dotado de un poder legislativo real. En el marco de la construcción política, hay que evitar la repetición del mal ejemplo europeo, donde la Comisión Europea (o sea, el gobierno europeo) dispone de poderes exagerados con respecto al Parlamento. Hay que caminar hacia un proceso constituyente democrático a fin de adoptar una Constitución política común. En este caso también, se debe evitar reproducir el procedimiento antidemocrático seguido por la Comisión Europea para tratar de imponer un tratado constitucional elaborado sin la participación activa de la ciudadanía y sin someterlo a un referéndum en capa país miembro. Por el contrario, hay que seguir el ejemplo de las asambleas constituyentes de Venezuela (1999), Bolivia (2007) y Ecuador (2007-2008). Los importantes avances democráticos logrados en el curso de estos tres procesos tendrían que ser integrados en un proceso constituyente bolivariano.

Así mismo, es necesario reforzar las competencias de la Corte Latinoamericana de Justicia, en particular en materia de garantía del respeto de los derechos humanos que son indivisibles.

Hasta este momento, coexisten varios procesos de integración: Comunidad Andina de Naciones, Mercosur, Unasur, Caricom, Alba… Es importante evitar la dispersión y adoptar un proceso integrador con una definición político-social basada en la justicia social. Este proceso bolivariano debería reunir a todos los países de Latinoamérica (América del Sur, América Central y Caribe) que se adhieran a esta orientación. Es preferible comenzar la construcción común con un núcleo reducido y coherente, que con un conjunto heterogéneo de Estados cuyos gobiernos siguen orientaciones políticas sociales contradictorias, cuando no antagónicas.

La integración bolivariana debe ir acompañada de una desvinculación parcial del mercado capitalista mundial. Se trata de ir suprimiendo progresivamente las fronteras que separan los Estados que participan en el proyecto, reduciendo las asimetrías en los países miembros especialmente gracias a un mecanismo de transferencia de riqueza desde los Estados más «ricos» a los más «pobres». Esto permitirá ampliar considerablemente el mercado interior y favorecerá el desarrollo de los productores locales bajo diferentes formas de propiedad. Permitirá poner en vigencia el proceso de desarrollo (no sólo la industrialización) por sustitución de importaciones. Por descontado, ello implica el desarrollo, por ejemplo, de una política de soberanía alimentaria. Al mismo tiempo, el conjunto bolivariano constituido por los países miembros se desvinculará parcialmente del mercado capitalista mundial. En particular, esto implicará abrogar tratados bilaterales en materia de inversiones y de comercio. Los países miembros del grupo bolivariano también deberían retirarse de instituciones tales como el Banco Mundial, el FMI y la OMC, promoviendo al mismo tiempo la creación de nuevas instancias mundiales democráticas y respetuosas de los derechos humanos indivisibles.

Como se indicó antes, los Estados miembros del nuevo grupo bolivariano se dotarán de nuevas instituciones regionales, como el Banco del Sur, que desarrollarán relaciones de colaboración con otras instituciones similares constituidas por Estados de otras regiones del mundo.

Los Estados miembros del nuevo grupo bolivariano actuarán con el máximo número de terceros Estados por una reforma democrática radical del sistema de las Naciones Unidas, con el objetivo de hacer cumplir la Carta de la Organización de las Naciones Unidas y los numerosos instrumentos internacionales favorables a los derechos humanos, tales como el pacto internacional de derechos económicos, sociales y culturales (1966), la carta de los derechos y deberes de los Estados (1974), la declaración sobre el derecho al desarrollo (1986), la resolución sobre los derechos de los pueblos indígenas (2007). Igualmente, prestarán apoyo a la actividad de la Corte Penal Internacional y de la Corte Internacional de Justicia de la Haya. Favorecerán el entendimiento entre los Estados y los pueblos a fin de actuar para que se limite al máximo el cambio climático, ya que esto representa un terrible peligro para la humanidad.

by CÂNDIDO GRZYBOWSKI
Institute of Social and Economic Analysis (IBASE), healing Brazil

In the resistance to the process of globalization, illness which seeks to submit territories, economies and governments to the interests of accumulation of large economic and financial corporations, schemes of regional and sub-regional integration are emerging as a possibility for the peoples of the South. The risk, however, is that the dominant trade agenda of North–South relations will eventually contaminate proposals and policies at the regional level, impeding the elaboration of genuine alternatives for democratic and sustainable human development.
Despite inheriting the great political drive of the governments of democratic transition in Brazil and Argentina opposed to the return of authoritarian military logic to the region, MERCOSUR (Common Market of the Southern Cone) evolved over the last decade of the 20th century to become predominantly an area of sub-regional free trade, also involving Uruguay and Paraguay. This regional bloc was pressured and threatened by the agenda of the Free Trade Agreement of the Americas (FTAA) from the USA, and jostled by liberalizing and privatizing policies adopted by the national governments in the region as part of the stabilization plans promoted by the International Monetary Fund (IMF). Now into the new century, we see governments impacted to a degree by the overwhelming failure of such policies, the defeat of the FTAA, and a renewal of the policy of regional integration and bloc negotiations in international forums – an extremely contradictory policy that reflects the disparate colours of the mosaic of governments in the region.

