Mensaje de la IV Cumbre de los Pueblos a la Cumbre de Gobiernos de las Américas

Statement issued at the end of joint Africa Trade Network (ATN) Southern African Peoples Solidarity Network (SAPSN) Pre-Cancun Strategy Conference, cheapest in Johannesburg 14-17 August 2003, purchase Resisting the WTO

1. From 14-17 August 2003, we activists from across Africa, representing African civil society organisations, labour unions and other social movements, gathered in Johannesburg, South Africa to evaluate the current state of negotiations in the World Trade Organisation (WTO), and to strategise and make known our positions on the 5th WTO Ministerial Conference due to be held in Cancun, Mexico from 10-14 September 2003.

2. Our stand on WTO’s role: We re-affirm our recognition of the WTO as a key instrument of transnational capital in its push for corporate globalisation. We noted the many destructive effects of WTO agreements on the lives of working people and the poor, especially women, in Africa and throughout the world. We renewed our determination to continue resisting corporate globalisation, and the WTO itself until it is replaced by a fully democratic institution.

3. The context of Cancun Meeting: We noted that the forthcoming WTO Ministerial meeting is taking place against a background of a crisis of credibility of neo-liberal policies and global capitalism, that have been deepened by the Enron and other corporate scandals exposing the duplicity and venality of the bosses of transnational capital. At the same time, the world is faced with the aggressive militarism of the United States under a political leadership whose illegal attack on Iraq under false pretences has shown that law and morality are no bar to what it will do to advance the interests of American capital. Across Africa and in other developing countries neo-liberal economic policies are putting basic services, such as health and education, beyond the reach of ordinary people and deepening unemployment, poverty and social inequality. We, however, take heart from the growing strength in the organised expression of all those around the world opposed to militarism and corporate globalisation.

4. Conclusions on the current state of affairs in WTO: After our deliberations on the WTO Doha agenda and related issues, we concluded as follows:

a. The WTO has ignored the continued and growing opposition by popular movements throughout the world to its policies and methods, such as the illegitimate ways by which the Doha Agenda was imposed on developing countries in the 4th Ministerial of the WTO.

b. The failure of the WTO to meet agreed deadlines in various negotiations – notably Agriculture, TRIPS and Public Health, Special and Differential Treatment and the many Implementation Issues is primarily due to the refusal of the Quad (USA, EU, Japan and Canada) to accept the legitimate demands of developing countries.

c. These failures are merely an aspect of the double standards the Quad countries apply in international trade issues; marked by one set of rules for themselves and another that they impose on developing countries, exposing the WTO as a thoroughly undemocratic institution.

d. We particularly condemn both the EU and the US for their role in resisting the fulfilment of the deadlines and undertakings on Agriculture, and their refusal to honour the compromise consensus on TRIPS and Public Health.

e. On the Singapore or New Issues (i.e. Investment, Competition, Government Procurement and Trade Facilitation) we reiterate our total opposition to their inclusion in the WTO, or the initiation of discussions on modalities with a view to the launch of negotiations on these in Cancun. We stand by our demand that these issues should be removed from the WTO’s agenda altogether.

f. It is clear that, as Cancun approaches, the Quad are accelerating the deployment of old and new undemocratic practices and pressures both in and outside the WTO so as to force their will on developing countries. In order to limit such illegitimate and underhand practices by the powerful, we endorse the campaign for internal transparency and participation in the WTO recently launched by many NGOs.

g. We note the opposition to the launch of negotiations on these issues expressed by African countries, especially the declaration by African Trade Ministers at the end of their meeting in Mauritius in June 2003. We also note a new initiative taken at the WTO on 13 August by a group of African countries to demand that the official WTO text that goes to Cancun includes proposals for improving the decision-making process in the WTO; as well as repeating their opposition to the new issues. We call on these countries to stand by these positions, as a matter of democratic principle, and also urge other African and developing countries to join them.

5. Call to Action: In the light of the above we have agreed and call on other African civil society organisations, labour unions and other social movements who share our views to join us to:

a. Mobilise the broadest possible sectors of African civil society to express their opposition to the continuing destructive role of the WTO in the lives of working people and the poor, and upon our countries’ development aspirations and prospects;

b. Mobilise and sustain strong political pressure on our governmental representatives, in ways best suited to the specific conditions in our countries, before and during the Cancun ministerial meeting; actively holding our governments accountable for the positions they take in the Cancun Ministerial meeting, and expose any attempt to betray the best interests of the African peoples;

c. Pressure institutions of government, and our legislatures, and relevant public officials in our various countries so as to ensure the defence of our peoples’ interests in the forthcoming Cancun ministerial meeting. Especially important are i) blocking the launch of negotiations on the Singapore issues and ii) rejecting any attempt by the Quad to manipulate developing countries into accepting negotiations on the Singapore Issues by linking these to issues of concern to developing countries;

d. Pressure our respective governments to endorse the two proposals tabled at the WTO by 11 African countries on 13 August 2003;

e. Be alert to, and therefore resist, the inevitable attempts by representatives of Quad countries and other governments who, between now and Cancun, will be visiting our national capitals under various guises, and contacting groups within our own countries to bully African governments to take positions detrimental to the African people on the issues on the Cancun agenda;

f. Launch an information dissemination campaign in our various countries to publicise what is happening in and around the WTO in the run up to and during the Cancun Ministerial meeting;

g. Mobilise a strong team of African activists to give voice to African perspectives in the activities of civil society organisations who will gather from around the world in Cancun;

h. Affirm our links with our partners in organisations of civil society outside Africa, including in the global North, to pressure their governments (especially of the Quad) in the interest of working people and the poor throughout the world, and in the interest of our planet;

i. Work together across Africa on the WTO, before and during Cancun, under the umbrella of the Africa Trade Network (ATN) to ensure common focus and strength in unity.

We issue this statement, and our call, as part of our commitment to the global movement against neo-liberalism and corporate globalisation, and the struggle for the establishment of alternative systems and institutions for all of humanity and the world.

Another Africa is possible!
Another world is possible!

THE ECONOMIC MODEL THAT IS IN CRISIS NEEDS URGENT CHANGE
NO MORE EXCLUSION, sale and NEOLIBERALISM, health “FREE TRADE” OR MILITARIZATION

MESSAGE FROM THE IV PEOPLES SUMMIT
TO THE PRESIDENTS GATHERED AT THE
V SUMMIT OF THE AMERICAS
Trinidad Tobago, April 18, 2009

As representatives from a wide diversity of trade union, farmer, indigenous, women’s, youth, consumer advocacy, human rights, environmental and, in general, social and civil organizations that are part of hemispheric networks such as the Hemispheric Social Alliance and united here at the IV Peoples’ Summit of the Americas in Trinidad and Tobago, we wish to transmit this message from the people we represent:

1)    The Summit of the Americas continues to be marked by exclusion and lack of democracy. First, we consider the continued exclusion of Cuba from hemispheric governmental forums to be inexplicable and unacceptable. No reason suffices to justify this exclusion, especially when nearly all countries of the hemisphere – the only exception being the U.S. – have diplomatic relations with this sovereign nation. We demand the full inclusion of Cuba in all hemispheric spaces in which it chooses to participate and, above all, an end to the illegitimate and unjust blockade that the United States has imposed on the island for decades. [This Summit represents an opportunity for President Obama to demonstrate whether or not he intends to truly change hemispheric relations that have been based on impositions]. For the majority of countries in the hemisphere, we also condemn the near complete lack of channels for democratic participation and consultation on decisions that are made in the official Summit, decisions which will affect the destinies of our nations. This exclusion is one of the reasons for which we are here meeting in the Peoples’ Summit. In this same vein, we want to raise the most energetic protest to the official treatment of our summit, which has included every conceivable obstacle, direct hostility and arbitrary actions that we have had to overcome to make the Summit possible. This has included detentions, deportations, interrogations, mistreatment, spying, denying us the use of facilities and retracting guarantees.

2)    In the face of the grave crisis shaking the world and our hemisphere in particular, which illustrates the failure of the so-called “free trade” model it is evident that the official Summit’s declaration is far from representing the indispensible and urgent change that current reality and hemispheric relations demand. We note with alarm that this ‘project’ chooses to ignore the significance of a crisis with such historic dimensions.  It is as if by doing this, one could ‘disappear’ the crisis. The official declaration covers with rhetoric, ambiguity, and meaningless good intentions its lack of an urgently needed turnaround in hemispheric policies.   What is worse, it insists on proposing solutions that are merely more of the same old policies, more of the medicine that has created the worst illness – in other words, more neoliberalism and free trade.  The declaration further ratifies support for antiquated institutions that contributed to the current debacle. Even if by omission, giving forums such as the G-20, which are illegitimate and exclusive, the power to determine so-called solutions to the crisis—such as “prescriptions” to dedicate more resources to the already repudiated IMF—is to maintain a vicious circle. Canceling the illegitimate debts of countries in the South, rather than condemning them to further indebtedness, is a solution that could actually provide countries the resources needed for development.

3)    The neoliberal model arose as a “solution” to previous crises, but it has only lead to an even worse crisis. The solution must not be more of the same. We, the social movements and organizations from the hemisphere, affirm that another solution to the crisis is possible and necessary. The solutions will not be found by reactivating the same economic model or establishing an even more perverse one.   The solution will not be found in continuing to convert everything – including life itself – into mere commodities. Instead, the solution must be one that puts ‘Living Well’ for all people above the profits of a few. It is not a question of resolving a financial crisis, but rather overcoming all of the dimensions of the crisis – which include the food, climate and energy crises. This requires guaranteeing the people’s food sovereignty, putting an end to the pillaging of the South’s natural resources, paying the ecological debt that is owed to the South and developing sustainable energy strategies. If the governments gathered in the official Summit refuse to explicitly address the urgent changes needed, they thereby renounce their right to receive support from their people.  We salute the fact that some presidents from the South are raising with dignity in the official event, alternatives which coincide with those which the people of the Americas are raising.

4)    We demand that in the short term, the working people of the hemisphere must not be made to bear the brunt of the crisis, which is what has been happening so far. Instead of dedicating billions of dollars to rescuing financial speculators and large corporations, that profited before the crisis, provoked the crisis, and then returned to the same behavior, we demand that the people be rescued. This is one way to strengthen our national economies and promote recovery directed towards real development that inverts the order of the beneficiaries, giving priority to the people.

5)    We also demand that the crisis not be used as a pretext to attack or reduce social rights that have been won. Rights do not have costs. On the contrary, the best solution to the crisis is to expand rights, making decent work, democratic freedoms, and human, economic, social and cultural rights a reality. To start with, the full rights of indigenous peoples must finally be recognized as well as womens’ rights.

6)    A just and sustainable solution to the crisis necessitates a complete reorganizing of hemispheric relations and a burial of the so-called “free trade” model. No more FTAs. It is necessary to replace the FTAs that have been proliferating throughout the region with a new model of agreements between nations based on equity, complementary arrangements, mutual benefit, cooperation and just trade. This model must protect the right to development, the right of nations to protect their goods, strategic resources and sovereignty. Processes of regional integration that are developed on these bases are also a strong lever for resolving the crisis and promoting alternative solutions. We especially call on the governments in countries of the South that have advanced these types of processes to deepen them, to not lose their autonomy and to not stray from this path. Perverse and hegemonic projects such as the FTAA should be buried forever. We ask governments in the region, namely the new United States administration headed by President Obama, to make explicit their position on the future of initiatives such as the one developed in the entrails of the Bush administration – Pathways to Prosperity in the Americas – that not only aims to revive the corpse of the FTAA, but also to subordinate the rest of the hemisphere to Washington’s policies and security forces. We hereby affirm that we, the people of the Americas, will not allow this to happen.

7)    Cooperation between nations must not, in any circumstance, include the militarization of our societies. The security policies of each country must not be subordinated to the interests of any power, nor should human rights and individual guarantees be restricted. We demand the closure of all military bases and the withdrawal of all troops and the U.S. IV Fleet from the waters and territories of Latin America and the Caribbean.  The future for our America demands an end, once and for all, to the colonial domination of Puerto Rico and all forms of colonialism in the Caribbean.

Presidents: listening to your people and acting in favor of their interests–not the profits of a small few—is the only true, lasting and sustainable solution to end the crisis and build another, more just America.

HEMISPHERIC SOCIAL ALLIANCE / IV PEOPLE’S SUMMIT OF THE AMERICAS

 


Es urgente cambiar las relaciones hemisfericas y el modelo economico en crisis:: NO MÁS EXCLUSIÓN, NEOLIBERALISMO, LIBRE COMERCIO Y MILITARIZACIÓN

MENSAJE DE LA IV CUMBRE DE LOS PUEBLOS A LA CUMBRE DE GOBIERNOS DE AMÉRICA

Trinidad y Tobago, 18 de abril del 2009

Las y los representantes de una gran diversidad de organizaciones sindicales, campesinas, indígenas, de mujeres, de jóvenes, de pobladores, de derechos humanos, del medio ambiente, en general de organizaciones sociales y civiles que integramos redes hemisféricas como la Alianza Social Continental y que nos encontramos reunidos en la IV Cumbre de los Pueblos de América también aquí, en Trinidad y Tobago, les hacemos llegar el mensaje de los pueblos que representamos:

1) La Cumbre de las Américas continúa estando marcada por la exclusión y la falta de democracia. En primer lugar, consideramos inexplicable e inaceptable que se continúe excluyendo a Cuba de los foros hemisféricos gubernamentales; no existe razón alguna que lo justifique, mucho menos cuando la totalidad de los países del continente, con la ya única excepción de EU, mantienen relaciones normales con esa nación soberana. Exigimos la inclusión plena de Cuba en todo espacio hemisférico en el que desee participar y, sobre todo, el fin del ilegitimo e injusto bloqueo impuesto por Estados Unidos contra la isla ya durante décadas. También condenamos la falta casi total en la mayoría de los países del hemisferio de vías de participación y consulta social democrática sobre las decisiones que se toman en la cumbre oficial y que afectan los destinos de nuestras naciones, exclusión que es una de las razones por las que nos encontramos aquí en la Cumbre de los Pueblos. Queremos en este sentido levantar la más enérgica protesta por todos los obstáculos, hostigamiento y arbitrariedades que ha debido enfrentar nuestra cumbre para su realización, entre ellas detenciones, deportaciones, interrogatorios, maltratos, vigilancia, falta de facilidades y garantías.

2) Ante la grave crisis que azota al mundo y en particular a nuestro hemisferio, que expresa también el fracaso del modelo del mal llamado “libre comercio”, resulta más evidente que el proyecto de declaración de la cumbre oficial está muy lejos de representar el indispensable y urgente cambio que la realidad actual y las relaciones hemisféricas reclaman. Notamos con alarma que tal proyecto opta por ignorar el significado de una crisis de dimensiones históricas, como si de esta manera pudiera desaparecerla. La declaración oficial cubre de retórica, de ambigüedad, de supuestas buenas intenciones sociales sin sustento concreto, la falta de un giro indispensable en la política hemisférica y, peor aún, de pasada insiste en dar como soluciones más de lo mismo, más de la medicina que se convirtió a su vez en la peor enfermedad, es decir, más neoliberalismo y libre comercio, además de ratificar el apoyo a instituciones anacrónicas que contribuyeron a la debacle actual. Así sea por omisión, dejar a espacios como el G-20, de por sí ilegitimo y excluyente, la determinación de una supuesta salida a la crisis, con “recetas” como el dar más recursos a través del repudiado FMI, es continuar en un circulo vicioso. Anular las deudas ilegitimas de los países del Sur, en lugar de volverlos a endeudar, es una salida que sí podría poner a disposición de los países recursos para el desarrollo.

3) De crisis anteriores surgió como “salida” el modelo neoliberal, que sólo condujo a una peor crisis. La salida de ésta no puede ser más de lo mismo. Los movimientos y organizaciones sociales del continente decimos que otra salida a la crisis es posible y necesaria, no aquella que reactive el mismo modelo económico o incluso uno aún mas perverso; no aquella que continúe mercantilizando todo, incluida la vida, sino aquella que posibilite avanzar en colocar el Buen Vivir para todos por encima de las ganancias de algunos. No se trata solo de resolver una crisis financiera, sino de superarla en todas sus dimensiones, que incluyen también las crisis alimentarias, climática y energética, garantizando la soberanía alimentaria de los pueblos, terminar con el saqueo de los recursos naturales del Sur y pagar la deuda ecológica que se tiene con ellos, y desarrollar estrategias energéticas sustentables. Si los gobiernos reunidos en la Cumbre oficial renuncian a abordar explícitamente los cambios urgentes que se necesitan, renuncian también a cualquier apoyo de sus pueblos. Saludamos desde ahora la posibilidad de que algunos presidentes del Sur manifiesten con dignidad en el evento oficial alternativas coincidentes con las levantadas por los pueblos de América.

4) Exigimos que en lo inmediato la crisis no signifique como siempre el cargar sus costos sobre los hombros del pueblo trabajador del continente, como ya se está haciendo. Exigimos que, en lugar de dedicar miles de millones de dólares al rescate de los especuladores financieros y las grandes corporaciones que se beneficiaron antes y provocaron la crisis, para luego volver a lo mismo, se rescate a los pueblos, porque además de esa manera puede potenciarse las economías nacionales y propiciar una recuperación dirigida a un desarrollo verdadero que invierta el orden de los beneficiarios, dando prioridad a los seres humanos.

5) Demandamos igualmente que la crisis no se convierta en un pretexto para atacar o reducir los derechos sociales conquistados. Los derechos no cuestan. Por el contrario, la mejor salida a la crisis es ampliar los derechos, hacer realidad el Trabajo Decente, las libertades democráticas, los Derechos Humanos, Económicos, Sociales y Culturales, comenzando por reconocer por fin el respeto pleno de los derechos colectivos de los pueblos originarios, y los derechos de más de la mitad de la humanidad, los de las mujeres.

6) Una salida justa y sustentable a la crisis pasa necesariamente por replantear en su totalidad las relaciones hemisféricas y enterrar el modelo del mal llamado libre comercio. No más TLC’S. Es necesario remplazar los TLC’S que han venido proliferando por un nuevo modelo de acuerdos entre naciones basado en la equidad, la complementariedad, el beneficio reciproco, la cooperación y el comercio justo, y que preserve el derecho al desarrollo, el derecho de las naciones a proteger sus bienes y recursos estratégicos y su soberanía. Procesos de integración regionales que se desarrollen sobre estas bases son también una palanca poderosa para enfrentar la crisis y promover otra salida; llamamos en particular a los gobiernos de países del Sur que han avanzado en procesos de esta naturaleza a profundizarlos, a no perder autonomía y a no apartarse de este camino. Proyectos perversos y hegemonistas como el ALCA deben ser enterrados para siempre. Emplazamos a los gobiernos de la región, y en particular a la nueva administración de Estados Unidos encabezada por el presidente Obama a que hagan explícita su postura sobre el futuro de iniciativas como la prohijada en los estertores de la administración Bush llamada Caminos para la Prosperidad en las Américas, que no solo pretende revivir el cadáver del ALCA sino extender la subordinación del continente a las políticas y fuerzas de seguridad de Washington. Desde ya decimos que los pueblos de América no lo permitiremos.

7) La cooperación entre las naciones no puede incluir la militarización de nuestras sociedades con pretexto alguno, ni la subordinación de las políticas de seguridad de cada país a los intereses de potencia alguna, o mucho menos la restricción de los derechos humanos y las garantías individuales. Exigimos el cierre de todas las bases militares, la salida de las tropas y la retirada de la IV Flota de Estados Unidos de aguas y territorios de América Latina y el Caribe. Cualquier futuro justo para las Américas implica acabar con toda forma de colonialismo en el Caribe y el continente, empezando por terminar con la dominación colonial sobre Puerto Rico.

Sras. y Sres presidentes: escuchar a sus pueblos y actuar en función de sus intereses y no de las ganancias de unos cuantos es la única salida real a la crisis, duradera, sustentable y hacia otra América más justa.

ALIANZA SOCIAL CONTINENTAL / IV CUMBRE DE LOS PUEBLOS DE AMÉRICA

Message from the IV People's Summit to the Presidents gathered at the V Summit of the Americas

THE ECONOMIC MODEL THAT IS IN CRISIS NEEDS URGENT CHANGE
NO MORE EXCLUSION, NEOLIBERALISM, sales “FREE TRADE” OR MILITARIZATION

MESSAGE FROM THE IV PEOPLES SUMMIT
TO THE PRESIDENTS GATHERED AT THE
V SUMMIT OF THE AMERICAS
Trinidad Tobago, April 18, 2009

As representatives from a wide diversity of trade union, farmer, indigenous, women’s, youth, consumer advocacy, human rights, environmental and, in general, social and civil organizations that are part of hemispheric networks such as the Hemispheric Social Alliance and united here at the IV Peoples’ Summit of the Americas in Trinidad and Tobago, we wish to transmit this message from the people we represent:

1)    The Summit of the Americas continues to be marked by exclusion and lack of democracy. First, we consider the continued exclusion of Cuba from hemispheric governmental forums to be inexplicable and unacceptable. No reason suffices to justify this exclusion, especially when nearly all countries of the hemisphere – the only exception being the U.S. – have diplomatic relations with this sovereign nation. We demand the full inclusion of Cuba in all hemispheric spaces in which it chooses to participate and, above all, an end to the illegitimate and unjust blockade that the United States has imposed on the island for decades. [This Summit represents an opportunity for President Obama to demonstrate whether or not he intends to truly change hemispheric relations that have been based on impositions]. For the majority of countries in the hemisphere, we also condemn the near complete lack of channels for democratic participation and consultation on decisions that are made in the official Summit, decisions which will affect the destinies of our nations. This exclusion is one of the reasons for which we are here meeting in the Peoples’ Summit. In this same vein, we want to raise the most energetic protest to the official treatment of our summit, which has included every conceivable obstacle, direct hostility and arbitrary actions that we have had to overcome to make the Summit possible. This has included detentions, deportations, interrogations, mistreatment, spying, denying us the use of facilities and retracting guarantees.

2)    In the face of the grave crisis shaking the world and our hemisphere in particular, which illustrates the failure of the so-called “free trade” model it is evident that the official Summit’s declaration is far from representing the indispensible and urgent change that current reality and hemispheric relations demand. We note with alarm that this ‘project’ chooses to ignore the significance of a crisis with such historic dimensions.  It is as if by doing this, one could ‘disappear’ the crisis. The official declaration covers with rhetoric, ambiguity, and meaningless good intentions its lack of an urgently needed turnaround in hemispheric policies.   What is worse, it insists on proposing solutions that are merely more of the same old policies, more of the medicine that has created the worst illness – in other words, more neoliberalism and free trade.  The declaration further ratifies support for antiquated institutions that contributed to the current debacle. Even if by omission, giving forums such as the G-20, which are illegitimate and exclusive, the power to determine so-called solutions to the crisis—such as “prescriptions” to dedicate more resources to the already repudiated IMF—is to maintain a vicious circle. Canceling the illegitimate debts of countries in the South, rather than condemning them to further indebtedness, is a solution that could actually provide countries the resources needed for development.

3)    The neoliberal model arose as a “solution” to previous crises, but it has only lead to an even worse crisis. The solution must not be more of the same. We, the social movements and organizations from the hemisphere, affirm that another solution to the crisis is possible and necessary. The solutions will not be found by reactivating the same economic model or establishing an even more perverse one.   The solution will not be found in continuing to convert everything – including life itself – into mere commodities. Instead, the solution must be one that puts ‘Living Well’ for all people above the profits of a few. It is not a question of resolving a financial crisis, but rather overcoming all of the dimensions of the crisis – which include the food, climate and energy crises. This requires guaranteeing the people’s food sovereignty, putting an end to the pillaging of the South’s natural resources, paying the ecological debt that is owed to the South and developing sustainable energy strategies. If the governments gathered in the official Summit refuse to explicitly address the urgent changes needed, they thereby renounce their right to receive support from their people.  We salute the fact that some presidents from the South are raising with dignity in the official event, alternatives which coincide with those which the people of the Americas are raising.

4)    We demand that in the short term, the working people of the hemisphere must not be made to bear the brunt of the crisis, which is what has been happening so far. Instead of dedicating billions of dollars to rescuing financial speculators and large corporations, that profited before the crisis, provoked the crisis, and then returned to the same behavior, we demand that the people be rescued. This is one way to strengthen our national economies and promote recovery directed towards real development that inverts the order of the beneficiaries, giving priority to the people.

5)    We also demand that the crisis not be used as a pretext to attack or reduce social rights that have been won. Rights do not have costs. On the contrary, the best solution to the crisis is to expand rights, making decent work, democratic freedoms, and human, economic, social and cultural rights a reality. To start with, the full rights of indigenous peoples must finally be recognized as well as womens’ rights.

6)    A just and sustainable solution to the crisis necessitates a complete reorganizing of hemispheric relations and a burial of the so-called “free trade” model. No more FTAs. It is necessary to replace the FTAs that have been proliferating throughout the region with a new model of agreements between nations based on equity, complementary arrangements, mutual benefit, cooperation and just trade. This model must protect the right to development, the right of nations to protect their goods, strategic resources and sovereignty. Processes of regional integration that are developed on these bases are also a strong lever for resolving the crisis and promoting alternative solutions. We especially call on the governments in countries of the South that have advanced these types of processes to deepen them, to not lose their autonomy and to not stray from this path. Perverse and hegemonic projects such as the FTAA should be buried forever. We ask governments in the region, namely the new United States administration headed by President Obama, to make explicit their position on the future of initiatives such as the one developed in the entrails of the Bush administration – Pathways to Prosperity in the Americas – that not only aims to revive the corpse of the FTAA, but also to subordinate the rest of the hemisphere to Washington’s policies and security forces. We hereby affirm that we, the people of the Americas, will not allow this to happen.

7)    Cooperation between nations must not, in any circumstance, include the militarization of our societies. The security policies of each country must not be subordinated to the interests of any power, nor should human rights and individual guarantees be restricted. We demand the closure of all military bases and the withdrawal of all troops and the U.S. IV Fleet from the waters and territories of Latin America and the Caribbean.  The future for our America demands an end, once and for all, to the colonial domination of Puerto Rico and all forms of colonialism in the Caribbean.

Presidents: listening to your people and acting in favor of their interests–not the profits of a small few—is the only true, lasting and sustainable solution to end the crisis and build another, more just America.

HEMISPHERIC SOCIAL ALLIANCE / IV PEOPLE’S SUMMIT OF THE AMERICAS

 


THE ECONOMIC MODEL THAT IS IN CRISIS NEEDS URGENT CHANGE
NO MORE EXCLUSION, seek NEOLIBERALISM, sale “FREE TRADE” OR MILITARIZATION

MESSAGE FROM THE IV PEOPLES SUMMIT
TO THE PRESIDENTS GATHERED AT THE
V SUMMIT OF THE AMERICAS
Trinidad Tobago, April 18, 2009

As representatives from a wide diversity of trade union, farmer, indigenous, women’s, youth, consumer advocacy, human rights, environmental and, in general, social and civil organizations that are part of hemispheric networks such as the Hemispheric Social Alliance and united here at the IV Peoples’ Summit of the Americas in Trinidad and Tobago, we wish to transmit this message from the people we represent:

1)    The Summit of the Americas continues to be marked by exclusion and lack of democracy. First, we consider the continued exclusion of Cuba from hemispheric governmental forums to be inexplicable and unacceptable. No reason suffices to justify this exclusion, especially when nearly all countries of the hemisphere – the only exception being the U.S. – have diplomatic relations with this sovereign nation. We demand the full inclusion of Cuba in all hemispheric spaces in which it chooses to participate and, above all, an end to the illegitimate and unjust blockade that the United States has imposed on the island for decades. [This Summit represents an opportunity for President Obama to demonstrate whether or not he intends to truly change hemispheric relations that have been based on impositions]. For the majority of countries in the hemisphere, we also condemn the near complete lack of channels for democratic participation and consultation on decisions that are made in the official Summit, decisions which will affect the destinies of our nations. This exclusion is one of the reasons for which we are here meeting in the Peoples’ Summit. In this same vein, we want to raise the most energetic protest to the official treatment of our summit, which has included every conceivable obstacle, direct hostility and arbitrary actions that we have had to overcome to make the Summit possible. This has included detentions, deportations, interrogations, mistreatment, spying, denying us the use of facilities and retracting guarantees.

2)    In the face of the grave crisis shaking the world and our hemisphere in particular, which illustrates the failure of the so-called “free trade” model it is evident that the official Summit’s declaration is far from representing the indispensible and urgent change that current reality and hemispheric relations demand. We note with alarm that this ‘project’ chooses to ignore the significance of a crisis with such historic dimensions.  It is as if by doing this, one could ‘disappear’ the crisis. The official declaration covers with rhetoric, ambiguity, and meaningless good intentions its lack of an urgently needed turnaround in hemispheric policies.   What is worse, it insists on proposing solutions that are merely more of the same old policies, more of the medicine that has created the worst illness – in other words, more neoliberalism and free trade.  The declaration further ratifies support for antiquated institutions that contributed to the current debacle. Even if by omission, giving forums such as the G-20, which are illegitimate and exclusive, the power to determine so-called solutions to the crisis—such as “prescriptions” to dedicate more resources to the already repudiated IMF—is to maintain a vicious circle. Canceling the illegitimate debts of countries in the South, rather than condemning them to further indebtedness, is a solution that could actually provide countries the resources needed for development.

3)    The neoliberal model arose as a “solution” to previous crises, but it has only lead to an even worse crisis. The solution must not be more of the same. We, the social movements and organizations from the hemisphere, affirm that another solution to the crisis is possible and necessary. The solutions will not be found by reactivating the same economic model or establishing an even more perverse one.   The solution will not be found in continuing to convert everything – including life itself – into mere commodities. Instead, the solution must be one that puts ‘Living Well’ for all people above the profits of a few. It is not a question of resolving a financial crisis, but rather overcoming all of the dimensions of the crisis – which include the food, climate and energy crises. This requires guaranteeing the people’s food sovereignty, putting an end to the pillaging of the South’s natural resources, paying the ecological debt that is owed to the South and developing sustainable energy strategies. If the governments gathered in the official Summit refuse to explicitly address the urgent changes needed, they thereby renounce their right to receive support from their people.  We salute the fact that some presidents from the South are raising with dignity in the official event, alternatives which coincide with those which the people of the Americas are raising.

4)    We demand that in the short term, the working people of the hemisphere must not be made to bear the brunt of the crisis, which is what has been happening so far. Instead of dedicating billions of dollars to rescuing financial speculators and large corporations, that profited before the crisis, provoked the crisis, and then returned to the same behavior, we demand that the people be rescued. This is one way to strengthen our national economies and promote recovery directed towards real development that inverts the order of the beneficiaries, giving priority to the people.

5)    We also demand that the crisis not be used as a pretext to attack or reduce social rights that have been won. Rights do not have costs. On the contrary, the best solution to the crisis is to expand rights, making decent work, democratic freedoms, and human, economic, social and cultural rights a reality. To start with, the full rights of indigenous peoples must finally be recognized as well as womens’ rights.

6)    A just and sustainable solution to the crisis necessitates a complete reorganizing of hemispheric relations and a burial of the so-called “free trade” model. No more FTAs. It is necessary to replace the FTAs that have been proliferating throughout the region with a new model of agreements between nations based on equity, complementary arrangements, mutual benefit, cooperation and just trade. This model must protect the right to development, the right of nations to protect their goods, strategic resources and sovereignty. Processes of regional integration that are developed on these bases are also a strong lever for resolving the crisis and promoting alternative solutions. We especially call on the governments in countries of the South that have advanced these types of processes to deepen them, to not lose their autonomy and to not stray from this path. Perverse and hegemonic projects such as the FTAA should be buried forever. We ask governments in the region, namely the new United States administration headed by President Obama, to make explicit their position on the future of initiatives such as the one developed in the entrails of the Bush administration – Pathways to Prosperity in the Americas – that not only aims to revive the corpse of the FTAA, but also to subordinate the rest of the hemisphere to Washington’s policies and security forces. We hereby affirm that we, the people of the Americas, will not allow this to happen.

7)    Cooperation between nations must not, in any circumstance, include the militarization of our societies. The security policies of each country must not be subordinated to the interests of any power, nor should human rights and individual guarantees be restricted. We demand the closure of all military bases and the withdrawal of all troops and the U.S. IV Fleet from the waters and territories of Latin America and the Caribbean.  The future for our America demands an end, once and for all, to the colonial domination of Puerto Rico and all forms of colonialism in the Caribbean.

Presidents: listening to your people and acting in favor of their interests–not the profits of a small few—is the only true, lasting and sustainable solution to end the crisis and build another, more just America.

HEMISPHERIC SOCIAL ALLIANCE / IV PEOPLE’S SUMMIT OF THE AMERICAS

 


  1. The Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa (COMESA) is holding its Policy Organs meetings and the 13th Summit of Heads of State and Government in the resort town of Victoria Falls, help Zimbabwe from the 28th May to 8th June 2009 under the theme Consolidating Regional Economic Integration through Value Addition, Trade and Food Security.2.
  2. From the 2nd – 4th June 2009 the Council of Ministers will be meeting to deliberate on a number of issues affecting the COMESA region, including the current negotiations with the European Union (officially known as the European Community) on concluding Economic Partnership Agreements (EPAs).

We recall that:

3.         The Eastern and Southern Africa Group (ESA) and the European Community (EC) senior officials met in Brussels on 28 April 2009 under the co-chairmanship of H.E Ambassadors S Gunessee and N. Wahab on ESA side as well as P. Thompson, Director, DG Trade on EC side. In their conclusions on the Interim EPAs initialled towards the end of 2007, the officials noted that:

On signature of interim EPA, EC confirmed that provided that an agreement is reached on translation, the interim Economic Partnership Agreement (EPA) could be ready for signature around mid-May 2009. ESA confirmed its decision to host the signature in Mauritius and informed that the issue of the date of signature will be considered at the next ESA Council scheduled for the 4th June 2009 in Victoria Falls back to back with COMESA Summit with a view to agreeing on a mutually convenient date as well as its arrangement for the signing ceremony.

We are concerned that:

4.         The ESA countries (as represented by their officials) have confirmed their decision to host the signature of the interim EPAs and that they are already considering discussing the dates of such a ceremony when the outstanding and contentious issues in the interim EPAs have not been addressed and resolved.

5.         The contentious issues arising from the interim EPAs include, inter alia, involve far reaching commitments on tariffs reductions the freezing of export taxes that ESA countries have been using, the requirement that ESA countries should not increase duties on products from the EU beyond what they have been applying (standstill clause), liberalising “substantially all trade”, bilateral safeguards (for infant industry protection)-all these issues are still under negotiations. We take the precautionary principle and reiterate that nothing is agreed until everything is agreed.

6.         The EC has insisted that the first priority should be the signature of the interim EPA. The EU main interest is in market access which they may achieve in interim EPAs. This limits the scope of focussing on the real issues of interest to ESA countries that need attention before the signature. ESA countries should resist the pressure of rushing to sign the interim EPA when it is clear they will be mortgaging national and public assets to the EC.

We urge ESA countries to recognise that:

7.         Africa remains a marginal player in world trade (6% in 1980 and 3% in 2008) since the continent’s trade structure still lacks diversity in terms of production and exports. As such, negotiations to further liberalise (after Structural Adjustment Programmes) their economies will be a futile and possible suicidal exercise until certain pre-requisites are met and instituted within their economies. The emphasis on trade liberalisation alone as a means to stimulating growth and development is misplaced.

8.         The pre-requisites (as informed by the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development) centre on addressing the structural constraints in ESA countries including

  • increased public investment in research and development, rural infrastructure — including roads — and health and education
  • overhauling the basic productive infrastructure to make production more reliable. Power generation, water supply and telecommunications are three key areas that need special attention. In addition, building a competitive manufacturing sector will require the strengthening of the support infrastructure needed for exporting, including roads, railways and port facilities.
  • encouraging cross-border trade infrastructure. It is unlikely that the manufacturing sector in Africa will grow to a competitive level if it is limited to small domestic markets. The smallness of individual African markets and the difficulty for most firms to access the markets of industrialized countries suggest that in the short and medium term, the expansion of intra-African trade could offer the opportunity to widen markets outside national boundaries. In so doing, some key infrastructure projects could be executed at the regional level, taking into account regional economic complementarities.
  • development of domestic policy regulatory frameworks to regulate the movement of goods and services in and outside ESA countries. This includes adopting policies that ensure Special and Differential Treatment including the Special Safeguard Mechanism in agriculture, use of tariffs, among other things

9.         Trade liberalisation has so far discouraged intra-regional trade in Africa as the reduction of tariffs, which reduce the preference margins given to other African countries, reduce the incentives for intraregional trade.

10.       The Cotonou Agreement (that forms the legal basis of negotiating EPAs), recognise that reciprocal agreements (EPAs) with the EC had to foster regional integration and to be based on current integration efforts. However, as the interim agreements have shown, this commitment has been negated as the current configuration of the EPA encompasses a major risk of undermining ongoing regional integration processes.

11.       Most countries in the region continue to suffer from food shortages and food insecurity. As a result they have been importing more food and energy (including inflation which was at 10.7% in 2008 up from 6.4% in 2007, the continental average excluding Zimbabwe) into the region. Trade liberalisation will exacerbate the problems of food insecurity.

12.       The ESA political leadership have an obligation towards their people and should ensure that whatever decisions they take should not put the lives of people in danger. This means all those targets of reducing poverty, reducing child and maternal mortality and increasing access to education for the people should be used as tools for making informed decisions especially with regards to trade negotiations.

13.       Given the above, liberalising ESA economies under the EPAs as already indicated by the interim EPAs will further weaken the countries’ ability to develop and respond to the challenges posed by liberalisation and Limit Africa to the production and export of low value goods (the so-called “poor-country” goods) based on the so-called comparative advantage argument. This is tantamount to condemning the continent and locking it into poverty.

We therefore recommend that:

14.       A moratorium be put in place on EPAs negotiations until the ESA countries have put in place adequate institutional mechanisms to deal with trade liberalisation as recommended by the African Union, UNCTAD, the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa among others.