Most recently, MERCOSUR expanded further with the inclusion of Venezuela and the association of Bolivia, Chile and Ecuador.  The People’s Dialogue on Alternatives is an initiative being forged within the heart of civil society, with the recovery of the peoples’ perspectives on ongoing regional processes and on alternatives to be constructed in the region as its basic motivation. In this sense, it is neither an initiative pushed by the official agenda of MERCOSUR, nor by global trade agreements. Its inspiration is the World Social Forum, or rather, the theoretical and political rupture that the Forum represents with the dominant ideas of free trade and the search for a new political culture that is capable of respecting, yet taking advantage of, the rich social and environmental diversity in the region, and of constructing alternatives that validate the autonomy and complementarity of the peoples, their territories, and the biodiversity and enormous array of natural resources that fall to them to manage in a planetary context. In sum, it addresses the renewal of struggles and knowledge accumulated by social
movements and local organizations, by civic entities and national and regional networks, respecting their outlooks and strengthening alternative practices of construction that they are currently developing. The major challenge of the project is to overcome the fragmentation, to create conditions of exchange of experiences and knowledges, and to stimulate the dialogue on practices and strategies of transformation.  The task of making the project visible set its own demanding challenges; first, at the level of the Institute of Social and Economic Analysis (IBASE) itself, it involved the facilitation of the initiative. As an entity based on active citizenship, IBASE needed to construct the project in consultation with various networks and partners. This involved the formation of a regional reference group, in order to share the political coordination of the dialogue with the more than 40 organizations and movements of different countries that are its actors. From there, we were all faced with the question of the methodology of the dialogue itself. In the background, the dialogue seeks to reinvent a mode of
dialogue that works towards the production of knowledge – inspired by Paulo Freire – but it faces the added complication of being an inter-movement and inter-regional dialogue, with all the social and cultural diversity this implies.  Beyond this, the initiative was envisaged from the beginning to involve both the MERCOSUR region and that of the South African Development Community (SADC), transforming it in dialogue with South–South peoples, which made the task all that more complex.  In practice, the People’s Dialogue initiative, in cooperation with the Alternative Development Center (AIDC-South Africa) took concrete shape throughout 2006. The question of ‘land and common wealth of nature’ was identified as a unifying theme, especially given the onslaught of processes of competition for territories and natural resources now in play. Many social movements, communities, indigenous peoples, quilombos, human rights networks and environmental networks are facing the question of land and the common wealth of nature as bases of life and, moreover, of alternatives for the
region, as much in South America as in Africa. What rights then emerge?  What forms of social inclusion and life are possible? What mode of democratic
management is necessary? These are questions for an alternative region and integration project. And this has to be elaborated in a context of confronting
powerful groups of multinationals and their global strategies of exploitation and control. A second broad theme for the dialogue, to be launched in 2007,
has already been identified as a common question for Latin Americans and Africans – namely, the theme of ‘work and inclusion in the cities’.
The People’s Dialogue on Alternatives for Regional Integration has only just begun. Determined efforts from organizations and social movements will be necessary to move it forward. But, without a doubt, the agenda set out to date already points towards a promising trajectory and the energy and fervour around the project is enormous.

(CANDIDO GRZYBOWSKI is a Sociologist and Director General of the Brazilian Institute of Social and Economic Analysis (IBASE), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.)

by CÂNDIDO GRZYBOWSKI
Institute of Social and Economic Analysis (IBASE), ed Brazil

In the resistance to the process of globalization, which seeks to submit territories, economies and governments to the interests of accumulation of large economic and financial corporations, schemes of regional and sub-regional integration are emerging as a possibility for the peoples of the South. The risk, however, is that the dominant trade agenda of North–South relations will eventually contaminate proposals and policies at the regional level, impeding the elaboration of genuine alternatives for democratic and sustainable human development.
Despite inheriting the great political drive of the governments of democratic transition in Brazil and Argentina opposed to the return of authoritarian military logic to the region, MERCOSUR (Common Market of the Southern Cone) evolved over the last decade of the 20th century to become predominantly an area of sub-regional free trade, also involving Uruguay and Paraguay. This regional bloc was pressured and threatened by the agenda of the Free Trade Agreement of the Americas (FTAA) from the USA, and jostled by liberalizing and privatizing policies adopted by the national governments in the region as part of the stabilization plans promoted by the International Monetary Fund (IMF). Now into the new century, we see governments impacted to a degree by the overwhelming failure of such policies, the defeat of the FTAA, and a renewal of the policy of regional integration and bloc negotiations in international forums – an extremely contradictory policy that reflects the disparate colours of the mosaic of governments in the region.

Most recently, MERCOSUR expanded further with the inclusion of Venezuela and the association of Bolivia, Chile and Ecuador.  The People’s Dialogue on Alternatives is an initiative being forged within the heart of civil society, with the recovery of the peoples’ perspectives on ongoing regional processes and on alternatives to be constructed in the region as its basic motivation. In this sense, it is neither an initiative pushed by the official agenda of MERCOSUR, nor by global trade agreements. Its inspiration is the World Social Forum, or rather, the theoretical and political rupture that the Forum represents with the dominant ideas of free trade and the search for a new political culture that is capable of respecting, yet taking advantage of, the rich social and environmental diversity in the region, and of constructing alternatives that validate the autonomy and complementarity of the peoples, their territories, and the biodiversity and enormous array of natural resources that fall to them to manage in a planetary context. In sum, it addresses the renewal of struggles and knowledge accumulated by social
movements and local organizations, by civic entities and national and regional networks, respecting their outlooks and strengthening alternative practices of construction that they are currently developing. The major challenge of the project is to overcome the fragmentation, to create conditions of exchange of experiences and knowledges, and to stimulate the dialogue on practices and strategies of transformation.  The task of making the project visible set its own demanding challenges; first, at the level of the Institute of Social and Economic Analysis (IBASE) itself, it involved the facilitation of the initiative. As an entity based on active citizenship, IBASE needed to construct the project in consultation with various networks and partners. This involved the formation of a regional reference group, in order to share the political coordination of the dialogue with the more than 40 organizations and movements of different countries that are its actors. From there, we were all faced with the question of the methodology of the dialogue itself. In the background, the dialogue seeks to reinvent a mode of
dialogue that works towards the production of knowledge – inspired by Paulo Freire – but it faces the added complication of being an inter-movement and inter-regional dialogue, with all the social and cultural diversity this implies.  Beyond this, the initiative was envisaged from the beginning to involve both the MERCOSUR region and that of the South African Development Community (SADC), transforming it in dialogue with South–South peoples, which made the task all that more complex.  In practice, the People’s Dialogue initiative, in cooperation with the Alternative Development Center (AIDC-South Africa) took concrete shape throughout 2006. The question of ‘land and common wealth of nature’ was identified as a unifying theme, especially given the onslaught of processes of competition for territories and natural resources now in play. Many social movements, communities, indigenous peoples, quilombos, human rights networks and environmental networks are facing the question of land and the common wealth of nature as bases of life and, moreover, of alternatives for the
region, as much in South America as in Africa. What rights then emerge?  What forms of social inclusion and life are possible? What mode of democratic
management is necessary? These are questions for an alternative region and integration project. And this has to be elaborated in a context of confronting
powerful groups of multinationals and their global strategies of exploitation and control. A second broad theme for the dialogue, to be launched in 2007,
has already been identified as a common question for Latin Americans and Africans – namely, the theme of ‘work and inclusion in the cities’.
The People’s Dialogue on Alternatives for Regional Integration has only just begun. Determined efforts from organizations and social movements will be necessary to move it forward. But, without a doubt, the agenda set out to date already points towards a promising trajectory and the energy and fervour around the project is enormous.

(CANDIDO GRZYBOWSKI is a Sociologist and Director General of the Brazilian Institute of Social and Economic Analysis (IBASE), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.)

by CÂNDIDO GRZYBOWSKI
Institute of Social and Economic Analysis (IBASE), help Brazil

In the resistance to the process of globalization, pharm which seeks to submit territories, economies and governments to the interests of accumulation of large economic and financial corporations, schemes of regional and sub-regional integration are emerging as a possibility for the peoples of the South. The risk, however, is that the dominant trade agenda of North–South relations will eventually contaminate proposals and policies at the regional level, impeding the elaboration of genuine alternatives for democratic and sustainable human development.
Despite inheriting the great political drive of the governments of democratic transition in Brazil and Argentina opposed to the return of authoritarian military logic to the region, MERCOSUR (Common Market of the Southern Cone) evolved over the last decade of the 20th century to become predominantly an area of sub-regional free trade, also involving Uruguay and Paraguay. This regional bloc was pressured and threatened by the agenda of the Free Trade Agreement of the Americas (FTAA) from the USA, and jostled by liberalizing and privatizing policies adopted by the national governments in the region as part of the stabilization plans promoted by the International Monetary Fund (IMF). Now into the new century, we see governments impacted to a degree by the overwhelming failure of such policies, the defeat of the FTAA, and a renewal of the policy of regional integration and bloc negotiations in international forums – an extremely contradictory policy that reflects the disparate colours of the mosaic of governments in the region.

Most recently, MERCOSUR expanded further with the inclusion of Venezuela and the association of Bolivia, Chile and Ecuador.  The People’s Dialogue on Alternatives is an initiative being forged within the heart of civil society, with the recovery of the peoples’ perspectives on ongoing regional processes and on alternatives to be constructed in the region as its basic motivation. In this sense, it is neither an initiative pushed by the official agenda of MERCOSUR, nor by global trade agreements. Its inspiration is the World Social Forum, or rather, the theoretical and political rupture that the Forum represents with the dominant ideas of free trade and the search for a new political culture that is capable of respecting, yet taking advantage of, the rich social and environmental diversity in the region, and of constructing alternatives that validate the autonomy and complementarity of the peoples, their territories, and the biodiversity and enormous array of natural resources that fall to them to manage in a planetary context. In sum, it addresses the renewal of struggles and knowledge accumulated by social
movements and local organizations, by civic entities and national and regional networks, respecting their outlooks and strengthening alternative practices of construction that they are currently developing. The major challenge of the project is to overcome the fragmentation, to create conditions of exchange of experiences and knowledges, and to stimulate the dialogue on practices and strategies of transformation.  The task of making the project visible set its own demanding challenges; first, at the level of the Institute of Social and Economic Analysis (IBASE) itself, it involved the facilitation of the initiative. As an entity based on active citizenship, IBASE needed to construct the project in consultation with various networks and partners. This involved the formation of a regional reference group, in order to share the political coordination of the dialogue with the more than 40 organizations and movements of different countries that are its actors. From there, we were all faced with the question of the methodology of the dialogue itself. In the background, the dialogue seeks to reinvent a mode of
dialogue that works towards the production of knowledge – inspired by Paulo Freire – but it faces the added complication of being an inter-movement and inter-regional dialogue, with all the social and cultural diversity this implies.  Beyond this, the initiative was envisaged from the beginning to involve both the MERCOSUR region and that of the South African Development Community (SADC), transforming it in dialogue with South–South peoples, which made the task all that more complex.  In practice, the People’s Dialogue initiative, in cooperation with the Alternative Development Center (AIDC-South Africa) took concrete shape throughout 2006. The question of ‘land and common wealth of nature’ was identified as a unifying theme, especially given the onslaught of processes of competition for territories and natural resources now in play. Many social movements, communities, indigenous peoples, quilombos, human rights networks and environmental networks are facing the question of land and the common wealth of nature as bases of life and, moreover, of alternatives for the
region, as much in South America as in Africa. What rights then emerge?  What forms of social inclusion and life are possible? What mode of democratic
management is necessary? These are questions for an alternative region and integration project. And this has to be elaborated in a context of confronting
powerful groups of multinationals and their global strategies of exploitation and control. A second broad theme for the dialogue, to be launched in 2007,
has already been identified as a common question for Latin Americans and Africans – namely, the theme of ‘work and inclusion in the cities’.
The People’s Dialogue on Alternatives for Regional Integration has only just begun. Determined efforts from organizations and social movements will be necessary to move it forward. But, without a doubt, the agenda set out to date already points towards a promising trajectory and the energy and fervour around the project is enormous.

(CANDIDO GRZYBOWSKI is a Sociologist and Director General of the Brazilian Institute of Social and Economic Analysis (IBASE), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.)

by CÂNDIDO GRZYBOWSKI
Institute of Social and Economic Analysis (IBASE), thumb Brazil

In the resistance to the process of globalization, which seeks to submit territories, economies and governments to the interests of accumulation of large economic and financial corporations, schemes of regional and sub-regional integration are emerging as a possibility for the peoples of the South. The risk, however, is that the dominant trade agenda of North–South relations will eventually contaminate proposals and policies at the regional level, impeding the elaboration of genuine alternatives for democratic and sustainable human development.
Despite inheriting the great political drive of the governments of democratic transition in Brazil and Argentina opposed to the return of authoritarian military logic to the region, MERCOSUR (Common Market of the Southern Cone) evolved over the last decade of the 20th century to become predominantly an area of sub-regional free trade, also involving Uruguay and Paraguay. This regional bloc was pressured and threatened by the agenda of the Free Trade Agreement of the Americas (FTAA) from the USA, and jostled by liberalizing and privatizing policies adopted by the national governments in the region as part of the stabilization plans promoted by the International Monetary Fund (IMF). Now into the new century, we see governments impacted to a degree by the overwhelming failure of such policies, the defeat of the FTAA, and a renewal of the policy of regional integration and bloc negotiations in international forums – an extremely contradictory policy that reflects the disparate colours of the mosaic of governments in the region.