15.       ESA countries focus on developing its regional market, steps that have already been taken by consolidating the gains of the COMESA FTA, the Customs Union and the move to form a single FTA with the East African Community (EAC) and the Southern African Development Community (SADC)

16.       In light of the high food and energy prices, the climate crisis and the current global recession triggered by the financial crisis, ESA countries MUST reverse most of the commitments they have agreed under the IMF/World Bank SAP policies, the World Trade Organisation and the so-called interim Economic Partnership Agreements. This will allow the countries to implement favourable home grown policies that are in tandem with their development priorities.

A GLOBAL CALL FOR ACTION TO STOP EPAs

From the 27-30 March, ampoule 2006 we the undermentioned organisations involved in the Stop–EPA campaign, salve from Africa and Europe met in Harare, clinic Zimbabwe, at meeting organised the umbrella of the Africa Trade Network. We deliberated on the developments since the campaign was adopted and discussed strategies for the coming period. 

It has been two years since civil society organisations, social movements, and mass-membership organisations across Africa, the Caribbean, the Pacific and Europe adopted the campaign to STOP the Economic Partnership Agreements (EPAs) as currently designed and being negotiated between the European Union and ACP groups of countries. 

The campaign was adopted on the grounds that in their current form, the EPAs are essentially free-trade agreements between unequal parties: Europe, with its overwhelming economic and political power, and the fragile and dependent economies of the ACP countries. In addition, the process of the negotiations is imbalanced and rushed, allowing the EU to impose its interests and agenda, and dictate the momentum of the negotiations to suit its own needs and purposes. 

Two years since the adoption of the campaign, there is wide-spread recognition among governments, inter-governmental institutions, parliamentarians, civil society actors and a diverse range of social constituencies across the ACP, Europe and the rest of the world of the dangers posed by the EPAs to the economies and peoples of the ACP countries. This has yet not led to fundamental changes in the nature of the EPAs and the process of negotiations. 

Member governments of the European Union, which have publicly adopted policy positions in direct contradiction to the negotiating mandate of the EC, have not followed up with action to change that mandate. Strong unofficial reservations expressed by other member-governments continue to remain as unofficial reservations. 

For its part, the European Commission has constructed new rhetoric to sell the EPAs and justify continuation of its mandate. It has encouraged false hopes of increase in European development assistance to ACP countries, and used different forms of pressure, including aid conditionality, to continue to override the reluctance of ACP groups to yield to its interests.

On the part of governments in the ACP countries, individual and collective public positions, which have effectively repudiated the EPAs in their current forms are not translated into policy and negotiating positions. Dependency on aid, and concern for the maintenance of preferences seem to have disproportionately influenced governments into accepting the ECs terms and parameters of negotiations. In some instances, secretariats of the regional groups and machineries whose role it is to facilitate the negotiations on behalf of the ACP groupings have abandoned the policy directions of national governments which make up the region, and have tended to promote the perspectives of the EC.

An immediate outcome of these developments is the negative effect of the EPA negotiations on autonomous ACP regional integration initiatives. On-going regional integration initiatives and processes have been hijacked and diverted, and many historical and political African regional configurations have been split.

Added to the above situation, the current deadlock in the WTO negotiations has lead to increasing pressure on bilateral and regional free trade negotiations. 

All these developments affirm validity of the positions and concerns of the STOP EPA campaign, and make its demands even more urgent.

We are inspired by the global mobilisation that the campaign has generated and welcome the increasing numbers of diverse groups of stakeholders and networks of actors who have joined or otherwise taken up the cause of the campaign. 

Although civil society engagement with the EPA negotiations is increasing, we are still very much concerned by the lack of involvement of the majority of affected citizens, workers and farmers in ACP countries and the lack of openness and transparency in the negotiations.

We reaffirm the positions and demands of the STOP EPA campaign. We reject the EPAs in their current form. They will:

•    expand Europe’s access to ACP markets for its goods, services, and investments; expose ACP producers to unfair European competition in domestic and regional markets, and increase the domination and concentration of European firms, goods and services;
•    thereby lead to deeper unemployment, loss of livelihoods, food insecurity and social and gender inequity and inequality as well as undermine human and social rights; 
•    endanger the ongoing but fragile processes of regional integration among the ACP countries; and deepen – and prolong – the socio-economic decline and political fragility that characterises most ACP countries. 

We re-affirm our demand for an overhaul and review of the EU’s neo-liberal external trade policy, particularly with respect to developing countries, and demanded that EU-ACP trade cooperation should be founded on an approach that:
•    is based on a principle of non-reciprocity, as instituted in Generalised System of Preferences and special and differential treatment in the WTO;
•    protects ACP producers domestic and regional markets; 
•    reverses the pressure for trade and investment liberalisation; and 
•    allows the necessary policy space and supports ACP countries to pursue their own development strategies.     

In further pursuit of the goals and demands of the campaign we make the following demands.

Governments of the ACP countries
The primary responsibility for promoting the interests and needs of the people in ACP countries and of defending them against the ravages of free trade agreements with the EU lies with the governments in the ACP countries, both in their individual and collective capacities, acting at national, regional and ACP-wide levels. In this regard we call upon ACP governments:

•    to heed to the call of their citizens over the EPAs and ensure that hopes over increased aid, and concerns about the future of preferences does not lead to sacrificing the economic and developmental future of their people;
•    to live up to their policy statements and positions on the EPAs and to translate these into positions in the processes of engagement over the EPA;
•    to reassert their policy authority on the negotiations over the regional secretariats, and to ensure that the latter do not undermine stated policy positions in the negotiations;

European Union – Member States

The European Union has a responsibility to live up to its stated developmental objectives. We demand that member-governments of the European Union should 
•    assert their authority over the EC on issues concerning ACP-EU co-operation for the promotion of sustainable development in the ACP countries;
•    change the EC’s negotiating mandate in relation to the EPA negotiations; and to this end;
•    ensure that the EPA review mandated for this year is comprehensive, all-inclusive, transparent, and substantive and places sustainable development at the centre.

Finally we call upon civil society organisations, social movements, and mass-membership organisations across the ACP and Europe to join the campaign, and engage with their governments on the issues of ACP development in relation to the EU.

Harare, Thursday, 30 March 2006

1.    Mwelekeo wa NGO (MWENGO), Zimbabwe
2.    Third World Network-Africa, Ghana
3.    ACDIC, Cameroon
4.    Alternative Information Development Centre
5.    AIPAD TRUST, Zimbabwe
6.    Alternatives to Neo-liberalism in Southern Africa (ANSA)
7.    Civil Society Trade Network of Zambia
8.    CECIDE, Guinea
9.    Christian Relief and Development Association (CRDA), Ethiopia
10.    Economic Justice Network, South Africa
11.    ENDA, Senegal
12.    GENTA, South Africa
13.    GRAPAD, Benin
14.    InterAfrica Group, Ethiopia
15.    Labour and Economic Development Research Institute (LEDRIZ), Zimbabwe
16.    Malawi Economic Justice And Network 
17.    Southern African People’s Solidarity Network (SAPSN)
18.    SEATINI, Zimbabwe
19.    TradesCentre, Zimbabwe
20.    Zimbabwe Coalition on Debt and Development (ZIMCODD), Zimbabwe
21.    Action Aid
22.    ACORD
23.    Both Ends
24.    ChristianAid
25.    ICCO
26.    KASA/WERKSTATT OKONOMIE
27.    One World Action (VIA Project)
28.    Oxfam International
29.    Traidcraft
30.    11.11.11

THE ECONOMIC MODEL THAT IS IN CRISIS NEEDS URGENT CHANGE
NO MORE EXCLUSION, sick NEOLIBERALISM, “FREE TRADE” OR MILITARIZATION

Trinidad Tobago, April 18, 2009

As representatives from a wide diversity of trade union, farmer, indigenous, women’s, youth, consumer advocacy, human rights, environmental and, in general, social and civil organizations that are part of hemispheric networks such as the Hemispheric Social Alliance and united here at the IV Peoples’ Summit of the Americas in Trinidad and Tobago, we wish to transmit this message from the people we represent:

1)    The Summit of the Americas continues to be marked by exclusion and lack of democracy. First, we consider the continued exclusion of Cuba from hemispheric governmental forums to be inexplicable and unacceptable. No reason suffices to justify this exclusion, especially when nearly all countries of the hemisphere – the only exception being the U.S. – have diplomatic relations with this sovereign nation. We demand the full inclusion of Cuba in all hemispheric spaces in which it chooses to participate and, above all, an end to the illegitimate and unjust blockade that the United States has imposed on the island for decades. [This Summit represents an opportunity for President Obama to demonstrate whether or not he intends to truly change hemispheric relations that have been based on impositions]. For the majority of countries in the hemisphere, we also condemn the near complete lack of channels for democratic participation and consultation on decisions that are made in the official Summit, decisions which will affect the destinies of our nations. This exclusion is one of the reasons for which we are here meeting in the Peoples’ Summit. In this same vein, we want to raise the most energetic protest to the official treatment of our summit, which has included every conceivable obstacle, direct hostility and arbitrary actions that we have had to overcome to make the Summit possible. This has included detentions, deportations, interrogations, mistreatment, spying, denying us the use of facilities and retracting guarantees.

2)    In the face of the grave crisis shaking the world and our hemisphere in particular, which illustrates the failure of the so-called “free trade” model it is evident that the official Summit’s declaration is far from representing the indispensible and urgent change that current reality and hemispheric relations demand. We note with alarm that this ‘project’ chooses to ignore the significance of a crisis with such historic dimensions.  It is as if by doing this, one could ‘disappear’ the crisis. The official declaration covers with rhetoric, ambiguity, and meaningless good intentions its lack of an urgently needed turnaround in hemispheric policies.   What is worse, it insists on proposing solutions that are merely more of the same old policies, more of the medicine that has created the worst illness – in other words, more neoliberalism and free trade.  The declaration further ratifies support for antiquated institutions that contributed to the current debacle. Even if by omission, giving forums such as the G-20, which are illegitimate and exclusive, the power to determine so-called solutions to the crisis—such as “prescriptions” to dedicate more resources to the already repudiated IMF—is to maintain a vicious circle. Canceling the illegitimate debts of countries in the South, rather than condemning them to further indebtedness, is a solution that could actually provide countries the resources needed for development.

3)    The neoliberal model arose as a “solution” to previous crises, but it has only lead to an even worse crisis. The solution must not be more of the same. We, the social movements and organizations from the hemisphere, affirm that another solution to the crisis is possible and necessary. The solutions will not be found by reactivating the same economic model or establishing an even more perverse one.   The solution will not be found in continuing to convert everything – including life itself – into mere commodities. Instead, the solution must be one that puts ‘Living Well’ for all people above the profits of a few. It is not a question of resolving a financial crisis, but rather overcoming all of the dimensions of the crisis – which include the food, climate and energy crises. This requires guaranteeing the people’s food sovereignty, putting an end to the pillaging of the South’s natural resources, paying the ecological debt that is owed to the South and developing sustainable energy strategies. If the governments gathered in the official Summit refuse to explicitly address the urgent changes needed, they thereby renounce their right to receive support from their people.  We salute the fact that some presidents from the South are raising with dignity in the official event, alternatives which coincide with those which the people of the Americas are raising.

4)    We demand that in the short term, the working people of the hemisphere must not be made to bear the brunt of the crisis, which is what has been happening so far. Instead of dedicating billions of dollars to rescuing financial speculators and large corporations, that profited before the crisis, provoked the crisis, and then returned to the same behavior, we demand that the people be rescued. This is one way to strengthen our national economies and promote recovery directed towards real development that inverts the order of the beneficiaries, giving priority to the people.

5)    We also demand that the crisis not be used as a pretext to attack or reduce social rights that have been won. Rights do not have costs. On the contrary, the best solution to the crisis is to expand rights, making decent work, democratic freedoms, and human, economic, social and cultural rights a reality. To start with, the full rights of indigenous peoples must finally be recognized as well as womens’ rights.

6)    A just and sustainable solution to the crisis necessitates a complete reorganizing of hemispheric relations and a burial of the so-called “free trade” model. No more FTAs. It is necessary to replace the FTAs that have been proliferating throughout the region with a new model of agreements between nations based on equity, complementary arrangements, mutual benefit, cooperation and just trade. This model must protect the right to development, the right of nations to protect their goods, strategic resources and sovereignty. Processes of regional integration that are developed on these bases are also a strong lever for resolving the crisis and promoting alternative solutions. We especially call on the governments in countries of the South that have advanced these types of processes to deepen them, to not lose their autonomy and to not stray from this path. Perverse and hegemonic projects such as the FTAA should be buried forever. We ask governments in the region, namely the new United States administration headed by President Obama, to make explicit their position on the future of initiatives such as the one developed in the entrails of the Bush administration – Pathways to Prosperity in the Americas – that not only aims to revive the corpse of the FTAA, but also to subordinate the rest of the hemisphere to Washington’s policies and security forces. We hereby affirm that we, the people of the Americas, will not allow this to happen.

7)    Cooperation between nations must not, in any circumstance, include the militarization of our societies. The security policies of each country must not be subordinated to the interests of any power, nor should human rights and individual guarantees be restricted. We demand the closure of all military bases and the withdrawal of all troops and the U.S. IV Fleet from the waters and territories of Latin America and the Caribbean.  The future for our America demands an end, once and for all, to the colonial domination of Puerto Rico and all forms of colonialism in the Caribbean.

Presidents: listening to your people and acting in favor of their interests–not the profits of a small few—is the only true, lasting and sustainable solution to end the crisis and build another, more just America.

HEMISPHERIC SOCIAL ALLIANCE / IV PEOPLE’S SUMMIT OF THE AMERICAS

 

 

Latin America: Return to the IMF or reinforce alternatives?

Maria Jose Romero

Today Latin American countries are faced with the option of returning to international and regional financial institutions – IMF, World Bank and Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) – or rejecting the failed recipes of the 1990s in order to build and reinforce alternatives that allow them to face the current crisis.

The crisis is a global phenomenon that fails to forgive either regions or countries. The Institute of International Finance has forecast a dramatic reduction in private capital flows to emerging markets. While capital flows in 2007 amounted to $929 billion, they predict in 2009 flows will only reach $165 billion. Therefore, we are facing the possibility of a significant contraction of capital flows and investment in emerging economies. The question is how and by whom this contraction can be compensated.

The political argument that Latin American countries used when moving away from the IMF is the same that led them to accumulate international reserves and think of funding alternatives for the region. Now they must decide between participating in the recapitalisation of IFIs and demanding reform that gives them more power in their decision-making, or else advancing the construction of South-South cooperation mechanisms, giving shape to a regional currency and setting the Bank of the South into operation.

On the eve of the G20 meeting, South American presidents travelled to Doha to participate in the second summit of South American-Arab countries (ASPA), to strengthen the South-South axis and join forces to give more weight to their voices at the international level. Since the first meeting of ASPA in Brasilia in 2005, Brazilian exports to the Arab world have increased from $8 billion to $20 billion; while Argentinian exports also rose from $1.8 billion to $4.5 billion. According to Argentinian government officials, this relationship has been based on cooperation rather than on imposition.

The BRIC group of countries made up of Brazil, Russia, India and China, announced in March that they will only provide more money to the IMF if the institution is reformed and the voting power of emerging countries increased (see Update 65). This reform should also include the reduction of loan conditionalities for poor countries, and an increased capacity to discipline the most powerful nations.

However, many people still doubt the real magnitude of the reforms to be implemented at the IFIs. According to Argentinian economist, Benjamín Hopenhayn, a reform of the IMF’s thinking is not credible, since it needs to “change its ideology and that of the 3,000 economists that are part of the IMF.”

On the other hand, economist Anwar Shaik, professor at the New School for Social Research, of New York, has said that “global coordination would be a good idea but the question is what interests it will respond to. I do not trust the IMF or the World Bank to tell us what is right. Their track-record is awful. If coordination goes along these lines, I’d rather not have it.”

Brazilian president, Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, has also intensified his discourse against neo-liberalism, its policies and institutions, asserting that institutions such as the IMF or World Bank had been “incapable of anticipating and controlling the financial disorder.”

In recent months, China extended currency swap arrangements worth billions of dollars to South Korea, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Malaysia and Belarus, after rejecting the requests of rich countries that it give substantial funding to the IMF in the absence of an institutional reform. This list is now joined by Argentina to which China has offered a $10.2 billion curency swap. According to Mark Weisbrot of US-based think tank Center for Economic and Policy Research this implies a specific alternative for the South American country to escape from IMF influence.

At the IDB’s 50th annual meeting in Medellin, Colombia, in March, the president of the Central Bank of Argentina, Martín Redrado talked about the convergence of macro-economic policy and made reference to the proposal for creating a single regional currency. This builds on the initiative of Venezuela to implement the Sucre as a trading currency between Venezuela, Cuba, Nicaragua and Ecuador.

Finally, the Bank of the South should be launched next May with starting capital of $10 billion from Argentina, Brazil, Venezuela, Bolivia, Ecuador, Paraguay and Uruguay (see Update 62).

Civil society and organisations in the region are demanding that their governments reject the IFIs and turn towards people-centred regional alternatives.


brettonwoodsproject.org

La Unión Europea: ¿promotora de la integración regional en América Latina? Retórica y Realidad

By Alberto Arroyo Picard, Graciela Rodríguez, buy Norma Castañeda Bustamante


The European Union (EU) presents itself as a supportive partner of Latin America (LA), rather than as a competitor. In recent years, the EU has been stressing that its primary interest in negotiating Association Agreements (AAs) with the countries of LA is to provide support to the integration of different regions in LA.

In this report, the authors contrast the EU‘s professed aims for supporting regional integration in Latin America with the actual experiences of the different regions in LA with which the EU is seeking to sign AAs: Central America (CA), the countries of the Andean Community of Nations (CAN) and the Common Market of the South (MERCOSUR).

The authors explore the following questions: What interests does the EU have in regional integration in LA? What kind of integration does the EU promote in LA? How is support for regional integration made compatible with the search for Association Agreements (AAs) that pursue a broad liberalisation of trade and investment? What impact did the AA negotiations have on the different regional integration processes? What are the potential effects of AAs on the proposals for alternative regional integration that are coming from social movements and some progressive governments in the region?

This report raises questions about the EU’s discourse on co-operative support for regional integration in LA. The report argues that in reality the EU’s interests lie in preparing the terrain to later negotiate with regional blocks (rather than individual countries), and thus gain access to larger goods and services markets. Furthermore, it develops the argument that the trade negotiations promoted by the EU in LA entail serious risks that may result in heightening divisions in existing regional processes, as we have seen in the case of CAN. Furthermore, the signing of Association Agreements will become a ball and chain that will frustrate peoples’ efforts and struggles to achieve a different kind of regional integration in LA.


Por Alberto Arroyo Picard, find Graciela Rodríguez, pilule Norma Castañeda Bustamante

La Unión Europea (UE) se presenta como un socio y no como un competidor de América Latina (AL). En tiempos recientes, la UE viene afirmando que su interés de fondo en la relación con los países de América Latina con los que negocia Acuerdos de Asociación (AdAs) es apoyar la integración de las distintas regiones.

En este reporte, los autores, analizan el discurso de la UE sobre su objetivo de apoyo a la integración regional en AL y lo contrastan con la realidad de las actuales relaciones de la UE con las regiones con las que busca firmar AdAs: Centroamérica, países de la Comunidad Andina de Naciones (CAN) y, auque actualmente las negociaciones están estancadas, también con MERCOSUR.

Los autores exploran así las siguientes interrogantes: ¿cuál es el interés de la UE en la integración regional en AL?; ¿que tipo de integración promueve la UE en América Latina?; ¿cómo se compatibiliza el apoyo a la integración regional de la UE con la búsqueda de Acuerdos de Asociación que persiguen una liberalización amplia del comercio y las inversiones?; ¿qué impactos tienen las negociaciones de AdAs en los diferentes procesos de integración regional?; ¿qué posibles impactos se prevén sobre las propuestas de integración regional alternativa propuesta por los movimientos sociales de la región y algunos gobiernos si los AdAs se firmaran?.

Este reporte cuestiona el discurso de la UE sobre su objetivo de apoyo a la integración regional en AL, argumentando que en realidad su interés yace en preparar el terreno para luego negociar con los bloques regionales y lograr así mercados más amplios de bienes y servicios. También presenta el argumento que las negociaciones comerciales impulsadas por la UE en AL conllevan el riesgo que los proyectos de integración regional en curso, como en el caso de la CAN, acentúen las divisiones internas y a su vez que la firma de Acuerdos de Asociación frustren los afanes y luchas de los pueblos por una integración distinta en AL.


Descargar PDF


The European Union: promoter of regional integration in Latin America? Rhetoric and Reality

THE ECONOMIC MODEL THAT IS IN CRISIS NEEDS URGENT CHANGE
NO MORE EXCLUSION, NEOLIBERALISM, sales “FREE TRADE” OR MILITARIZATION

MESSAGE FROM THE IV PEOPLES SUMMIT
TO THE PRESIDENTS GATHERED AT THE
V SUMMIT OF THE AMERICAS
Trinidad Tobago, April 18, 2009

As representatives from a wide diversity of trade union, farmer, indigenous, women’s, youth, consumer advocacy, human rights, environmental and, in general, social and civil organizations that are part of hemispheric networks such as the Hemispheric Social Alliance and united here at the IV Peoples’ Summit of the Americas in Trinidad and Tobago, we wish to transmit this message from the people we represent:

1)    The Summit of the Americas continues to be marked by exclusion and lack of democracy. First, we consider the continued exclusion of Cuba from hemispheric governmental forums to be inexplicable and unacceptable. No reason suffices to justify this exclusion, especially when nearly all countries of the hemisphere – the only exception being the U.S. – have diplomatic relations with this sovereign nation. We demand the full inclusion of Cuba in all hemispheric spaces in which it chooses to participate and, above all, an end to the illegitimate and unjust blockade that the United States has imposed on the island for decades. [This Summit represents an opportunity for President Obama to demonstrate whether or not he intends to truly change hemispheric relations that have been based on impositions]. For the majority of countries in the hemisphere, we also condemn the near complete lack of channels for democratic participation and consultation on decisions that are made in the official Summit, decisions which will affect the destinies of our nations. This exclusion is one of the reasons for which we are here meeting in the Peoples’ Summit. In this same vein, we want to raise the most energetic protest to the official treatment of our summit, which has included every conceivable obstacle, direct hostility and arbitrary actions that we have had to overcome to make the Summit possible. This has included detentions, deportations, interrogations, mistreatment, spying, denying us the use of facilities and retracting guarantees.

2)    In the face of the grave crisis shaking the world and our hemisphere in particular, which illustrates the failure of the so-called “free trade” model it is evident that the official Summit’s declaration is far from representing the indispensible and urgent change that current reality and hemispheric relations demand. We note with alarm that this ‘project’ chooses to ignore the significance of a crisis with such historic dimensions.  It is as if by doing this, one could ‘disappear’ the crisis. The official declaration covers with rhetoric, ambiguity, and meaningless good intentions its lack of an urgently needed turnaround in hemispheric policies.   What is worse, it insists on proposing solutions that are merely more of the same old policies, more of the medicine that has created the worst illness – in other words, more neoliberalism and free trade.  The declaration further ratifies support for antiquated institutions that contributed to the current debacle. Even if by omission, giving forums such as the G-20, which are illegitimate and exclusive, the power to determine so-called solutions to the crisis—such as “prescriptions” to dedicate more resources to the already repudiated IMF—is to maintain a vicious circle. Canceling the illegitimate debts of countries in the South, rather than condemning them to further indebtedness, is a solution that could actually provide countries the resources needed for development.

3)    The neoliberal model arose as a “solution” to previous crises, but it has only lead to an even worse crisis. The solution must not be more of the same. We, the social movements and organizations from the hemisphere, affirm that another solution to the crisis is possible and necessary. The solutions will not be found by reactivating the same economic model or establishing an even more perverse one.   The solution will not be found in continuing to convert everything – including life itself – into mere commodities. Instead, the solution must be one that puts ‘Living Well’ for all people above the profits of a few. It is not a question of resolving a financial crisis, but rather overcoming all of the dimensions of the crisis – which include the food, climate and energy crises. This requires guaranteeing the people’s food sovereignty, putting an end to the pillaging of the South’s natural resources, paying the ecological debt that is owed to the South and developing sustainable energy strategies. If the governments gathered in the official Summit refuse to explicitly address the urgent changes needed, they thereby renounce their right to receive support from their people.  We salute the fact that some presidents from the South are raising with dignity in the official event, alternatives which coincide with those which the people of the Americas are raising.

4)    We demand that in the short term, the working people of the hemisphere must not be made to bear the brunt of the crisis, which is what has been happening so far. Instead of dedicating billions of dollars to rescuing financial speculators and large corporations, that profited before the crisis, provoked the crisis, and then returned to the same behavior, we demand that the people be rescued. This is one way to strengthen our national economies and promote recovery directed towards real development that inverts the order of the beneficiaries, giving priority to the people.

5)    We also demand that the crisis not be used as a pretext to attack or reduce social rights that have been won. Rights do not have costs. On the contrary, the best solution to the crisis is to expand rights, making decent work, democratic freedoms, and human, economic, social and cultural rights a reality. To start with, the full rights of indigenous peoples must finally be recognized as well as womens’ rights.

6)    A just and sustainable solution to the crisis necessitates a complete reorganizing of hemispheric relations and a burial of the so-called “free trade” model. No more FTAs. It is necessary to replace the FTAs that have been proliferating throughout the region with a new model of agreements between nations based on equity, complementary arrangements, mutual benefit, cooperation and just trade. This model must protect the right to development, the right of nations to protect their goods, strategic resources and sovereignty. Processes of regional integration that are developed on these bases are also a strong lever for resolving the crisis and promoting alternative solutions. We especially call on the governments in countries of the South that have advanced these types of processes to deepen them, to not lose their autonomy and to not stray from this path. Perverse and hegemonic projects such as the FTAA should be buried forever. We ask governments in the region, namely the new United States administration headed by President Obama, to make explicit their position on the future of initiatives such as the one developed in the entrails of the Bush administration – Pathways to Prosperity in the Americas – that not only aims to revive the corpse of the FTAA, but also to subordinate the rest of the hemisphere to Washington’s policies and security forces. We hereby affirm that we, the people of the Americas, will not allow this to happen.

7)    Cooperation between nations must not, in any circumstance, include the militarization of our societies. The security policies of each country must not be subordinated to the interests of any power, nor should human rights and individual guarantees be restricted. We demand the closure of all military bases and the withdrawal of all troops and the U.S. IV Fleet from the waters and territories of Latin America and the Caribbean.  The future for our America demands an end, once and for all, to the colonial domination of Puerto Rico and all forms of colonialism in the Caribbean.

Presidents: listening to your people and acting in favor of their interests–not the profits of a small few—is the only true, lasting and sustainable solution to end the crisis and build another, more just America.

HEMISPHERIC SOCIAL ALLIANCE / IV PEOPLE’S SUMMIT OF THE AMERICAS

 


THE ECONOMIC MODEL THAT IS IN CRISIS NEEDS URGENT CHANGE
NO MORE EXCLUSION, seek NEOLIBERALISM, sale “FREE TRADE” OR MILITARIZATION

MESSAGE FROM THE IV PEOPLES SUMMIT
TO THE PRESIDENTS GATHERED AT THE
V SUMMIT OF THE AMERICAS
Trinidad Tobago, April 18, 2009

As representatives from a wide diversity of trade union, farmer, indigenous, women’s, youth, consumer advocacy, human rights, environmental and, in general, social and civil organizations that are part of hemispheric networks such as the Hemispheric Social Alliance and united here at the IV Peoples’ Summit of the Americas in Trinidad and Tobago, we wish to transmit this message from the people we represent:

1)    The Summit of the Americas continues to be marked by exclusion and lack of democracy. First, we consider the continued exclusion of Cuba from hemispheric governmental forums to be inexplicable and unacceptable. No reason suffices to justify this exclusion, especially when nearly all countries of the hemisphere – the only exception being the U.S. – have diplomatic relations with this sovereign nation. We demand the full inclusion of Cuba in all hemispheric spaces in which it chooses to participate and, above all, an end to the illegitimate and unjust blockade that the United States has imposed on the island for decades. [This Summit represents an opportunity for President Obama to demonstrate whether or not he intends to truly change hemispheric relations that have been based on impositions]. For the majority of countries in the hemisphere, we also condemn the near complete lack of channels for democratic participation and consultation on decisions that are made in the official Summit, decisions which will affect the destinies of our nations. This exclusion is one of the reasons for which we are here meeting in the Peoples’ Summit. In this same vein, we want to raise the most energetic protest to the official treatment of our summit, which has included every conceivable obstacle, direct hostility and arbitrary actions that we have had to overcome to make the Summit possible. This has included detentions, deportations, interrogations, mistreatment, spying, denying us the use of facilities and retracting guarantees.

2)    In the face of the grave crisis shaking the world and our hemisphere in particular, which illustrates the failure of the so-called “free trade” model it is evident that the official Summit’s declaration is far from representing the indispensible and urgent change that current reality and hemispheric relations demand. We note with alarm that this ‘project’ chooses to ignore the significance of a crisis with such historic dimensions.  It is as if by doing this, one could ‘disappear’ the crisis. The official declaration covers with rhetoric, ambiguity, and meaningless good intentions its lack of an urgently needed turnaround in hemispheric policies.   What is worse, it insists on proposing solutions that are merely more of the same old policies, more of the medicine that has created the worst illness – in other words, more neoliberalism and free trade.  The declaration further ratifies support for antiquated institutions that contributed to the current debacle. Even if by omission, giving forums such as the G-20, which are illegitimate and exclusive, the power to determine so-called solutions to the crisis—such as “prescriptions” to dedicate more resources to the already repudiated IMF—is to maintain a vicious circle. Canceling the illegitimate debts of countries in the South, rather than condemning them to further indebtedness, is a solution that could actually provide countries the resources needed for development.

3)    The neoliberal model arose as a “solution” to previous crises, but it has only lead to an even worse crisis. The solution must not be more of the same. We, the social movements and organizations from the hemisphere, affirm that another solution to the crisis is possible and necessary. The solutions will not be found by reactivating the same economic model or establishing an even more perverse one.   The solution will not be found in continuing to convert everything – including life itself – into mere commodities. Instead, the solution must be one that puts ‘Living Well’ for all people above the profits of a few. It is not a question of resolving a financial crisis, but rather overcoming all of the dimensions of the crisis – which include the food, climate and energy crises. This requires guaranteeing the people’s food sovereignty, putting an end to the pillaging of the South’s natural resources, paying the ecological debt that is owed to the South and developing sustainable energy strategies. If the governments gathered in the official Summit refuse to explicitly address the urgent changes needed, they thereby renounce their right to receive support from their people.  We salute the fact that some presidents from the South are raising with dignity in the official event, alternatives which coincide with those which the people of the Americas are raising.

4)    We demand that in the short term, the working people of the hemisphere must not be made to bear the brunt of the crisis, which is what has been happening so far. Instead of dedicating billions of dollars to rescuing financial speculators and large corporations, that profited before the crisis, provoked the crisis, and then returned to the same behavior, we demand that the people be rescued. This is one way to strengthen our national economies and promote recovery directed towards real development that inverts the order of the beneficiaries, giving priority to the people.

5)    We also demand that the crisis not be used as a pretext to attack or reduce social rights that have been won. Rights do not have costs. On the contrary, the best solution to the crisis is to expand rights, making decent work, democratic freedoms, and human, economic, social and cultural rights a reality. To start with, the full rights of indigenous peoples must finally be recognized as well as womens’ rights.

6)    A just and sustainable solution to the crisis necessitates a complete reorganizing of hemispheric relations and a burial of the so-called “free trade” model. No more FTAs. It is necessary to replace the FTAs that have been proliferating throughout the region with a new model of agreements between nations based on equity, complementary arrangements, mutual benefit, cooperation and just trade. This model must protect the right to development, the right of nations to protect their goods, strategic resources and sovereignty. Processes of regional integration that are developed on these bases are also a strong lever for resolving the crisis and promoting alternative solutions. We especially call on the governments in countries of the South that have advanced these types of processes to deepen them, to not lose their autonomy and to not stray from this path. Perverse and hegemonic projects such as the FTAA should be buried forever. We ask governments in the region, namely the new United States administration headed by President Obama, to make explicit their position on the future of initiatives such as the one developed in the entrails of the Bush administration – Pathways to Prosperity in the Americas – that not only aims to revive the corpse of the FTAA, but also to subordinate the rest of the hemisphere to Washington’s policies and security forces. We hereby affirm that we, the people of the Americas, will not allow this to happen.

7)    Cooperation between nations must not, in any circumstance, include the militarization of our societies. The security policies of each country must not be subordinated to the interests of any power, nor should human rights and individual guarantees be restricted. We demand the closure of all military bases and the withdrawal of all troops and the U.S. IV Fleet from the waters and territories of Latin America and the Caribbean.  The future for our America demands an end, once and for all, to the colonial domination of Puerto Rico and all forms of colonialism in the Caribbean.

Presidents: listening to your people and acting in favor of their interests–not the profits of a small few—is the only true, lasting and sustainable solution to end the crisis and build another, more just America.

HEMISPHERIC SOCIAL ALLIANCE / IV PEOPLE’S SUMMIT OF THE AMERICAS

 


  1. The Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa (COMESA) is holding its Policy Organs meetings and the 13th Summit of Heads of State and Government in the resort town of Victoria Falls, help Zimbabwe from the 28th May to 8th June 2009 under the theme Consolidating Regional Economic Integration through Value Addition, Trade and Food Security.2.
  2. From the 2nd – 4th June 2009 the Council of Ministers will be meeting to deliberate on a number of issues affecting the COMESA region, including the current negotiations with the European Union (officially known as the European Community) on concluding Economic Partnership Agreements (EPAs).

We recall that:

3.         The Eastern and Southern Africa Group (ESA) and the European Community (EC) senior officials met in Brussels on 28 April 2009 under the co-chairmanship of H.E Ambassadors S Gunessee and N. Wahab on ESA side as well as P. Thompson, Director, DG Trade on EC side. In their conclusions on the Interim EPAs initialled towards the end of 2007, the officials noted that:

On signature of interim EPA, EC confirmed that provided that an agreement is reached on translation, the interim Economic Partnership Agreement (EPA) could be ready for signature around mid-May 2009. ESA confirmed its decision to host the signature in Mauritius and informed that the issue of the date of signature will be considered at the next ESA Council scheduled for the 4th June 2009 in Victoria Falls back to back with COMESA Summit with a view to agreeing on a mutually convenient date as well as its arrangement for the signing ceremony.

We are concerned that:

4.         The ESA countries (as represented by their officials) have confirmed their decision to host the signature of the interim EPAs and that they are already considering discussing the dates of such a ceremony when the outstanding and contentious issues in the interim EPAs have not been addressed and resolved.

5.         The contentious issues arising from the interim EPAs include, inter alia, involve far reaching commitments on tariffs reductions the freezing of export taxes that ESA countries have been using, the requirement that ESA countries should not increase duties on products from the EU beyond what they have been applying (standstill clause), liberalising “substantially all trade”, bilateral safeguards (for infant industry protection)-all these issues are still under negotiations. We take the precautionary principle and reiterate that nothing is agreed until everything is agreed.

6.         The EC has insisted that the first priority should be the signature of the interim EPA. The EU main interest is in market access which they may achieve in interim EPAs. This limits the scope of focussing on the real issues of interest to ESA countries that need attention before the signature. ESA countries should resist the pressure of rushing to sign the interim EPA when it is clear they will be mortgaging national and public assets to the EC.

We urge ESA countries to recognise that:

7.         Africa remains a marginal player in world trade (6% in 1980 and 3% in 2008) since the continent’s trade structure still lacks diversity in terms of production and exports. As such, negotiations to further liberalise (after Structural Adjustment Programmes) their economies will be a futile and possible suicidal exercise until certain pre-requisites are met and instituted within their economies. The emphasis on trade liberalisation alone as a means to stimulating growth and development is misplaced.

8.         The pre-requisites (as informed by the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development) centre on addressing the structural constraints in ESA countries including

  • increased public investment in research and development, rural infrastructure — including roads — and health and education
  • overhauling the basic productive infrastructure to make production more reliable. Power generation, water supply and telecommunications are three key areas that need special attention. In addition, building a competitive manufacturing sector will require the strengthening of the support infrastructure needed for exporting, including roads, railways and port facilities.
  • encouraging cross-border trade infrastructure. It is unlikely that the manufacturing sector in Africa will grow to a competitive level if it is limited to small domestic markets. The smallness of individual African markets and the difficulty for most firms to access the markets of industrialized countries suggest that in the short and medium term, the expansion of intra-African trade could offer the opportunity to widen markets outside national boundaries. In so doing, some key infrastructure projects could be executed at the regional level, taking into account regional economic complementarities.
  • development of domestic policy regulatory frameworks to regulate the movement of goods and services in and outside ESA countries. This includes adopting policies that ensure Special and Differential Treatment including the Special Safeguard Mechanism in agriculture, use of tariffs, among other things

9.         Trade liberalisation has so far discouraged intra-regional trade in Africa as the reduction of tariffs, which reduce the preference margins given to other African countries, reduce the incentives for intraregional trade.

10.       The Cotonou Agreement (that forms the legal basis of negotiating EPAs), recognise that reciprocal agreements (EPAs) with the EC had to foster regional integration and to be based on current integration efforts. However, as the interim agreements have shown, this commitment has been negated as the current configuration of the EPA encompasses a major risk of undermining ongoing regional integration processes.

11.       Most countries in the region continue to suffer from food shortages and food insecurity. As a result they have been importing more food and energy (including inflation which was at 10.7% in 2008 up from 6.4% in 2007, the continental average excluding Zimbabwe) into the region. Trade liberalisation will exacerbate the problems of food insecurity.

12.       The ESA political leadership have an obligation towards their people and should ensure that whatever decisions they take should not put the lives of people in danger. This means all those targets of reducing poverty, reducing child and maternal mortality and increasing access to education for the people should be used as tools for making informed decisions especially with regards to trade negotiations.