Most recently, MERCOSUR expanded further with the inclusion of Venezuela and the association of Bolivia, Chile and Ecuador.  The People’s Dialogue on Alternatives is an initiative being forged within the heart of civil society, with the recovery of the peoples’ perspectives on ongoing regional processes and on alternatives to be constructed in the region as its basic motivation. In this sense, it is neither an initiative pushed by the official agenda of MERCOSUR, nor by global trade agreements. Its inspiration is the World Social Forum, or rather, the theoretical and political rupture that the Forum represents with the dominant ideas of free trade and the search for a new political culture that is capable of respecting, yet taking advantage of, the rich social and environmental diversity in the region, and of constructing alternatives that validate the autonomy and complementarity of the peoples, their territories, and the biodiversity and enormous array of natural resources that fall to them to manage in a planetary context. In sum, it addresses the renewal of struggles and knowledge accumulated by social
movements and local organizations, by civic entities and national and regional networks, respecting their outlooks and strengthening alternative practices of construction that they are currently developing. The major challenge of the project is to overcome the fragmentation, to create conditions of exchange of experiences and knowledges, and to stimulate the dialogue on practices and strategies of transformation.  The task of making the project visible set its own demanding challenges; first, at the level of the Institute of Social and Economic Analysis (IBASE) itself, it involved the facilitation of the initiative. As an entity based on active citizenship, IBASE needed to construct the project in consultation with various networks and partners. This involved the formation of a regional reference group, in order to share the political coordination of the dialogue with the more than 40 organizations and movements of different countries that are its actors. From there, we were all faced with the question of the methodology of the dialogue itself. In the background, the dialogue seeks to reinvent a mode of
dialogue that works towards the production of knowledge – inspired by Paulo Freire – but it faces the added complication of being an inter-movement and inter-regional dialogue, with all the social and cultural diversity this implies.  Beyond this, the initiative was envisaged from the beginning to involve both the MERCOSUR region and that of the South African Development Community (SADC), transforming it in dialogue with South–South peoples, which made the task all that more complex.  In practice, the People’s Dialogue initiative, in cooperation with the Alternative Development Center (AIDC-South Africa) took concrete shape throughout 2006. The question of ‘land and common wealth of nature’ was identified as a unifying theme, especially given the onslaught of processes of competition for territories and natural resources now in play. Many social movements, communities, indigenous peoples, quilombos, human rights networks and environmental networks are facing the question of land and the common wealth of nature as bases of life and, moreover, of alternatives for the
region, as much in South America as in Africa. What rights then emerge?  What forms of social inclusion and life are possible? What mode of democratic
management is necessary? These are questions for an alternative region and integration project. And this has to be elaborated in a context of confronting
powerful groups of multinationals and their global strategies of exploitation and control. A second broad theme for the dialogue, to be launched in 2007,
has already been identified as a common question for Latin Americans and Africans – namely, the theme of ‘work and inclusion in the cities’.
The People’s Dialogue on Alternatives for Regional Integration has only just begun. Determined efforts from organizations and social movements will be necessary to move it forward. But, without a doubt, the agenda set out to date already points towards a promising trajectory and the energy and fervour around the project is enormous.

(CANDIDO GRZYBOWSKI is a Sociologist and Director General of the Brazilian Institute of Social and Economic Analysis (IBASE), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.)

by CÂNDIDO GRZYBOWSKI
Institute of Social and Economic Analysis (IBASE), sickness Brazil

In the resistance to the process of globalization, which seeks to submit territories, economies and governments to the interests of accumulation of large economic and financial corporations, schemes of regional and sub-regional integration are emerging as a possibility for the peoples of the South. The risk, however, is that the dominant trade agenda of North–South relations will eventually contaminate proposals and policies at the regional level, impeding the elaboration of genuine alternatives for democratic and sustainable human development.
Despite inheriting the great political drive of the governments of democratic transition in Brazil and Argentina opposed to the return of authoritarian military logic to the region, MERCOSUR (Common Market of the Southern Cone) evolved over the last decade of the 20th century to become predominantly an area of sub-regional free trade, also involving Uruguay and Paraguay. This regional bloc was pressured and threatened by the agenda of the Free Trade Agreement of the Americas (FTAA) from the USA, and jostled by liberalizing and privatizing policies adopted by the national governments in the region as part of the stabilization plans promoted by the International Monetary Fund (IMF). Now into the new century, we see governments impacted to a degree by the overwhelming failure of such policies, the defeat of the FTAA, and a renewal of the policy of regional integration and bloc negotiations in international forums – an extremely contradictory policy that reflects the disparate colours of the mosaic of governments in the region.

Most recently, MERCOSUR expanded further with the inclusion of Venezuela and the association of Bolivia, Chile and Ecuador.  The People’s Dialogue on Alternatives is an initiative being forged within the heart of civil society, with the recovery of the peoples’ perspectives on ongoing regional processes and on alternatives to be constructed in the region as its basic motivation. In this sense, it is neither an initiative pushed by the official agenda of MERCOSUR, nor by global trade agreements. Its inspiration is the World Social Forum, or rather, the theoretical and political rupture that the Forum represents with the dominant ideas of free trade and the search for a new political culture that is capable of respecting, yet taking advantage of, the rich social and environmental diversity in the region, and of constructing alternatives that validate the autonomy and complementarity of the peoples, their territories, and the biodiversity and enormous array of natural resources that fall to them to manage in a planetary context. In sum, it addresses the renewal of struggles and knowledge accumulated by social
movements and local organizations, by civic entities and national and regional networks, respecting their outlooks and strengthening alternative practices of construction that they are currently developing. The major challenge of the project is to overcome the fragmentation, to create conditions of exchange of experiences and knowledges, and to stimulate the dialogue on practices and strategies of transformation.  The task of making the project visible set its own demanding challenges; first, at the level of the Institute of Social and Economic Analysis (IBASE) itself, it involved the facilitation of the initiative. As an entity based on active citizenship, IBASE needed to construct the project in consultation with various networks and partners. This involved the formation of a regional reference group, in order to share the political coordination of the dialogue with the more than 40 organizations and movements of different countries that are its actors. From there, we were all faced with the question of the methodology of the dialogue itself. In the background, the dialogue seeks to reinvent a mode of
dialogue that works towards the production of knowledge – inspired by Paulo Freire – but it faces the added complication of being an inter-movement and inter-regional dialogue, with all the social and cultural diversity this implies.  Beyond this, the initiative was envisaged from the beginning to involve both the MERCOSUR region and that of the South African Development Community (SADC), transforming it in dialogue with South–South peoples, which made the task all that more complex.  In practice, the People’s Dialogue initiative, in cooperation with the Alternative Development Center (AIDC-South Africa) took concrete shape throughout 2006. The question of ‘land and common wealth of nature’ was identified as a unifying theme, especially given the onslaught of processes of competition for territories and natural resources now in play. Many social movements, communities, indigenous peoples, quilombos, human rights networks and environmental networks are facing the question of land and the common wealth of nature as bases of life and, moreover, of alternatives for the
region, as much in South America as in Africa. What rights then emerge?  What forms of social inclusion and life are possible? What mode of democratic
management is necessary? These are questions for an alternative region and integration project. And this has to be elaborated in a context of confronting
powerful groups of multinationals and their global strategies of exploitation and control. A second broad theme for the dialogue, to be launched in 2007,
has already been identified as a common question for Latin Americans and Africans – namely, the theme of ‘work and inclusion in the cities’.
The People’s Dialogue on Alternatives for Regional Integration has only just begun. Determined efforts from organizations and social movements will be necessary to move it forward. But, without a doubt, the agenda set out to date already points towards a promising trajectory and the energy and fervour around the project is enormous.