13.       Given the above, liberalising ESA economies under the EPAs as already indicated by the interim EPAs will further weaken the countries’ ability to develop and respond to the challenges posed by liberalisation and Limit Africa to the production and export of low value goods (the so-called “poor-country” goods) based on the so-called comparative advantage argument. This is tantamount to condemning the continent and locking it into poverty.

We therefore recommend that:

14.       A moratorium be put in place on EPAs negotiations until the ESA countries have put in place adequate institutional mechanisms to deal with trade liberalisation as recommended by the African Union, UNCTAD, the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa among others.

15.       ESA countries focus on developing its regional market, steps that have already been taken by consolidating the gains of the COMESA FTA, the Customs Union and the move to form a single FTA with the East African Community (EAC) and the Southern African Development Community (SADC)

16.       In light of the high food and energy prices, the climate crisis and the current global recession triggered by the financial crisis, ESA countries MUST reverse most of the commitments they have agreed under the IMF/World Bank SAP policies, the World Trade Organisation and the so-called interim Economic Partnership Agreements. This will allow the countries to implement favourable home grown policies that are in tandem with their development priorities.

A GLOBAL CALL FOR ACTION TO STOP EPAs

From the 27-30 March, ampoule 2006 we the undermentioned organisations involved in the Stop–EPA campaign, salve from Africa and Europe met in Harare, clinic Zimbabwe, at meeting organised the umbrella of the Africa Trade Network. We deliberated on the developments since the campaign was adopted and discussed strategies for the coming period. 

It has been two years since civil society organisations, social movements, and mass-membership organisations across Africa, the Caribbean, the Pacific and Europe adopted the campaign to STOP the Economic Partnership Agreements (EPAs) as currently designed and being negotiated between the European Union and ACP groups of countries. 

The campaign was adopted on the grounds that in their current form, the EPAs are essentially free-trade agreements between unequal parties: Europe, with its overwhelming economic and political power, and the fragile and dependent economies of the ACP countries. In addition, the process of the negotiations is imbalanced and rushed, allowing the EU to impose its interests and agenda, and dictate the momentum of the negotiations to suit its own needs and purposes. 

Two years since the adoption of the campaign, there is wide-spread recognition among governments, inter-governmental institutions, parliamentarians, civil society actors and a diverse range of social constituencies across the ACP, Europe and the rest of the world of the dangers posed by the EPAs to the economies and peoples of the ACP countries. This has yet not led to fundamental changes in the nature of the EPAs and the process of negotiations. 

Member governments of the European Union, which have publicly adopted policy positions in direct contradiction to the negotiating mandate of the EC, have not followed up with action to change that mandate. Strong unofficial reservations expressed by other member-governments continue to remain as unofficial reservations. 

For its part, the European Commission has constructed new rhetoric to sell the EPAs and justify continuation of its mandate. It has encouraged false hopes of increase in European development assistance to ACP countries, and used different forms of pressure, including aid conditionality, to continue to override the reluctance of ACP groups to yield to its interests.

On the part of governments in the ACP countries, individual and collective public positions, which have effectively repudiated the EPAs in their current forms are not translated into policy and negotiating positions. Dependency on aid, and concern for the maintenance of preferences seem to have disproportionately influenced governments into accepting the ECs terms and parameters of negotiations. In some instances, secretariats of the regional groups and machineries whose role it is to facilitate the negotiations on behalf of the ACP groupings have abandoned the policy directions of national governments which make up the region, and have tended to promote the perspectives of the EC.

An immediate outcome of these developments is the negative effect of the EPA negotiations on autonomous ACP regional integration initiatives. On-going regional integration initiatives and processes have been hijacked and diverted, and many historical and political African regional configurations have been split.

Added to the above situation, the current deadlock in the WTO negotiations has lead to increasing pressure on bilateral and regional free trade negotiations. 

All these developments affirm validity of the positions and concerns of the STOP EPA campaign, and make its demands even more urgent.

We are inspired by the global mobilisation that the campaign has generated and welcome the increasing numbers of diverse groups of stakeholders and networks of actors who have joined or otherwise taken up the cause of the campaign. 

Although civil society engagement with the EPA negotiations is increasing, we are still very much concerned by the lack of involvement of the majority of affected citizens, workers and farmers in ACP countries and the lack of openness and transparency in the negotiations.

We reaffirm the positions and demands of the STOP EPA campaign. We reject the EPAs in their current form. They will:

•    expand Europe’s access to ACP markets for its goods, services, and investments; expose ACP producers to unfair European competition in domestic and regional markets, and increase the domination and concentration of European firms, goods and services;
•    thereby lead to deeper unemployment, loss of livelihoods, food insecurity and social and gender inequity and inequality as well as undermine human and social rights; 
•    endanger the ongoing but fragile processes of regional integration among the ACP countries; and deepen – and prolong – the socio-economic decline and political fragility that characterises most ACP countries. 

We re-affirm our demand for an overhaul and review of the EU’s neo-liberal external trade policy, particularly with respect to developing countries, and demanded that EU-ACP trade cooperation should be founded on an approach that:
•    is based on a principle of non-reciprocity, as instituted in Generalised System of Preferences and special and differential treatment in the WTO;
•    protects ACP producers domestic and regional markets; 
•    reverses the pressure for trade and investment liberalisation; and 
•    allows the necessary policy space and supports ACP countries to pursue their own development strategies.     

In further pursuit of the goals and demands of the campaign we make the following demands.

Governments of the ACP countries
The primary responsibility for promoting the interests and needs of the people in ACP countries and of defending them against the ravages of free trade agreements with the EU lies with the governments in the ACP countries, both in their individual and collective capacities, acting at national, regional and ACP-wide levels. In this regard we call upon ACP governments:

•    to heed to the call of their citizens over the EPAs and ensure that hopes over increased aid, and concerns about the future of preferences does not lead to sacrificing the economic and developmental future of their people;
•    to live up to their policy statements and positions on the EPAs and to translate these into positions in the processes of engagement over the EPA;
•    to reassert their policy authority on the negotiations over the regional secretariats, and to ensure that the latter do not undermine stated policy positions in the negotiations;

European Union – Member States

The European Union has a responsibility to live up to its stated developmental objectives. We demand that member-governments of the European Union should 
•    assert their authority over the EC on issues concerning ACP-EU co-operation for the promotion of sustainable development in the ACP countries;
•    change the EC’s negotiating mandate in relation to the EPA negotiations; and to this end;
•    ensure that the EPA review mandated for this year is comprehensive, all-inclusive, transparent, and substantive and places sustainable development at the centre.

Finally we call upon civil society organisations, social movements, and mass-membership organisations across the ACP and Europe to join the campaign, and engage with their governments on the issues of ACP development in relation to the EU.

Harare, Thursday, 30 March 2006

1.    Mwelekeo wa NGO (MWENGO), Zimbabwe
2.    Third World Network-Africa, Ghana
3.    ACDIC, Cameroon
4.    Alternative Information Development Centre
5.    AIPAD TRUST, Zimbabwe
6.    Alternatives to Neo-liberalism in Southern Africa (ANSA)
7.    Civil Society Trade Network of Zambia
8.    CECIDE, Guinea
9.    Christian Relief and Development Association (CRDA), Ethiopia
10.    Economic Justice Network, South Africa
11.    ENDA, Senegal
12.    GENTA, South Africa
13.    GRAPAD, Benin
14.    InterAfrica Group, Ethiopia
15.    Labour and Economic Development Research Institute (LEDRIZ), Zimbabwe
16.    Malawi Economic Justice And Network 
17.    Southern African People’s Solidarity Network (SAPSN)
18.    SEATINI, Zimbabwe
19.    TradesCentre, Zimbabwe
20.    Zimbabwe Coalition on Debt and Development (ZIMCODD), Zimbabwe
21.    Action Aid
22.    ACORD
23.    Both Ends
24.    ChristianAid
25.    ICCO
26.    KASA/WERKSTATT OKONOMIE
27.    One World Action (VIA Project)
28.    Oxfam International
29.    Traidcraft
30.    11.11.11

THE ECONOMIC MODEL THAT IS IN CRISIS NEEDS URGENT CHANGE
NO MORE EXCLUSION, sick NEOLIBERALISM, “FREE TRADE” OR MILITARIZATION

Trinidad Tobago, April 18, 2009

As representatives from a wide diversity of trade union, farmer, indigenous, women’s, youth, consumer advocacy, human rights, environmental and, in general, social and civil organizations that are part of hemispheric networks such as the Hemispheric Social Alliance and united here at the IV Peoples’ Summit of the Americas in Trinidad and Tobago, we wish to transmit this message from the people we represent:

1)    The Summit of the Americas continues to be marked by exclusion and lack of democracy. First, we consider the continued exclusion of Cuba from hemispheric governmental forums to be inexplicable and unacceptable. No reason suffices to justify this exclusion, especially when nearly all countries of the hemisphere – the only exception being the U.S. – have diplomatic relations with this sovereign nation. We demand the full inclusion of Cuba in all hemispheric spaces in which it chooses to participate and, above all, an end to the illegitimate and unjust blockade that the United States has imposed on the island for decades. [This Summit represents an opportunity for President Obama to demonstrate whether or not he intends to truly change hemispheric relations that have been based on impositions]. For the majority of countries in the hemisphere, we also condemn the near complete lack of channels for democratic participation and consultation on decisions that are made in the official Summit, decisions which will affect the destinies of our nations. This exclusion is one of the reasons for which we are here meeting in the Peoples’ Summit. In this same vein, we want to raise the most energetic protest to the official treatment of our summit, which has included every conceivable obstacle, direct hostility and arbitrary actions that we have had to overcome to make the Summit possible. This has included detentions, deportations, interrogations, mistreatment, spying, denying us the use of facilities and retracting guarantees.

2)    In the face of the grave crisis shaking the world and our hemisphere in particular, which illustrates the failure of the so-called “free trade” model it is evident that the official Summit’s declaration is far from representing the indispensible and urgent change that current reality and hemispheric relations demand. We note with alarm that this ‘project’ chooses to ignore the significance of a crisis with such historic dimensions.  It is as if by doing this, one could ‘disappear’ the crisis. The official declaration covers with rhetoric, ambiguity, and meaningless good intentions its lack of an urgently needed turnaround in hemispheric policies.   What is worse, it insists on proposing solutions that are merely more of the same old policies, more of the medicine that has created the worst illness – in other words, more neoliberalism and free trade.  The declaration further ratifies support for antiquated institutions that contributed to the current debacle. Even if by omission, giving forums such as the G-20, which are illegitimate and exclusive, the power to determine so-called solutions to the crisis—such as “prescriptions” to dedicate more resources to the already repudiated IMF—is to maintain a vicious circle. Canceling the illegitimate debts of countries in the South, rather than condemning them to further indebtedness, is a solution that could actually provide countries the resources needed for development.

3)    The neoliberal model arose as a “solution” to previous crises, but it has only lead to an even worse crisis. The solution must not be more of the same. We, the social movements and organizations from the hemisphere, affirm that another solution to the crisis is possible and necessary. The solutions will not be found by reactivating the same economic model or establishing an even more perverse one.   The solution will not be found in continuing to convert everything – including life itself – into mere commodities. Instead, the solution must be one that puts ‘Living Well’ for all people above the profits of a few. It is not a question of resolving a financial crisis, but rather overcoming all of the dimensions of the crisis – which include the food, climate and energy crises. This requires guaranteeing the people’s food sovereignty, putting an end to the pillaging of the South’s natural resources, paying the ecological debt that is owed to the South and developing sustainable energy strategies. If the governments gathered in the official Summit refuse to explicitly address the urgent changes needed, they thereby renounce their right to receive support from their people.  We salute the fact that some presidents from the South are raising with dignity in the official event, alternatives which coincide with those which the people of the Americas are raising.

4)    We demand that in the short term, the working people of the hemisphere must not be made to bear the brunt of the crisis, which is what has been happening so far. Instead of dedicating billions of dollars to rescuing financial speculators and large corporations, that profited before the crisis, provoked the crisis, and then returned to the same behavior, we demand that the people be rescued. This is one way to strengthen our national economies and promote recovery directed towards real development that inverts the order of the beneficiaries, giving priority to the people.

5)    We also demand that the crisis not be used as a pretext to attack or reduce social rights that have been won. Rights do not have costs. On the contrary, the best solution to the crisis is to expand rights, making decent work, democratic freedoms, and human, economic, social and cultural rights a reality. To start with, the full rights of indigenous peoples must finally be recognized as well as womens’ rights.

6)    A just and sustainable solution to the crisis necessitates a complete reorganizing of hemispheric relations and a burial of the so-called “free trade” model. No more FTAs. It is necessary to replace the FTAs that have been proliferating throughout the region with a new model of agreements between nations based on equity, complementary arrangements, mutual benefit, cooperation and just trade. This model must protect the right to development, the right of nations to protect their goods, strategic resources and sovereignty. Processes of regional integration that are developed on these bases are also a strong lever for resolving the crisis and promoting alternative solutions. We especially call on the governments in countries of the South that have advanced these types of processes to deepen them, to not lose their autonomy and to not stray from this path. Perverse and hegemonic projects such as the FTAA should be buried forever. We ask governments in the region, namely the new United States administration headed by President Obama, to make explicit their position on the future of initiatives such as the one developed in the entrails of the Bush administration – Pathways to Prosperity in the Americas – that not only aims to revive the corpse of the FTAA, but also to subordinate the rest of the hemisphere to Washington’s policies and security forces. We hereby affirm that we, the people of the Americas, will not allow this to happen.

7)    Cooperation between nations must not, in any circumstance, include the militarization of our societies. The security policies of each country must not be subordinated to the interests of any power, nor should human rights and individual guarantees be restricted. We demand the closure of all military bases and the withdrawal of all troops and the U.S. IV Fleet from the waters and territories of Latin America and the Caribbean.  The future for our America demands an end, once and for all, to the colonial domination of Puerto Rico and all forms of colonialism in the Caribbean.

Presidents: listening to your people and acting in favor of their interests–not the profits of a small few—is the only true, lasting and sustainable solution to end the crisis and build another, more just America.

HEMISPHERIC SOCIAL ALLIANCE / IV PEOPLE’S SUMMIT OF THE AMERICAS

 

 

THE ECONOMIC MODEL THAT IS IN CRISIS NEEDS URGENT CHANGE
NO MORE EXCLUSION, NEOLIBERALISM, capsule “FREE TRADE” OR MILITARIZATION

Trinidad Tobago, April 18, 2009

As representatives from a wide diversity of trade union, farmer, indigenous, women’s, youth, consumer advocacy, human rights, environmental and, in general, social and civil organizations that are part of hemispheric networks such as the Hemispheric Social Alliance and united here at the IV Peoples’ Summit of the Americas in Trinidad and Tobago, we wish to transmit this message from the people we represent:

1)    The Summit of the Americas continues to be marked by exclusion and lack of democracy. First, we consider the continued exclusion of Cuba from hemispheric governmental forums to be inexplicable and unacceptable. No reason suffices to justify this exclusion, especially when nearly all countries of the hemisphere – the only exception being the U.S. – have diplomatic relations with this sovereign nation. We demand the full inclusion of Cuba in all hemispheric spaces in which it chooses to participate and, above all, an end to the illegitimate and unjust blockade that the United States has imposed on the island for decades. [This Summit represents an opportunity for President Obama to demonstrate whether or not he intends to truly change hemispheric relations that have been based on impositions]. For the majority of countries in the hemisphere, we also condemn the near complete lack of channels for democratic participation and consultation on decisions that are made in the official Summit, decisions which will affect the destinies of our nations. This exclusion is one of the reasons for which we are here meeting in the Peoples’ Summit. In this same vein, we want to raise the most energetic protest to the official treatment of our summit, which has included every conceivable obstacle, direct hostility and arbitrary actions that we have had to overcome to make the Summit possible. This has included detentions, deportations, interrogations, mistreatment, spying, denying us the use of facilities and retracting guarantees.

2)    In the face of the grave crisis shaking the world and our hemisphere in particular, which illustrates the failure of the so-called “free trade” model it is evident that the official Summit’s declaration is far from representing the indispensible and urgent change that current reality and hemispheric relations demand. We note with alarm that this ‘project’ chooses to ignore the significance of a crisis with such historic dimensions.  It is as if by doing this, one could ‘disappear’ the crisis. The official declaration covers with rhetoric, ambiguity, and meaningless good intentions its lack of an urgently needed turnaround in hemispheric policies.   What is worse, it insists on proposing solutions that are merely more of the same old policies, more of the medicine that has created the worst illness – in other words, more neoliberalism and free trade.  The declaration further ratifies support for antiquated institutions that contributed to the current debacle. Even if by omission, giving forums such as the G-20, which are illegitimate and exclusive, the power to determine so-called solutions to the crisis—such as “prescriptions” to dedicate more resources to the already repudiated IMF—is to maintain a vicious circle. Canceling the illegitimate debts of countries in the South, rather than condemning them to further indebtedness, is a solution that could actually provide countries the resources needed for development.

3)    The neoliberal model arose as a “solution” to previous crises, but it has only lead to an even worse crisis. The solution must not be more of the same. We, the social movements and organizations from the hemisphere, affirm that another solution to the crisis is possible and necessary. The solutions will not be found by reactivating the same economic model or establishing an even more perverse one.   The solution will not be found in continuing to convert everything – including life itself – into mere commodities. Instead, the solution must be one that puts ‘Living Well’ for all people above the profits of a few. It is not a question of resolving a financial crisis, but rather overcoming all of the dimensions of the crisis – which include the food, climate and energy crises. This requires guaranteeing the people’s food sovereignty, putting an end to the pillaging of the South’s natural resources, paying the ecological debt that is owed to the South and developing sustainable energy strategies. If the governments gathered in the official Summit refuse to explicitly address the urgent changes needed, they thereby renounce their right to receive support from their people.  We salute the fact that some presidents from the South are raising with dignity in the official event, alternatives which coincide with those which the people of the Americas are raising.

4)    We demand that in the short term, the working people of the hemisphere must not be made to bear the brunt of the crisis, which is what has been happening so far. Instead of dedicating billions of dollars to rescuing financial speculators and large corporations, that profited before the crisis, provoked the crisis, and then returned to the same behavior, we demand that the people be rescued. This is one way to strengthen our national economies and promote recovery directed towards real development that inverts the order of the beneficiaries, giving priority to the people.

5)    We also demand that the crisis not be used as a pretext to attack or reduce social rights that have been won. Rights do not have costs. On the contrary, the best solution to the crisis is to expand rights, making decent work, democratic freedoms, and human, economic, social and cultural rights a reality. To start with, the full rights of indigenous peoples must finally be recognized as well as womens’ rights.

6)    A just and sustainable solution to the crisis necessitates a complete reorganizing of hemispheric relations and a burial of the so-called “free trade” model. No more FTAs. It is necessary to replace the FTAs that have been proliferating throughout the region with a new model of agreements between nations based on equity, complementary arrangements, mutual benefit, cooperation and just trade. This model must protect the right to development, the right of nations to protect their goods, strategic resources and sovereignty. Processes of regional integration that are developed on these bases are also a strong lever for resolving the crisis and promoting alternative solutions. We especially call on the governments in countries of the South that have advanced these types of processes to deepen them, to not lose their autonomy and to not stray from this path. Perverse and hegemonic projects such as the FTAA should be buried forever. We ask governments in the region, namely the new United States administration headed by President Obama, to make explicit their position on the future of initiatives such as the one developed in the entrails of the Bush administration – Pathways to Prosperity in the Americas – that not only aims to revive the corpse of the FTAA, but also to subordinate the rest of the hemisphere to Washington’s policies and security forces. We hereby affirm that we, the people of the Americas, will not allow this to happen.

7)    Cooperation between nations must not, in any circumstance, include the militarization of our societies. The security policies of each country must not be subordinated to the interests of any power, nor should human rights and individual guarantees be restricted. We demand the closure of all military bases and the withdrawal of all troops and the U.S. IV Fleet from the waters and territories of Latin America and the Caribbean.  The future for our America demands an end, once and for all, to the colonial domination of Puerto Rico and all forms of colonialism in the Caribbean.

Presidents: listening to your people and acting in favor of their interests–not the profits of a small few—is the only true, lasting and sustainable solution to end the crisis and build another, more just America.

HEMISPHERIC SOCIAL ALLIANCE / IV PEOPLE’S SUMMIT OF THE AMERICAS

 

 

By Alberto Arroyo Picard, doctor Graciela Rodríguez, Norma Castañeda Bustamante



The European Union (EU) presents itself as a supportive partner of Latin America (LA), rather than as a competitor. In recent years, the EU has been stressing that its primary interest in negotiating Association Agreements (AAs) with the countries of LA is to provide support to the integration of different regions in LA.

In this report, the authors contrast the EU‘s professed aims for supporting regional integration in Latin America with the actual experiences of the different regions in LA with which the EU is seeking to sign AAs: Central America (CA), the countries of the Andean Community of Nations (CAN) and the Common Market of the South (MERCOSUR).

The authors explore the following questions: What interests does the EU have in regional integration in LA? What kind of integration does the EU promote in LA? How is support for regional integration made compatible with the search for Association Agreements (AAs) that pursue a broad liberalisation of trade and investment? What impact did the AA negotiations have on the different regional integration processes? What are the potential effects of AAs on the proposals for alternative regional integration that are coming from social movements and some progressive governments in the region?

This report raises questions about the EU’s discourse on co-operative support for regional integration in LA. The report argues that in reality the EU’s interests lie in preparing the terrain to later negotiate with regional blocks (rather than individual countries), and thus gain access to larger goods and services markets. Furthermore, it develops the argument that the trade negotiations promoted by the EU in LA entail serious risks that may result in heightening divisions in existing regional processes, as we have seen in the case of CAN. Furthermore, the signing of Association Agreements will become a ball and chain that will frustrate peoples’ efforts and struggles to achieve a different kind of regional integration in LA.


Download PDF



Movimientos sociales del Sur. ALBA, UNASUR y Mercosur

The South Asian Peoples Assembly took place in Colombo, Sri Lanka, medications from 18 – 20 July, 2008, as a part of the process of People’s SAARC, to forge a vision for a People’s Union of South Asia. Over 1000 Sri Lankans and 400 delegates from other South Asian countries including India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Maldives, Nepal, Bhutan and Afghanistan participated.

 

Download PDF

Jenina Joy Chavez / Focus on the Global South

 

(Presentation at the Conference on “Regional Integration: an Opportunity Presented by the Crisis”, shop Asuncion, decease Paraguay, July 21-22, 2009.)

 


Jenina Joy Chavez / Focus on the Global South

 

(Presentation at the Conference on “Regional Integration: an Opportunity Presented by the Crisis”, capsule Asuncion, physician Paraguay, July 21-22, 2009.)

 

What I will tackle this evening is an updated version of the notes I used for the Regional Integration: Opportunities to Face the Crisis conference in Asuncion, Paraguay, and the Philippine WS on ASEAN, earlier this year. There is no claim that regional responses are the only viable responses to the global crisis, but hopefully we would be able to determine if it is appropriate to study and consider them as part of the many options on alternates we can try.

 

Before the crisis, it has been projected that in about a decade, the South –that is, the developing countries – would account for more than half of the world income and more than 50% of global trade. It has been trumpeted all over that Asia together with other emerging economies would be the major growth drivers in the world economy, highlighting the relevance of South-South cooperation, particularly regional economic integration in Asia.

 

For Asia, at least, this claim has been put to the test with the onset of the global financial crisis that put into the spotlight the basic development paradigm deployed by what is considered the world over as prosperous Asia.

 

 

In terms of what has happened in the last year and a half, following are some observations on how Asia tried to respond to the crisis:

 

  • First, unlike what characterized how the North (particularly Western Europe and North America) responded to the crisis, Asia’s response does not include massive bailout packages to failing corporations, particularly ailing financial entities.

 

    • This highlights the differential manifestations of the crisis. While financialization is a global phenomenon, sparing no one and certainly not Asia, Asia still hosts one of the most robust productive capacity worldwide – that is, the real economy remains the most significant feature of Asia’s growth and development.

 

  • Second, in most countries, though, the immediate response was to address the liquidity crunch and the crisis of confidence, especially in the banking system. This included moves to increase deposit insurance coverage, and guarantees on deposit-taking institutions. As a result, massive bank runs have been avoided.

 

  • Third, from the initial liquidity crunch, economic slowdown became the norm. Hence, governments moved to address this by increasing liquidity and easing credit and monetary policy, including intervening in foreign exchange markets. Many state enterprises also increased their shareholdings in publicly-traded companies. The result – relative low interest rates.

 

  • Fourth, stimulus packages have at their center fiscal policy and public spending, although social sector spending has not received much attention.

 

    • Asian countries have devoted between less than ½ percent of GDP to their fiscal stimulus package to more than 9%.

    • Among the biggest packages are those of the following:

      • Singapore, $15B (6%)

      • Malaysia, $2B initially to $16B (9% of GDP)

      • China, $600B spread only over 2 years

    • Most of the stimulus packages have a central tax break or tax credit component, as well as capital spending, including re-capitalization of state-run banks, most notably in India.

 

  • Fifth, the Asian response has been centered around resiliency. That is, they are focused on minimizing unemployment and on creating employment opportunities

 

    • With programs like job credits or payouts to employers of up to 12% of salaries (Singapore)

    • Various skills upgrading and retraining programs

    • Welfare support to retrenched workers and returning overseas workers.

    • Such resiliency packages, though, highlighted some tensions inherent in the increasingly connected Asian economies and job markets.

      • For instance, part of Malaysia’s and Singapore’s response is to cut down or crackdown on migrant workers, a classic response to appease worker’s restiveness at home, and a blatant disregard to the ripple such moves might effect.

 

  • Sixth, at least the ASEAN+3 is trying to improve on a regional financial cooperation first introduced in 2000 as a response to the 97/98 Asian financial crisis.

    • The Chiang Mai Initiative is a collaboration to create a network of bilateral swap arrangements to manage short-term liquidity problems.

    • From $20B in 2000, it increased to $80B in 2008, and earlier this year was increased further to $120B.

    • Moreover, the swaps are being multilateralized, a step towards developing from a bilateral into a regional pool.

    • This is about the only such regional initiative in Asia. There is no equivalent for South Asia, or in West and Central Asia.

 

 

From these observations, several key questions emerge:

 

  • 1st: would Asia be able to export its way out of the crisis? Is it even proper to aim only for this?

 

  • 2nd:: would the regional integration vaunted to be necessary to solidify and further the growth in Asia be resorted to, or given life in practice, in the wake of this crisis?

 

  • 3rd: in the design of crisis response, what is Asia aiming for?

    • Is it just to recover previous levels of consumption and economic activity?

    • How much of the response is for immediate relief, extremely necessary at this time?

    • And how much of this response is for the long-term and tries to take advantage of converting the crisis into opportunity?

 

 

At this point, I would like to emphasize three points that interrogate what Asia has managed or not managed to do:

 

  • One, note that the responses now differ qualitatively from the responses Asia had a decade ago.

 

    • There is no IMF, not least because the IMF has gained notoriety and lost a lot of credibility because of how it bungled its job in the late 1990s.

    • Not only is there no IMF, the policy and programmatic responses of Asia have been antithesis to what the IMF formerly prescribed.

      • There was no interest cure that killed business; instead efforts were concentrated on preserving relative low interest rates (including intervention in the forex market).

      • There were many elements of direct transfers, subsidies, and re-capitalization; something the IMF would never do (at least before).

    • In short, the responses are not patently neoliberal.

 

  • Two, these responses have not warranted enough incentive towards a focus on internal demand, on the one hand, and on coordinated expanded demand regionally, on the other.

 

    • More pointedly, it is a concern that Asia should even set as its main objective the recovery and maintenance of consumption levels prior to the crisis.

    • We should not be overly concerned about trying to save what has been clearly a cause of failure. It is high time for Asia to draw from regional resources and invent something that will again set it apart – or, place it in cooperation with other regions trying to imagine things differently.

 

  • Three, there is concern that ASEAN+3 finds it difficult to make good on regional financial cooperation as designed through the Chiang Mai Initiative and related processes.

 

    • Take for instance, when South Korea got hit when the Lehman Brothers collapsed, it negotiated a $30B foreign exchange swap with the US Federal Reserve and not the ASEAN+3. (They came later.)

    • Despite increases in commitments, the CMI is still not functional, and the IMF still plays a role when countries tap the CMI for more than 20% of their requirement, detracting from the importance of financial as well policy autonomy for Asia.

 

 

There are certainly elements of response – some quite innovative or at least properly targeted – in Asia. The question is whether Asia is able to turn the crisis on its head, and be able to emerge with another unique contribution to development discourse as it has been known to have done in the past.

 

Moreover, we as civil society and social movements, in our interrogation of possible alternatives, esp. if we have little or no hold on power – the question of how to get that power either by holding political power ourselves or rallying massive constituencies on our side – is key.

 

The final set of points I wish to make has to do with the areas where regional response would be crucial:

 

  • One, the need to focus on internal demand and a more coordinated rationalization of regional demand.

 

    • There is need to re-imagine trade and production cooperation, where instead of competition, the prevailing principles would be cooperation, complementation and solidarity.

    • Such arrangement must address the issue of excess, and should have as outer limit some climate and ecological threshold.

 

  • Two, there is need to overhaul the financial architecture for Asia

 

    • Away from dependence on Northern currencies, esp. the American $

    • And towards the pooling of alternative sources of development finance

    • As well as appropriate surveillance and monitoring systems (without the IMF) that assist countries and build confidence that every one takes responsibility for regional financial stability

 

  • Three, there is need to strengthen regional stockpiling for food security

 

    • South Asia has better experience on this although technically Southeast Asia pledges bigger reserves

    • Away from trade logic and towards regional self-help and development of crisis response capabilities.

 

  • Four, there is need to re-imagine the public

 

    • It is time to talk about the public not only in the narrow confines of the State or the government, but also support different forms of provisioning that allowed communities to survive at a time that the State was neglecting them.

    • It must be recognized that such strength can be scaled up at the national and the regional level.

 

  • Five, whatever alternative we think of, resonance with the people is important.

 

    • We need to start where there is clear demand, and patent need, to make regional arrangements acceptable to the people

      • Migration

      • Rights and democracy

      • Decent living standards and environment

      • Ability to generate economic activity and distribute its fruits equitably

    • There is need to also work on something that works and shows results in the immediate even as the strategic alternative structures are still being constructed.

Jenina Joy Chavez / Focus on the Global South

 

(Presentation at the Conference on “Regional Integration: an Opportunity Presented by the Crisis”, help Asuncion, Paraguay, there July 21-22, 2009.)

 

There is no claim that regional responses are the only viable responses to the global crisis, but hopefully we would be able to determine if it is appropriate to study and consider them as part of the many options on alternates we can try.

Before the crisis, it has been projected that in about a decade, the South –that is, the developing countries – would account for more than half of the world income and more than 50% of global trade. It has been trumpeted all over that Asia together with other emerging economies would be the major growth drivers in the world economy, highlighting the relevance of South-South cooperation, particularly regional economic integration in Asia.

For Asia, at least, this claim has been put to the test with the onset of the global financial crisis that put into the spotlight the basic development paradigm deployed by what is considered the world over as prosperous Asia.

In terms of what has happened in the last year and a half, following are some observations on how Asia tried to respond to the crisis:

 

First, unlike what characterized how the North (particularly Western Europe and North America) responded to the crisis, Asia’s response does not include massive bailout packages to failing corporations, particularly ailing financial entities.

    • This highlights the differential manifestations of the crisis. While financialization is a global phenomenon, sparing no one and certainly not Asia, Asia still hosts one of the most robust productive capacity worldwide – that is, the real economy remains the most significant feature of Asia’s growth and development.

  • Second, in most countries, though, the immediate response was to address the liquidity crunch and the crisis of confidence, especially in the banking system. This included moves to increase deposit insurance coverage, and guarantees on deposit-taking institutions. As a result, massive bank runs have been avoided.

  • Third, from the initial liquidity crunch, economic slowdown became the norm. Hence, governments moved to address this by increasing liquidity and easing credit and monetary policy, including intervening in foreign exchange markets. Many state enterprises also increased their shareholdings in publicly-traded companies. The result – relative low interest rates.

  • Fourth, stimulus packages have at their center fiscal policy and public spending, although social sector spending has not received much attention.
    • Asian countries have devoted between less than ½ percent of GDP to their fiscal stimulus package to more than 9%.

    • Among the biggest packages are those of the following:
      • Singapore, $15B (6%)
      • Malaysia, $2B initially to $16B (9% of GDP)
      • China, $600B spread only over 2 years
    • Most of the stimulus packages have a central tax break or tax credit component, as well as capital spending, including re-capitalization of state-run banks, most notably in India.

  • Fifth, the Asian response has been centered around resiliency. That is, they are focused on minimizing unemployment and on creating employment opportunities
    • With programs like job credits or payouts to employers of up to 12% of salaries (Singapore)
    • Various skills upgrading and retraining programs
    • Welfare support to retrenched workers and returning overseas workers.
    • Such resiliency packages, though, highlighted some tensions inherent in the increasingly connected Asian economies and job markets.
      • For instance, part of Malaysia’s and Singapore’s response is to cut down or crackdown on migrant workers, a classic response to appease worker’s restiveness at home, and a blatant disregard to the ripple such moves might effect.

  • Sixth, at least the ASEAN+3 is trying to improve on a regional financial cooperation first introduced in 2000 as a response to the 97/98 Asian financial crisis.
    • The Chiang Mai Initiative is a collaboration to create a network of bilateral swap arrangements to manage short-term liquidity problems.
    • From $20B in 2000, it increased to $80B in 2008, and earlier this year was increased further to $120B.

    • Moreover, the swaps are being multilateralized, a step towards developing from a bilateral into a regional pool.

    • This is about the only such regional initiative in Asia. There is no equivalent for South Asia, or in West and Central Asia.

From these observations, several key questions emerge:

  • 1st: would Asia be able to export its way out of the crisis? Is it even proper to aim only for this?
  • 2nd:: would the regional integration vaunted to be necessary to solidify and further the growth in Asia be resorted to, or given life in practice, in the wake of this crisis?
  • 3rd: in the design of crisis response, what is Asia aiming for?
    • Is it just to recover previous levels of consumption and economic activity?
    • How much of the response is for immediate relief, extremely necessary at this time?
    • And how much of this response is for the long-term and tries to take advantage of converting the crisis into opportunity?

At this point, I would like to emphasize three points that interrogate what Asia has managed or not managed to do:

  • One, note that the responses now differ qualitatively from the responses Asia had a decade ago.
    • There is no IMF, not least because the IMF has gained notoriety and lost a lot of credibility because of how it bungled its job in the late 1990s.
    • Not only is there no IMF, the policy and programmatic responses of Asia have been antithesis to what the IMF formerly prescribed.
      • There was no interest cure that killed business; instead efforts were concentrated on preserving relative low interest rates (including intervention in the forex market).
      • There were many elements of direct transfers, subsidies, and re-capitalization; something the IMF would never do (at least before).
    • In short, the responses are not patently neoliberal.
  • Two, these responses have not warranted enough incentive towards a focus on internal demand, on the one hand, and on coordinated expanded demand regionally, on the other.
    • More pointedly, it is a concern that Asia should even set as its main objective the recovery and maintenance of consumption levels prior to the crisis.
    • We should not be overly concerned about trying to save what has been clearly a cause of failure. It is high time for Asia to draw from regional resources and invent something that will again set it apart – or, place it in cooperation with other regions trying to imagine things differently.
  • Three, there is concern that ASEAN+3 finds it difficult to make good on regional financial cooperation as designed through the Chiang Mai Initiative and related processes.
    • Take for instance, when South Korea got hit when the Lehman Brothers collapsed, it negotiated a $30B foreign exchange swap with the US Federal Reserve and not the ASEAN+3. (They came later.)
    • Despite increases in commitments, the CMI is still not functional, and the IMF still plays a role when countries tap the CMI for more than 20% of their requirement, detracting from the importance of financial as well policy autonomy for Asia.

There are certainly elements of response – some quite innovative or at least properly targeted – in Asia. The question is whether Asia is able to turn the crisis on its head, and be able to emerge with another unique contribution to development discourse as it has been known to have done in the past.

Moreover, we as civil society and social movements, in our interrogation of possible alternatives, esp. if we have little or no hold on power – the question of how to get that power either by holding political power ourselves or rallying massive constituencies on our side – is key.

The final set of points I wish to make has to do with the areas where regional response would be crucial:

  • One, the need to focus on internal demand and a more coordinated rationalization of regional demand.
    • There is need to re-imagine trade and production cooperation, where instead of competition, the prevailing principles would be cooperation, complementation and solidarity.
    • Such arrangement must address the issue of excess, and should have as outer limit some climate and ecological threshold.
  • Two, there is need to overhaul the financial architecture for Asia
    • Away from dependence on Northern currencies, esp. the American $
    • And towards the pooling of alternative sources of development finance
    • As well as appropriate surveillance and monitoring systems (without the IMF) that assist countries and build confidence that every one takes responsibility for regional financial stability
  • Three, there is need to strengthen regional stockpiling for food security
    • South Asia has better experience on this although technically Southeast Asia pledges bigger reserves
    • Away from trade logic and towards regional self-help and development of crisis response capabilities.
  • Four, there is need to re-imagine the public
    • It is time to talk about the public not only in the narrow confines of the State or the government, but also support different forms of provisioning that allowed communities to survive at a time that the State was neglecting them.
    • It must be recognized that such strength can be scaled up at the national and the regional level.
  • Five, whatever alternative we think of, resonance with the people is important.
    • We need to start where there is clear demand, and patent need, to make regional arrangements acceptable to the people
      • Migration
      • Rights and democracy
      • Decent living standards and environment
      • Ability to generate economic activity and distribute its fruits equitably
    • There is need to also work on something that works and shows results in the immediate even as the strategic alternative structures are still being constructed.

Jenina Joy Chavez / Focus on the Global South

 

(Presentation at the Conference on “Regional Integration: an Opportunity Presented by the Crisis”, Asuncion, Paraguay, July 21-22, 2009.)

 

<!– /* Font Definitions */ @font-face {font-family:Wingdings; panose-1:5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0; mso-font-charset:2; mso-generic-font-family:auto; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:0 268435456 0 0 -2147483648 0;} /* Style Definitions */ p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal {mso-style-parent:””; margin:0cm; margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Arial; mso-fareast-font-family:”Times New Roman”; mso-bidi-font-family:”Times New Roman”;} @page Section1 {size:612.0pt 792.0pt; margin:72.0pt 90.0pt 72.0pt 90.0pt; mso-header-margin:36.0pt; mso-footer-margin:36.0pt; mso-paper-source:0;} div.Section1 {page:Section1;} /* List Definitions */ @list l0 {mso-list-id:11492129; mso-list-template-ids:1959537826;} @list l0:level1 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:?; mso-level-tab-stop:36.0pt; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:-18.0pt; mso-ansi-font-size:10.0pt; font-family:Symbol;} @list l0:level2 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:o; mso-level-tab-stop:72.0pt; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:-18.0pt; mso-ansi-font-size:10.0pt; font-family:”Courier New”; mso-bidi-font-family:”Times New Roman”;} @list l1 {mso-list-id:34821200; mso-list-template-ids:-1368741596;} @list l1:level1 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:?; mso-level-tab-stop:36.0pt; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:-18.0pt; mso-ansi-font-size:10.0pt; font-family:Symbol;} @list l1:level2 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:o; mso-level-tab-stop:72.0pt; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:-18.0pt; mso-ansi-font-size:10.0pt; font-family:”Courier New”; mso-bidi-font-family:”Times New Roman”;} @list l1:level3 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:?; mso-level-tab-stop:108.0pt; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:-18.0pt; mso-ansi-font-size:10.0pt; font-family:Wingdings;} @list l2 {mso-list-id:167643628; mso-list-template-ids:-1141235810;} @list l2:level1 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:?; mso-level-tab-stop:36.0pt; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:-18.0pt; mso-ansi-font-size:10.0pt; font-family:Symbol;} @list l3 {mso-list-id:432288852; mso-list-template-ids:-1821474754;} @list l3:level1 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:?; mso-level-tab-stop:36.0pt; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:-18.0pt; mso-ansi-font-size:10.0pt; font-family:Symbol;} @list l4 {mso-list-id:515969328; mso-list-template-ids:174481662;} @list l4:level1 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:?; mso-level-tab-stop:36.0pt; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:-18.0pt; mso-ansi-font-size:10.0pt; font-family:Symbol;} @list l5 {mso-list-id:588655501; mso-list-template-ids:222574196;} @list l5:level1 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:?; mso-level-tab-stop:36.0pt; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:-18.0pt; mso-ansi-font-size:10.0pt; font-family:Symbol;} @list l6 {mso-list-id:602540810; mso-list-template-ids:1776979592;} @list l6:level1 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:?; mso-level-tab-stop:36.0pt; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:-18.0pt; mso-ansi-font-size:10.0pt; font-family:Symbol;} @list l7 {mso-list-id:735592364; mso-list-template-ids:-555303036;} @list l7:level1 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:?; mso-level-tab-stop:36.0pt; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:-18.0pt; mso-ansi-font-size:10.0pt; font-family:Symbol;} @list l7:level2 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:o; mso-level-tab-stop:72.0pt; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:-18.0pt; mso-ansi-font-size:10.0pt; font-family:”Courier New”; mso-bidi-font-family:”Times New Roman”;} @list l7:level3 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:?; mso-level-tab-stop:108.0pt; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:-18.0pt; mso-ansi-font-size:10.0pt; font-family:Wingdings;} @list l8 {mso-list-id:796530499; mso-list-template-ids:814630526;} @list l8:level1 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:?; mso-level-tab-stop:36.0pt; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:-18.0pt; mso-ansi-font-size:10.0pt; font-family:Symbol;} @list l9 {mso-list-id:813379218; mso-list-template-ids:-1297431042;} @list l9:level1 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:?; mso-level-tab-stop:36.0pt; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:-18.0pt; mso-ansi-font-size:10.0pt; font-family:Symbol;} @list l9:level2 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:o; mso-level-tab-stop:72.0pt; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:-18.0pt; mso-ansi-font-size:10.0pt; font-family:”Courier New”; mso-bidi-font-family:”Times New Roman”;} @list l10 {mso-list-id:825246276; mso-list-template-ids:-65246620;} @list l10:level1 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:?; mso-level-tab-stop:36.0pt; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:-18.0pt; mso-ansi-font-size:10.0pt; font-family:Symbol;} @list l10:level2 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:o; mso-level-tab-stop:72.0pt; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:-18.0pt; mso-ansi-font-size:10.0pt; font-family:”Courier New”; mso-bidi-font-family:”Times New Roman”;} @list l10:level3 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:?; mso-level-tab-stop:108.0pt; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:-18.0pt; mso-ansi-font-size:10.0pt; font-family:Wingdings;} @list l11 {mso-list-id:892815989; mso-list-template-ids:1672373076;} @list l11:level1 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:?; mso-level-tab-stop:36.0pt; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:-18.0pt; mso-ansi-font-size:10.0pt; font-family:Symbol;} @list l12 {mso-list-id:908077682; mso-list-template-ids:920923782;} @list l12:level1 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:?; mso-level-tab-stop:36.0pt; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:-18.0pt; mso-ansi-font-size:10.0pt; font-family:Symbol;} @list l12:level2 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:o; mso-level-tab-stop:72.0pt; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:-18.0pt; mso-ansi-font-size:10.0pt; font-family:”Courier New”; mso-bidi-font-family:”Times New Roman”;} @list l13 {mso-list-id:956063202; mso-list-template-ids:-382556514;} @list l13:level1 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:?; mso-level-tab-stop:36.0pt; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:-18.0pt; mso-ansi-font-size:10.0pt; font-family:Symbol;} @list l13:level2 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:o; mso-level-tab-stop:72.0pt; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:-18.0pt; mso-ansi-font-size:10.0pt; font-family:”Courier New”; mso-bidi-font-family:”Times New Roman”;} @list l14 {mso-list-id:973222125; mso-list-template-ids:1392155010;} @list l14:level1 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:?; mso-level-tab-stop:36.0pt; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:-18.0pt; mso-ansi-font-size:10.0pt; font-family:Symbol;} @list l14:level2 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:o; mso-level-tab-stop:72.0pt; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:-18.0pt; mso-ansi-font-size:10.0pt; font-family:”Courier New”; mso-bidi-font-family:”Times New Roman”;} @list l14:level3 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:?; mso-level-tab-stop:108.0pt; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:-18.0pt; mso-ansi-font-size:10.0pt; font-family:Wingdings;} @list l15 {mso-list-id:996691536; mso-list-template-ids:892872600;} @list l15:level1 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:?; mso-level-tab-stop:36.0pt; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:-18.0pt; mso-ansi-font-size:10.0pt; font-family:Symbol;} @list l15:level2 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:o; mso-level-tab-stop:72.0pt; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:-18.0pt; mso-ansi-font-size:10.0pt; font-family:”Courier New”; mso-bidi-font-family:”Times New Roman”;} @list l16 {mso-l
ist-id:1055079242; mso-list-template-ids:-1914527732;} @list l16:level1 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:?; mso-level-tab-stop:36.0pt; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:-18.0pt; mso-ansi-font-size:10.0pt; font-family:Symbol;} @list l17 {mso-list-id:1087581520; mso-list-template-ids:1215082730;} @list l17:level1 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:?; mso-level-tab-stop:36.0pt; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:-18.0pt; mso-ansi-font-size:10.0pt; font-family:Symbol;} @list l18 {mso-list-id:1089154822; mso-list-template-ids:1793881628;} @list l18:level1 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:?; mso-level-tab-stop:36.0pt; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:-18.0pt; mso-ansi-font-size:10.0pt; font-family:Symbol;} @list l19 {mso-list-id:1190214918; mso-list-template-ids:-1220741616;} @list l19:level1 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:?; mso-level-tab-stop:36.0pt; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:-18.0pt; mso-ansi-font-size:10.0pt; font-family:Symbol;} @list l20 {mso-list-id:1286349484; mso-list-template-ids:-763206088;} @list l20:level1 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:?; mso-level-tab-stop:36.0pt; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:-18.0pt; mso-ansi-font-size:10.0pt; font-family:Symbol;} @list l21 {mso-list-id:1302420129; mso-list-template-ids:313686702;} @list l21:level1 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:?; mso-level-tab-stop:36.0pt; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:-18.0pt; mso-ansi-font-size:10.0pt; font-family:Symbol;} @list l21:level2 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:o; mso-level-tab-stop:72.0pt; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:-18.0pt; mso-ansi-font-size:10.0pt; font-family:”Courier New”; mso-bidi-font-family:”Times New Roman”;} @list l22 {mso-list-id:1361124874; mso-list-template-ids:931947828;} @list l22:level1 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:?; mso-level-tab-stop:36.0pt; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:-18.0pt; mso-ansi-font-size:10.0pt; font-family:Symbol;} @list l23 {mso-list-id:1493568230; mso-list-template-ids:-1387095316;} @list l23:level1 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:?; mso-level-tab-stop:36.0pt; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:-18.0pt; mso-ansi-font-size:10.0pt; font-family:Symbol;} @list l24 {mso-list-id:1665860782; mso-list-template-ids:1533168810;} @list l24:level1 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:?; mso-level-tab-stop:36.0pt; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:-18.0pt; mso-ansi-font-size:10.0pt; font-family:Symbol;} @list l25 {mso-list-id:1793595278; mso-list-template-ids:-945764764;} @list l25:level1 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:?; mso-level-tab-stop:36.0pt; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:-18.0pt; mso-ansi-font-size:10.0pt; font-family:Symbol;} @list l25:level2 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:o; mso-level-tab-stop:72.0pt; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:-18.0pt; mso-ansi-font-size:10.0pt; font-family:”Courier New”; mso-bidi-font-family:”Times New Roman”;} @list l26 {mso-list-id:2006324079; mso-list-template-ids:1650485778;} @list l26:level1 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:?; mso-level-tab-stop:36.0pt; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:-18.0pt; mso-ansi-font-size:10.0pt; font-family:Symbol;} @list l26:level2 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:o; mso-level-tab-stop:72.0pt; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:-18.0pt; mso-ansi-font-size:10.0pt; font-family:”Courier New”; mso-bidi-font-family:”Times New Roman”;} @list l27 {mso-list-id:2023775117; mso-list-template-ids:-396337646;} @list l27:level1 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:?; mso-level-tab-stop:36.0pt; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:-18.0pt; mso-ansi-font-size:10.0pt; font-family:Symbol;} @list l27:level2 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:o; mso-level-tab-stop:72.0pt; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:-18.0pt; mso-ansi-font-size:10.0pt; font-family:”Courier New”; mso-bidi-font-family:”Times New Roman”;} ol {margin-bottom:0cm;} ul {margin-bottom:0cm;} –>

What I will tackle this evening is an updated version of the notes I used for the Regional Integration: Opportunities to Face the Crisis conference in Asuncion, Paraguay, and the Philippine WS on ASEAN, earlier this year. There is no claim that regional responses are the only viable responses to the global crisis, but hopefully we would be able to determine if it is appropriate to study and consider them as part of the many options on alternates we can try.

Before the crisis, it has been projected that in about a decade, the South –that is, the developing countries – would account for more than half of the world income and more than 50% of global trade. It has been trumpeted all over that Asia together with other emerging economies would be the major growth drivers in the world economy, highlighting the relevance of South-South cooperation, particularly regional economic integration in Asia.

For Asia, at least, this claim has been put to the test with the onset of the global financial crisis that put into the spotlight the basic development paradigm deployed by what is considered the world over as prosperous Asia.

In terms of what has happened in the last year and a half, following are some observations on how Asia tried to respond to the crisis:

  • First, unlike what characterized how the North (particularly Western Europe and North America) responded to the crisis, Asia’s response does not include massive bailout packages to failing corporations, particularly ailing financial entities.
    • This highlights the differential manifestations of the crisis. While financialization is a global phenomenon, sparing no one and certainly not Asia, Asia still hosts one of the most robust productive capacity worldwide – that is, the real economy remains the most significant feature of Asia’s growth and development.
  • Second, in most countries, though, the immediate response was to address the liquidity crunch and the crisis of confidence, especially in the banking system. This included moves to increase deposit insurance coverage, and guarantees on deposit-taking institutions. As a result, massive bank runs have been avoided.
  • Third, from the initial liquidity crunch, economic slowdown became the norm. Hence, governments moved to address this by increasing liquidity and easing credit and monetary policy, including intervening in foreign exchange markets. Many state enterprises also increased their shareholdings in publicly-traded companies. The result – relative low interest rates.
  • Fourth, stimulus packages have at their center fiscal policy and public spending, although social sector spending has not received much attention.
    • Asian countries have devoted between less than ½ percent of GDP to their fiscal stimulus package to more than 9%.
    • Among the biggest packages are those of the following:
      • Singapore, $15B (6%)
      • Malaysia, $2B initially to $16B (9% of GDP)
      • China, $600B spread only over 2 years
    • Most of the stimulus packages have a central tax break or tax credit component, as well as capital spending, including re-capitalization of state-run banks, most notably in India.
  • Fifth, the Asian response has been centered around resiliency. That is, they are focused on minimizing unemployment and on creating employment opportunities
    • With programs like job credits or payouts to employers of up to 12% of salaries (Singapore)
    • Various skills upgrading and retraining programs
    • Welfare support to retrenched workers and returning overseas workers.
    • Such resiliency packages, though, highlighted some tensions inherent in the increasingly connected Asian economies and job markets.
      • For instance, part of Malaysia’s and Singapore’s response is to cut down or crackdown on migrant workers, a classic response to appease worker’s restiveness at home, and a blatant disregard to the ripple such moves might effect.
  • Sixth, at least the ASEAN+3 is trying to improve on a regional financial cooperation first introduced in 2000 as a response to the 97/98 Asian financial crisis.
    • The Chiang Mai Initiative is a collaboration to create a network of bilateral swap arrangements to manage short-term liquidity problems.
    • From $20B in 2000, it increased to $80B in 2008, and earlier this year was increased further to $120B.
    • Moreover, the swaps are being multilateralized, a step towards developing from a bilateral into a regional pool.
    • This is about the only such regional initiative in Asia. There is no equivalent for South Asia, or in West and Central Asia.

From these observations, several key questions emerge:

  • 1st: would Asia be able to export its way out of the crisis? Is it even proper to aim only for this?
  • 2nd:: would the regional integration vaunted to be necessary to solidify and further the growth in Asia be resorted to, or given life in practice, in the wake of this crisis?
  • 3rd: in the design of crisis response, what is Asia aiming for?
    • Is it just to recover previous levels of consumption and economic activity?
    • How much of the response is for immediate relief, extremely necessary at this time?
    • And how much of this response is for the long-term and tries to take advantage of converting the crisis into opportunity?

At this point, I would like to emphasize three points that interrogate what Asia has managed or not managed to do:

  • One, note that the responses now differ qualitatively from the responses Asia had a decade ago.
    • There is no IMF, not least because the IMF has gained notoriety and lost a lot of credibility because of how it bungled its job in the late 1990s.
    • Not only is there no IMF, the policy and programmatic responses of Asia have been antithesis to what the IMF formerly prescribed.
      • There was no interest cure that killed business; instead efforts were concentrated on preserving relative low interest rates (including intervention in the forex market).
      • There were many elements of direct transfers, subsidies, and re-capitalization; something the IMF would never do (at least before).
    • In short, the responses are not patently neoliberal.
  • Two, these responses have not warranted enough incentive towards a focus on internal demand, on the one hand, and on coordinated expanded demand regionally, on the other.
    • More pointedly, it is a concern that Asia should even set as its main objective the recovery and maintenance of consumption levels prior to the crisis.
    • We should not be overly concerned about trying to save what has been clearly a cause of failure. It is high time for Asia to draw from regional resources and invent something that will again set it apart – or, place it in cooperation with other regions trying to imagine things differently.
  • Three, there is concern that ASEAN+3 finds it difficult to make good on regional financial cooperation as designed through the Chiang Mai Initiative and related processes.
    • Take for instance, when South Korea got hit when the Lehman Brothers collapsed, it negotiated a $30B foreign exchange swap with the US Federal Reserve and not the ASEAN+3. (They came later.)
    • Despite increases in commitments, the CMI is still not functional, and the IMF still plays a role when countries tap the CMI for more than 20% of their requirement, detracting from the importance of financial as well policy autonomy for Asia.

There are certainly elements of response – some quite innovative or at least properly targeted – in Asia. The question is whether Asia is able to turn the crisis on its head, and be able to emerge with another unique contribution to development discourse as it has been known to have done in the past.

Moreover, we as civil society and social movements, in our interrogation of possible alternatives, esp. if we have little or no hold on power – the question of how to get that power either by holding political power ourselves or rallying massive constituencies on our side – is key.

The final set of points I wish to make has to do with the areas where regional response would be crucial:

  • One, the need to focus on internal demand and a more coordinated rationalization of regional demand.
    • There is need to re-imagine trade and production cooperation, where instead of competition, the prevailing principles would be cooperation, complementation and solidarity.
    • Such arrangement must address the issue of excess, and should have as outer limit some climate and ecological threshold.
  • Two, there is need to overhaul the financial architecture for Asia
    • Away from dependence on Northern currencies, esp. the American $
    • And towards the pooling of alternative sources of development finance
    • As well as appropriate surveillance and monitoring systems (without the IMF) that assist countries and build confidence that every one takes responsibility for regional financial stability
  • Three, there is need to strengthen regional stockpiling for food security
    • South Asia has better experience on this although technically Southeast Asia pledges bigger reserves
    • Away from trade logic and towards regional self-help and development of crisis response capabilities.
  • Four, there is need to re-imagine the public
    • It is time to talk about the public not only in the narrow confines of the State or the government, but also support different forms of provisioning that allowed communities to survive at a time that the State was neglecting them.
    • It must be recognized that such strength can be scaled up at the national and the regional level.
  • Five, whatever alternative we think of, resonance with the people is important.
    • We need to start where there is clear demand, and patent need, to make regional arrangements acceptable to the people
      • Migration
      • Rights and democracy
      • Decent living standards and environment
      • Ability to generate economic activity and distribute its fruits equitably
    • There is need to also work on something that works and shows results in the immediate even as the strategic alternative structures are still being constructed.

Jenina Joy Chavez / Focus on the Global South

 

(Presentation at the Conference on “Regional Integration: an Opportunity Presented by the Crisis”, prostate Asuncion, Paraguay, treatment July 21-22, 2009.)

 

There is no claim that regional responses are the only viable responses to the global crisis, but hopefully we would be able to determine if it is appropriate to study and consider them as part of the many options on alternates we can try.

Before the crisis, it has been projected that in about a decade, the South –that is, the developing countries – would account for more than half of the world income and more than 50% of global trade. It has been trumpeted all over that Asia together with other emerging economies would be the major growth drivers in the world economy, highlighting the relevance of South-South cooperation, particularly regional economic integration in Asia.

For Asia, at least, this claim has been put to the test with the onset of the global financial crisis that put into the spotlight the basic development paradigm deployed by what is considered the world over as prosperous Asia.

In terms of what has happened in the last year and a half, following are some observations on how Asia tried to respond to the crisis:

  • First, unlike what characterized how the North (particularly Western Europe and North America) responded to the crisis, Asia’s response does not include massive bailout packages to failing corporations, particularly ailing financial entities.
    • This highlights the differential manifestations of the crisis. While financialization is a global phenomenon, sparing no one and certainly not Asia, Asia still hosts one of the most robust productive capacity worldwide – that is, the real economy remains the most significant feature of Asia’s growth and development.
  • Second, in most countries, though, the immediate response was to address the liquidity crunch and the crisis of confidence, especially in the banking system. This included moves to increase deposit insurance coverage, and guarantees on deposit-taking institutions. As a result, massive bank runs have been avoided.
  • Third, from the initial liquidity crunch, economic slowdown became the norm. Hence, governments moved to address this by increasing liquidity and easing credit and monetary policy, including intervening in foreign exchange markets. Many state enterprises also increased their shareholdings in publicly-traded companies. The result – relative low interest rates.
  • Fourth, stimulus packages have at their center fiscal policy and public spending, although social sector spending has not received much attention.
    • Asian countries have devoted between less than ½ percent of GDP to their fiscal stimulus package to more than 9%.
    • Among the biggest packages are those of the following:
      • Singapore, $15B (6%)
      • Malaysia, $2B initially to $16B (9% of GDP)
      • China, $600B spread only over 2 years
    • Most of the stimulus packages have a central tax break or tax credit component, as well as capital spending, including re-capitalization of state-run banks, most notably in India.
  • Fifth, the Asian response has been centered around resiliency. That is, they are focused on minimizing unemployment and on creating employment opportunities
    • With programs like job credits or payouts to employers of up to 12% of salaries (Singapore)
    • Various skills upgrading and retraining programs
    • Welfare support to retrenched workers and returning overseas workers.
    • Such resiliency packages, though, highlighted some tensions inherent in the increasingly connected Asian economies and job markets.
      • For instance, part of Malaysia’s and Singapore’s response is to cut down or crackdown on migrant workers, a classic response to appease worker’s restiveness at home, and a blatant disregard to the ripple such moves might effect.
  • Sixth, at least the ASEAN+3 is trying to improve on a regional financial cooperation first introduced in 2000 as a response to the 97/98 Asian financial crisis.
    • The Chiang Mai Initiative is a collaboration to create a network of bilateral swap arrangements to manage short-term liquidity problems.
    • From $20B in 2000, it increased to $80B in 2008, and earlier this year was increased further to $120B.
    • Moreover, the swaps are being multilateralized, a step towards developing from a bilateral into a regional pool.
    • This is about the only such regional initiative in Asia. There is no equivalent for South Asia, or in West and Central Asia.

From these observations, several key questions emerge:

  • 1st: would Asia be able to export its way out of the crisis? Is it even proper to aim only for this?
  • 2nd:: would the regional integration vaunted to be necessary to solidify and further the growth in Asia be resorted to, or given life in practice, in the wake of this crisis?
  • 3rd: in the design of crisis response, what is Asia aiming for?
    • Is it just to recover previous levels of consumption and economic activity?
    • How much of the response is for immediate relief, extremely necessary at this time?
    • And how much of this response is for the long-term and tries to take advantage of converting the crisis into opportunity?

At this point, I would like to emphasize three points that interrogate what Asia has managed or not managed to do:

  • One, note that the responses now differ qualitatively from the responses Asia had a decade ago.
    • There is no IMF, not least because the IMF has gained notoriety and lost a lot of credibility because of how it bungled its job in the late 1990s.
    • Not only is there no IMF, the policy and programmatic responses of Asia have been antithesis to what the IMF formerly prescribed.
      • There was no interest cure that killed business; instead efforts were concentrated on preserving relative low interest rates (including intervention in the forex market).
      • There were many elements of direct transfers, subsidies, and re-capitalization; something the IMF would never do (at least before).
    • In short, the responses are not patently neoliberal.
  • Two, these responses have not warranted enough incentive towards a focus on internal demand, on the one hand, and on coordinated expanded demand regionally, on the other.
    • More pointedly, it is a concern that Asia should even set as its main objective the recovery and maintenance of consumption levels prior to the crisis.
    • We should not be overly concerned about trying to save what has been clearly a cause of failure. It is high time for Asia to draw from regional resources and invent something that will again set it apart – or, place it in cooperation with other regions trying to imagine things differently.
  • Three, there is concern that ASEAN+3 finds it difficult to make good on regional financial cooperation as designed through the Chiang Mai Initiative and related processes.
    • Take for instance, when South Korea got hit when the Lehman Brothers collapsed, it negotiated a $30B foreign exchange swap with the US Federal Reserve and not the ASEAN+3. (They came later.)
    • Despite increases in commitments, the CMI is still not functional, and the IMF still plays a role when countries tap the CMI for more than 20% of their requirement, detracting from the importance of financial as well policy autonomy for Asia.

There are certainly elements of response – some quite innovative or at least properly targeted – in Asia. The question is whether Asia is able to turn the crisis on its head, and be able to emerge with another unique contribution to development discourse as it has been known to have done in the past.

Moreover, we as civil society and social movements, in our interrogation of possible alternatives, esp. if we have little or no hold on power – the question of how to get that power either by holding political power ourselves or rallying massive constituencies on our side – is key.

The final set of points I wish to make has to do with the areas where regional response would be crucial:

  • One, the need to focus on internal demand and a more coordinated rationalization of regional demand.
    • There is need to re-imagine trade and production cooperation, where instead of competition, the prevailing principles would be cooperation, complementation and solidarity.
    • Such arrangement must address the issue of excess, and should have as outer limit some climate and ecological threshold.
  • Two, there is need to overhaul the financial architecture for Asia
    • Away from dependence on Northern currencies, esp. the American $
    • And towards the pooling of alternative sources of development finance
    • As well as appropriate surveillance and monitoring systems (without the IMF) that assist countries and build confidence that every one takes responsibility for regional financial stability
  • Three, there is need to strengthen regional stockpiling for food security
    • South Asia has better experience on this although technically Southeast Asia pledges bigger reserves
    • Away from trade logic and towards regional self-help and development of crisis response capabilities.
  • Four, there is need to re-imagine the public
    • It is time to talk about the public not only in the narrow confines of the State or the government, but also support different forms of provisioning that allowed communities to survive at a time that the State was neglecting them.
    • It must be recognized that such strength can be scaled up at the national and the regional level.
  • Five, whatever alternative we think of, resonance with the people is important.
    • We need to start where there is clear demand, and patent need, to make regional arrangements acceptable to the people
      • Migration
      • Rights and democracy
      • Decent living standards and environment
      • Ability to generate economic activity and distribute its fruits equitably
    • There is need to also work on something that works and shows results in the immediate even as the strategic alternative structures are still being constructed.

Jenina Joy Chavez / Focus on the Global South

 

(Presentation at the Conference on “Regional Integration: an Opportunity Presented by the Crisis”, cure Asuncion, treatment Paraguay, search July 21-22, 2009.)

 

<!– /* Font Definitions */ @font-face {font-family:Wingdings; panose-1:5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0; mso-font-charset:2; mso-generic-font-family:auto; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:0 268435456 0 0 -2147483648 0;} /* Style Definitions */ p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal {mso-style-parent:””; margin:0cm; margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Arial; mso-fareast-font-family:”Times New Roman”; mso-bidi-font-family:”Times New Roman”;} @page Section1 {size:612.0pt 792.0pt; margin:72.0pt 90.0pt 72.0pt 90.0pt; mso-header-margin:36.0pt; mso-footer-margin:36.0pt; mso-paper-source:0;} div.Section1 {page:Section1;} /* List Definitions */ @list l0 {mso-list-id:34821200; mso-list-template-ids:-1368741596;} @list l0:level1 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:?; mso-level-tab-stop:36.0pt; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:-18.0pt; mso-ansi-font-size:10.0pt; font-family:Symbol;} @list l0:level2 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:o; mso-level-tab-stop:72.0pt; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:-18.0pt; mso-ansi-font-size:10.0pt; font-family:”Courier New”; mso-bidi-font-family:”Times New Roman”;} @list l0:level3 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:?; mso-level-tab-stop:108.0pt; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:-18.0pt; mso-ansi-font-size:10.0pt; font-family:Wingdings;} @list l1 {mso-list-id:735592364; mso-list-template-ids:-555303036;} @list l1:level1 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:?; mso-level-tab-stop:36.0pt; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:-18.0pt; mso-ansi-font-size:10.0pt; font-family:Symbol;} @list l1:level2 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:o; mso-level-tab-stop:72.0pt; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:-18.0pt; mso-ansi-font-size:10.0pt; font-family:”Courier New”; mso-bidi-font-family:”Times New Roman”;} @list l1:level3 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:?; mso-level-tab-stop:108.0pt; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:-18.0pt; mso-ansi-font-size:10.0pt; font-family:Wingdings;} @list l2 {mso-list-id:825246276; mso-list-template-ids:-65246620;} @list l2:level1 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:?; mso-level-tab-stop:36.0pt; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:-18.0pt; mso-ansi-font-size:10.0pt; font-family:Symbol;} @list l2:level2 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:o; mso-level-tab-stop:72.0pt; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:-18.0pt; mso-ansi-font-size:10.0pt; font-family:”Courier New”; mso-bidi-font-family:”Times New Roman”;} @list l2:level3 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:?; mso-level-tab-stop:108.0pt; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:-18.0pt; mso-ansi-font-size:10.0pt; font-family:Wingdings;} @list l3 {mso-list-id:973222125; mso-list-template-ids:1392155010;} @list l3:level1 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:?; mso-level-tab-stop:36.0pt; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:-18.0pt; mso-ansi-font-size:10.0pt; font-family:Symbol;} @list l3:level2 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:o; mso-level-tab-stop:72.0pt; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:-18.0pt; mso-ansi-font-size:10.0pt; font-family:”Courier New”; mso-bidi-font-family:”Times New Roman”;} @list l3:level3 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:?; mso-level-tab-stop:108.0pt; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:-18.0pt; mso-ansi-font-size:10.0pt; font-family:Wingdings;} ol {margin-bottom:0cm;} ul {margin-bottom:0cm;} –>

What I will tackle this evening is an updated version of the notes I used for the Regional Integration: Opportunities to Face the Crisis conference in Asuncion, Paraguay, and the Philippine WS on ASEAN, earlier this year. There is no claim that regional responses are the only viable responses to the global crisis, but hopefully we would be able to determine if it is appropriate to study and consider them as part of the many options on alternates we can try.

Before the crisis, it has been projected that in about a decade, the South –that is, the developing countries – would account for more than half of the world income and more than 50% of global trade. It has been trumpeted all over that Asia together with other emerging economies would be the major growth drivers in the world economy, highlighting the relevance of South-South cooperation, particularly regional economic integration in Asia.

For Asia, at least, this claim has been put to the test with the onset of the global financial crisis that put into the spotlight the basic development paradigm deployed by what is considered the world over as prosperous Asia.

In terms of what has happened in the last year and a half, following are some observations on how Asia tried to respond to the crisis:

First, unlike what characterized how the North (particularly Western Europe and North America) responded to the crisis, Asia’s response does not include massive bailout packages to failing corporations, particularly ailing financial entities.

This highlights the differential manifestations of the crisis. While financialization is a global phenomenon, sparing no one and certainly not Asia, Asia still hosts one of the most robust productive capacity worldwide – that is, the real economy remains the most significant feature of Asia’s growth and development.

Second, in most countries, though, the immediate response was to address the liquidity crunch and the crisis of confidence, especially in the banking system. This included moves to increase deposit insurance coverage, and guarantees on deposit-taking institutions. As a result, massive bank runs have been avoided.

Third, from the initial liquidity crunch, economic slowdown became the norm. Hence, governments moved to address this by increasing liquidity and easing credit and monetary policy, including intervening in foreign exchange markets. Many state enterprises also increased their shareholdings in publicly-traded companies. The result – relative low interest rates.

Fourth, stimulus packages have at their center fiscal policy and public spending, although social sector spending has not received much attention.

Asian countries have devoted between less than ½ percent of GDP to their fiscal stimulus package to more than 9%.

Among the biggest packages are those of the following:

      • Singapore, $15B (6%)
      • Malaysia, $2B initially to $16B (9% of GDP)
      • China, $600B spread only over 2 years

Most of the stimulus packages have a central tax break or tax credit component, as well as capital spending, including re-capitalization of state-run banks, most notably in India.

Fifth, the Asian response has been centered around resiliency. That is, they are focused on minimizing unemployment and on creating employment opportunities

With programs like job credits or payouts to employers of up to 12% of salaries (Singapore)

Various skills upgrading and retraining programs

Welfare support to retrenched workers and returning overseas workers.

Such resiliency packages, though, highlighted some tensions inherent in the increasingly connected Asian economies and job markets.

      • For instance, part of Malaysia’s and Singapore’s response is to cut down or crackdown on migrant workers, a classic response to appease worker’s restiveness at home, and a blatant disregard to the ripple such moves might effect.

Sixth, at least the ASEAN+3 is trying to improve on a regional financial cooperation first introduced in 2000 as a response to the 97/98 Asian financial crisis.

The Chiang Mai Initiative is a collaboration to create a network of bilateral swap arrangements to manage short-term liquidity problems.

From $20B in 2000, it increased to $80B in 2008, and earlier this year was increased further to $120B.

Moreover, the swaps are being multilateralized, a step towards developing from a bilateral into a regional pool.

This is about the only such regional initiative in Asia. There is no equivalent for South Asia, or in West and Central Asia.

From these observations, several key questions emerge:

1st: would Asia be able to export its way out of the crisis? Is it even proper to aim only for this?

2nd:: would the regional integration vaunted to be necessary to solidify and further the growth in Asia be resorted to, or given life in practice, in the wake of this crisis?

3rd: in the design of crisis response, what is Asia aiming for?

Is it just to recover previous levels of consumption and economic activity?

How much of the response is for immediate relief, extremely necessary at this time?

And how much of this response is for the long-term and tries to take advantage of converting the crisis into opportunity?

At this point, I would like to emphasize three points that interrogate what Asia has managed or not managed to do:

One, note that the responses now differ qualitatively from the responses Asia had a decade ago.

There is no IMF, not least because the IMF has gained notoriety and lost a lot of credibility because of how it bungled its job in the late 1990s.

Not only is there no IMF, the policy and programmatic responses of Asia have been antithesis to what the IMF formerly prescribed.

      • There was no interest cure that killed business; instead efforts were concentrated on preserving relative low interest rates (including intervention in the forex market).
      • There were many elements of direct transfers, subsidies, and re-capitalization; something the IMF would never do (at least before).

In short, the responses are not patently neoliberal.

Two, these responses have not warranted enough incentive towards a focus on internal demand, on the one hand, and on coordinated expanded demand regionally, on the other.

More pointedly, it is a concern that Asia should even set as its main objective the recovery and maintenance of consumption levels prior to the crisis.

We should not be overly concerned about trying to save what has been clearly a cause of failure. It is high time for Asia to draw from regional resources and invent something that will again set it apart – or, place it in cooperation with other regions trying to imagine things differently.

Three, there is concern that ASEAN+3 finds it difficult to make good on regional financial cooperation as designed through the Chiang Mai Initiative and related processes.

Take for instance, when South Korea got hit when the Lehman Brothers collapsed, it negotiated a $30B foreign exchange swap with the US Federal Reserve and not the ASEAN+3. (They came later.)

Despite increases in commitments, the CMI is still not functional, and the IMF still plays a role when countries tap the CMI for more than 20% of their requirement, detracting from the importance of financial as well policy autonomy for Asia.

There are certainly elements of response – some quite innovative or at least properly targeted – in Asia. The question is whether Asia is able to turn the crisis on its head, and be able to emerge with another unique contribution to development discourse as it has been known to have done in the past.

Moreover, we as civil society and social movements, in our interrogation of possible alternatives, esp. if we have little or no hold on power – the question of how to get that power either by holding political power ourselves or rallying massive constituencies on our side – is key.

The final set of points I wish to make has to do with the areas where regional response would be crucial:

One, the need to focus on internal demand and a more coordinated rationalization of regional demand.

There is need to re-imagine trade and production cooperation, where instead of competition, the prevailing principles would be cooperation, complementation and solidarity.

Such arrangement must address the issue of excess, and should have as outer limit some climate and ecological threshold.

Two, there is need to overhaul the financial architecture for Asia

Away from dependence on Northern currencies, esp. the American $

And towards the pooling of alternative sources of development finance

As well as appropriate surveillance and monitoring systems (without the IMF) that assist countries and build confidence that every one takes responsibility for regional financial stability

Three, there is need to strengthen regional stockpiling for food security

South Asia has better experience on this although technically Southeast Asia pledges bigger reserves

Away from trade logic and towards regional self-help and development of crisis response capabilities.

Four, there is need to re-imagine the public

It is time to talk about the public not only in the narrow confines of the State or the government, but also support different forms of provisioning that allowed communities to survive at a time that the State was neglecting them.

It must be recognized that such strength can be scaled up at the national and the regional level.

Five, whatever alternative we think of, resonance with the people is important.

We need to start where there is clear demand, and patent need, to make regional arrangements acceptable to the people

      • Migration
      • Rights and democracy
      • Decent living standards and environment
      • Ability to generate economic activity and distribute its fruits equitably

There is need to also work on something that works and shows results in the immediate even as the strategic alternative structures are still being constructed.

El 8 de mayo, los cuatro países miembros de Mercosur (Argentina, Brasil, Paraguay y Uruguay), junto con los miembros de la Unión de Naciones Suramericanas (UNASUR) Bolivia, Ecuador y Venezuela, se reunieron y convinieron finalmente los detalles de la formación del Banco del Sur (BDS) en la isla Margarita, Venezuela. Presidenta de Chile, Michelle Bachelet, asistió como invitada. Este elemento clave de una nueva arquitectura financiera en América Latina y el Caribe tiene el potencial de reorientar la estructura de financiación del desarrollo en la región1.

Los ministros de Finanzas acordaron las normas técnicas para el BDS el 8 de mayo. Este acuerdo detallado corre con un poco de retraso. El 9 de diciembre de 2007, los entonces presidentes de estos siete países firmaron el acta fundacional en el Palacio Presidencial de Buenos Aires y el 28 septiembre formaron el convenio constitutivo.

Sin embargo, las negociaciones tomaron 21 meses completos. El anfitrión de Argentina, el ex ministro de Economía Carlos Fernández, puso una cara positiva, elogiando el acuerdo “dado a que [el proceso] se llevó a cabo durante una crisis económica y financiera internacional”.