(CANDIDO GRZYBOWSKI is a Sociologist and Director General of the Brazilian Institute of Social and Economic Analysis (IBASE), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.)

by CÂNDIDO GRZYBOWSKI
Institute of Social and Economic Analysis (IBASE), Brazil

In the resistance to the process of globalization, which seeks to submit territories, economies and governments to the interests of accumulation of large economic and financial corporations, schemes of regional and sub-regional integration are emerging as a possibility for the peoples of the South. The risk, however, is that the dominant trade agenda of North–South relations will eventually contaminate proposals and policies at the regional level, impeding the elaboration of genuine alternatives for democratic and sustainable human development.
Despite inheriting the great political drive of the governments of democratic transition in Brazil and Argentina opposed to the return of authoritarian military logic to the region, MERCOSUR (Common Market of the Southern Cone) evolved over the last decade of the 20th century to become predominantly an area of sub-regional free trade, also involving Uruguay and Paraguay. This regional bloc was pressured and threatened by the agenda of the Free Trade Agreement of the Americas (FTAA) from the USA, and jostled by liberalizing and privatizing policies adopted by the national governments in the region as part of the stabilization plans promoted by the International Monetary Fund (IMF). Now into the new century, we see governments impacted to a degree by the overwhelming failure of such policies, the defeat of the FTAA, and a renewal of the policy of regional integration and bloc negotiations in international forums – an extremely contradictory policy that reflects the disparate colours of the mosaic of governments in the region.

Most recently, MERCOSUR expanded further with the inclusion of Venezuela and the association of Bolivia, Chile and Ecuador.  The People’s Dialogue on Alternatives is an initiative being forged within the heart of civil society, with the recovery of the peoples’ perspectives on ongoing regional processes and on alternatives to be constructed in the region as its basic motivation. In this sense, it is neither an initiative pushed by the official agenda of MERCOSUR, nor by global trade agreements. Its inspiration is the World Social Forum, or rather, the theoretical and political rupture that the Forum represents with the dominant ideas of free trade and the search for a new political culture that is capable of respecting, yet taking advantage of, the rich social and environmental diversity in the region, and of constructing alternatives that validate the autonomy and complementarity of the peoples, their territories, and the biodiversity and enormous array of natural resources that fall to them to manage in a planetary context. In sum, it addresses the renewal of struggles and knowledge accumulated by social
movements and local organizations, by civic entities and national and regional networks, respecting their outlooks and strengthening alternative practices of construction that they are currently developing. The major challenge of the project is to overcome the fragmentation, to create conditions of exchange of experiences and knowledges, and to stimulate the dialogue on practices and strategies of transformation.  The task of making the project visible set its own demanding challenges; first, at the level of the Institute of Social and Economic Analysis (IBASE) itself, it involved the facilitation of the initiative. As an entity based on active citizenship, IBASE needed to construct the project in consultation with various networks and partners. This involved the formation of a regional reference group, in order to share the political coordination of the dialogue with the more than 40 organizations and movements of different countries that are its actors. From there, we were all faced with the question of the methodology of the dialogue itself. In the background, the dialogue seeks to reinvent a mode of
dialogue that works towards the production of knowledge – inspired by Paulo Freire – but it faces the added complication of being an inter-movement and inter-regional dialogue, with all the social and cultural diversity this implies.  Beyond this, the initiative was envisaged from the beginning to involve both the MERCOSUR region and that of the South African Development Community (SADC), transforming it in dialogue with South–South peoples, which made the task all that more complex.  In practice, the People’s Dialogue initiative, in cooperation with the Alternative Development Center (AIDC-South Africa) took concrete shape throughout 2006. The question of ‘land and common wealth of nature’ was identified as a unifying theme, especially given the onslaught of processes of competition for territories and natural resources now in play. Many social movements, communities, indigenous peoples, quilombos, human rights networks and environmental networks are facing the question of land and the common wealth of nature as bases of life and, moreover, of alternatives for the
region, as much in South America as in Africa. What rights then emerge?  What forms of social inclusion and life are possible? What mode of democratic
management is necessary? These are questions for an alternative region and integration project. And this has to be elaborated in a context of confronting
powerful groups of multinationals and their global strategies of exploitation and control. A second broad theme for the dialogue, to be launched in 2007,
has already been identified as a common question for Latin Americans and Africans – namely, the theme of ‘work and inclusion in the cities’.
The People’s Dialogue on Alternatives for Regional Integration has only just begun. Determined efforts from organizations and social movements will be necessary to move it forward. But, without a doubt, the agenda set out to date already points towards a promising trajectory and the energy and fervour around the project is enormous.

(CANDIDO GRZYBOWSKI is a Sociologist and Director General of the Brazilian Institute of Social and Economic Analysis (IBASE), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.)

by CÂNDIDO GRZYBOWSKI
Institute of Social and Economic Analysis (IBASE), sale Brazil

In the resistance to the process of globalization, cure which seeks to submit territories, doctor economies and governments to the interests of accumulation of large economic and financial corporations, schemes of regional and sub-regional integration are emerging as a possibility for the peoples of the South. The risk, however, is that the dominant trade agenda of North–South relations will eventually contaminate proposals and policies at the regional level, impeding the elaboration of genuine alternatives for democratic and sustainable human development.
Despite inheriting the great political drive of the governments of democratic transition in Brazil and Argentina opposed to the return of authoritarian military logic to the region, MERCOSUR (Common Market of the Southern Cone) evolved over the last decade of the 20th century to become predominantly an area of sub-regional free trade, also involving Uruguay and Paraguay. This regional bloc was pressured and threatened by the agenda of the Free Trade Agreement of the Americas (FTAA) from the USA, and jostled by liberalizing and privatizing policies adopted by the national governments in the region as part of the stabilization plans promoted by the International Monetary Fund (IMF). Now into the new century, we see governments impacted to a degree by the overwhelming failure of such policies, the defeat of the FTAA, and a renewal of the policy of regional integration and bloc negotiations in international forums – an extremely contradictory policy that reflects the disparate colours of the mosaic of governments in the region.