“Hemos concluido las discusiones a nivel ministerial y lo que queda es la aprobación por los presidentes y congresos nacionales,” dijo Fernández en un comunicado de prensa con su homólogo de Brasil, Guido Mantega. Añadió que no creía que la ratificación por los siete países miembros sería un problema, dado que los negociadores ya han llegado a un acuerdo sobre algunas de las normas de funcionamiento más polémicas del BDS. “El convenio constitutivo trae reglamentaciones que han sido negociadas por comisiones a nivel de ministerios de economía y de hacienda en la que han dilucidado sobre los aportes de capital, el mecanismo de votación, el reclutamiento de personal, la jurisprudencia, las consideraciones tributarias y jurídicas de los funcionarios y se ha aclarado la funcionalidad del banco.”2

Un ejemplo que vale la pena destacar es que la regla de un país, un voto ha sido alterada de hecho. “Cada país tendrá un voto en la entidad”, dijo Fernández, pero agregó que la aprobación de préstamos equivalentes a $ 7.0 millones en dólares exigirá el apoyo de los votos que representen dos tercios de la suscripción de capital. Según el acuerdo, Argentina, Brasil y Venezuela proveerán $2.000 millones cada uno; Uruguay y Ecuador, $400 millones cada uno; y Bolivia y Paraguay $200 millones cada uno. Los importes deberán ser pagados en cinco cuotas durante un plazo de cinco años3.

Sincronización de los esfuerzos regionales

Dadas las actuales dificultades financieras mundiales, algunos podrían cuestionar la lógica de, o al menos qué tan oportuno es, crear una infraestructura financiera regional4 mientras el sistema actual está al borde del colapso. Pero los líderes latinoamericanos actuaron ahora precisamente para evitar el tipo de impacto regional experimentado en la década de 1990, cuando el “efecto tequila” que desatado por la caída precipitosa de la moneda nacional mexicana golpeó duro a las economías de América Latina, siendo un factor en el colapso de la economía argentina en el período 2001-2002.

Estas crisis latinoamericanas, como las que ahora se están experimentando por todo el mundo, tuvieron como resultado un desempleo masivo y niveles de indigencia sin precedentes, causando muertes por inanición en comunidades marginales de países exportadores de alimentos. Tal como en muchas crisis financieras, algunos se beneficiaron, emergiendo como multimillonarios.

Si bien la cooperación mundial es práctica y en definitiva necesaria para resolver cuestiones como la regulación de los bancos transnacionales, el establecimiento de normas de contabilidad, y la vigilancia o eliminación de paraísos tributarios extranjeros, el comercio regional y de finanzas también pueden desempeñar un papel vital en la estabilidad regional.

En tiempos de recesión global, los grupos multilaterales financieros frecuentemente disputan cuestiones de estrategia. Primero el G-8, después el G-20, y ahora el G-192 de las Naciones Unidas,5 en su mayoría un grupo de naciones en vías de desarrollo que plantean un plan ideado por Joseph Stiglitz,6 han presentado propuestas en competencia para amortiguar al planeta contra los efectos de los excesos financieros. Los planes de estímulo y rescates financieros mundiales, regionales y nacionales ya han prometido entre nueve y once billones de dólares en fondos.

Entre las recomendaciones del G-192, basadas en la “Comisión de Expertos del Presidente de la Asamblea General de las Naciones Unidas sobrelasreformasdel sistema monetario y financiero internacional ” de Stiglitz, hay varias sugerencias para el papel de los bancos regionales de desarrollo. Por ejemplo, en la sección “Apoyo para las innovaciones financieras para mejorar la reducción del riesgo”, el grupo recomienda lo siguiente:

“Los bancos regionales de desarrollo y otras instituciones oficiales deberían ser alentados a desempeñar un papel activo en la promoción de tales productos financieros. Las instituciones financieras internacionales necesitan explorar innovaciones significativas que mejoren la gestión y distribución del riesgo, y cómo animar a los mercados a mejorar su labor. […] La oferta de préstamos por instituciones financieras internacionales y regionales en divisas locales, en cestas de divisas locales, o en unidades regionales de cuenta, al igual que la cobertura de tasas de intercambio e interés podrían ser pasos importantes en mejorar los mercados internacionales de riesgo”.

Como vecinos cercanos y aliados, las estructuras regionales funcionan con ventajas e inconvenientes específicos. Su proximidad puede facilitar asuntos como la construcción de gasoductos o líneas ferroviarias. Pero los países vecinos también tienen sus rencillas. Un ejemplo de ello surge en la controversia actual entre Brasil y Ecuador relativa al incumplimiento de pagos al Fondo de solidaridad del Banco de Desarrollo de Brasil. Ecuador está rehusando efectuar pagos en un contrato ganado por la gigantesca empresa brasileña Odebrecht7 para construir una represa hidroeléctrica en Ecuador, alegando que fue mal ejecutado y cuestionando los pagos por el paquete de “asistencia extranjera” incluido. Con la celebración frecuente de reuniones políticas en varios foros de América Latina y del Sur, como UNASUR y Mercosur, los gobiernos tienen un fuerte incentivo para resolver estos asuntos. Los presidentes Lula y Correa han conversado sobre el caso aludido, pero Odebrecht ha rechazado las ofertas ecuatorianas para someterse a arbitraje externo.8

En América del Sur, el BDS es visto por los presidentes regionales y algunos de los funcionarios de los ministerios de Economía como un factor clave en la promoción del desarrollo mediante la retención de los flujos de capital en la región. En una entrevista concedida el pasado 28 de abril al diario español El País, el presidente Rafael Correa, un economista de formación, ofrece declaraciones concisas y reveladoras sobre la creación de una nueva arquitectura financiera regional:

“Eso es algo que he venido proponiendo desde hace tiempo y ya se está concretando. En realidad, lo que ha vivido América Latina es un completo absurdo, fruto entre otras cosas del neoliberalismo, porque en la época de los noventa se hicieron todos los bancos centrales autónomos. No existe ninguna razón técnica, teórica, para ello, pero se empeñaron en que con bancos centrales autónomos todo marchaba mejor. Esto fue una gran falsedad. Eran autónomos de nuestras democracias, pero muy dependientes de burócratas internacionales. Esos bancos centrales manejan nuestras reservas monetarias y las invierten en el exterior, en el primer mundo. Y América Latina tiene más de 200.000 millones de dólares para financiar a EE.UU. y Europa. Eso es un absurdo”.

Cuando le preguntaron acerca de sus propuestas alternativas, Correa sugirió:

“Traer esas reservas, hacer un fondo de reservas del Sur que sirva para respaldar las monedas nacionales [de manera que al compartir dichas reservas] se requieren menos reservas por país. […] Así pues, los puntos de la estrategia regional son: el Banco del Sur, el Fondo Regional de Reserva del Sur y la moneda regional, que puede empezar primero como una moneda electrónica, con sistemas de compensación, una especie de unidad de cuenta, como era el ECU.9 Esto es lo que aquí está satanizado. Y eso es lo que ya hemos empezado”.10

El presidente Correa se refirió a las fuerzas conservadoras quecon frecuencia están vinculadas al capital transnacional, las cuales siguen dominando el debate público en América Latina en el ámbito académico y en los medios de comunicación. Estos grupos se oponen firmemente a cualquier cambio en la arquitectura financiera regional de América Latina que disminuya la influencia estadounidense y europea en el sector financiero en general, y concretamente en el sector bancario, al aumentar el control regional de los flujos de capital dentro y fuera de la región, o al reducir los montos de préstamos externos.

El esfuerzo del BDS/UNASUR no carece totalmente de precedentes en el mundo. En otras regiones, las asociaciones comerciales se están ampliando para incluir la cooperación financiera. La Unión Europea y los países asiáticos de la ASEAN junto con Corea, Japón y China han estado promoviendo activamente la reorientación del comercio regional y los pactos de estabilidad financiera con diversos grados de éxito. La Unión Europea y la ASEAN han desarrollado iniciativas regionales específicas para hacer frente a la crisis actual. Estos esfuerzos regionales incluyen la creación de fondos regionales más pequeños para aliviar los efectos adversos de la recesión.

Las ideas del presidente Correa están basadas en el modelo financiero regional de la Unión Europea. La Unidad Monetaria Europea (ECU) fue una precursora del euro. Sus propuestas de banca de desarrollo regional se acatan estrechamente a la experiencia del Banco Europeo para la Reconstrucción y el Desarrollo. Cuando Correa se refiere a un banco (aún sin nombre) que pudiera administrar las reservas de América Latina y emitir bonos, el también describe una estructura similar a la del Banco Central Europeo (BCE).

El grupo ASEAN de naciones asiáticas es otro pionero en el establecimiento de una arquitectura financiera regional. Como región, ASEAN comparte una historia reciente de crisis financieras incluyendo la crisis financiera asiática que comenzó en 1997.11 En su detrimento, los países asiáticos, tal como sus homólogos de América Latina, se sometieron al mismo asesoramiento cuestionable del Fondo Monetario Internacional (FMI) durante las crisis financieras de los noventa. La recuperación más rápida de las naciones, como Malasia y China, que mantuvieron más controles de capital sobre sus finanzas nacionales resultó ser una lección importante para el desarrollo de una autonomía sana de los organismos internacionales. Sin embargo, en gran medida las instituciones financieras internacionales no se han percatado de la lección. Como se lamentaba John Maynard Keynes: “La sabiduría de mucho mundo nos enseña que es mejor para la reputación fracasar convencionalmente que tener éxito de forma no convencional”.12

En Asia, la estructura equivalente al BDS toma la forma del Banco Asiático Desarrollo (BAsD) de la ASEAN.13 El BAsD ahora forma parte de una infraestructura financiera más compleja, recientemente reforzada por cientos de millones de dólares obtenidos en el calor de la crisis financiera mundial. El 3 de mayo, los gobiernos asiáticos respaldaron con su poderío financiero un proyecto regional de estabilización de la ASEAN, conocido como la Iniciativa Chiang Mai (CMI por sus siglas en inglés),14 la cual implica un plan monetario de divisas de $120 mil millones en que están incluidos intercambios y reservas. La Iniciativa Chiang Mai fue ratificada por los países de la ASEAN, más Japón, China y Corea del Sur.15 Tanto China como Japón convinieron proporcionar $38,4 mil millones, con Corea del Sur contribuyendo otros $19,2 mil millones, y el resto de los $100 mil millones prometidos divididos entre los miembros restantes de la ASEAN.

Mantener el capital en la región

Martin Wolf, el analista económico principal del Financial Times, comentó sobre los esfuerzos de la ASEAN en un artículo titulado “Asia necesita su propio fondo monetario” publicado el 18 de mayo de 2004. Wolf señala: “Hoy día los gobiernos asiáticos están exportando cantidades asombrosas de capital, en su inmensa mayoría a Estados Unidos. Esto no es solamente absurdo. También es desestabilizador económicamente.”16 Si bien el capital de Asia ahora busca inversiones en todo el mundo, no deja de apoyar a sus vecinos. Fondos como el nuevo fondo de la ASEAN animarán a que algo de las grandes reservas de capital de la región permanezcan en Asia.

El término “absurdo” es utilizado por Martin Wolf para describir a los países más pobres de Asia poniendo sus reservas en Letras del Tesoro de EE.UU. El Presidente Correa utiliza la misma palabra cuando habla acerca de las reservas latinoamericanas. Ambos esfuerzos regionales intentan racionalizar los flujos de capital, reorientando parte para solventar las necesidades de la región.

Para los países en vías de desarrollo, la segunda conclusión del Dr. Wolf de que la exportación de capital es “desestabilizador económicamente” cobra una urgencia particular.

La estabilidad económica se basa en la buena planificación económica. Si un país tiene el espacio político para desarrollar un plan, entonces también tiene la oportunidad de un desarrollo planificado. En el mejor de los casos, una menor dependencia en los sistemas financieros externos, tales como el FMI y el Tesoro de EE.UU., significa que las naciones más pobres de América Latina pueden utilizar sus propios fondos para fomentar su propio desarrollo. Mantener las reservas del gobierno en el extranjero en bonos denominados en otras monedas frecuentemente rinde menos de 4% al año (y ahora rinde aún menos), mientras que los gobiernos de América Latina a veces pagan más del 10% de interés sobre la deuda externa pública, gran parte de la cual también está denominada en dólares y euros.

Exportar capital financiero es desestabilizador porque un país entonces tiene que pedir prestado para cubrir sus propias necesidades. La deuda exterior elevada fuerza a un país a pasar por grandes apuros en obtener fondos para refinanciar el monto principal de la deuda y pagar los intereses de cada año. Esta planificación a corto plazo causa que sea imposible el desarrollo a largo plazo. Si un proyecto de desarrollo requiere de grandes fondos, esos fondos a menudo sólo están disponibles a través de endeudamiento externo adicional, lo cual implica más deuda, un círculo vicioso que al final es asfixiante para el desarrollo económico nacional. Tal es el caso en muchos gobiernos de América del Sur, con Argentina sirviendo de excelente ejemplo.

El absurdo de mantener reservas en bonos denominados en dólares y euros desafía la lógica, excepto en el mundo del comercio y especulación de divisas en el cual sigue siendo esencial proteger la moneda propia utilizando grandes reservas extranjeras. Este es un juego arriesgado y costoso para el cual los países europeos ya no pagan para jugar.

Del mismo modo, las motivaciones de desarrollo en la formación del BDS reflejan la convicción de que mantener las reservas de América Latina funcionando en la región unos y otros con el fin de construir la tan necesaria infraestructura física y el crecimiento económico es preferible a aceptar préstamos de asistencia y desarrollo con origen fuera de la región. Los planes futuros son para la estabilidad monetaria mencionada anteriormente por el presidente Correa, en que se relacionan tres pedestales claves para el verdadero desarrollo económico, con lo cual hay economías estables basadas en monedas estables, en que estén endeudados sólo unos países con otros de la región (también parte de la experiencia europea).

Notas

  1. Cuando se menciona el desarrollo regional, este artículo usa el término “región” en el sentido de múltiples países, en vez de las regiones dentro de un país. En particular el artículo se basa en la región latinoamericana y las organizaciones comerciales regionales suramericanas Mercosur (Mercado Común del Sur) y ALBA (Alternativa Bolivariana para los Pueblos de Nuestra América) en particular. Mercosur es suramericano (Paraguay, Uruguay, Argentina y Brasil), mientras que ALBA incluye a naciones de centro y sur América y el Caribe. El término “región” según se usa aquí se refiere a un bloque de países vecinos que se juntan para cualquier tipo de cooperación social, ya sea comercio, asistencia o desarrollo, o para contribuir a la estabilidad financiera mutua. Ejemplos incluyen ASEAN (siglas en inglés para Asociación de Naciones del Sudeste Asiático), SACU (siglas en inglés para la Unión Aduanera de África Austral), Mercosur (Mercado Común del Sur), ALBA, la Unión Europea, o incluso agrupaciones de comercio e inversión tales como el TLCNA (Tratado de Libre Comercio entre Canadá, Estados Unidos y México).
  2. Para más información sobre lo que pasó entre mayo y septiembre ver: http://alainet.org/active/33345.
  3. http://en.mercopress.com/2009/05/09/bank-of-the-south-takes-off-with-7-billion-usd-initial-capital.
  4. La infraestructura regional financiera posibilita las finanzas y el comercio. Para propósitos de este artículo se define como la totalidad de acuerdos multilaterales financieros entre países específicos a un bloque y cualquier institución creada para apoyarlos. Esta infraestructura incluye las reglas para el comercio de servicios financieros entre los países y las estructuras bancarias y los fondos que manejan para los propósitos en su carta constitutiva, tales como proteger la estabilidad de divisas regionales, y promover el desarrollo en países más pobres.
  5. http://ifis.choike.org/informes/922.html, acceso obtenido el sábado 10 de octubre, 2009.
  6. Stiglitz es el presidente de la Comisión de Expertos del Presidente de la Asamblea General de las Naciones Unidas sobre las reformas del sistema monetario y financiero internacional. http://www.un.org/ga/president/63/commi ssion/financial_commission.shtml, acceso obtenido el lunes 11 de mayo, 2009.
  7. (diplomacia) http://www.elcomercio.com/solo_texto_search.asp?id_noticia=177440&anio=2009&mes=5&dia=6, acceso obtenido el sábado 10 de octubre, 2009.
    (declaración de la empresa sobre el arbitraje) http://www.odebrecht.com/web/ptb/pag_noticias.php?id=1257, acceso obtenido el 14 de mayo, 2009.
  8. http://www.soitu.es/soitu/2009/05/05/info/1241553779_787643.html.
  9. ECU es la sigla en inglés para la Unidad Monetaria Europea, la precursora del euro.
  10. http://www.elpais.com/articulo/internacional/problema/eje/Venezuela/Bolivia/Ecuador/
    elpepuint/20090428elpepuint_5/Tes#EnlaceComentarios
    , acceso obtenido el 10 de mayo, 2009.
  11. http://www.ifg.org/imf_asia.html.
  12. Cita original en inglés: “Worldly wisdom teaches us that it is better for the reputation to fail conventionally than to succeed unconventionally.” http://www.marxists.org/reference/subject/economics/keynes/general-theory/ch12.htm.
  13. Aunque debe notarse que la influencia de los países principales de ASEAN en el BDA queda pequeña al compararse con la de Japón.
  14. Por la ciudad al norte de Tailandia donde se lanzó la iniciativa.
  15. Menos Indonesia.
  16. http://www.ft.com/cms/s/92d94ba6-24e4-11d8-81c6-08209b00dd01,id=040518008959,print=yes.html.

Tony Phillips es un investigador y periodista sobre el comercio y las finanzas multinacionales con énfasis en las dictaduras y la OMC, y es un traductor y analista para el Programa de las Américas en www.ircamericas.org. Mucha de la obra de Tony se encuentra publicada en http://projectallende.org/.

Cochabamba, generic 15 al 17 de 2009
Hacia la fundación del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales del “ALBA – TCP”


Durante muchos años nuestros pueblos y naciones originarias fueron saqueados permanentemente y reducidos a simples colonias por los países más poderosos del mundo, quienes en su afán de acumulación de riqueza invadieron nuestros territorios, ailment se adueñaron de nuestras riquezas, culturas, conciencias, enajenando nuestro trabajo y ofendiendo a nuestra madre tierra (pachamama) depredando los recursos que existe en ella en pos de lucro desmedido.
En los 80 una inmensa deuda externa imposible de pagar nos postró aun más en la pobreza y la miseria, volviendo a generarse la violencia institucional que ya se había vivido con la militarización de nuestros pueblos, la desaparición y la tortura de nuestros familiares y el sometimiento de nuestras naciones indígenas originarias campesinas.
A lo anterior, ya en la etapa neoliberal, se añaden en el marco del capitalismo transnacional y globalizado los inhumanos procesos de desnacionalización y la sumisión absoluta de los gobiernos neoliberales a los dictados del Fondo Monetario Internacional y del Banco Mundial.
Todo esto ha hecho que la voluntad popular no signifique nada en el esquema del pensamiento de las transnacionales, de la explotación y el crimen, recordándonos permanentemente que la era de colonización de nuestros pueblos aún no ha terminado.
La intromisión del imperialismo yanqui en la historia de nuestros pueblos como ocurrió con países como Colombia, Haití, México, Puerto Rico, Nicaragua, Argentina, Ecuador, Venezuela, Bolivia, entre otros, con el pretexto de luchar contra el “terrorismo” o el “narcotráfico” ha expoliado nuestros recursos y ha empobrecido a nuestra gente; igual que los colonizadores de la “cruz y la espada” se ha apoderado de nuestras riquezas y ha dañado el medio ambiente.
La desigualdad económica, política y social, al igual que la exclusión y la discriminación son producto del neoliberalismo y el colonialismo de larga data, que debilitaron a los Estados y supeditaron el bienestar de nuestros pueblos a los designios de las organizaciones multinacionales y a los intereses de las empresas trasnacionales. La capacidad destructiva del sistema de dominación imperialista es aterradora, el desempleo aumenta y la esperanza de vida desciende; ellos mismos se encuentran ahora sumidos en una crisis sistémica cuya resolución no puede ser a costa del bienestar de nuestros pueblos.
Los movimientos sociales, expresión de las organizaciones indígenas originarias, afro descendientes, campesinas, organizaciones sindicales, juveniles, gremiales, los maestros, los obreros, los sin tierra, los productores cocaleros, las juntas de vecinos, profesionales progresistas y otros que luchan no solo por reivindicaciones salariales, sino también por la vida y el respeto a la madre tierra, desde antes, y desde siempre fueron los verdaderos artífices de la revolución y de las transformaciones profundas.
No olvidemos que los movimientos sociales hemos jugado un papel central en los últimos años en la perspectiva de una democratización y descolonización profunda de nuestros países, por un cambio sustantivo y genuinamente transformador tanto en lo económico, como en lo superestructural de nuestra Abya Yala.
Recordemos que el 14 de diciembre de 2004, Cuba y Venezuela proponen dar inicio e impulsar el ALBA, como alternativa al ALCA, que permita a nuestros pueblos y naciones avanzar políticamente en la búsqueda de una verdadera y libre integración, basada en la solidaridad, que responda a las necesidades sociales, políticas, educativas, culturales, económicas, reconociendo las luchas históricas de los pueblos latinoamericanos y caribeños por su unidad y soberanía.
En noviembre de 2005, en el marco de la Cumbre de las Américas en Mar del Plata, se da la simbólica derrota del ALCA que fue organizada por la Alianza Social Continental, como aporte a la integración.
Meses después en enero de 2006, en el marco del capítulo del Foro Social Mundial, el Presidente Chávez se reúne con Movimientos Sociales y plantea la necesidad de la creación del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales del Alba.
El año 2006, en Lima Perú se lleva a cabo la Cumbre Enlazando Alternativas, paralela a la Cumbre de Jefes de Estado y de Gobierno de América Latina y la Unión Europea, en la que se avanza en la articulación de los Movimientos Sociales en el marco del proceso de integración latinoamericana.
Más tarde en noviembre del 2006, en la ciudad de Cochabamba, Bolivia, se celebra la Cumbre Social por la integración de los Pueblos, paralela a la Cumbre Presidencial de la Comunidad Suramericana de Naciones (CSN). Fue organizada por la Alianza Social Continental, como aporte a la integración en el marco de una gran movilización de los movimientos sociales, originarios y originarios del país.
En la V Cumbre del ALBA celebrada en abril de 2007 se lanza la declaración de Tintorero donde se aprueba la creación del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales del ALBA.
Después en noviembre de 2007, en la II Reunión de la Comisión Política del ALBA, el Consejo de Ministros decide que cada país miembro debe crear su capítulo nacional en el marco de la conformación del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales del ALBA, y que los integrantes de dicho capítulo acordaran la forma y metodología para el funcionamiento de dicho Consejo, así como la invitación a otros movimientos sociales de países extra-ALBA a participar en el mismo.
En ese mismo año, se expande la Alternativa Bolivariana a partir de la formación de las casas del ALBA a países no integrados al ALBA con la participación de las organizaciones sociales de esos países, entre ellos en Perú.
Posteriormente en enero del año 2008, en Caracas se celebra la VI Cumbre del ALBA, donde se aprueba la estrategia para el Consejo de Movimientos Sociales del ALBA, incluyendo sus principios, estructura y funciones, además se acuerda darle continuidad a dos acciones pendientes aprobadas en Tintorero, que son:
– Identificar en el ámbito Latinoamericano y caribeño, organizaciones, redes y campañas sub-regionales y regionales, nacionales y locales, en países extra-ALBA que puedan ser convocadas para formar parte del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales”.
– Realizar reunión constitutiva del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales”.
El complejo proceso de organización de la institucionalidad del ALBA-TCP como mecanismo de integración, las realidades y desafíos que han vivido algunos de los procesos políticos de los países miembros (Bolivia, Venezuela), otras prioridades y esfuerzos dentro del ALBA-TCP y criterios de países miembros han determinado que esta iniciativa esté pospuesta desde esa fecha (Aún en febrero de este año, 2009, la Comisión Política acordó “establecer un plazo a la creación de los capítulos nacionales de movimientos sociales y comunicar a la coordinación permanente del ALBA los detalles al respecto antes de finales de abril de 2009. Ello con el fin de promover la instalación del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales del ALBA el primero de mayo de 2009”).
Y es en este contexto que en julio de 2008 el MST y las organizaciones de la Vía Campesina Brasil, en diálogo con otras organizaciones del continente, convocan a sendos encuentros en la Escuela Nacional Florestán Fernández (MST) con un grupo sustantivo de líderes y operadores políticos de movimientos y organizaciones sociales, para, con todos estos antecedentes, llamar a un proceso de construcción de una articulación hemisférica de movimientos y organizaciones sociales en torno a los principios del ALBA y sus iniciativas. Resultado de esta reunión es la Carta de los Movimientos Sociales de las Américas que fue lanzada en la Asamblea de Movimientos Sociales, en ocasión del III Foro Social de las Américas (Guatemala, octubre 2008).
En enero de 2009, como parte de las actividades del VIII FSM 2009, celebrado en Belem de Pará, Brasil, se reunieron en la Asamblea de Movimientos Sociales, representantes de centenares de organizaciones y movimientos de todos los países de las Américas, que se identifican con el proceso de construcción del ALBA, para aprobar esta carta en su versión definitiva: Carta de los Movimientos Sociales de las Américas. Construyendo la integración de los pueblos desde abajo. Impulsando el ALBA y la solidaridad de los pueblos, frente al proyecto del imperialismo.
Recientemente en septiembre de este año, en Sao Paulo se realiza una Convocatoria a los Movimientos Sociales de Las Américas con el objetivo de articular el proceso de construcción del ALBA a partir de los Movimientos Sociales.
Con este recuento no solo reflejamos el camino recorrido en este proceso de integración hasta la fecha, sino que los alentamos a reflexionar y construir desde nuestra historia común.
En efecto lo que estamos viviendo en América Latina es parte de un proceso abarcador de reapropiación social de nuestro destino, de nuevas formas de organización política, horizontal, de democracia directa y participativa, de una economía plural que recupere los recursos naturales en beneficio de los pueblos, de una construcción de nuevas relaciones sociales armónicas, solidarias y comunitarias de producción.
Ahora con una fuerza inusitada surge en América y el mundo el grito de libertad, de lucha por la recuperación de nuestro territorio, de nuestras libertades, de nuestra soberanía; miles de hermanos se sumaron a la causa revolucionaria para liberar la patria, miles de ellos ofrendaron sus vidas en este intento, en diferentes épocas y de diferentes maneras, mártires de la revolución fueron los Tupac Katari, Tupac Amaru, Bartolina Sisa, Manuela Saenz, Apiaguayki Tumpa, Juana Azurduy de Padilla, Santos Pariamo, Marcelo Quiroga Santa Cruz, Inti Peredo, Lempira el héroe de la revolución hondureña, el libertador Simón Bolívar, Augusto Cesar Sandino, José Martí, Ernesto Che Guevara, Salvador Allende. Luis Espinal y actualmente los cinco patriotas cubanos que purgan condenas perpetúas por el solo hecho de luchar contra el terrorismo, contra el imperialismo.
Esta Primera Cumbre del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales en el marco del ALBA-TCP, es una Cumbre histórica que permite la participación directa de los movimientos sociales en los diferentes medios de cooperación y solidaridad, a diferencia de otros mecanismos de integración de países, que nunca han considerado la participación plena de los pueblos y naciones, limitándose a meros intercambios de intereses mercantilistas que van en contra de la integración y reciprocidad de pueblos y naciones de la gran Abya Yala (latinoamericana).
En este contexto la Alianza Bolivariana para los Pueblos de nuestra América y el Caribe, se constituye en un verdadero espacio de construcción de una nueva patria latinoamericana, portando la bandera de la humanidad por su definitiva emancipación. Por eso estamos dispuestos a combatir contra la explotación del hombre por el hombre, considerando que existe la latente necesidad de una “segunda independencia”.
Ésta Cumbre Internacional, es el saludo de los Movimientos Sociales de los países miembros del ALBA-TCP, a la VII Cumbre de Presidentes de la Alianza Bolivariana para los Pueblos de nuestra América – Tratado de Comercio de los Pueblos, que durante media década lucha por la desaparición de toda forma de dominación y explotación contra los pueblos y la construcción de relaciones de complementariedad y ayuda recíproca en procura de su desarrollo y de lograr el buen vivir.
Aquí, desde el corazón de Sudamérica, desde los pueblos combatientes, las organizaciones indígenas originarios campesinas, obreros, trabajadores, estudiantes, clase media y profesionales comprometidos con su pueblo de Venezuela, Cuba, Bolivia, Antigua y Barbuda, Ecuador, Nicaragua, Honduras, la Mancomunidad de Domínica, San Vicente y las Granadinas, aunados en el Consejo de Movimientos Sociales del ALBA-TCP, nos comprometemos a defender los principios revolucionarios del ALBA-TCP, que potencian la lucha y la resistencia contra todo tipo de explotación para construir un mundo diferente.
Nuestro objetivo como Consejo de Movimientos Sociales de los países miembros del ALBA-TCP, es la lucha por el pluralismo en nuestros países y en el mundo entero, sustentada en la armonía entre nuestros pueblos y la madre tierra para el buen vivir, en los principios morales, éticos, políticos y económicos de nuestras comunidades y barrios del campo y la ciudad. Pretendemos forjar desde el seno del pueblo una nueva Patria Social Comunitaria, descolonizada y fundada en la multidiversidad, respetuosa de las diferencias y de las particularidades sociales y regionales.
La actuación del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales, estará fundamentada en los siguientes principios:
– Es un espacio inclusivo, abierto, diverso y plural, a partir de la identificación con los objetivos y principios del ALBA-TCP.
– Es un espacio para compartir y desarrollar agendas comunes que beneficien a los pueblos, sin convertirnos en un espacio para dirimir disputas y representaciones políticas.
– Es un espacio para fortalecer posiciones políticas económicas y sociales, sin convertirnos en un foro o asamblea de actuación social, que reconoce los espacios de articulación existentes.
– Significa el compromiso de la plena identificación con los principios generales que definen el ALBA-TCP como proceso de integración.
– Expresa la legitimidad y representación real de los Movimientos Sociales que se integran.
– En países miembros, sostener permanente diálogo e interrelación con sus respectivos gobiernos.
– Cada Coordinación Nacional en los países miembros del ALBA-TCP, definirá sus propias dinámicas de actuación y de relacionamiento con sus gobiernos.
– En países miembros del ALBA-TCP, los vínculos de las organizaciones sociales con el CMS, se desarrollará a través de las Coordinaciones Nacionales.
– Integrar el enfoque de género, reconociendo el legítimo derecho de la participación de la mujer en los movimientos sociales con equidad, igualdad real y justicia social.
Los pueblos de América Latina que pertenecemos a la Alianza Bolivariana para los Pueblos de nuestra América Latina y el Caribe – Tratado de Comercio de los Pueblos, organizados en este Consejo, continuaremos luchando contra los constantes intentos del imperialismo norteamericano de privarnos del desarrollo económico pleno; ni los ataques, amedrentamientos, armas, utilización de la violencia podrán callarnos, seguiremos luchando y siendo solidarios ahora particularmente con el pueblo hermano de Honduras.
Estamos convencidos de que sólo con la organización, movilización y la unidad de los pueblos del ALBA-TCP, es posible un auténtico proceso de integración, como también el logro de la transformación económica, social, política y cultural de nuestros países.
Esta Cumbre reafirma la voluntad de Bolivia, Venezuela, Cuba, Antigua y Barbuda, San Vicente y las Granadinas, Nicaragua, Honduras, Ecuador y la Mancomunidad de Dominica por el desarrollo y el fortalecimiento del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales sobre la base de una solidaridad comprometida con los demás pueblos del continente; optamos por la lucha plural, democrática, antifascista y antiimperialista, a través de un trabajo con objetivos políticos que no escondan su naturaleza ni su carácter revolucionario.
La conformación de este Consejo de Movimientos Sociales nos permite salir de las luchas locales y aisladas, de nuestras fronteras nacionales para integrarnos en la dimensión del AbyaYala o patria latinoamericana, permite la complementariedad y participación de los pueblos en los diferentes Consejos y Grupos de Trabajo que son las instancias de unificación que funcionan en el marco de la Alianza Bolivariana para los Pueblos de nuestra América Latina y el Caribe.
Para lo cual se conforma un comité ad hoc, que coordinara Bolivia, y será integrado por un representante de los tres capítulos nacionales ya creados (Bolivia, Venezuela y Cuba) y otras importantes organizaciones, redes y campañas para impulsar el proceso de constitución del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales del ALBA-TCP en seis meses.
Es dado en la ciudad de Cochabamba, a los 16 días del mes octubre de 2009.
______________________________
PROPUESTA DE ACCION
– Consolidación de los capítulos nacionales con organizaciones representativas de los movimientos sociales.
– Incorporar a los movimientos sociales de los países del ALBA en el Exterior. Así como organizaciones sociales presentes en los países Miembros del ALBA.
– Crear espacios de discusión para evaluar actividades de los movimientos sociales y desarrollar programas comunes.
– Que los movimientos sociales realicen actividades de solidaridad de manera conjunta.
– Saludamos las iniciativas de Vía Campesina, MST y otras organizaciones, propuestas en septiembre de 2009 en Sao Paulo, en la perspectiva de fortalecer la articulación de los movimientos sociales del continente. En específico, nos sumamos a la iniciativa de la realización de una Asamblea Continental de Movimientos Sociales con el ALBA, para el primer semestre del 2010.
– Fortalecer los programas de desarrollo, participación y asistencia a través de los movimientos sociales.
– Asignación presupuestaria a los movimientos sociales
– Privilegiar el proceso de participación de la mujer en la dirección de los movimientos sociales.
– Incorporación de manera progresiva a organizaciones comunitarias pequeñas con igualdad de derecho de participación.
– Luchar por los derechos de los inmigrantes a un trabajo digno y a la salud.
– Impulsar la participación de los movimientos sociales de los países cuyos gobiernos no son integrantes formales del ALBA como forma de globalizar la lucha.
– Los programas de los movimientos sociales deben ser entregados a los Jefes de Estado y de Gobierno de los Países del ALBA a través de resoluciones para su aprobación.
– Los “10 mandamientos para salvar la vida y el planeta, la humanidad y la vida” propuesto por el Presidente Evo Morales deben ser adoptados como principios fundamentales de los movimientos sociales.
– Cada capítulo nacional debe establecer sus programas que respondan a las necesidades reales de los pueblos.
– Establecer mecanismos de comunicación permanente entre los movimientos sociales y los pueblos y naciones indígenas originarias campesinas, donde se compartan las experiencias del proceso en cada país.
– Desarrollar programas de formación para los voceros de los movimientos sociales.
– Crear una red de medios de comunicación e información propios de los movimientos sociales.
– Luchar y demandar el derecho de los pueblos a la paz y a su autodeterminación.
– Invitar a las Nacionalidades y pueblos indígenas; a las comunidades del campo y de la ciudad; a las organizaciones populares; a los medios y redes de comunicación comunitaria y masiva; a todos y todas los habitantes del mundo, a difundir, denunciar y condenar en sus espacios; las estrategias de intervención de los Estados Unidos, a través de bases militares en Colombia, en la región, y el resto del mundo.
– Impulsar campañas en contra de las empresas transnacionales e impulsar proyectos gran nacionales promovidos por los gobiernos del ALBA A TRAVES DEL TRATADO DE COMERCIO DE LOS PUEBLOS.
– Apoyar la adopción de una moneda internacional, promovidos por los países del ALBA y la UNASUR.
– Estimular las luchas sociales para el re-ascenso del movimiento de masas.
Para lo cual se conforma un comité ad hoc, que coordinara Bolivia, y será integrado por un representante de los tres capítulos nacionales ya creados (Bolivia, Venezuela y Cuba) y otras importantes organizaciones, redes y campañas para impulsar el proceso de constitución del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales del ALBA-TCP en seis meses

Edgardo Lander

¿Integración de qué? ¿Para quién? La consideración de los proyectos de integración latinoamericanos exige formularse algunas interrogantes vitales. ¿Integración para quién? ¿Para las los sectores privilegiados de estas sociedades? ¿Para que los capitales, nurse sean nacionales o transnacionales, puedan moverse libremente en todo el continente? ¿O, por el contrario, para los pueblos, para las mayorías empobrecidas, excluidas, subordinadas?

 

No hay nada en la idea de integración que en sí mismo podamos considerar como favorable para el futuro de los pueblos del continente. No basta con que sea una integración latinoamericana o sudamericana para que corresponda a los intereses populares. Todo depende del modelo de integración en cuestión. ¿Quiénes lo impulsan? ¿Para qué? ¿Para quién? ¿En función de qué intereses y de que valores se diseña? Dependiendo de la respuesta a estas interrogantes, la integración puede afianzar las relaciones de dominación actualmente hegemónicas, o puede contribuir a abrir rendijas para socavarlas.

¿Un proyecto de integración orientado a abrir aún más estas economías para someterlas a los dictados de los dueños del capital? ¿O una integración defensiva que tenga como meta conquistar espacios de autonomía y soberanía para definir políticas públicas y opciones económicas propias? En otras palabras, ¿una integración que contribuya a desdibujar aún más los espacios y territorios del ejercicio de la soberanía democrática de los pueblos, o una integración orientada a recuperar lo que siglos de colonialismo y políticas imperiales le han arrebatado y continúan arrebatando a los pueblos del continente?

¿Una integración orientada por los valores del individualismo posesivo, de la competencia de todos contra todos, en la cual se garantice el éxito de los más fuertes sobre la base de la explotación y exclusión de los más débiles, esto es, una integración que acentúe las inaceptables desigualdades actuales? ¿O una integración guiada por los valores de la igualdad, de la participación, la pluralidad, la solidaridad, la comunidad, una integración que reconozca, valore y haga posible el despliegue de la extraordinaria variedad de modos de vida de los pueblos de nuestro continente?

¿Una integración que sin límite alguno explote los recursos naturales, convirtiéndolos en mercancías exportables para generar los excedentes requeridos para pagar la deuda externa? ¿O una integración que se oriente a la recuperación y construcción de otras formas de ser los humanos parte de la naturaleza, que no la considere como un enemigo a ser sometido, controlado, explotado y por ende destruido?

¿Una integración pensada como área de libre comercio, concebida principalmente como la construcción de un espacio económico de libre circulación de mercancías y capitales? ¿O una integración geopolítica concebida como parte de los procesos de resistencia al orden global que busca imponer la política unilateral e imperial del capital transnacional y del gobierno de los Estados Unidos? El ALCA

El principal proyecto estratégico del gobierno de Estados Unidos hacia el continente americano en su conjunto durante los últimos diez años ha sido el ALCA o Área de Libre Comercio de las Américas. Mediante este acuerdo de alcance continental, Estados Unidos y sus empresas han buscado consolidar, profundizar y hacer irreversibles las políticas de ajuste estructural de las últimas décadas, pretendiendo establecer de una vez por todas la prioridad absoluta de los derechos del capital sobre los derechos de la gente.