Most recently, MERCOSUR expanded further with the inclusion of Venezuela and the association of Bolivia, Chile and Ecuador.  The People’s Dialogue on Alternatives is an initiative being forged within the heart of civil society, with the recovery of the peoples’ perspectives on ongoing regional processes and on alternatives to be constructed in the region as its basic motivation. In this sense, it is neither an initiative pushed by the official agenda of MERCOSUR, nor by global trade agreements. Its inspiration is the World Social Forum, or rather, the theoretical and political rupture that the Forum represents with the dominant ideas of free trade and the search for a new political culture that is capable of respecting, yet taking advantage of, the rich social and environmental diversity in the region, and of constructing alternatives that validate the autonomy and complementarity of the peoples, their territories, and the biodiversity and enormous array of natural resources that fall to them to manage in a planetary context. In sum, it addresses the renewal of struggles and knowledge accumulated by social
movements and local organizations, by civic entities and national and regional networks, respecting their outlooks and strengthening alternative practices of construction that they are currently developing. The major challenge of the project is to overcome the fragmentation, to create conditions of exchange of experiences and knowledges, and to stimulate the dialogue on practices and strategies of transformation.  The task of making the project visible set its own demanding challenges; first, at the level of the Institute of Social and Economic Analysis (IBASE) itself, it involved the facilitation of the initiative. As an entity based on active citizenship, IBASE needed to construct the project in consultation with various networks and partners. This involved the formation of a regional reference group, in order to share the political coordination of the dialogue with the more than 40 organizations and movements of different countries that are its actors. From there, we were all faced with the question of the methodology of the dialogue itself. In the background, the dialogue seeks to reinvent a mode of
dialogue that works towards the production of knowledge – inspired by Paulo Freire – but it faces the added complication of being an inter-movement and inter-regional dialogue, with all the social and cultural diversity this implies.  Beyond this, the initiative was envisaged from the beginning to involve both the MERCOSUR region and that of the South African Development Community (SADC), transforming it in dialogue with South–South peoples, which made the task all that more complex.  In practice, the People’s Dialogue initiative, in cooperation with the Alternative Development Center (AIDC-South Africa) took concrete shape throughout 2006. The question of ‘land and common wealth of nature’ was identified as a unifying theme, especially given the onslaught of processes of competition for territories and natural resources now in play. Many social movements, communities, indigenous peoples, quilombos, human rights networks and environmental networks are facing the question of land and the common wealth of nature as bases of life and, moreover, of alternatives for the
region, as much in South America as in Africa. What rights then emerge?  What forms of social inclusion and life are possible? What mode of democratic
management is necessary? These are questions for an alternative region and integration project. And this has to be elaborated in a context of confronting
powerful groups of multinationals and their global strategies of exploitation and control. A second broad theme for the dialogue, to be launched in 2007,
has already been identified as a common question for Latin Americans and Africans – namely, the theme of ‘work and inclusion in the cities’.
The People’s Dialogue on Alternatives for Regional Integration has only just begun. Determined efforts from organizations and social movements will be necessary to move it forward. But, without a doubt, the agenda set out to date already points towards a promising trajectory and the energy and fervour around the project is enormous.

(CANDIDO GRZYBOWSKI is a Sociologist and Director General of the Brazilian Institute of Social and Economic Analysis (IBASE), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.)

by CÂNDIDO GRZYBOWSKI
Institute of Social and Economic Analysis (IBASE), sale
Brazil

In the resistance to the process of globalization, patient which seeks to submit territories, sale economies and governments to the interests of accumulation of large economic and financial corporations, schemes of regional and sub-regional integration are emerging as a possibility for the peoples of the South. The risk, however, is that the dominant trade agenda of North–South relations will eventually contaminate proposals and policies at the regional level, impeding the elaboration of genuine alternatives for democratic and sustainable human development.
Despite inheriting the great political drive of the governments of democratic transition in Brazil and Argentina opposed to the return of authoritarian military logic to the region, MERCOSUR (Common Market of the Southern Cone) evolved over the last decade of the 20th century to become predominantly an area of sub-regional free trade, also involving Uruguay and Paraguay. This regional bloc was pressured and threatened by the agenda of the Free Trade Agreement of the Americas (FTAA) from the USA, and jostled by liberalizing and privatizing policies adopted by the national governments in the region as part of the stabilization plans promoted by the International Monetary Fund (IMF). Now into the new century, we see governments impacted to a degree by the overwhelming failure of such policies, the defeat of the FTAA, and a renewal of the policy of regional integration and bloc negotiations in international forums – an extremely contradictory policy that reflects the disparate colours of the mosaic of governments in the region.

Most recently, MERCOSUR expanded further with the inclusion of Venezuela and the association of Bolivia, Chile and Ecuador.  The People’s Dialogue on Alternatives is an initiative being forged within the heart of civil society, with the recovery of the peoples’ perspectives on ongoing regional processes and on alternatives to be constructed in the region as its basic motivation. In this sense, it is neither an initiative pushed by the official agenda of MERCOSUR, nor by global trade agreements. Its inspiration is the World Social Forum, or rather, the theoretical and political rupture that the Forum represents with the dominant ideas of free trade and the search for a new political culture that is capable of respecting, yet taking advantage of, the rich social and environmental diversity in the region, and of constructing alternatives that validate the autonomy and complementarity of the peoples, their territories, and the biodiversity and enormous array of natural resources that fall to them to manage in a planetary context. In sum, it addresses the renewal of struggles and knowledge accumulated by social
movements and local organizations, by civic entities and national and regional networks, respecting their outlooks and strengthening alternative practices of construction that they are currently developing. The major challenge of the project is to overcome the fragmentation, to create conditions of exchange of experiences and knowledges, and to stimulate the dialogue on practices and strategies of transformation.  The task of making the project visible set its own demanding challenges; first, at the level of the Institute of Social and Economic Analysis (IBASE) itself, it involved the facilitation of the initiative. As an entity based on active citizenship, IBASE needed to construct the project in consultation with various networks and partners. This involved the formation of a regional reference group, in order to share the political coordination of the dialogue with the more than 40 organizations and movements of different countries that are its actors. From there, we were all faced with the question of the methodology of the dialogue itself. In the background, the dialogue seeks to reinvent a mode of
dialogue that works towards the production of knowledge – inspired by Paulo Freire – but it faces the added complication of being an inter-movement and inter-regional dialogue, with all the social and cultural diversity this implies.  Beyond this, the initiative was envisaged from the beginning to involve both the MERCOSUR region and that of the South African Development Community (SADC), transforming it in dialogue with South–South peoples, which made the task all that more complex.  In practice, the People’s Dialogue initiative, in cooperation with the Alternative Development Center (AIDC-South Africa) took concrete shape throughout 2006. The question of ‘land and common wealth of nature’ was identified as a unifying theme, especially given the onslaught of processes of competition for territories and natural resources now in play. Many social movements, communities, indigenous peoples, quilombos, human rights networks and environmental networks are facing the question of land and the common wealth of nature as bases of life and, moreover, of alternatives for the
region, as much in South America as in Africa. What rights then emerge?  What forms of social inclusion and life are possible? What mode of democratic
management is necessary? These are questions for an alternative region and integration project. And this has to be elaborated in a context of confronting
powerful groups of multinationals and their global strategies of exploitation and control. A second broad theme for the dialogue, to be launched in 2007,
has already been identified as a common question for Latin Americans and Africans – namely, the theme of ‘work and inclusion in the cities’.
The People’s Dialogue on Alternatives for Regional Integration has only just begun. Determined efforts from organizations and social movements will be necessary to move it forward. But, without a doubt, the agenda set out to date already points towards a promising trajectory and the energy and fervour around the project is enormous.

(CANDIDO GRZYBOWSKI is a Sociologist and Director General of the Brazilian Institute of Social and Economic Analysis (IBASE), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.)

by CÂNDIDO GRZYBOWSKI
Institute of Social and Economic Analysis (IBASE), sovaldi sale Brazil

In the resistance to the process of globalization, erectile
which seeks to submit territories, economies and governments to the interests of accumulation of large economic and financial corporations, schemes of regional and sub-regional integration are emerging as a possibility for the peoples of the South. The risk, however, is that the dominant trade agenda of North–South relations will eventually contaminate proposals and policies at the regional level, impeding the elaboration of genuine alternatives for democratic and sustainable human development.
Despite inheriting the great political drive of the governments of democratic transition in Brazil and Argentina opposed to the return of authoritarian military logic to the region, MERCOSUR (Common Market of the Southern Cone) evolved over the last decade of the 20th century to become predominantly an area of sub-regional free trade, also involving Uruguay and Paraguay. This regional bloc was pressured and threatened by the agenda of the Free Trade Agreement of the Americas (FTAA) from the USA, and jostled by liberalizing and privatizing policies adopted by the national governments in the region as part of the stabilization plans promoted by the International Monetary Fund (IMF). Now into the new century, we see governments impacted to a degree by the overwhelming failure of such policies, the defeat of the FTAA, and a renewal of the policy of regional integration and bloc negotiations in international forums – an extremely contradictory policy that reflects the disparate colours of the mosaic of governments in the region.

Most recently, MERCOSUR expanded further with the inclusion of Venezuela and the association of Bolivia, Chile and Ecuador.  The People’s Dialogue on Alternatives is an initiative being forged within the heart of civil society, with the recovery of the peoples’ perspectives on ongoing regional processes and on alternatives to be constructed in the region as its basic motivation. In this sense, it is neither an initiative pushed by the official agenda of MERCOSUR, nor by global trade agreements. Its inspiration is the World Social Forum, or rather, the theoretical and political rupture that the Forum represents with the dominant ideas of free trade and the search for a new political culture that is capable of respecting, yet taking advantage of, the rich social and environmental diversity in the region, and of constructing alternatives that validate the autonomy and complementarity of the peoples, their territories, and the biodiversity and enormous array of natural resources that fall to them to manage in a planetary context. In sum, it addresses the renewal of struggles and knowledge accumulated by social
movements and local organizations, by civic entities and national and regional networks, respecting their outlooks and strengthening alternative practices of construction that they are currently developing. The major challenge of the project is to overcome the fragmentation, to create conditions of exchange of experiences and knowledges, and to stimulate the dialogue on practices and strategies of transformation.  The task of making the project visible set its own demanding challenges; first, at the level of the Institute of Social and Economic Analysis (IBASE) itself, it involved the facilitation of the initiative. As an entity based on active citizenship, IBASE needed to construct the project in consultation with various networks and partners. This involved the formation of a regional reference group, in order to share the political coordination of the dialogue with the more than 40 organizations and movements of different countries that are its actors. From there, we were all faced with the question of the methodology of the dialogue itself. In the background, the dialogue seeks to reinvent a mode of
dialogue that works towards the production of knowledge – inspired by Paulo Freire – but it faces the added complication of being an inter-movement and inter-regional dialogue, with all the social and cultural diversity this implies.  Beyond this, the initiative was envisaged from the beginning to involve both the MERCOSUR region and that of the South African Development Community (SADC), transforming it in dialogue with South–South peoples, which made the task all that more complex.  In practice, the People’s Dialogue initiative, in cooperation with the Alternative Development Center (AIDC-South Africa) took concrete shape throughout 2006. The question of ‘land and common wealth of nature’ was identified as a unifying theme, especially given the onslaught of processes of competition for territories and natural resources now in play. Many social movements, communities, indigenous peoples, quilombos, human rights networks and environmental networks are facing the question of land and the common wealth of nature as bases of life and, moreover, of alternatives for the
region, as much in South America as in Africa. What rights then emerge?  What forms of social inclusion and life are possible? What mode of democratic
management is necessary? These are questions for an alternative region and integration project. And this has to be elaborated in a context of confronting
powerful groups of multinationals and their global strategies of exploitation and control. A second broad theme for the dialogue, to be launched in 2007,
has already been identified as a common question for Latin Americans and Africans – namely, the theme of ‘work and inclusion in the cities’.
The People’s Dialogue on Alternatives for Regional Integration has only just begun. Determined efforts from organizations and social movements will be necessary to move it forward. But, without a doubt, the agenda set out to date already points towards a promising trajectory and the energy and fervour around the project is enormous.

(CANDIDO GRZYBOWSKI is a Sociologist and Director General of the Brazilian Institute of Social and Economic Analysis (IBASE), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.)

Alexander C. Chandra

The so-called alternative regionalism is becoming a popular concept of late particularly given the increasing role and importance of non-governmental element, or civil society, and also commonly referred to as the track-three, in the institutional development and community building of Southeast Asia. Despite the widespread use of the terms, there is yet a common understanding amongst relevant actors in the regionalisation process as to what alternative regionalism actually entails of. The theoretical and practical debates on and about alternative regionalism in Southeast Asian context has been minimal and far from sufficient. Given the increase dynamics of civil society’s efforts to reform ASEAN, alternative regionalism, or the concept attached to it, will hold an important position in the analysis of civil society dynamics in Southeast Asian regionalism. This paper is one of the few attempts that have been initiated by scholars and activists from within the region that tries to fill this gap. More importantly, it is also an effort to provide greater clarity of the dynamics attached to civil society’s engagement with ASEAN as a whole.

Key findings:

  • In its own context, alternative regionalism is certainly in the making in Southeast Asia, and civil society is playing a crucial role in promoting it. Various actors in Southeast Asian regionalisation process have different ideas as to what alternative regionalism entails of in the ASEAN context. One common thread in the promotion of alternative regionalism amongst these non-state actors is the question of the participation of the people in ASEAN policy-making process.