Mediante la constitucionalización del orden neoliberal en un pacto supranacional de obligatorio cumplimento, se aspira a acotar drásticamente los ámbitos de la soberanía y del ejercicio de la democracia y la regulación social, concebidas todas como trabas ilegítimas al pleno y libre despliegue y movimiento del capital.

Hasta hace poco más de dos años, las negociaciones avanzaban en forma aparentemente indetenible. Gobiernos sumisos en todo el continente negociaban textos secretos a espaldas de sus pueblos, y parecía inevitable que para la fecha prevista, esto es, para finales del año 2004, se concluyeran la negociación y revisión del texto de manera que este pudiese ser ratificado en 2005. Sin embargo, a partir del año 2002 las cosas comenzaron a cambiar.

Los movimientos y organizaciones sociales de la resistencia al ALCA, especialmente mediante su articulación en la Alianza Social Continental, lograron sacar el debate del ámbito acotado de una negociación entre expertos en comercio internacional para colocarla en el terreno del debate y la movilización pública.

Organizaciones sindicales, indígenas, ecologistas, campesinas, de mujeres y académicas en todo el continente logran converger en una resistencia crecientemente organizada y capaz de grandes movilizaciones. Cada una de las principales reuniones de los negociadores del acuerdo pasó a estar acompañada de masivas protestas (Québec, Buenos Aires, Quito, Miami). Los cambios políticos representados por la elección de Chávez, Lula y Kirchner introdujeron perspectivas y posturas negociadoras no previstas.

En la reunión del Comité de Negociaciones Comerciales (CNC) celebrada en San Salvador en julio de 2003 se reconoce por primera vez, en la propia mesa de negociaciones, que estas están severamente estancadas. Se realizaron sucesivos intentos de salvar el acuerdo mediante un tratado más diluido (Alca light) o por la vía de un ALCA de dos niveles que permitiese a los gobiernos más comprometidos con el modelo de libre comercio preservar el contenido del proyecto original, facultando a otros gobiernos el asumir compromisos menores. Buscando destrancar las negociaciones, los Estados Unidos convocaron sucesivas “reuniones informales” entre diferentes grupos de países.

Persistieron los desacuerdos. Finalmente, en contra de todos los pronósticos, lo que no parecía posible es hoy un hecho. La resistencia continental ha derrotado al ALCA, quizás definitivamente. Desde comienzos del año 2003 no se ha llevado a cabo ninguna reunión formal. De hecho, aunque esto no se admita públicamente, las negociaciones han sido pospuestas en forma indefinida [1].

Diversas organizaciones del continente han sugerido que el 1 de enero de 2005, fecha en que se suponía que estuviese listo el acuerdo, sea celebrado como el día del triunfo de los movimientos populares de las Américas contra el ALCA. En estos tiempos neoliberales no son muchas las victorias populares: hay que celebrarlas. Los Tratados de Libre Comercio (TLCs)

El descarrilamiento del ALCA representa sin duda una victoria para la resistencia al proyecto imperial de libre comercio. Sin embargo, la agenda estratégica del gobierno de Estados Unidos hacia el continente no ha sido derrotada: avanza por otras vías. Dado que las dificultades en las negociaciones del ALCA las enfrentaba principalmente con tres países -Brasil, Argentina y Venezuela- el gobierno de Estados Unidos optó por continuar negociaciones vía TLCs con prácticamente todos los demás países. Negoció y firmó un TLC con Chile, concluyó las negociaciones con Centroamérica, y está en lo que se supone que es la fase final de las negociaciones con Colombia, Ecuador y Perú.

Dado el fraccionamiento de la resistencia y las posturas más amigables (tanto al libre comercio como al gobierno de Estados Unidos) de los gobiernos en cuestión, en estos acuerdos se radicaliza la agenda neoliberal. No sólo se va más allá de los acuerdos de la Organización Mundial de Comercio (OMC), sino incluso de lo previsto en los borradores del ALCA. La extraordinaria disparidad entre las partes de estas negociaciones queda ilustrada en el contenido, por ejemplo, de los capítulos sobre propiedad intelectual y agricultura del TLC andino, acuerdos que de aprobarse en su versión actual tendrían impactos catastróficos sobre la salud y la alimentación de los pueblos.

Estados Unidos ha exigido el patentamiento de plantas y animales (¡definidos como inventos!), así como de procedimientos diagnósticos, terapéuticos y quirúrgicos. Reafirmando una vez más que considera más importante las ganancias de sus transnacionales farmacéuticas que la salud pública, además de diversas medidas destinadas a impedir la utilización de medicamentes genéricos exige que se deje sin efecto la Declaración Relativa al Acuerdo sobre ADPIC [2] de Doha (2001), que autoriza cierta flexibilidad en la interpretación de los derechos de propiedad intelectual de los medicamentos y permite a los países miembros de la OMC “proteger la salud pública y, en particular, promover el acceso a los medicamentos para todos”.

En las negociaciones sobre agricultura Estados Unidos exige la eliminación de todos los instrumentos de protección y fomento agrícola utilizados por los países andinos (bandas de precios, cuotas de importación, etc.), a la vez que se niega en forma categórica a siquiera discutir sus opulentos subsidios agrícolas. Esta combinación no puede conducir sino a la devastación de la agricultura andina, a socavar las condiciones de la seguridad alimentaria y a la expulsión de millones de personas del campo.

A pesar de la firme oposición popular y de las masivas movilizaciones de organizaciones sociales y políticas centroamericanas y andinas [3], no ha sido posible hasta el momento frenar estas negociaciones.

MERCOSUR y la Comunidad Andina de Naciones

¿Constituyen hoy el MERCOSUR o la Comunidad Andina de Naciones (CAN) alternativas a este modelo de integración y desarrollo? La integración no puede pensarse como algo diferente a los proyectos nacionales, diferente a las sociedades que se prefiguran al interior de cada Estado-nación. Los proyectos de integración del continente dependen de los procesos políticos, de las estructuras productivas, de las correlaciones de fuerza existentes tanto global y regionalmente como al interior de cada uno de los países participantes.

Los actuales proyectos y prácticas de integración en América Latina se dan con estructuras productivas y condiciones políticas e ideológicas muy diferentes a las existentes cuando se debatía la integración latinoamericana en los ‘60 y ‘70. Como resultado de las dictaduras militares y de la aplicación sistemática de las políticas neoliberales de ajuste estructural, estas sociedades han cambiado profundamente tanto en su estructura productiva como en su tejido social. Como consecuencia de la represión, la desindustrialización y las reformas laborales, el movimiento sindical se encuentra extraordinariamente reducido y debilitado, y la mayor parte de los nuevos empleos se crean en el llamado sector informal.

El peso de empresarios cuya producción se orientaba prioritariamente al mercado interno ha igualmente declinado. La propiedad de la tierra se encuentra aún más concentrada que hace tres décadas. Los sectores más dinámicos de las economías del continente -los que tienen igualmente hoy mayor incidencia política, mayor capacidad de tener impacto sobre las políticas públicas- son los sectores triunfantes de estas transformaciones económicas. Son principalmente los grupos financieros, los de los servicios -como las telecomunicaciones- y los exportadores de productos primarios: en el caso del Cono Sur, principalmente el sector agroindustrial.

Estos sectores están controlados o asociados estrechamente con el capital transnacional, sus beneficios dependen de la apertura económica, de la desregulación, de las privatizaciones y del acceso a los mercados internacionales. Constituyen las fuerzas dinámicas internas detrás de las políticas del libre comercio.

El sentido común neoliberal hoy hegemónico, y los intereses de estos sectores que resultaron beneficiados de las transformaciones políticas y de la estructura económica producidas en las últimas tres décadas, condicionan las orientaciones básicas de los proyectos de integración que hoy operan y se negocian en todo el continente. Es posible constatar incluso que la razón fundamental por la cual los gobiernos de Brasil y Argentina pusieron una resistencia tan firme al ALCA tuvo que ver principalmente con el hecho de que los beneficios que esperaban estos sectores no estaban siendo garantizados suficientemente en la negociación.

No se trata de desconocer que estos gobiernos no han tenido posiciones únicas y que han existido tensiones entre visiones más orientadas hacia el libre comercio y visiones que reivindican mayor autonomía para el impulso de políticas públicas nacionales. Sin embargo, y más allá de los discursos, fue precisamente el hecho de que el ALCA no garantizaba un mayor acceso de los productos de la agroindustria del MERCOSUR al mercado de Estados Unidos, y que el gobierno de dicho país no estaba dispuesto a siquiera considerar la reducción de los subsidios a su producción agrícola, la verdadera razón por la cual se trancaron las negociaciones del ALCA.

El único gobierno participante en las negociaciones que formuló cuestionamientos conceptuales, políticos y doctrinarios fundamentales a cada una de las dimensiones del modelo de integración propuesto por el gobierno de Estados Unidos a través del ALCA fue el de Venezuela.

Esos mismos intereses han estado impulsando las negociaciones del MERCOSUR con la Unión Europea. De acuerdo a denuncias formuladas por las principales organizaciones sociales del Cono Sur [4], a cambio de un acceso limitado de los productos de la agroindustria del MERCOSUR al mercado de la Unión Europea, los negociadores del MERCOSUR están realizando concesiones que tendrían efectos nocivos sobre la agricultura familiar, limitarían la capacidad de los Estados para tener políticas industriales autónomas, y convertirían en mercancías áreas tan críticas como los denominados “servicios culturales” y “servicios ambientales”.

Se habrían ofrecido igualmente preferencias a la Unión Europea para las compras del Sector Público. No hay razón alguna por la cual se pueda suponer que las transnacionales basadas en Europa puedan tener efectos más benignos o sean menos rapaces que las estadounidenses, ni para asumir que los gobiernos europeos sean menos agresivos en la defensa de los intereses de sus corporaciones. Cualquier ilusión en este sentido quedó desmentida con la reciente crisis argentina. La Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones

Los gobiernos de Sudamérica celebran lo que denominan un nuevo momento histórico en el continente, la realización del sueño de Bolívar: la creación de la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones. ¿Podrá este acuerdo convertirse efectivamente en un punto de partida para nuevos proyectos económicos y geopolíticos alternativos a los modelos hegemónicos?

La retórica de la Declaración del Cusco, firmada por los presidentes o cancilleres de 12 países sudamericanos [5], parecería efectivamente apuntar en una nueva dirección. Predomina en esta un lenguaje diferente a la prioritaria del libre comercio que ha sido hegemónica durante los últimos lustros.

Partiendo de la “historia compartida y solidaria de nuestras naciones”, se reivindica “una identidad sudamericana compartida y valores comunes, tales como: la democracia, la solidaridad, los derechos humanos, la libertad, la justicia social, el respeto a la integridad territorial, a la diversidad, la no discriminación y la afirmación de su autonomía, la igualdad soberana de los Estados y la solución pacífica de controversias”.

Se reconoce que no es suficiente con el desarrollo económico, y que se requieren estrategias que junto a “una conciencia ambiental responsable y el reconocimiento de asimetrías en el desarrollo de sus países, aseguren una más justa y equitativa distribución del ingreso, el acceso a la educación, la cohesión y la inclusión social, así como la preservación del medio ambiente y la promoción del desarrollo sostenible”.

Se enfatiza un “compromiso esencial con la lucha contra la pobreza, la eliminación del hambre, la generación de empleo decente y el acceso de todos a la salud y a la educación como herramientas fundamentales para el desarrollo de los pueblos”. En el terreno internacional se apela a “los valores de la paz y la seguridad internacionales, a partir de la afirmación de la vigencia del derecho internacional y de un multilateralismo renovado y democrático que integre decididamente y de manera eficaz el desarrollo económico y social en la agenda mundial”.

Desde el punto de vista institucional, se afirma a la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones como proyecto que trasciende un área de libre comercio, acordándose que se va a “desarrollar un espacio sudamericano integrado en lo político, social, económico, ambiental y de infraestructura, que fortalezca la identidad propia de América del Sur y que contribuya, a partir de una perspectiva subregional y, en articulación con otras experiencias de integración regional, al fortalecimiento de América Latina y el Caribe y le otorgue una mayor gravitación y representación en los foros internacionales”.

De acuerdo al texto, se trata de un proyecto de integración de los pueblos. Se afirma: “Nuestra convicción en el sentido que la realización de los valores e intereses compartidos que nos unen, además de comprometer a los Gobiernos, sólo encontrará viabilidad en la medida que los pueblos asuman el rol protagónico que les corresponde en este proceso. La integración sudamericana es y debe ser una integración de los pueblos”.

Más allá de temas cruciales que están ausentes en el texto, como el de la deuda externa, y el de las relaciones de este proyecto con los acuerdos de libre comercio firmados o en proceso de negociación con Estados Unidos y la Unión Europea, ¿puede esperarse que los actuales gobiernos sudamericanos (los firmantes de la Declaración del Cusco) sean consecuentes con estas declaraciones de intención? ¿Se trata de un lenguaje destinado al público de galería, o es la expresión de una nueva voluntad política de los gobiernos sudamericanos?

Más que descartar de antemano la Declaración del Cusco como pura retórica y a la decisión de crear la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones como una mera formalidad, es conveniente analizar este proceso en la potencialidad que podría ofrecer para convertirse en un nuevo terreno de pugnas y tensiones entre diferentes visiones y diferentes fuerzas sociales en torno al futuro de América Latina. ¿Pretenden los gobiernos firmantes de la declaración (o algunos de ellos) adecuar las orientaciones de sus políticas públicas a los objetivos declarados de la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones?

Lo que resulta evidente es que hay flagrantes contradicciones entre los objetivos y metas formulados en esta declaración y el rumbo principal que hoy asumen las políticas públicas en la mayoría de los países sudamericanos. Los objetivos formulados en la Declaración del Cusco no son, de modo alguno, compatibles con las políticas públicas y orientaciones económicas que, gracias a la deuda externa, los organismos financieros internacionales continúan imponiendo en todo el continente. ¿Pueden los movimientos sociales y políticos populares del continente aprovechar estas tensiones para formular e impulsar propuestas contrahegemónicas?

¿Qué sentido tiene que los gobiernos andinos que hoy negocian un TLC con Estados Unidos, proyecto que constituye una severa amenaza a la salud, educación, alimentación y el ambiente de dichos países, se comprometan a garantizar la salud, la educación, la alimentación de sus pueblos, así como la preservación del ambiente? ¿Qué sentido tiene la reivindicación del derecho a un empleo decente cuando las políticas de apertura, privatización y desregulación, la desindustrialización, la flexibilidad laboral y las reformas de la legislación laboral impulsadas por estos mismos gobiernos continúan deteriorando y precarizando sistemáticamente las condiciones del empleo? ¿Para qué proclamar la autonomía e igualdad soberana de los Estados mientras se están negociando acuerdos comerciales que limitan cada vez más el ejercicio de la soberanía? ¿Por qué hablar de la equitativa distribución del ingreso, y de la cohesión y la inclusión social, si la experiencia confirma que las actuales políticas de predominio dogmático del libre comercio no conducen sino a la desintegración social y al incremento de las desigualdades sociales? ¿Qué sentido tiene destacar la importancia de la preservación del medio ambiente y la promoción del desarrollo sostenible si -como es evidente por ejemplo en el caso de Brasil- las actuales políticas de prioridad de las exportaciones primarias orientadas a generar un excedente en la balanza comercial para pagar la deuda externa requieren una sobreexplotación depredadora y no sostenible de los recursos naturales? ¿Qué tipo de infraestructura va a acompañar este proceso de integración? ¿Continuará la prioridad en la inversión en infraestructura orientada a facilitar las exportaciones y consolidar el modelo de crecimiento hacia afuera, la economía de puertos? ¿Pondrá esta infraestructura a la Amazonía y sus recursos a la disposición de las empresas transnacionales?6. ¿Podrá por el contrario dársele prioridad a las exigencias de un desarrollo endógeno, de ampliación de los mercados internos continentales y de la efectiva integración de los pueblos? ¿Será posible avanzar en la dirección de un modelo alternativo de integración cuando se está incorporando a la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones, en forma acrítica, la base jurídica y normativa que el MERCOSUR y la Comunidad Andina de Naciones fueron armando durante los lustros recientes de hegemonía neoliberal?

La retórica latinoamericanista, la reivindicación de la soberanía y la democracia, así como de los derechos de los pueblos, podría bajar la guardia de los movimientos sociales y políticos populares en torno a las negociaciones entre los gobiernos del continente mientras mantienen una actitud vigilante ante los acuerdos negociados con potencias extracontinentales (ALCA, TLCs, MERCOSUR-UE). No hay, sin embargo, nada en la idea de integración sudamericana que en sí misma, por su propia condición de ser latina o sudamericana, sea necesariamente más favorable a los intereses de los pueblos. Todo depende, como se señaló al comienzo de este texto, de los modelos de integración en juego.

Se abre con la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones un nuevo terreno de lucha continental. El destino de este proyecto de integración y la respuesta a la cuestión básica de si puede o no llegar a ser favorable a los intereses populares, más que del contenido de sus textos fundantes, dependerá del resultado de las luchas sociales y políticas, de la capacidad de las fuerzas populares para revertir las tendencias políticas y económicas hoy hegemónicas en la mayor parte del continente.

¿Será posible convertir a la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones en un nuevo terreno capaz de articular en forma efectiva las luchas de los pueblos del continente por la soberanía, la democracia, la igualdad, la pluralidad cultural? ¿Podrá este nuevo proyecto integrador jugar un papel en la resistencia a la hegemonía imperial de Estados Unidos?

Son estos nuevos retos y nuevas interrogantes que confronta hoy la lucha popular latinoamericana.

Edgardo Lander Sociólogo, profesor titular de la UCV Ver los artículos de Edgardo Lander

[1] Han circulado, sin embargo, rumores de acuerdo a los cuales los co-presidentes de la fase final de las negociaciones del ALCA, el Embajador Robert Zoellick de Estados Unidos y el Canciller de Brasil, Celso Amorim, tendrían previsto reunirse en el mes de enero de 2005 para explorar las posibilidades de un reinicio de las negociaciones. Mientras han estado absolutamente suspendidas todas las negociaciones sustantivas, ha continuado la pugna entre las ciudades candidatas a ser sede permanente del acuerdo

[2] Aspectos de Propiedad Intelectual Relacionados con el Comercio, mejor conocido por sus siglas en inglés: TRIPS.

[3] Ver, por ejemplo, la declaración conjunta de las cuatro centrales de trabajadores colombianas: Declaración frente al tratado de libre comercio con Estados Unidos y el tema laboral, Bogotá, 3 de diciembre 2004. En Red Colombiana de Acción Frente al Libre Comercio (Recalca)

[4] Autoconvocatoria No al ALCA (Argentina), “Acuerdo Unión Europea-MERCOSUR: ganancias para pocos, amenaza para la mayoría”

[5] Declaración del Cusco sobre la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones, Cumbre Presidencial Sudamericana, Cusco, 8 de diciembre de 2004. Los países firmantes de esta declaración son: Argentina, Bolivia, Brasil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Guyana, Paraguay, Perú, Surinam, Uruguay y Venezuela

source link: Red Voltaire

Printed from http://www.bilaterals.org/article.php3?id_article=2101

<!– @page { margin: 0.79in } P { margin-bottom: 0.08in } –>

Edgardo Lander

¿Integración de qué? ¿Para quién? La consideración de los proyectos de integración latinoamericanos exige formularse algunas interrogantes vitales. ¿Integración para quién? ¿Para las los sectores privilegiados de estas sociedades? ¿Para que los capitales, sean nacionales o transnacionales, puedan moverse libremente en todo el continente? ¿O, por el contrario, para los pueblos, para las mayorías empobrecidas, excluidas, subordinadas?

 

No hay nada en la idea de integración que en sí mismo podamos considerar como favorable para el futuro de los pueblos del continente. No basta con que sea una integración latinoamericana o sudamericana para que corresponda a los intereses populares. Todo depende del modelo de integración en cuestión. ¿Quiénes lo impulsan? ¿Para qué? ¿Para quién? ¿En función de qué intereses y de que valores se diseña? Dependiendo de la respuesta a estas interrogantes, la integración puede afianzar las relaciones de dominación actualmente hegemónicas, o puede contribuir a abrir rendijas para socavarlas.

¿Un proyecto de integración orientado a abrir aún más estas economías para someterlas a los dictados de los dueños del capital? ¿O una integración defensiva que tenga como meta conquistar espacios de autonomía y soberanía para definir políticas públicas y opciones económicas propias? En otras palabras, ¿una integración que contribuya a desdibujar aún más los espacios y territorios del ejercicio de la soberanía democrática de los pueblos, o una integración orientada a recuperar lo que siglos de colonialismo y políticas imperiales le han arrebatado y continúan arrebatando a los pueblos del continente?

¿Una integración orientada por los valores del individualismo posesivo, de la competencia de todos contra todos, en la cual se garantice el éxito de los más fuertes sobre la base de la explotación y exclusión de los más débiles, esto es, una integración que acentúe las inaceptables desigualdades actuales? ¿O una integración guiada por los valores de la igualdad, de la participación, la pluralidad, la solidaridad, la comunidad, una integración que reconozca, valore y haga posible el despliegue de la extraordinaria variedad de modos de vida de los pueblos de nuestro continente?

¿Una integración que sin límite alguno explote los recursos naturales, convirtiéndolos en mercancías exportables para generar los excedentes requeridos para pagar la deuda externa? ¿O una integración que se oriente a la recuperación y construcción de otras formas de ser los humanos parte de la naturaleza, que no la considere como un enemigo a ser sometido, controlado, explotado y por ende destruido?

¿Una integración pensada como área de libre comercio, concebida principalmente como la construcción de un espacio económico de libre circulación de mercancías y capitales? ¿O una integración geopolítica concebida como parte de los procesos de resistencia al orden global que busca imponer la política unilateral e imperial del capital transnacional y del gobierno de los Estados Unidos? El ALCA

El principal proyecto estratégico del gobierno de Estados Unidos hacia el continente americano en su conjunto durante los últimos diez años ha sido el ALCA o Área de Libre Comercio de las Américas. Mediante este acuerdo de alcance continental, Estados Unidos y sus empresas han buscado consolidar, profundizar y hacer irreversibles las políticas de ajuste estructural de las últimas décadas, pretendiendo establecer de una vez por todas la prioridad absoluta de los derechos del capital sobre los derechos de la gente.

Mediante la constitucionalización del orden neoliberal en un pacto supranacional de obligatorio cumplimento, se aspira a acotar drásticamente los ámbitos de la soberanía y del ejercicio de la democracia y la regulación social, concebidas todas como trabas ilegítimas al pleno y libre despliegue y movimiento del capital.

Hasta hace poco más de dos años, las negociaciones avanzaban en forma aparentemente indetenible. Gobiernos sumisos en todo el continente negociaban textos secretos a espaldas de sus pueblos, y parecía inevitable que para la fecha prevista, esto es, para finales del año 2004, se concluyeran la negociación y revisión del texto de manera que este pudiese ser ratificado en 2005. Sin embargo, a partir del año 2002 las cosas comenzaron a cambiar.

Los movimientos y organizaciones sociales de la resistencia al ALCA, especialmente mediante su articulación en la Alianza Social Continental, lograron sacar el debate del ámbito acotado de una negociación entre expertos en comercio internacional para colocarla en el terreno del debate y la movilización pública.

Organizaciones sindicales, indígenas, ecologistas, campesinas, de mujeres y académicas en todo el continente logran converger en una resistencia crecientemente organizada y capaz de grandes movilizaciones. Cada una de las principales reuniones de los negociadores del acuerdo pasó a estar acompañada de masivas protestas (Québec, Buenos Aires, Quito, Miami). Los cambios políticos representados por la elección de Chávez, Lula y Kirchner introdujeron perspectivas y posturas negociadoras no previstas.

En la reunión del Comité de Negociaciones Comerciales (CNC) celebrada en San Salvador en julio de 2003 se reconoce por primera vez, en la propia mesa de negociaciones, que estas están severamente estancadas. Se realizaron sucesivos intentos de salvar el acuerdo mediante un tratado más diluido (Alca light) o por la vía de un ALCA de dos niveles que permitiese a los gobiernos más comprometidos con el modelo de libre comercio preservar el contenido del proyecto original, facultando a otros gobiernos el asumir compromisos menores. Buscando destrancar las negociaciones, los Estados Unidos convocaron sucesivas “reuniones informales” entre diferentes grupos de países.

Persistieron los desacuerdos. Finalmente, en contra de todos los pronósticos, lo que no parecía posible es hoy un hecho. La resistencia continental ha derrotado al ALCA, quizás definitivamente. Desde comienzos del año 2003 no se ha llevado a cabo ninguna reunión formal. De hecho, aunque esto no se admita públicamente, las negociaciones han sido pospuestas en forma indefinida [1].

Diversas organizaciones del continente han sugerido que el 1 de enero de 2005, fecha en que se suponía que estuviese listo el acuerdo, sea celebrado como el día del triunfo de los movimientos populares de las Américas contra el ALCA. En estos tiempos neoliberales no son muchas las victorias populares: hay que celebrarlas. Los Tratados de Libre Comercio (TLCs)

El descarrilamiento del ALCA representa sin duda una victoria para la resistencia al proyecto imperial de libre comercio. Sin embargo, la agenda estratégica del gobierno de Estados Unidos hacia el continente no ha sido derrotada: avanza por otras vías. Dado que las dificultades en las negociaciones del ALCA las enfrentaba principalmente con tres países -Brasil, Argentina y Venezuela- el gobierno de Estados Unidos optó por continuar negociaciones vía TLCs con prácticamente todos los demás países. Negoció y firmó un TLC con Chile, concluyó las negociaciones con Centroamérica, y está en lo que se supone que es la fase final de las negociaciones con Colombia, Ecuador y Perú.

Dado el fraccionamiento de la resistencia y las posturas más amigables (tanto al libre comercio como al gobierno de Estados Unidos) de los gobiernos en cuestión, en estos acuerdos se radicaliza la agenda neoliberal. No sólo se va más allá de los acuerdos de la Organización Mundial de Comercio (OMC), sino incluso de lo previsto en los borradores del ALCA. La extraordinaria disparidad entre las partes de estas negociaciones queda ilustrada en el contenido, por ejemplo, de los capítulos sobre propiedad intelectual y agricultura del TLC andino, acuerdos que de aprobarse en su versión actual tendrían impactos catastróficos sobre la salud y la alimentación de los pueblos.

Estados Unidos ha exigido el patentamiento de plantas y animales (¡definidos como inventos!), así como de procedimientos diagnósticos, terapéuticos y quirúrgicos. Reafirmando una vez más que considera más importante las ganancias de sus transnacionales farmacéuticas que la salud pública, además de diversas medidas destinadas a impedir la utilización de medicamentes genéricos exige que se deje sin efecto la Declaración Relativa al Acuerdo sobre ADPIC [2] de Doha (2001), que autoriza cierta flexibilidad en la interpretación de los derechos de propiedad intelectual de los medicamentos y permite a los países miembros de la OMC “proteger la salud pública y, en particular, promover el acceso a los medicamentos para todos”.

En las negociaciones sobre agricultura Estados Unidos exige la eliminación de todos los instrumentos de protección y fomento agrícola utilizados por los países andinos (bandas de precios, cuotas de importación, etc.), a la vez que se niega en forma categórica a siquiera discutir sus opulentos subsidios agrícolas. Esta combinación no puede conducir sino a la devastación de la agricultura andina, a socavar las condiciones de la seguridad alimentaria y a la expulsión de millones de personas del campo.

A pesar de la firme oposición popular y de las masivas movilizaciones de organizaciones sociales y políticas centroamericanas y andinas [3], no ha sido posible hasta el momento frenar estas negociaciones.

MERCOSUR y la Comunidad Andina de Naciones

¿Constituyen hoy el MERCOSUR o la Comunidad Andina de Naciones (CAN) alternativas a este modelo de integración y desarrollo? La integración no puede pensarse como algo diferente a los proyectos nacionales, diferente a las sociedades que se prefiguran al interior de cada Estado-nación. Los proyectos de integración del continente dependen de los procesos políticos, de las estructuras productivas, de las correlaciones de fuerza existentes tanto global y regionalmente como al interior de cada uno de los países participantes.

Los actuales proyectos y prácticas de integración en América Latina se dan con estructuras productivas y condiciones políticas e ideológicas muy diferentes a las existentes cuando se debatía la integración latinoamericana en los ‘60 y ‘70. Como resultado de las dictaduras militares y de la aplicación sistemática de las políticas neoliberales de ajuste estructural, estas sociedades han cambiado profundamente tanto en su estructura productiva como en su tejido social. Como consecuencia de la represión, la desindustrialización y las reformas laborales, el movimiento sindical se encuentra extraordinariamente reducido y debilitado, y la mayor parte de los nuevos empleos se crean en el llamado sector informal.

El peso de empresarios cuya producción se orientaba prioritariamente al mercado interno ha igualmente declinado. La propiedad de la tierra se encuentra aún más concentrada que hace tres décadas. Los sectores más dinámicos de las economías del continente -los que tienen igualmente hoy mayor incidencia política, mayor capacidad de tener impacto sobre las políticas públicas- son los sectores triunfantes de estas transformaciones económicas. Son principalmente los grupos financieros, los de los servicios -como las telecomunicaciones- y los exportadores de productos primarios: en el caso del Cono Sur, principalmente el sector agroindustrial.

Estos sectores están controlados o asociados estrechamente con el capital transnacional, sus beneficios dependen de la apertura económica, de la desregulación, de las privatizaciones y del acceso a los mercados internacionales. Constituyen las fuerzas dinámicas internas detrás de las políticas del libre comercio.

El sentido común neoliberal hoy hegemónico, y los intereses de estos sectores que resultaron beneficiados de las transformaciones políticas y de la estructura económica producidas en las últimas tres décadas, condicionan las orientaciones básicas de los proyectos de integración que hoy operan y se negocian en todo el continente. Es posible constatar incluso que la razón fundamental por la cual los gobiernos de Brasil y Argentina pusieron una resistencia tan firme al ALCA tuvo que ver principalmente con el hecho de que los beneficios que esperaban estos sectores no estaban siendo garantizados suficientemente en la negociación.

No se trata de desconocer que estos gobiernos no han tenido posiciones únicas y que han existido tensiones entre visiones más orientadas hacia el libre comercio y visiones que reivindican mayor autonomía para el impulso de políticas públicas nacionales. Sin embargo, y más allá de los discursos, fue precisamente el hecho de que el ALCA no garantizaba un mayor acceso de los productos de la agroindustria del MERCOSUR al mercado de Estados Unidos, y que el gobierno de dicho país no estaba dispuesto a siquiera considerar la reducción de los subsidios a su producción agrícola, la verdadera razón por la cual se trancaron las negociaciones del ALCA.

El único gobierno participante en las negociaciones que formuló cuestionamientos conceptuales, políticos y doctrinarios fundamentales a cada una de las dimensiones del modelo de integración propuesto por el gobierno de Estados Unidos a través del ALCA fue el de Venezuela.

Esos mismos intereses han estado impulsando las negociaciones del MERCOSUR con la Unión Europea. De acuerdo a denuncias formuladas por las principales organizaciones sociales del Cono Sur [4], a cambio de un acceso limitado de los productos de la agroindustria del MERCOSUR al mercado de la Unión Europea, los negociadores del MERCOSUR están realizando concesiones que tendrían efectos nocivos sobre la agricultura familiar, limitarían la capacidad de los Estados para tener políticas industriales autónomas, y convertirían en mercancías áreas tan críticas como los denominados “servicios culturales” y “servicios ambientales”.

Se habrían ofrecido igualmente preferencias a la Unión Europea para las compras del Sector Público. No hay razón alguna por la cual se pueda suponer que las transnacionales basadas en Europa puedan tener efectos más benignos o sean menos rapaces que las estadounidenses, ni para asumir que los gobiernos europeos sean menos agresivos en la defensa de los intereses de sus corporaciones. Cualquier ilusión en este sentido quedó desmentida con la reciente crisis argentina. La Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones

Los gobiernos de Sudamérica celebran lo que denominan un nuevo momento histórico en el continente, la realización del sueño de Bolívar: la creación de la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones. ¿Podrá este acuerdo convertirse efectivamente en un punto de partida para nuevos proyectos económicos y geopolíticos alternativos a los modelos hegemónicos?

La retórica de la Declaración del Cusco, firmada por los presidentes o cancilleres de 12 países sudamericanos [5], parecería efectivamente apuntar en una nueva dirección. Predomina en esta un lenguaje diferente a la prioritaria del libre comercio que ha sido hegemónica durante los últimos lustros.

Partiendo de la “historia compartida y solidaria de nuestras naciones”, se reivindica “una identidad sudamericana compartida y valores comunes, tales como: la democracia, la solidaridad, los derechos humanos, la libertad, la justicia social, el respeto a la integridad territorial, a la diversidad, la no discriminación y la afirmación de su autonomía, la igualdad soberana de los Estados y la solución pacífica de controversias”.

Se reconoce que no es suficiente con el desarrollo económico, y que se requieren estrategias que junto a “una conciencia ambiental responsable y el reconocimiento de asimetrías en el desarrollo de sus países, aseguren una más justa y equitativa distribución del ingreso, el acceso a la educación, la cohesión y la inclusión social, así como la preservación del medio ambiente y la promoción del desarrollo sostenible”.

Se enfatiza un “compromiso esencial con la lucha contra la pobreza, la eliminación del hambre, la generación de empleo decente y el acceso de todos a la salud y a la educación como herramientas fundamentales para el desarrollo de los pueblos”. En el terreno internacional se apela a “los valores de la paz y la seguridad internacionales, a partir de la afirmación de la vigencia del derecho internacional y de un multilateralismo renovado y democrático que integre decididamente y de manera eficaz el desarrollo económico y social en la agenda mundial”.

Desde el punto de vista institucional, se afirma a la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones como proyecto que trasciende un área de libre comercio, acordándose que se va a “desarrollar un espacio sudamericano integrado en lo político, social, económico, ambiental y de infraestructura, que fortalezca la identidad propia de América del Sur y que contribuya, a partir de una perspectiva subregional y, en articulación con otras experiencias de integración regional, al fortalecimiento de América Latina y el Caribe y le otorgue una mayor gravitación y representación en los foros internacionales”.

De acuerdo al texto, se trata de un proyecto de integración de los pueblos. Se afirma: “Nuestra convicción en el sentido que la realización de los valores e intereses compartidos que nos unen, además de comprometer a los Gobiernos, sólo encontrará viabilidad en la medida que los pueblos asuman el rol protagónico que les corresponde en este proceso. La integración sudamericana es y debe ser una integración de los pueblos”.

Más allá de temas cruciales que están ausentes en el texto, como el de la deuda externa, y el de las relaciones de este proyecto con los acuerdos de libre comercio firmados o en proceso de negociación con Estados Unidos y la Unión Europea, ¿puede esperarse que los actuales gobiernos sudamericanos (los firmantes de la Declaración del Cusco) sean consecuentes con estas declaraciones de intención? ¿Se trata de un lenguaje destinado al público de galería, o es la expresión de una nueva voluntad política de los gobiernos sudamericanos?

Más que descartar de antemano la Declaración del Cusco como pura retórica y a la decisión de crear la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones como una mera formalidad, es conveniente analizar este proceso en la potencialidad que podría ofrecer para convertirse en un nuevo terreno de pugnas y tensiones entre diferentes visiones y diferentes fuerzas sociales en torno al futuro de América Latina. ¿Pretenden los gobiernos firmantes de la declaración (o algunos de ellos) adecuar las orientaciones de sus políticas públicas a los objetivos declarados de la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones?

Lo que resulta evidente es que hay flagrantes contradicciones entre los objetivos y metas formulados en esta declaración y el rumbo principal que hoy asumen las políticas públicas en la mayoría de los países sudamericanos. Los objetivos formulados en la Declaración del Cusco no son, de modo alguno, compatibles con las políticas públicas y orientaciones económicas que, gracias a la deuda externa, los organismos financieros internacionales continúan imponiendo en todo el continente. ¿Pueden los movimientos sociales y políticos populares del continente aprovechar estas tensiones para formular e impulsar propuestas contrahegemónicas?

¿Qué sentido tiene que los gobiernos andinos que hoy negocian un TLC con Estados Unidos, proyecto que constituye una severa amenaza a la salud, educación, alimentación y el ambiente de dichos países, se comprometan a garantizar la salud, la educación, la alimentación de sus pueblos, así como la preservación del ambiente? ¿Qué sentido tiene la reivindicación del derecho a un empleo decente cuando las políticas de apertura, privatización y desregulación, la desindustrialización, la flexibilidad laboral y las reformas de la legislación laboral impulsadas por estos mismos gobiernos continúan deteriorando y precarizando sistemáticamente las condiciones del empleo? ¿Para qué proclamar la autonomía e igualdad soberana de los Estados mientras se están negociando acuerdos comerciales que limitan cada vez más el ejercicio de la soberanía? ¿Por qué hablar de la equitativa distribución del ingreso, y de la cohesión y la inclusión social, si la experiencia confirma que las actuales políticas de predominio dogmático del libre comercio no conducen sino a la desintegración social y al incremento de las desigualdades sociales? ¿Qué sentido tiene destacar la importancia de la preservación del medio ambiente y la promoción del desarrollo sostenible si -como es evidente por ejemplo en el caso de Brasil- las actuales políticas de prioridad de las exportaciones primarias orientadas a generar un excedente en la balanza comercial para pagar la deuda externa requieren una sobreexplotación depredadora y no sostenible de los recursos naturales? ¿Qué tipo de infraestructura va a acompañar este proceso de integración? ¿Continuará la prioridad en la inversión en infraestructura orientada a facilitar las exportaciones y consolidar el modelo de crecimiento hacia afuera, la economía de puertos? ¿Pondrá esta infraestructura a la Amazonía y sus recursos a la disposición de las empresas transnacionales?6. ¿Podrá por el contrario dársele prioridad a las exigencias de un desarrollo endógeno, de ampliación de los mercados internos continentales y de la efectiva integración de los pueblos? ¿Será posible avanzar en la dirección de un modelo alternativo de integración cuando se está incorporando a la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones, en forma acrítica, la base jurídica y normativa que el MERCOSUR y la Comunidad Andina de Naciones fueron armando durante los lustros recientes de hegemonía neoliberal?

La retórica latinoamericanista, la reivindicación de la soberanía y la democracia, así como de los derechos de los pueblos, podría bajar la guardia de los movimientos sociales y políticos populares en torno a las negociaciones entre los gobiernos del continente mientras mantienen una actitud vigilante ante los acuerdos negociados con potencias extracontinentales (ALCA, TLCs, MERCOSUR-UE). No hay, sin embargo, nada en la idea de integración sudamericana que en sí misma, por su propia condición de ser latina o sudamericana, sea necesariamente más favorable a los intereses de los pueblos. Todo depende, como se señaló al comienzo de este texto, de los modelos de integración en juego.

Se abre con la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones un nuevo terreno de lucha continental. El destino de este proyecto de integración y la respuesta a la cuestión básica de si puede o no llegar a ser favorable a los intereses populares, más que del contenido de sus textos fundantes, dependerá del resultado de las luchas sociales y políticas, de la capacidad de las fuerzas populares para revertir las tendencias políticas y económicas hoy hegemónicas en la mayor parte del continente.

¿Será posible convertir a la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones en un nuevo terreno capaz de articular en forma efectiva las luchas de los pueblos del continente por la soberanía, la democracia, la igualdad, la pluralidad cultural? ¿Podrá este nuevo proyecto integrador jugar un papel en la resistencia a la hegemonía imperial de Estados Unidos?

Son estos nuevos retos y nuevas interrogantes que confronta hoy la lucha popular latinoamericana.

Edgardo Lander Sociólogo, profesor titular de la UCV Ver los artículos de Edgardo Lander

[1] Han circulado, sin embargo, rumores de acuerdo a los cuales los co-presidentes de la fase final de las negociaciones del ALCA, el Embajador Robert Zoellick de Estados Unidos y el Canciller de Brasil, Celso Amorim, tendrían previsto reunirse en el mes de enero de 2005 para explorar las posibilidades de un reinicio de las negociaciones. Mientras han estado absolutamente suspendidas todas las negociaciones sustantivas, ha continuado la pugna entre las ciudades candidatas a ser sede permanente del acuerdo

[2] Aspectos de Propiedad Intelectual Relacionados con el Comercio, mejor conocido por sus siglas en inglés: TRIPS.

[3] Ver, por ejemplo, la declaración conjunta de las cuatro centrales de trabajadores colombianas: Declaración frente al tratado de libre comercio con Estados Unidos y el tema laboral, Bogotá, 3 de diciembre 2004. En Red Colombiana de Acción Frente al Libre Comercio (Recalca)

[4] Autoconvocatoria No al ALCA (Argentina), “Acuerdo Unión Europea-MERCOSUR: ganancias para pocos, amenaza para la mayoría”

[5] Declaración del Cusco sobre la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones, Cumbre Presidencial Sudamericana, Cusco, 8 de diciembre de 2004. Los países firmantes de esta declaración son: Argentina, Bolivia, Brasil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Guyana, Paraguay, Perú, Surinam, Uruguay y Venezuela


source link: Red Voltaire


Printed from http://www.bilaterals.org/article.php3?id_article=2101

Edgardo Lander

¿Integración de qué? ¿Para quién? La consideración de los proyectos de integración latinoamericanos exige formularse algunas interrogantes vitales. ¿Integración para quién? ¿Para las los sectores privilegiados de estas sociedades? ¿Para que los capitales, sovaldi sean nacionales o transnacionales, puedan moverse libremente en todo el continente? ¿O, por el contrario, para los pueblos, para las mayorías empobrecidas, excluidas, subordinadas?

 

No hay nada en la idea de integración que en sí mismo podamos considerar como favorable para el futuro de los pueblos del continente. No basta con que sea una integración latinoamericana o sudamericana para que corresponda a los intereses populares. Todo depende del modelo de integración en cuestión. ¿Quiénes lo impulsan? ¿Para qué? ¿Para quién? ¿En función de qué intereses y de que valores se diseña? Dependiendo de la respuesta a estas interrogantes, la integración puede afianzar las relaciones de dominación actualmente hegemónicas, o puede contribuir a abrir rendijas para socavarlas.

¿Un proyecto de integración orientado a abrir aún más estas economías para someterlas a los dictados de los dueños del capital? ¿O una integración defensiva que tenga como meta conquistar espacios de autonomía y soberanía para definir políticas públicas y opciones económicas propias? En otras palabras, ¿una integración que contribuya a desdibujar aún más los espacios y territorios del ejercicio de la soberanía democrática de los pueblos, o una integración orientada a recuperar lo que siglos de colonialismo y políticas imperiales le han arrebatado y continúan arrebatando a los pueblos del continente?

¿Una integración orientada por los valores del individualismo posesivo, de la competencia de todos contra todos, en la cual se garantice el éxito de los más fuertes sobre la base de la explotación y exclusión de los más débiles, esto es, una integración que acentúe las inaceptables desigualdades actuales? ¿O una integración guiada por los valores de la igualdad, de la participación, la pluralidad, la solidaridad, la comunidad, una integración que reconozca, valore y haga posible el despliegue de la extraordinaria variedad de modos de vida de los pueblos de nuestro continente?

¿Una integración que sin límite alguno explote los recursos naturales, convirtiéndolos en mercancías exportables para generar los excedentes requeridos para pagar la deuda externa? ¿O una integración que se oriente a la recuperación y construcción de otras formas de ser los humanos parte de la naturaleza, que no la considere como un enemigo a ser sometido, controlado, explotado y por ende destruido?

¿Una integración pensada como área de libre comercio, concebida principalmente como la construcción de un espacio económico de libre circulación de mercancías y capitales? ¿O una integración geopolítica concebida como parte de los procesos de resistencia al orden global que busca imponer la política unilateral e imperial del capital transnacional y del gobierno de los Estados Unidos? El ALCA

El principal proyecto estratégico del gobierno de Estados Unidos hacia el continente americano en su conjunto durante los últimos diez años ha sido el ALCA o Área de Libre Comercio de las Américas. Mediante este acuerdo de alcance continental, Estados Unidos y sus empresas han buscado consolidar, profundizar y hacer irreversibles las políticas de ajuste estructural de las últimas décadas, pretendiendo establecer de una vez por todas la prioridad absoluta de los derechos del capital sobre los derechos de la gente.

Mediante la constitucionalización del orden neoliberal en un pacto supranacional de obligatorio cumplimento, se aspira a acotar drásticamente los ámbitos de la soberanía y del ejercicio de la democracia y la regulación social, concebidas todas como trabas ilegítimas al pleno y libre despliegue y movimiento del capital.

Hasta hace poco más de dos años, las negociaciones avanzaban en forma aparentemente indetenible. Gobiernos sumisos en todo el continente negociaban textos secretos a espaldas de sus pueblos, y parecía inevitable que para la fecha prevista, esto es, para finales del año 2004, se concluyeran la negociación y revisión del texto de manera que este pudiese ser ratificado en 2005. Sin embargo, a partir del año 2002 las cosas comenzaron a cambiar.

Los movimientos y organizaciones sociales de la resistencia al ALCA, especialmente mediante su articulación en la Alianza Social Continental, lograron sacar el debate del ámbito acotado de una negociación entre expertos en comercio internacional para colocarla en el terreno del debate y la movilización pública.

Organizaciones sindicales, indígenas, ecologistas, campesinas, de mujeres y académicas en todo el continente logran converger en una resistencia crecientemente organizada y capaz de grandes movilizaciones. Cada una de las principales reuniones de los negociadores del acuerdo pasó a estar acompañada de masivas protestas (Québec, Buenos Aires, Quito, Miami). Los cambios políticos representados por la elección de Chávez, Lula y Kirchner introdujeron perspectivas y posturas negociadoras no previstas.

En la reunión del Comité de Negociaciones Comerciales (CNC) celebrada en San Salvador en julio de 2003 se reconoce por primera vez, en la propia mesa de negociaciones, que estas están severamente estancadas. Se realizaron sucesivos intentos de salvar el acuerdo mediante un tratado más diluido (Alca light) o por la vía de un ALCA de dos niveles que permitiese a los gobiernos más comprometidos con el modelo de libre comercio preservar el contenido del proyecto original, facultando a otros gobiernos el asumir compromisos menores. Buscando destrancar las negociaciones, los Estados Unidos convocaron sucesivas “reuniones informales” entre diferentes grupos de países.

Persistieron los desacuerdos. Finalmente, en contra de todos los pronósticos, lo que no parecía posible es hoy un hecho. La resistencia continental ha derrotado al ALCA, quizás definitivamente. Desde comienzos del año 2003 no se ha llevado a cabo ninguna reunión formal. De hecho, aunque esto no se admita públicamente, las negociaciones han sido pospuestas en forma indefinida [1].

Diversas organizaciones del continente han sugerido que el 1 de enero de 2005, fecha en que se suponía que estuviese listo el acuerdo, sea celebrado como el día del triunfo de los movimientos populares de las Américas contra el ALCA. En estos tiempos neoliberales no son muchas las victorias populares: hay que celebrarlas. Los Tratados de Libre Comercio (TLCs)

El descarrilamiento del ALCA representa sin duda una victoria para la resistencia al proyecto imperial de libre comercio. Sin embargo, la agenda estratégica del gobierno de Estados Unidos hacia el continente no ha sido derrotada: avanza por otras vías. Dado que las dificultades en las negociaciones del ALCA las enfrentaba principalmente con tres países -Brasil, Argentina y Venezuela- el gobierno de Estados Unidos optó por continuar negociaciones vía TLCs con prácticamente todos los demás países. Negoció y firmó un TLC con Chile, concluyó las negociaciones con Centroamérica, y está en lo que se supone que es la fase final de las negociaciones con Colombia, Ecuador y Perú.

Dado el fraccionamiento de la resistencia y las posturas más amigables (tanto al libre comercio como al gobierno de Estados Unidos) de los gobiernos en cuestión, en estos acuerdos se radicaliza la agenda neoliberal. No sólo se va más allá de los acuerdos de la Organización Mundial de Comercio (OMC), sino incluso de lo previsto en los borradores del ALCA. La extraordinaria disparidad entre las partes de estas negociaciones queda ilustrada en el contenido, por ejemplo, de los capítulos sobre propiedad intelectual y agricultura del TLC andino, acuerdos que de aprobarse en su versión actual tendrían impactos catastróficos sobre la salud y la alimentación de los pueblos.

Estados Unidos ha exigido el patentamiento de plantas y animales (¡definidos como inventos!), así como de procedimientos diagnósticos, terapéuticos y quirúrgicos. Reafirmando una vez más que considera más importante las ganancias de sus transnacionales farmacéuticas que la salud pública, además de diversas medidas destinadas a impedir la utilización de medicamentes genéricos exige que se deje sin efecto la Declaración Relativa al Acuerdo sobre ADPIC [2] de Doha (2001), que autoriza cierta flexibilidad en la interpretación de los derechos de propiedad intelectual de los medicamentos y permite a los países miembros de la OMC “proteger la salud pública y, en particular, promover el acceso a los medicamentos para todos”.

En las negociaciones sobre agricultura Estados Unidos exige la eliminación de todos los instrumentos de protección y fomento agrícola utilizados por los países andinos (bandas de precios, cuotas de importación, etc.), a la vez que se niega en forma categórica a siquiera discutir sus opulentos subsidios agrícolas. Esta combinación no puede conducir sino a la devastación de la agricultura andina, a socavar las condiciones de la seguridad alimentaria y a la expulsión de millones de personas del campo.

A pesar de la firme oposición popular y de las masivas movilizaciones de organizaciones sociales y políticas centroamericanas y andinas [3], no ha sido posible hasta el momento frenar estas negociaciones.

MERCOSUR y la Comunidad Andina de Naciones

¿Constituyen hoy el MERCOSUR o la Comunidad Andina de Naciones (CAN) alternativas a este modelo de integración y desarrollo? La integración no puede pensarse como algo diferente a los proyectos nacionales, diferente a las sociedades que se prefiguran al interior de cada Estado-nación. Los proyectos de integración del continente dependen de los procesos políticos, de las estructuras productivas, de las correlaciones de fuerza existentes tanto global y regionalmente como al interior de cada uno de los países participantes.

Los actuales proyectos y prácticas de integración en América Latina se dan con estructuras productivas y condiciones políticas e ideológicas muy diferentes a las existentes cuando se debatía la integración latinoamericana en los ‘60 y ‘70. Como resultado de las dictaduras militares y de la aplicación sistemática de las políticas neoliberales de ajuste estructural, estas sociedades han cambiado profundamente tanto en su estructura productiva como en su tejido social. Como consecuencia de la represión, la desindustrialización y las reformas laborales, el movimiento sindical se encuentra extraordinariamente reducido y debilitado, y la mayor parte de los nuevos empleos se crean en el llamado sector informal.

El peso de empresarios cuya producción se orientaba prioritariamente al mercado interno ha igualmente declinado. La propiedad de la tierra se encuentra aún más concentrada que hace tres décadas. Los sectores más dinámicos de las economías del continente -los que tienen igualmente hoy mayor incidencia política, mayor capacidad de tener impacto sobre las políticas públicas- son los sectores triunfantes de estas transformaciones económicas. Son principalmente los grupos financieros, los de los servicios -como las telecomunicaciones- y los exportadores de productos primarios: en el caso del Cono Sur, principalmente el sector agroindustrial.

Estos sectores están controlados o asociados estrechamente con el capital transnacional, sus beneficios dependen de la apertura económica, de la desregulación, de las privatizaciones y del acceso a los mercados internacionales. Constituyen las fuerzas dinámicas internas detrás de las políticas del libre comercio.

El sentido común neoliberal hoy hegemónico, y los intereses de estos sectores que resultaron beneficiados de las transformaciones políticas y de la estructura económica producidas en las últimas tres décadas, condicionan las orientaciones básicas de los proyectos de integración que hoy operan y se negocian en todo el continente. Es posible constatar incluso que la razón fundamental por la cual los gobiernos de Brasil y Argentina pusieron una resistencia tan firme al ALCA tuvo que ver principalmente con el hecho de que los beneficios que esperaban estos sectores no estaban siendo garantizados suficientemente en la negociación.

No se trata de desconocer que estos gobiernos no han tenido posiciones únicas y que han existido tensiones entre visiones más orientadas hacia el libre comercio y visiones que reivindican mayor autonomía para el impulso de políticas públicas nacionales. Sin embargo, y más allá de los discursos, fue precisamente el hecho de que el ALCA no garantizaba un mayor acceso de los productos de la agroindustria del MERCOSUR al mercado de Estados Unidos, y que el gobierno de dicho país no estaba dispuesto a siquiera considerar la reducción de los subsidios a su producción agrícola, la verdadera razón por la cual se trancaron las negociaciones del ALCA.

El único gobierno participante en las negociaciones que formuló cuestionamientos conceptuales, políticos y doctrinarios fundamentales a cada una de las dimensiones del modelo de integración propuesto por el gobierno de Estados Unidos a través del ALCA fue el de Venezuela.

Esos mismos intereses han estado impulsando las negociaciones del MERCOSUR con la Unión Europea. De acuerdo a denuncias formuladas por las principales organizaciones sociales del Cono Sur [4], a cambio de un acceso limitado de los productos de la agroindustria del MERCOSUR al mercado de la Unión Europea, los negociadores del MERCOSUR están realizando concesiones que tendrían efectos nocivos sobre la agricultura familiar, limitarían la capacidad de los Estados para tener políticas industriales autónomas, y convertirían en mercancías áreas tan críticas como los denominados “servicios culturales” y “servicios ambientales”.

Se habrían ofrecido igualmente preferencias a la Unión Europea para las compras del Sector Público. No hay razón alguna por la cual se pueda suponer que las transnacionales basadas en Europa puedan tener efectos más benignos o sean menos rapaces que las estadounidenses, ni para asumir que los gobiernos europeos sean menos agresivos en la defensa de los intereses de sus corporaciones. Cualquier ilusión en este sentido quedó desmentida con la reciente crisis argentina. La Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones

Los gobiernos de Sudamérica celebran lo que denominan un nuevo momento histórico en el continente, la realización del sueño de Bolívar: la creación de la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones. ¿Podrá este acuerdo convertirse efectivamente en un punto de partida para nuevos proyectos económicos y geopolíticos alternativos a los modelos hegemónicos?

La retórica de la Declaración del Cusco, firmada por los presidentes o cancilleres de 12 países sudamericanos [5], parecería efectivamente apuntar en una nueva dirección. Predomina en esta un lenguaje diferente a la prioritaria del libre comercio que ha sido hegemónica durante los últimos lustros.

Partiendo de la “historia compartida y solidaria de nuestras naciones”, se reivindica “una identidad sudamericana compartida y valores comunes, tales como: la democracia, la solidaridad, los derechos humanos, la libertad, la justicia social, el respeto a la integridad territorial, a la diversidad, la no discriminación y la afirmación de su autonomía, la igualdad soberana de los Estados y la solución pacífica de controversias”.

Se reconoce que no es suficiente con el desarrollo económico, y que se requieren estrategias que junto a “una conciencia ambiental responsable y el reconocimiento de asimetrías en el desarrollo de sus países, aseguren una más justa y equitativa distribución del ingreso, el acceso a la educación, la cohesión y la inclusión social, así como la preservación del medio ambiente y la promoción del desarrollo sostenible”.

Se enfatiza un “compromiso esencial con la lucha contra la pobreza, la eliminación del hambre, la generación de empleo decente y el acceso de todos a la salud y a la educación como herramientas fundamentales para el desarrollo de los pueblos”. En el terreno internacional se apela a “los valores de la paz y la seguridad internacionales, a partir de la afirmación de la vigencia del derecho internacional y de un multilateralismo renovado y democrático que integre decididamente y de manera eficaz el desarrollo económico y social en la agenda mundial”.

Desde el punto de vista institucional, se afirma a la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones como proyecto que trasciende un área de libre comercio, acordándose que se va a “desarrollar un espacio sudamericano integrado en lo político, social, económico, ambiental y de infraestructura, que fortalezca la identidad propia de América del Sur y que contribuya, a partir de una perspectiva subregional y, en articulación con otras experiencias de integración regional, al fortalecimiento de América Latina y el Caribe y le otorgue una mayor gravitación y representación en los foros internacionales”.

De acuerdo al texto, se trata de un proyecto de integración de los pueblos. Se afirma: “Nuestra convicción en el sentido que la realización de los valores e intereses compartidos que nos unen, además de comprometer a los Gobiernos, sólo encontrará viabilidad en la medida que los pueblos asuman el rol protagónico que les corresponde en este proceso. La integración sudamericana es y debe ser una integración de los pueblos”.

Más allá de temas cruciales que están ausentes en el texto, como el de la deuda externa, y el de las relaciones de este proyecto con los acuerdos de libre comercio firmados o en proceso de negociación con Estados Unidos y la Unión Europea, ¿puede esperarse que los actuales gobiernos sudamericanos (los firmantes de la Declaración del Cusco) sean consecuentes con estas declaraciones de intención? ¿Se trata de un lenguaje destinado al público de galería, o es la expresión de una nueva voluntad política de los gobiernos sudamericanos?

Más que descartar de antemano la Declaración del Cusco como pura retórica y a la decisión de crear la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones como una mera formalidad, es conveniente analizar este proceso en la potencialidad que podría ofrecer para convertirse en un nuevo terreno de pugnas y tensiones entre diferentes visiones y diferentes fuerzas sociales en torno al futuro de América Latina. ¿Pretenden los gobiernos firmantes de la declaración (o algunos de ellos) adecuar las orientaciones de sus políticas públicas a los objetivos declarados de la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones?

Lo que resulta evidente es que hay flagrantes contradicciones entre los objetivos y metas formulados en esta declaración y el rumbo principal que hoy asumen las políticas públicas en la mayoría de los países sudamericanos. Los objetivos formulados en la Declaración del Cusco no son, de modo alguno, compatibles con las políticas públicas y orientaciones económicas que, gracias a la deuda externa, los organismos financieros internacionales continúan imponiendo en todo el continente. ¿Pueden los movimientos sociales y políticos populares del continente aprovechar estas tensiones para formular e impulsar propuestas contrahegemónicas?

¿Qué sentido tiene que los gobiernos andinos que hoy negocian un TLC con Estados Unidos, proyecto que constituye una severa amenaza a la salud, educación, alimentación y el ambiente de dichos países, se comprometan a garantizar la salud, la educación, la alimentación de sus pueblos, así como la preservación del ambiente? ¿Qué sentido tiene la reivindicación del derecho a un empleo decente cuando las políticas de apertura, privatización y desregulación, la desindustrialización, la flexibilidad laboral y las reformas de la legislación laboral impulsadas por estos mismos gobiernos continúan deteriorando y precarizando sistemáticamente las condiciones del empleo? ¿Para qué proclamar la autonomía e igualdad soberana de los Estados mientras se están negociando acuerdos comerciales que limitan cada vez más el ejercicio de la soberanía? ¿Por qué hablar de la equitativa distribución del ingreso, y de la cohesión y la inclusión social, si la experiencia confirma que las actuales políticas de predominio dogmático del libre comercio no conducen sino a la desintegración social y al incremento de las desigualdades sociales? ¿Qué sentido tiene destacar la importancia de la preservación del medio ambiente y la promoción del desarrollo sostenible si -como es evidente por ejemplo en el caso de Brasil- las actuales políticas de prioridad de las exportaciones primarias orientadas a generar un excedente en la balanza comercial para pagar la deuda externa requieren una sobreexplotación depredadora y no sostenible de los recursos naturales? ¿Qué tipo de infraestructura va a acompañar este proceso de integración? ¿Continuará la prioridad en la inversión en infraestructura orientada a facilitar las exportaciones y consolidar el modelo de crecimiento hacia afuera, la economía de puertos? ¿Pondrá esta infraestructura a la Amazonía y sus recursos a la disposición de las empresas transnacionales?6. ¿Podrá por el contrario dársele prioridad a las exigencias de un desarrollo endógeno, de ampliación de los mercados internos continentales y de la efectiva integración de los pueblos? ¿Será posible avanzar en la dirección de un modelo alternativo de integración cuando se está incorporando a la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones, en forma acrítica, la base jurídica y normativa que el MERCOSUR y la Comunidad Andina de Naciones fueron armando durante los lustros recientes de hegemonía neoliberal?

La retórica latinoamericanista, la reivindicación de la soberanía y la democracia, así como de los derechos de los pueblos, podría bajar la guardia de los movimientos sociales y políticos populares en torno a las negociaciones entre los gobiernos del continente mientras mantienen una actitud vigilante ante los acuerdos negociados con potencias extracontinentales (ALCA, TLCs, MERCOSUR-UE). No hay, sin embargo, nada en la idea de integración sudamericana que en sí misma, por su propia condición de ser latina o sudamericana, sea necesariamente más favorable a los intereses de los pueblos. Todo depende, como se señaló al comienzo de este texto, de los modelos de integración en juego.

Se abre con la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones un nuevo terreno de lucha continental. El destino de este proyecto de integración y la respuesta a la cuestión básica de si puede o no llegar a ser favorable a los intereses populares, más que del contenido de sus textos fundantes, dependerá del resultado de las luchas sociales y políticas, de la capacidad de las fuerzas populares para revertir las tendencias políticas y económicas hoy hegemónicas en la mayor parte del continente.

¿Será posible convertir a la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones en un nuevo terreno capaz de articular en forma efectiva las luchas de los pueblos del continente por la soberanía, la democracia, la igualdad, la pluralidad cultural? ¿Podrá este nuevo proyecto integrador jugar un papel en la resistencia a la hegemonía imperial de Estados Unidos?

Son estos nuevos retos y nuevas interrogantes que confronta hoy la lucha popular latinoamericana.

Edgardo Lander Sociólogo, profesor titular de la UCV Ver los artículos de Edgardo Lander

[1] Han circulado, sin embargo, rumores de acuerdo a los cuales los co-presidentes de la fase final de las negociaciones del ALCA, el Embajador Robert Zoellick de Estados Unidos y el Canciller de Brasil, Celso Amorim, tendrían previsto reunirse en el mes de enero de 2005 para explorar las posibilidades de un reinicio de las negociaciones. Mientras han estado absolutamente suspendidas todas las negociaciones sustantivas, ha continuado la pugna entre las ciudades candidatas a ser sede permanente del acuerdo

[2] Aspectos de Propiedad Intelectual Relacionados con el Comercio, mejor conocido por sus siglas en inglés: TRIPS.

[3] Ver, por ejemplo, la declaración conjunta de las cuatro centrales de trabajadores colombianas: Declaración frente al tratado de libre comercio con Estados Unidos y el tema laboral, Bogotá, 3 de diciembre 2004. En Red Colombiana de Acción Frente al Libre Comercio (Recalca)

[4] Autoconvocatoria No al ALCA (Argentina), “Acuerdo Unión Europea-MERCOSUR: ganancias para pocos, amenaza para la mayoría”

[5] Declaración del Cusco sobre la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones, Cumbre Presidencial Sudamericana, Cusco, 8 de diciembre de 2004. Los países firmantes de esta declaración son: Argentina, Bolivia, Brasil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Guyana, Paraguay, Perú, Surinam, Uruguay y Venezuela

source link: Red Voltaire

Printed from http://www.bilaterals.org/article.php3?id_article=2101

<!– @page { margin: 0.79in } P { margin-bottom: 0.08in } –>

Edgardo Lander

¿Integración de qué? ¿Para quién? La consideración de los proyectos de integración latinoamericanos exige formularse algunas interrogantes vitales. ¿Integración para quién? ¿Para las los sectores privilegiados de estas sociedades? ¿Para que los capitales, sean nacionales o transnacionales, puedan moverse libremente en todo el continente? ¿O, por el contrario, para los pueblos, para las mayorías empobrecidas, excluidas, subordinadas?

 

No hay nada en la idea de integración que en sí mismo podamos considerar como favorable para el futuro de los pueblos del continente. No basta con que sea una integración latinoamericana o sudamericana para que corresponda a los intereses populares. Todo depende del modelo de integración en cuestión. ¿Quiénes lo impulsan? ¿Para qué? ¿Para quién? ¿En función de qué intereses y de que valores se diseña? Dependiendo de la respuesta a estas interrogantes, la integración puede afianzar las relaciones de dominación actualmente hegemónicas, o puede contribuir a abrir rendijas para socavarlas.

¿Un proyecto de integración orientado a abrir aún más estas economías para someterlas a los dictados de los dueños del capital? ¿O una integración defensiva que tenga como meta conquistar espacios de autonomía y soberanía para definir políticas públicas y opciones económicas propias? En otras palabras, ¿una integración que contribuya a desdibujar aún más los espacios y territorios del ejercicio de la soberanía democrática de los pueblos, o una integración orientada a recuperar lo que siglos de colonialismo y políticas imperiales le han arrebatado y continúan arrebatando a los pueblos del continente?

¿Una integración orientada por los valores del individualismo posesivo, de la competencia de todos contra todos, en la cual se garantice el éxito de los más fuertes sobre la base de la explotación y exclusión de los más débiles, esto es, una integración que acentúe las inaceptables desigualdades actuales? ¿O una integración guiada por los valores de la igualdad, de la participación, la pluralidad, la solidaridad, la comunidad, una integración que reconozca, valore y haga posible el despliegue de la extraordinaria variedad de modos de vida de los pueblos de nuestro continente?

¿Una integración que sin límite alguno explote los recursos naturales, convirtiéndolos en mercancías exportables para generar los excedentes requeridos para pagar la deuda externa? ¿O una integración que se oriente a la recuperación y construcción de otras formas de ser los humanos parte de la naturaleza, que no la considere como un enemigo a ser sometido, controlado, explotado y por ende destruido?

¿Una integración pensada como área de libre comercio, concebida principalmente como la construcción de un espacio económico de libre circulación de mercancías y capitales? ¿O una integración geopolítica concebida como parte de los procesos de resistencia al orden global que busca imponer la política unilateral e imperial del capital transnacional y del gobierno de los Estados Unidos? El ALCA

El principal proyecto estratégico del gobierno de Estados Unidos hacia el continente americano en su conjunto durante los últimos diez años ha sido el ALCA o Área de Libre Comercio de las Américas. Mediante este acuerdo de alcance continental, Estados Unidos y sus empresas han buscado consolidar, profundizar y hacer irreversibles las políticas de ajuste estructural de las últimas décadas, pretendiendo establecer de una vez por todas la prioridad absoluta de los derechos del capital sobre los derechos de la gente.

Mediante la constitucionalización del orden neoliberal en un pacto supranacional de obligatorio cumplimento, se aspira a acotar drásticamente los ámbitos de la soberanía y del ejercicio de la democracia y la regulación social, concebidas todas como trabas ilegítimas al pleno y libre despliegue y movimiento del capital.

Hasta hace poco más de dos años, las negociaciones avanzaban en forma aparentemente indetenible. Gobiernos sumisos en todo el continente negociaban textos secretos a espaldas de sus pueblos, y parecía inevitable que para la fecha prevista, esto es, para finales del año 2004, se concluyeran la negociación y revisión del texto de manera que este pudiese ser ratificado en 2005. Sin embargo, a partir del año 2002 las cosas comenzaron a cambiar.

Los movimientos y organizaciones sociales de la resistencia al ALCA, especialmente mediante su articulación en la Alianza Social Continental, lograron sacar el debate del ámbito acotado de una negociación entre expertos en comercio internacional para colocarla en el terreno del debate y la movilización pública.

Organizaciones sindicales, indígenas, ecologistas, campesinas, de mujeres y académicas en todo el continente logran converger en una resistencia crecientemente organizada y capaz de grandes movilizaciones. Cada una de las principales reuniones de los negociadores del acuerdo pasó a estar acompañada de masivas protestas (Québec, Buenos Aires, Quito, Miami). Los cambios políticos representados por la elección de Chávez, Lula y Kirchner introdujeron perspectivas y posturas negociadoras no previstas.

En la reunión del Comité de Negociaciones Comerciales (CNC) celebrada en San Salvador en julio de 2003 se reconoce por primera vez, en la propia mesa de negociaciones, que estas están severamente estancadas. Se realizaron sucesivos intentos de salvar el acuerdo mediante un tratado más diluido (Alca light) o por la vía de un ALCA de dos niveles que permitiese a los gobiernos más comprometidos con el modelo de libre comercio preservar el contenido del proyecto original, facultando a otros gobiernos el asumir compromisos menores. Buscando destrancar las negociaciones, los Estados Unidos convocaron sucesivas “reuniones informales” entre diferentes grupos de países.

Persistieron los desacuerdos. Finalmente, en contra de todos los pronósticos, lo que no parecía posible es hoy un hecho. La resistencia continental ha derrotado al ALCA, quizás definitivamente. Desde comienzos del año 2003 no se ha llevado a cabo ninguna reunión formal. De hecho, aunque esto no se admita públicamente, las negociaciones han sido pospuestas en forma indefinida [1].

Diversas organizaciones del continente han sugerido que el 1 de enero de 2005, fecha en que se suponía que estuviese listo el acuerdo, sea celebrado como el día del triunfo de los movimientos populares de las Américas contra el ALCA. En estos tiempos neoliberales no son muchas las victorias populares: hay que celebrarlas. Los Tratados de Libre Comercio (TLCs)

El descarrilamiento del ALCA representa sin duda una victoria para la resistencia al proyecto imperial de libre comercio. Sin embargo, la agenda estratégica del gobierno de Estados Unidos hacia el continente no ha sido derrotada: avanza por otras vías. Dado que las dificultades en las negociaciones del ALCA las enfrentaba principalmente con tres países -Brasil, Argentina y Venezuela- el gobierno de Estados Unidos optó por continuar negociaciones vía TLCs con prácticamente todos los demás países. Negoció y firmó un TLC con Chile, concluyó las negociaciones con Centroamérica, y está en lo que se supone que es la fase final de las negociaciones con Colombia, Ecuador y Perú.

Dado el fraccionamiento de la resistencia y las posturas más amigables (tanto al libre comercio como al gobierno de Estados Unidos) de los gobiernos en cuestión, en estos acuerdos se radicaliza la agenda neoliberal. No sólo se va más allá de los acuerdos de la Organización Mundial de Comercio (OMC), sino incluso de lo previsto en los borradores del ALCA. La extraordinaria disparidad entre las partes de estas negociaciones queda ilustrada en el contenido, por ejemplo, de los capítulos sobre propiedad intelectual y agricultura del TLC andino, acuerdos que de aprobarse en su versión actual tendrían impactos catastróficos sobre la salud y la alimentación de los pueblos.

Estados Unidos ha exigido el patentamiento de plantas y animales (¡definidos como inventos!), así como de procedimientos diagnósticos, terapéuticos y quirúrgicos. Reafirmando una vez más que considera más importante las ganancias de sus transnacionales farmacéuticas que la salud pública, además de diversas medidas destinadas a impedir la utilización de medicamentes genéricos exige que se deje sin efecto la Declaración Relativa al Acuerdo sobre ADPIC [2] de Doha (2001), que autoriza cierta flexibilidad en la interpretación de los derechos de propiedad intelectual de los medicamentos y permite a los países miembros de la OMC “proteger la salud pública y, en particular, promover el acceso a los medicamentos para todos”.

En las negociaciones sobre agricultura Estados Unidos exige la eliminación de todos los instrumentos de protección y fomento agrícola utilizados por los países andinos (bandas de precios, cuotas de importación, etc.), a la vez que se niega en forma categórica a siquiera discutir sus opulentos subsidios agrícolas. Esta combinación no puede conducir sino a la devastación de la agricultura andina, a socavar las condiciones de la seguridad alimentaria y a la expulsión de millones de personas del campo.

A pesar de la firme oposición popular y de las masivas movilizaciones de organizaciones sociales y políticas centroamericanas y andinas [3], no ha sido posible hasta el momento frenar estas negociaciones.

MERCOSUR y la Comunidad Andina de Naciones

¿Constituyen hoy el MERCOSUR o la Comunidad Andina de Naciones (CAN) alternativas a este modelo de integración y desarrollo? La integración no puede pensarse como algo diferente a los proyectos nacionales, diferente a las sociedades que se prefiguran al interior de cada Estado-nación. Los proyectos de integración del continente dependen de los procesos políticos, de las estructuras productivas, de las correlaciones de fuerza existentes tanto global y regionalmente como al interior de cada uno de los países participantes.

Los actuales proyectos y prácticas de integración en América Latina se dan con estructuras productivas y condiciones políticas e ideológicas muy diferentes a las existentes cuando se debatía la integración latinoamericana en los ‘60 y ‘70. Como resultado de las dictaduras militares y de la aplicación sistemática de las políticas neoliberales de ajuste estructural, estas sociedades han cambiado profundamente tanto en su estructura productiva como en su tejido social. Como consecuencia de la represión, la desindustrialización y las reformas laborales, el movimiento sindical se encuentra extraordinariamente reducido y debilitado, y la mayor parte de los nuevos empleos se crean en el llamado sector informal.

El peso de empresarios cuya producción se orientaba prioritariamente al mercado interno ha igualmente declinado. La propiedad de la tierra se encuentra aún más concentrada que hace tres décadas. Los sectores más dinámicos de las economías del continente -los que tienen igualmente hoy mayor incidencia política, mayor capacidad de tener impacto sobre las políticas públicas- son los sectores triunfantes de estas transformaciones económicas. Son principalmente los grupos financieros, los de los servicios -como las telecomunicaciones- y los exportadores de productos primarios: en el caso del Cono Sur, principalmente el sector agroindustrial.

Estos sectores están controlados o asociados estrechamente con el capital transnacional, sus beneficios dependen de la apertura económica, de la desregulación, de las privatizaciones y del acceso a los mercados internacionales. Constituyen las fuerzas dinámicas internas detrás de las políticas del libre comercio.

El sentido común neoliberal hoy hegemónico, y los intereses de estos sectores que resultaron beneficiados de las transformaciones políticas y de la estructura económica producidas en las últimas tres décadas, condicionan las orientaciones básicas de los proyectos de integración que hoy operan y se negocian en todo el continente. Es posible constatar incluso que la razón fundamental por la cual los gobiernos de Brasil y Argentina pusieron una resistencia tan firme al ALCA tuvo que ver principalmente con el hecho de que los beneficios que esperaban estos sectores no estaban siendo garantizados suficientemente en la negociación.

No se trata de desconocer que estos gobiernos no han tenido posiciones únicas y que han existido tensiones entre visiones más orientadas hacia el libre comercio y visiones que reivindican mayor autonomía para el impulso de políticas públicas nacionales. Sin embargo, y más allá de los discursos, fue precisamente el hecho de que el ALCA no garantizaba un mayor acceso de los productos de la agroindustria del MERCOSUR al mercado de Estados Unidos, y que el gobierno de dicho país no estaba dispuesto a siquiera considerar la reducción de los subsidios a su producción agrícola, la verdadera razón por la cual se trancaron las negociaciones del ALCA.

El único gobierno participante en las negociaciones que formuló cuestionamientos conceptuales, políticos y doctrinarios fundamentales a cada una de las dimensiones del modelo de integración propuesto por el gobierno de Estados Unidos a través del ALCA fue el de Venezuela.

Esos mismos intereses han estado impulsando las negociaciones del MERCOSUR con la Unión Europea. De acuerdo a denuncias formuladas por las principales organizaciones sociales del Cono Sur [4], a cambio de un acceso limitado de los productos de la agroindustria del MERCOSUR al mercado de la Unión Europea, los negociadores del MERCOSUR están realizando concesiones que tendrían efectos nocivos sobre la agricultura familiar, limitarían la capacidad de los Estados para tener políticas industriales autónomas, y convertirían en mercancías áreas tan críticas como los denominados “servicios culturales” y “servicios ambientales”.