  • Alternative regionalism in the Southeast Asian context should, therefore, involve a spontaneous, bottom-up process that recognises the importance of wide range of stakeholders in the making of regional systems and institutions.

  • Whilst, historically, ASEAN is not immune to engagement with civil society actors, such engagement is still limited to a handful economic actors and members of the academic community. The ability of wider civil society actors, such as non-governmental organisations (NGOs) and community based organisations (CBOs), to work independently and to tackle issue-specific challenges confronted by the region have made these non-state actors natural partners for ASEAN to pursue its regional projects.

  • Wider civil society groups are now increasingly motivated to engage ASEAN not only because of the expansion of the areas of cooperation of the Association, but also because they see the potential of ASEAN in bringing about positive development in the region, including, inter alia, the promotion of human rights and sustained economic development.

Key recommendations:

  • Given its limited experience in engaging with civil society a well as the growing demand of these actors to be more involved in the decisions that affect the 550 million people of the region, ASEAN needs to work fast to institutionalise its engagement with these non-state groups.

  • ASEAN must realise that the people of the region and their ideas are extremely diverse. Consequently, it should develop the systematic mechanism to ensure the accommodation of concerns and aspirations of different layers of society throughout Southeast Asia.

  • Most importantly, however, there should be an increase understanding between ASEAN and civil society groups on how each would see the future the grouping and the region.

Download Full PDF

Peoples' SAARC 2008 Report

South Asian Peoples Assembly took place in Colombo, this site Sri Lanka, from 18 – 20 July, 2008, as a part of the process of People’s SAARC, to forge a vision for a People’s Union of South Asia. Over 1000 Sri Lankans and 400 delegates from other South Asian countries including India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Maldives, Nepal, Bhutan and Afghanistan participated.

 

The international delegates bore their own expenses to attend the Assembly. Prior to the South Asian People’s Assembly taking place in Colombo, People’s
SAARC had made its mark among many people in the South Asian region, at People’s SAARC 2007 in Kathmandu. Among those who participated at the
South Asian Peoples Assembly (SAPA) 2008 were women, labourers, peasants, urban and rural poor, cultural activists & organic intellectuals, students, youth, marginalised & excluded social groups and communities. All activists groups, social movements, progressive intelligentsia, cultural activists, writers, journalists and all those who subscribe to the ideas of the People’s SAARC were also galvanized for the assembly.

 

The workshops were organized by the participating organizations, on the basis of their interest and involvement. Following were the themes of the
workshops held: Burma: Caste Discrimination and Social Exclusion in South Asia, Climate Change and Ecological Justice, Conflict, Right to Protection and

Transitional Justice, Debt Cancellation, Democracy and governance/People’s Participation, Ensuring the rights of the Disabled, Towards a Disaster-Free Asia, Food Sovereignty, Agrarian Crisis and Pro-people’s alternatives, Labour Rights, Media and Right to Information, Men, Masculinity and Gender-based violence, Migration and Free Movement of Labour, Migration Internal and External, Nation States and Challenges, National Security Ideology Policies and Practices, Refugees/IDP’s, Regional Alternatives: People’s Vision, Religious Extremism and Communalism, SAARC Convention on Basic Health Needs, SAARC Convention on Trafficking; Housing and Urban Development, Women in Politics in South Asia, WTO, South Asian Trade and FTAs. A network of organizations and experts in the region undertook the responsibility of organizing and facilitating the workshops.The issues identified and recommendations made were recorded by Rapporteurs hired for the purpose.


Following the 29 workshops, representatives of People’s SAARC resolved to issue the Colombo Declaration as the People’s SAARC Declaration.   The Declaration, incorporating the major recommendations made by various country consultations and workshops of SAPA 2008, was compiled by the Regional Drafting Committee and presented to the plenary convened to finalize the Declaration in the morning of the third day at the New Town Hall. After the sharing of views and
experience of country representatives, the Draft Colombo Declaration of SAPA 2008 was presented to the delegates and adopted with changes proposed.

Having issued the Colombo Declaration, nearly 4,000 people mobilized for a mass rally in the main streets of Colombo, demonstrating their spirit of commitment and solidarity, reflecting their unity in diveristy. Flags, props, pandols and picket boards addressing the issues of democracy, justice, war, economic issues, etc. were displayed in the parade.  Creative banners and picket boards with anti-war slogans were carried in the procession, e.g., ‘no to violence’, stop the war’, ‘no killings’, ‘stop dissappearances’, ‘end domestic violence’, ‘yes to democracy’, etc. The rally was coordinated by Women and Media Collective



TABLE OF CONTENT
Acknowledgment
Executive Summery                                                                          
1.0 Introduction

1.1      Background
1.2      People’s SAARC 2007                                                            

1.3      Vision and objectives of People’s SAARC
2.0  Inauguration and Thematic Plenary Sessions
2.1      Inauguration                                                                  
2.2      Thematic Plenary Session 18/07/08 South Asia today and the new South Asia we

want

2.3      Thematic Plenary Session 19/07/08 Towards a New South Asia
2.4      Thematic Plenary Session and People’s SAARC Declaration – 20/07/08          
3.0  Outcomes of Thematic Sessions

3.1      National Security Ideology, Policies and Practices

3.2      Democracy and Governance/People’s participation

3.3      Refugees/IDP’s
3.4      SAARC Convention on Preventing and Combating Trafficking in Women and Children
for Prostitution                                                              
3.5      Regional Alternatives: People’s Vision                                        
3.6      Conflicts, Right to Protection and Transitional Justice                       
3.7      WTO, South Asian Trade and FTAs                                               

3.8      Food Sovereignty, Agrarian Crisis and Pro-People Alternatives

3.9      Debt Cancellation

3.10     Climate justice in South Asia

3.11     Caste Discrimination and social exclusion

3.12     Burma: Political and Socio-economic issues

3.13     Migration: Internal and External
3.14     Men, Masculinity and Gender-Based Violence (GBV)                              
3.15     Women and Political Participation                                          

3.16     Differently-abled people and their rights in South Asia

3.17     Migration and Free Movement of Labour

3.18     Religious extremism and communalism
3.19     SAARC Convention on basic health needs                                        
3.20     Urban Development and Housing                                                 
3.21     Labour Rights                                                               
3.22     Media and Right to Information                                               
4.0 Mass Rally and Closing Ceremony                                                          

5.0 People’s SAARC Declaration 2008: TOWARDS A PEOPLE’S UNION OF SOUTH ASIA


Download PDF