Se habrían ofrecido igualmente preferencias a la Unión Europea para las compras del Sector Público. No hay razón alguna por la cual se pueda suponer que las transnacionales basadas en Europa puedan tener efectos más benignos o sean menos rapaces que las estadounidenses, ni para asumir que los gobiernos europeos sean menos agresivos en la defensa de los intereses de sus corporaciones. Cualquier ilusión en este sentido quedó desmentida con la reciente crisis argentina. La Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones

Los gobiernos de Sudamérica celebran lo que denominan un nuevo momento histórico en el continente, la realización del sueño de Bolívar: la creación de la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones. ¿Podrá este acuerdo convertirse efectivamente en un punto de partida para nuevos proyectos económicos y geopolíticos alternativos a los modelos hegemónicos?

La retórica de la Declaración del Cusco, firmada por los presidentes o cancilleres de 12 países sudamericanos [5], parecería efectivamente apuntar en una nueva dirección. Predomina en esta un lenguaje diferente a la prioritaria del libre comercio que ha sido hegemónica durante los últimos lustros.

Partiendo de la “historia compartida y solidaria de nuestras naciones”, se reivindica “una identidad sudamericana compartida y valores comunes, tales como: la democracia, la solidaridad, los derechos humanos, la libertad, la justicia social, el respeto a la integridad territorial, a la diversidad, la no discriminación y la afirmación de su autonomía, la igualdad soberana de los Estados y la solución pacífica de controversias”.

Se reconoce que no es suficiente con el desarrollo económico, y que se requieren estrategias que junto a “una conciencia ambiental responsable y el reconocimiento de asimetrías en el desarrollo de sus países, aseguren una más justa y equitativa distribución del ingreso, el acceso a la educación, la cohesión y la inclusión social, así como la preservación del medio ambiente y la promoción del desarrollo sostenible”.

Se enfatiza un “compromiso esencial con la lucha contra la pobreza, la eliminación del hambre, la generación de empleo decente y el acceso de todos a la salud y a la educación como herramientas fundamentales para el desarrollo de los pueblos”. En el terreno internacional se apela a “los valores de la paz y la seguridad internacionales, a partir de la afirmación de la vigencia del derecho internacional y de un multilateralismo renovado y democrático que integre decididamente y de manera eficaz el desarrollo económico y social en la agenda mundial”.

Desde el punto de vista institucional, se afirma a la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones como proyecto que trasciende un área de libre comercio, acordándose que se va a “desarrollar un espacio sudamericano integrado en lo político, social, económico, ambiental y de infraestructura, que fortalezca la identidad propia de América del Sur y que contribuya, a partir de una perspectiva subregional y, en articulación con otras experiencias de integración regional, al fortalecimiento de América Latina y el Caribe y le otorgue una mayor gravitación y representación en los foros internacionales”.

De acuerdo al texto, se trata de un proyecto de integración de los pueblos. Se afirma: “Nuestra convicción en el sentido que la realización de los valores e intereses compartidos que nos unen, además de comprometer a los Gobiernos, sólo encontrará viabilidad en la medida que los pueblos asuman el rol protagónico que les corresponde en este proceso. La integración sudamericana es y debe ser una integración de los pueblos”.

Más allá de temas cruciales que están ausentes en el texto, como el de la deuda externa, y el de las relaciones de este proyecto con los acuerdos de libre comercio firmados o en proceso de negociación con Estados Unidos y la Unión Europea, ¿puede esperarse que los actuales gobiernos sudamericanos (los firmantes de la Declaración del Cusco) sean consecuentes con estas declaraciones de intención? ¿Se trata de un lenguaje destinado al público de galería, o es la expresión de una nueva voluntad política de los gobiernos sudamericanos?

Más que descartar de antemano la Declaración del Cusco como pura retórica y a la decisión de crear la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones como una mera formalidad, es conveniente analizar este proceso en la potencialidad que podría ofrecer para convertirse en un nuevo terreno de pugnas y tensiones entre diferentes visiones y diferentes fuerzas sociales en torno al futuro de América Latina. ¿Pretenden los gobiernos firmantes de la declaración (o algunos de ellos) adecuar las orientaciones de sus políticas públicas a los objetivos declarados de la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones?

Lo que resulta evidente es que hay flagrantes contradicciones entre los objetivos y metas formulados en esta declaración y el rumbo principal que hoy asumen las políticas públicas en la mayoría de los países sudamericanos. Los objetivos formulados en la Declaración del Cusco no son, de modo alguno, compatibles con las políticas públicas y orientaciones económicas que, gracias a la deuda externa, los organismos financieros internacionales continúan imponiendo en todo el continente. ¿Pueden los movimientos sociales y políticos populares del continente aprovechar estas tensiones para formular e impulsar propuestas contrahegemónicas?

¿Qué sentido tiene que los gobiernos andinos que hoy negocian un TLC con Estados Unidos, proyecto que constituye una severa amenaza a la salud, educación, alimentación y el ambiente de dichos países, se comprometan a garantizar la salud, la educación, la alimentación de sus pueblos, así como la preservación del ambiente? ¿Qué sentido tiene la reivindicación del derecho a un empleo decente cuando las políticas de apertura, privatización y desregulación, la desindustrialización, la flexibilidad laboral y las reformas de la legislación laboral impulsadas por estos mismos gobiernos continúan deteriorando y precarizando sistemáticamente las condiciones del empleo? ¿Para qué proclamar la autonomía e igualdad soberana de los Estados mientras se están negociando acuerdos comerciales que limitan cada vez más el ejercicio de la soberanía? ¿Por qué hablar de la equitativa distribución del ingreso, y de la cohesión y la inclusión social, si la experiencia confirma que las actuales políticas de predominio dogmático del libre comercio no conducen sino a la desintegración social y al incremento de las desigualdades sociales? ¿Qué sentido tiene destacar la importancia de la preservación del medio ambiente y la promoción del desarrollo sostenible si -como es evidente por ejemplo en el caso de Brasil- las actuales políticas de prioridad de las exportaciones primarias orientadas a generar un excedente en la balanza comercial para pagar la deuda externa requieren una sobreexplotación depredadora y no sostenible de los recursos naturales? ¿Qué tipo de infraestructura va a acompañar este proceso de integración? ¿Continuará la prioridad en la inversión en infraestructura orientada a facilitar las exportaciones y consolidar el modelo de crecimiento hacia afuera, la economía de puertos? ¿Pondrá esta infraestructura a la Amazonía y sus recursos a la disposición de las empresas transnacionales?6. ¿Podrá por el contrario dársele prioridad a las exigencias de un desarrollo endógeno, de ampliación de los mercados internos continentales y de la efectiva integración de los pueblos? ¿Será posible avanzar en la dirección de un modelo alternativo de integración cuando se está incorporando a la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones, en forma acrítica, la base jurídica y normativa que el MERCOSUR y la Comunidad Andina de Naciones fueron armando durante los lustros recientes de hegemonía neoliberal?

La retórica latinoamericanista, la reivindicación de la soberanía y la democracia, así como de los derechos de los pueblos, podría bajar la guardia de los movimientos sociales y políticos populares en torno a las negociaciones entre los gobiernos del continente mientras mantienen una actitud vigilante ante los acuerdos negociados con potencias extracontinentales (ALCA, TLCs, MERCOSUR-UE). No hay, sin embargo, nada en la idea de integración sudamericana que en sí misma, por su propia condición de ser latina o sudamericana, sea necesariamente más favorable a los intereses de los pueblos. Todo depende, como se señaló al comienzo de este texto, de los modelos de integración en juego.

Se abre con la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones un nuevo terreno de lucha continental. El destino de este proyecto de integración y la respuesta a la cuestión básica de si puede o no llegar a ser favorable a los intereses populares, más que del contenido de sus textos fundantes, dependerá del resultado de las luchas sociales y políticas, de la capacidad de las fuerzas populares para revertir las tendencias políticas y económicas hoy hegemónicas en la mayor parte del continente.

¿Será posible convertir a la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones en un nuevo terreno capaz de articular en forma efectiva las luchas de los pueblos del continente por la soberanía, la democracia, la igualdad, la pluralidad cultural? ¿Podrá este nuevo proyecto integrador jugar un papel en la resistencia a la hegemonía imperial de Estados Unidos?

Son estos nuevos retos y nuevas interrogantes que confronta hoy la lucha popular latinoamericana.

Edgardo Lander Sociólogo, profesor titular de la UCV Ver los artículos de Edgardo Lander

[1] Han circulado, sin embargo, rumores de acuerdo a los cuales los co-presidentes de la fase final de las negociaciones del ALCA, el Embajador Robert Zoellick de Estados Unidos y el Canciller de Brasil, Celso Amorim, tendrían previsto reunirse en el mes de enero de 2005 para explorar las posibilidades de un reinicio de las negociaciones. Mientras han estado absolutamente suspendidas todas las negociaciones sustantivas, ha continuado la pugna entre las ciudades candidatas a ser sede permanente del acuerdo

[2] Aspectos de Propiedad Intelectual Relacionados con el Comercio, mejor conocido por sus siglas en inglés: TRIPS.

[3] Ver, por ejemplo, la declaración conjunta de las cuatro centrales de trabajadores colombianas: Declaración frente al tratado de libre comercio con Estados Unidos y el tema laboral, Bogotá, 3 de diciembre 2004. En Red Colombiana de Acción Frente al Libre Comercio (Recalca)

[4] Autoconvocatoria No al ALCA (Argentina), “Acuerdo Unión Europea-MERCOSUR: ganancias para pocos, amenaza para la mayoría”

[5] Declaración del Cusco sobre la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones, Cumbre Presidencial Sudamericana, Cusco, 8 de diciembre de 2004. Los países firmantes de esta declaración son: Argentina, Bolivia, Brasil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Guyana, Paraguay, Perú, Surinam, Uruguay y Venezuela


source link: Red Voltaire


Printed from http://www.bilaterals.org/article.php3?id_article=2101

Gonzalo Berrón

Investigador del Núcleo de Pesquisa de Relações Internacionais da USP, discount Brasil

 

Más que en ninguna otra región del continente Americano, find y de América Latina en particular, los movimientos y organizaciones sociales que históricamente han enfrentado al libre comercio y la globalización neoliberal en el Cono Sur se encuentran ante el desafío que les impone el complejo escenario de la integración regional. A riesgo de ser esquemático, considero que son el ALBA, el Mercosur y la Unasur los tres procesos que interpelan de forma directa la acción de los actores sociales de esta parte del continente.

 

Esta geografía laberíntica que presenta la superposición – pero no la contradicción – de los procesos genera situaciones inéditas: ninguno de los países del Mercosur forma parte del ALBA, sin embargo el movimiento social que viene impulsando la mayor movilización social a favor de este proceso, el MST, es justamente de Brasil. A su vez, Venezuela, el motor del ALBA, aún aguarda la decisión de los senadores paraguayos y brasileños para tornarse miembro pleno del Mercosur. La UNASUR, una idea que impulsara el presidente conservador Fernando Henrique Cardoso de Brasil, fue luego abrazada como propia por el presidente Lula y su asesor dilecto Marco Aurélio Garcia, y finalmente por el gobierno de Evo Morales, la expresión más cabal del cambio político en la región. Por fin, resulta llamativo que no se identifiquen con el ALBA países como Argentina, que recibiera un salvataje millonario de Venezuela, o Brasil, que comparte con ese país, por ejemplo, el proyecto energético de la refinería Abreu e Lima en el estado de Pernambuco, iniciativas binacionales que perfectamente podrían caer bajo la denominación “ALBA-TCP”. También Paraguay y Uruguay tienen en marcha iniciativas similares con Venezuela, sin embargo, ninguno de los gobiernos del Mercosur habla del ALBA, o ha hecho muestras de querer sumarse al bloque siendo que tal acción no sería de ninguna forma incompatible con la normativa ni del Mercosur ni del ALBA. Los conflictos se producen al interior de los bloques, y no como dinámica competitiva entre los mismos.

 

Este enmarañado cuadro, desde la visión de los movimientos sociales, se completa con el fin de las negociaciones del ALCA, en la Cumbre de las Américas de Mar del Plata (noviembre de 2005), que significó el fin, como todos sabemos, de la lucha contra lo que era identificado como la encarnación de las ansias imperialistas de los Estados Unidos en América Latina y el Caribe. Muerto el ALCA, los movimientos sociales de la región se volvieron, en lo que consideraron un viraje lógico, hacia los escenarios y las iniciativas de integración regional. Mientras en otras regiones la resistencia contra el libre comercio continuó de forma muy activa contra los TLCs con los EUA y luego contra los AdAs con Europa, en el Mercosur la amenaza del libre comercio se restringió a una cada vez más lánguida negociación de la Ronda de Doha en la OMC.

 

UNASUR y movimientos

La relación UNASUR movimientos sociales fue estimulada por dos dinámicas. Por una lado, la UNASUR se presentaba como la iniciativa de integración regional más amplia en términos de extensión geográfica y de número de países, así como en relación a la cantidad de “nuevos gobiernos”. Esta extensión favorecía una dinámica también más abarcadora para la articulación de los movimientos sociales, y el hecho de que en el 2006 aún fuera una “cáscara vacía” lo hacía también atractivo, pues se estimaba que junto con el grupo de presidentes próximos al ideario – u origen – de los movimientos existiría una gran chance para proponer y participar. Por otro lado, la asunción de la Secretaría de UNASUR por parte de Bolivia y el impulso que el gobierno de Evo Morales le quiso dar a éste proceso en medio de la crisis de la CAN, llevaron a una aproximación fuerte con quienes otrora fueran sus compañeros de lucha a nivel continental, que se expresó en la Cumbre Social por la Integración de los Pueblos realizada en Cochabamba, en diciembre de 2006, como actividad simultánea a la cumbre de Presidentes de la UNASUR.

 

Esto generó una relación estrecha entre movimientos y organizaciones sociales y el proceso de la UNASUR. En este contexto, también se discutió originalmente la idea del Banco del Sur que había sido igualmente transformada en objeto de lucha por parte de las organizaciones sociales de la región, así como, por la negativa, la necesidad de interactuar con una instancia que heredaba de la etapa anterior la iniciativa del IIRSA, para denunciar y presionar de forma más eficiente sobre este plan de infraestructura pergeñado de espaldas a los pueblos del América del Sur y con el fin último de proveer energía, caminos y comunicaciones para un modelo de desarrollo que, tal como asistimos en estos días de crisis global, se demuestra impropio para traer justicia social y ambiental a nuestros pueblos.

 

La UNASUR siguió siendo vista como un proceso con potencial de cambio al que los actores sociales acompañaban. La Cumbre Energética en Isla Margarita (17 de abril de 2007) fue motivo para consolidar una posición de las organizaciones en esta materia. La declaración oficial ya dejaba entrever el debate petroleo/etanol y fuentes renovables de energía, así como una velada puja de las estatales venezolana y brasileña. En su texto, sin embargo, mantuvo un espíritu progresista ratificando el papel de las empresas nacionales en el contexto de la entonces aún reciente nacionalización de los hidrocarburos en Bolivia. Durante la Secretaría Boliviana de la UNASUR se mantuvo esa impronta, incluso se realizaron consultas con organizaciones sociales a fin de discutir los mecanismos de participación que podría adoptar la institucionalidad a ser creada con el tratado que por entonces estaba en construcción. En mayo de 2008 se firma el tratado que constituye la UNASUR con status de bloque de países a nivel internacional y con un perfil cuyo foco se distancia de lo estrictamente económico para “construir, de manera participativa y consensuada, un espacio de integración y unión en lo cultural, social, económico y político entre sus pueblos, otorgando prioridad al diálogo político, las políticas sociales, la educación, la energía, la infraestructura, el financiamiento y el medio ambiente, entre otros, con miras a eliminar la desigualdad socioeconómica, lograr la inclusión social y la participación ciudadana, fortalecer la democracia y reducir las asimetrías en el marco del fortalecimiento de la soberanía e independencia de los Estados.” (Tratado Constitutivo de la Unión de Naciones Sudamericana, 6 de mayo de 2008). El ímpetu de la firma del Tratado, sin embargo, fue opacado por la salida de la Secretaría de Bolivia hacia Chile en medio de una disputa áspera que incluyó vetos explícitos de unos países a otros para la designación del Secretario del bloque. Esta sensación sólo sería interrumpida por el excelente papel que jugó la UNASUR en cortar la escalada de sabotajes e intentos golpistas al gobierno Evo Morales, así como en el proceso posterior de investigación de la masacre perpetrada por grupos armados comandados por el prefecto de Pando. Finalmente, en estos días, el Consejo de Defensa Sudamericana (“CDS”, como ya es llamado por los ministros de defensa de la región), que funciona como una instancia de coordinación de los ministros de defensa del bloque, aprobó un plan de acción que “prevê a adoção de uma doutrina política comum, o inventário da atual capacidade militar de todos e o monitoramento dos gastos do setor” y que podría transformarse en una “alianza militar defensiva regional”, lo que dificultaría, o por lo menos ejercería un contrapeso, a la actuación militar estadounidense en la región.

 

Mercosur y movimientos

Una parte significativa de los movimientos sociales del Cono Sur buscaron, a la salida de la lucha contra el ALCA, construir un “sujeto social” regional que orientase su actuación a los problemas más acuciantes a nivel regional y a nivel de cada país en relación a la región o a alguno de sus países miembros. En este sentido se inicia en julio de 2006, en Córdoba, un proceso semestral de Cumbre de los Pueblos del Sur – sólo interrumpiéndose en diciembre de 2006, pues por entonces se realizaba la Cumbre de Cochabamba – que a la fecha cuenta con la realización de cumbres en Córdoba, Asunción, Montevideo, Posadas/Tucumán y Salvador de Bahía.

 

Más allá de la generación de esta dinámica de Cumbres, sin embargo, han existido dificultades para coordinar acciones/campañas conjuntas sobre temas específicos. Estas dificultades devienen del hecho de que las dinámicas nacionales siguen aún siendo muy fuertes, pues el movimiento aún identifica la lucha prioritaria como siendo una que se define en el ámbito nacional, y en ese sentido problemas que tienen una eminente configuración regional (energía, agua, medio ambiente, modelo agropecuario, mecanismos financieros, e incluso comercio), aparecen aún como siendo tratados prioritariamente con estrategias nacionales. El hecho de existir redes y actores sociales fuertes en relación a alguno de estos temas no ha sido suficiente como para desencadenar campañas de carácter regional, o bien las mismas no han superado la instancia de las declaraciones conjuntas y enfrentan dificultades en la implementación concreta. Recién en los últimos tiempos, y después de varias tentativas, se comienza a articular un movimiento que, a partir de las demandas paraguayas sobre Itaipú, propone regionalizar la lucha iniciada por la Coordinación Nacional por la Soberanía y la Integración Energética (CNSIE) desde el Paraguay. Esta experiencia, en caso de que resulte exitosa, podrá abrir la puerta a nuevas acciones que tengan como blanco a los gobiernos de la región, y que se propongan realizar el debate en favor de un destino progresista para el Bloque.

 

Este último punto es clave para entender el debate enunciado al comienzo de estas notas, y con las cuales podemos entrar en la relación de los movimientos sociales de la región del Cono Sur y el ALBA. El Mercosur, por muchos años, fue o ignorado estratégicamente por los movimientos y organizaciones sociales que de forma conjunta se opusieron al libre comercio en la región, o bien caracterizado como una expresión más del proyecto neoliberal a ser combatida. Sólo el movimiento sindical participó del debate público y las instancias formales de interlocución desde los albores de la institucionalización del Mercosur. Ahora, con el fin del ALCA, y en medio a lo que fuera caracterizado como una coyuntura política distinta, este espacio más amplio y heterogéneo de movimientos realiza un viraje hacia el debate de la integración regional. Este viraje, que no fue fácil y que, como expliqué más arriba aún está en construcción en términos de marco político para la acción, encontró en expresiones tales como “integración de los pueblos” o “integración popular” una formulación para expresar esta nueva voluntad política en la coyuntura de cambio y oportunidad que se abría con los nuevos gobiernos conectados por su origen o sus opciones a la lucha popular. Sin embargo, en lo táctico, implicó la opción de unos por impulsar el proceso del ALBA, que funciona como faro de las ideas de cambio en materia de integración popular y cuya promoción tiene por objetivo alterar la correlación de fuerzas tanto en el plano de la hegemonía, como en el de los hechos, para torcer el rumbo de los procesos de integración regional – los demás – hacia un horizonte albeano. La segunda opción táctica recoge la trayectoria del movimiento sindical en relación a su intervención en el debate público sobre Mercosur, así como la experiencia acumulada en el debate técnico y político de la negociación de los acuerdos de libre comercio y decide entablar también el debate con el proceso oficial de la negociación del Mercosur. Desde una perspectiva política muy próxima, que reconoce la importancia del ALBA como la experiencia de lo nuevo, y la necesidad táctica de discutir el sentido de la integración en procesos reales como el Mercosur.

 

ALBA y movimientos de los países extra ALBA

Fundamentalmente en Brasil opera la separación táctica descrita arriba, que permite la discusión programática acerca de la “integración popular” o “integración de los pueblos” en el plano de la construcción contrahegemónica, pero que impide la acción conjunta en el escenario Mercosur. Y que, sin embargo, y a pesar de su carácter extra-regional, convergen en la interlocución hacia el proceso ALBA. El impulso que ha tomado la iniciativa del MST en torno al ALBA sin dudas es un elemento que dinamizará el debate sobre los contenidos concretos de la integración de los pueblos o popular y debe dialogar con el esfuerzo que muchas organizaciones han venido realizando a partir de la Cumbre de Cochabamba en el marco de la Alianza Social Continental.

 

Por otro lado, es necesario afinar el proceso de dialogo oficial de los movimientos sociales con el proceso ALBA. Aquí se ha logrado realizar encuentros y actos públicos en ocasiones esporádicas, que generalmente coinciden con Cumbres de Presidentes o Foros Sociales, y que han sido útiles para estrechar el vínculo pero poco eficientes para tratar los temas en profundidad. Esta es una cuestión que queda pendiente en la perspectiva de ampliación de iniciativas y proyectos del ALBA en una dimensión de la complementariedad no convencional en la que se pueden establecer acuerdos de cooperación entre movimientos sociales de un país con gobiernos de otros.

 

Notas finales

La proliferación de iniciativas comunes entre los gobiernos de la región – salvo aquellos que de forma activa y militante pregonan soluciones neoliberales y conservadoras evidentemente demodés – en un marco de compatibilidad y cierta, hasta podríamos decir, armonía nos alienta a pensar que la profundización de la integración con un sentido progresista por parte de los gobiernos podría ser posible. Sin embargo, las diferencias en estilo de liderazgos y la persistencia de ciertos nacionalismos soberanistas, van a seguir siendo obstáculos para una integración profunda, incluso en este contexto de proliferación de gobiernos distintos de aquellos que hacían del alineamiento incondicional a las políticas de Washington. En este contexto, la convergencia estratégica y la complementariedad táctica de los movimientos y organizaciones sociales en torno a la integración es urgente y está llamada a cumplir un papel central en este debate y en la lucha política hacia la integración de los pueblos del Sur.

Según noticia de Radio Nacional de Venezuela-RNV, del 17 de marzo de 2009, la República Federativa de Brasil espera la visita del presidente Hugo Chávez a la nación sureña el próximo 26 de mayo, para definir proyectos estratégicos en las áreas de petroquímica, salud, educación y turismo. Así lo afirmó el gobernador del estado de Bahía, Jaques Wagner, en el Palacio de Miraflores, tras culminar una reunión con el jefe de Estado venezolano.

Folha de São Paulo, 11 de março de 2009 “Proposto inicialmente como simples fórum de debates, o CDS (Conselho de Defesa Sul-Americano) pode tomar a forma de uma aliança militar defensiva regional. Os 12 ministros da Defesa sul-americanos aprovaram ontem, em Santiago, plano de ação que prevê a adoção de uma doutrina política comum, o inventário da atual capacidade militar de todos e o monitoramento dos gastos do setor, como antecipado pela Folha”.

Para una referencia sobre éste debate puede accederse al sitio de Brasil de Fato, donde se está publicando una serie de “Cartas paraguaias” escritas por Roberto Colman, miembro de la CNSIE www.brasildefato.com.b

“Este proceso de integración de movimientos y organizaciones sociales, impulsa los principios del ALBA, y a su vez quiere promover diversos mecanismos y potencialidades que ofrece el ALBA, para potenciar la integración latinoamericana desde los pueblos.” Carta de los Movimientos Sociales de las Américas, Belém, 30 de Enero de 2009.

El Movimiento de Trabajadores sin Tierra que ha impulsado ésta perspectiva del ALBA co-convoca regularmente junto con la Marcha Mundial de las Mujeres a las reuniones de planificación en las que participan organizaciones como la Red Braileira Pela Integração dos Povos que tiene un papel activo en la dinámica del escenario de debate público con el Mercosur.

Democratising Trade Politics in the Americas: Insights from the Women’s, Environmental and Labour Movements

Much has been written and theorized about the Bolivarian Alternative for the Americas (ALBA) since President Chavez first proposed the idea at Isla Margarita at the III Summit of the Heads of State and the Government of the Association of Caribbean States in December, discount 2001.
a

Raúl Zibechi

ALAI AMLATINA, 30/05/2008, prescription Montevideo.- No es ALBA, ni el MERCOSUR ampliado, ni la integración energética que venía trabajando Venezuela. La UNASUR, impulsada por Brasil, tiene ventajas y desventajas: entre las primeras, potencia la autonomía regional respecto de los Estados Unidos; pero es un tipo de integración a la medida de las grandes empresas brasileñas.

El 23 de mayo, en Brasilia, once presidentes y un vicepresidente en representación de los doce países de América del Sur, firmaron el Tratado Constitutivo de la Unión de Naciones Suramericanas (UNASUR). El tiempo dirá, pero todo indica que se trata de un hecho que hará historia en el largo y complejo proceso de integración de los países de la región y, muy en particular, de la afirmación de un proyecto propio que necesariamente toma distancias de Washington.

El proceso en curso presenta dos novedades respecto a los anteriores. Uno, es el neto protagonismo de Brasil que se ha convertido en la locomotora regional, luego de tejer una alianza estratégica con Argentina. El resto de los países pueden elegir entre seguir la corriente del país que representa la mitad del PIB regional y de su población y es, junto a Rusia, China e India, uno de los principales emergentes del mundo. Pero, además, el único en condiciones de liderar un proceso que colocará a la región como uno de los cinco o seis polos de poder global.

El segundo, es que la seguridad regional ha sido sustituida a la energía como disparador de la integración. Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva presentó la propuesta de crear un Consejo de Defensa Suramericano, del que sólo la Colombia de Alvaro Uribe tomó distancias. No obstante, se ha creado un grupo de trabajo que en 90 días presentará un informe técnico con el objetivo de eliminar las divergencias existentes. Lula se mostró confiado en que Uribe aceptará la integración en materia de seguridad, luego de su viaje a Bogotá el próximo 20 de julio.

De este modo, la diplomacia de Itamaraty arrincona las expectativas del Pentágono de abrir un frente militar, luego del ataque al campamento de las FARC en suelo ecuatoriano el pasado 1 de marzo. Esta es apenas la fase final de una estrategia que comenzó con maniobras conjuntas entre Brasil y Argentina, cuyas hipótesis de conflicto consistían en la defensa de los recursos naturales ante una potencia extracontinental. En noviembre de 2006, el coronel Oliva Neto, quien dirige el Núcleo de Asuntos Estratégicos de la Presidencia de Brasil, había hecho la propuesta de crear unas fuerzas armadas regionales como parte del proyecto Brasil en Tres Tiempos, que busca convertir a la nación en un “país desarrollado” para 2022.

Para horror de Washington, y de las derechas vernáculas, la región contará en adelante con cuatro poderosas instancias de integración: la UNASUR, el Consejo de Defensa, y según el anuncio de Lula, “un banco central y una moneda única”. No está claro qué papel jugará el Banco del Sur, aunque es probable que Brasilia opte por otro formato en línea con su poderoso Banco Nacional de Desarrollo, que cuenta con más fondos para invertir en la región que el FMI y el propio Banco Mundial.

Sin duda, esta integración a la medida del “Brasil potencia” no es la que hubiera preferido Hugo Chávez, pero las dificultades por las que atraviesa el proceso bolivariano y los resquemores que levanta en la región, fortalecieron la opción brasileña. Que las grandes empresas de ese país (Petrobras, Embraer, Odebrecht, Camargo Correa, Itaú….) serán las grandes beneficiarias, está fuera de duda. Seguramente, sea el precio a pagar por romper dependencias más onerosas.

Analistas conservadores como el argentino Rosendo Fraga, esperan que “la heterogeneidad de los doce países de la región” (Nueva Mayoría, 20 de mayo) sea la piedra en el zapato del proceso de integración. Washington tiene las mismas expectativas y, además, trabaja con ahínco para ello. Llama la atención, en vista de las escasas perspectivas de futuro que tienen los pequeños países en un mundo globalizado, que el único presidente que faltó a la cita haya sido Tabaré Vázquez.


– Raúl Zibechi, periodista uruguayo, es docente e investigador en la Multiversidad Franciscana de América Latina, y asesor de varios grupos sociales.

Raúl Zibechi
ALAI AMLATINA, stuff 30/05/2008, Montevideo.- No es ALBA, ni el MERCOSUR ampliado, ni la integración energética que venía trabajando Venezuela. La UNASUR, impulsada por Brasil, tiene ventajas y desventajas: entre las primeras, potencia la autonomía regional respecto de los Estados Unidos; pero es un tipo de integración a la medida de las grandes empresas brasileñas.
El 23 de mayo, en Brasilia, once presidentes y un vicepresidente en representación de los doce países de América del Sur, firmaron el Tratado Constitutivo de la Unión de Naciones Suramericanas (UNASUR). El tiempo dirá, pero todo indica que se trata de un hecho que hará historia en el largo y complejo proceso de integración de los países de la región y, muy en particular, de la afirmación de un proyecto propio que necesariamente toma distancias de Washington.
El proceso en curso presenta dos novedades respecto a los anteriores. Uno, es el neto protagonismo de Brasil que se ha convertido en la locomotora regional, luego de tejer una alianza estratégica con Argentina. El resto de los países pueden elegir entre seguir la corriente del país que representa la mitad del PIB regional y de su población y es, junto a Rusia, China e India, uno de los principales emergentes del mundo. Pero, además, el único en condiciones de liderar un proceso que colocará a la región como uno de los cinco o seis polos de poder global.
El segundo, es que la seguridad regional ha sido sustituida a la energía como disparador de la integración. Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva presentó la propuesta de crear un Consejo de Defensa Suramericano, del que sólo la Colombia de Alvaro Uribe tomó distancias. No obstante, se ha creado un grupo de trabajo que en 90 días presentará un informe técnico con el objetivo de eliminar las divergencias existentes. Lula se mostró confiado en que Uribe aceptará la integración en materia de seguridad, luego de su viaje a Bogotá el próximo 20 de julio.
De este modo, la diplomacia de Itamaraty arrincona las expectativas del Pentágono de abrir un frente militar, luego del ataque al campamento de las FARC en suelo ecuatoriano el pasado 1 de marzo. Esta es apenas la fase final de una estrategia que comenzó con maniobras conjuntas entre Brasil y Argentina, cuyas hipótesis de conflicto consistían en la defensa de los recursos naturales ante una potencia extracontinental. En noviembre de 2006, el coronel Oliva Neto, quien dirige el Núcleo de Asuntos Estratégicos de la Presidencia de Brasil, había hecho la propuesta de crear unas fuerzas armadas regionales como parte del proyecto Brasil en Tres Tiempos, que busca convertir a la nación en un “país desarrollado” para 2022.
Para horror de Washington, y de las derechas vernáculas, la región contará en adelante con cuatro poderosas instancias de integración: la UNASUR, el Consejo de Defensa, y según el anuncio de Lula, “un banco central y una moneda única”. No está claro qué papel jugará el Banco del Sur, aunque es probable que Brasilia opte por otro formato en línea con su poderoso Banco Nacional de Desarrollo, que cuenta con más fondos para invertir en la región que el FMI y el propio Banco Mundial.
Sin duda, esta integración a la medida del “Brasil potencia” no es la que hubiera preferido Hugo Chávez, pero las dificultades por las que atraviesa el proceso bolivariano y los resquemores que levanta en la región, fortalecieron la opción brasileña. Que las grandes empresas de ese país (Petrobras, Embraer, Odebrecht, Camargo Correa, Itaú….) serán las grandes beneficiarias, está fuera de duda. Seguramente, sea el precio a pagar por romper dependencias más onerosas.
Analistas conservadores como el argentino Rosendo Fraga, esperan que “la heterogeneidad de los doce países de la región” (Nueva Mayoría, 20 de mayo) sea la piedra en el zapato del proceso de integración. Washington tiene las mismas expectativas y, además, trabaja con ahínco para ello. Llama la atención, en vista de las escasas perspectivas de futuro que tienen los pequeños países en un mundo globalizado, que el único presidente que faltó a la cita haya sido Tabaré Vázquez.


– Raúl Zibechi, periodista uruguayo, es docente e investigador en la Multiversidad Franciscana de América Latina, y asesor de varios grupos sociales.

V Cumbre del ALBA

Tintorero – Estado Lara, physician online 29 de abril de 2007
En ocasión de celebrarse la V Cumbre de la Alternativa Bolivariana para los Pueblos de Nuestra América (ALBA) y el primer aniversario del Tratado de Comercio de los Pueblos (TCP), healing
Hugo Chávez Frías, Presidente de la República Bolivariana de Venezuela, Evo Morales Ayma; Presidente de la República de Bolivia, Carlos Lage Dávila, Vicepresidente del Consejo de Estado de la República de Cuba; Daniel Ortega Saavedra, Presidente de la República de Nicaragua; todos representantes de los países miembros del ALBA; y contando con la presencia de René Preval, Presidente de la República de Haití; Maria Fernanda Espinosa, Canciller de la República de Ecuador; Reginald Austrie, Ministro de Energía y Obras Públicas de la Mancomunidad de Dominica; Assim Martin, Ministro de Obras Públicas, Transporte, Correos y Energía de la Federación de San Crist& oacute;bal y Nieves; Julian Francis, Ministro de la Vivienda, Asentamientos Humanos Informales, Planificación Física y Tierra de San Vicente y las Granadinas y Eduardo Bonomi, Ministro de Trabajo y Seguridad Social de la República Oriental del Uruguay, en calidad de invitados especiales y observadores de esta Cumbre, efectuada los días 28 y 29 de abril de 2007, realizaron una completa evaluación del desarrollo de los programas y proyectos aprobados en el Primer Plan Estratégico del ALBA, así como de las acciones de cooperación e integración desplegadas durante el año 2006 en la República de Bolivia y la República de Nicaragua y los hermanos países del Caribe.

En el curso del debate sostenido en un clima de fraternidad y hermandad, ratificamos la idea de que el principio rector de la Alternativa Bolivariana para los Pueblos de Nuestra América, es la solidaridad más amplia entre los pueblos de América Latina y el Caribe, sin nacionalismos egoístas ni políticas nacionales restrictivas que puedan negar el objetivo de construir la Patria Grande que soñaron los próceres y héroes de nuestras luchas emancipadoras.

La integración y unión de América Latina y el Caribe a partir de un modelo de desarrollo independiente que priorice la complementariedad económica regional, haga realidad la voluntad de promover el desarrollo de todos y fortalezca una cooperación genuina basada en el respeto mutuo y solidaridad, ya no es una simple quimera, sino una realidad tangible que se ha manifestado en estos años en los programas de alfabetización y salud, que han permitido a miles de latinoamericanos avanzar en el camino de la superación real de la pobreza; en la cooperación dada en materia energética y financiera a los países del Caribe, que está contribuyendo decisivamente al progreso de estos pueblos hermanos; en el incremento sostenido del comercio compensado y justo entre Cuba y Venezuela, y en el conjunto de empresas mixtas conformadas entre ambos en diversas ramas productivas; en el importante apoyo de financiamiento directo brindado a Bolivia para el cumplimiento de diversos programas sociales, en el conjunto de proyectos identificados para la constitución de empresas mixtas binacionales; en todo el proceso de impulso que estamos brindando al Gobierno Sandinista de Nicaragua que en tan solo escasos meses está produciendo efectos altamente positivos en las áreas de generación eléctrica, producción agrícola, suministros de insumos para la industrias, entre otras áreas.

La Alternativa Bolivariana para los Pueblos de Nuestra América que se sustenta en los principios de solidaridad, cooperación genuina y complementariedad entre nuestros países, en el aprovechamiento racional y en función del bienestar de nuestros pueblos de sus recursos naturales – incluido su potencial energético-, en la formación integral e intensiva del capital humano que requiere nuestro desarrollo y en la atención a las necesidades y aspiraciones de nuestros hombres y mujeres, ha demostrado su fuerza y viabilidad como una alternativa de justicia frente al neoliberalismo y la inequidad.

El ALBA está demostrando con estadísticas concretas que el libre comercio no es capaz de generar los cambios sociales requeridos, y que puede más la voluntad política como sustento de la definición conciente de programas de acción encaminados hacia la erradicación de los dramas sociales de millones de seres humanos en nuestro continente.

En virtud de los antes expresado los Jefes de Estado de Cuba, Venezuela, Bolivia y Nicaragua, en representación de sus respectivos pueblos, reafirmaron su determinación de seguir avanzando y profundizando la construcción del ALBA, en el entendido de que esta alternativa constituye una alianza política estratégica, cuyo propósito fundamental en el mediano plazo es producir transformaciones estructurales en las formaciones económico-sociales de las naciones que la integran, para hacer posible un desarrollo compartido, capaz de garantizar la inserción exitosa y sostenible en los procesos de producción e intercambio del mundo actual, para colocar la política y la economía al servicio de los seres humanos.

En el contexto en que toma cuerpo, el ALBA constituye el primer esfuerzo histórico de construcción de un proyecto global latinoamericano desde una posición política favorable. Desde la Revolución Cubana, las fuerzas progresistas del continente, bien desde la oposición o desde el poder, lo que habían hecho era acumular fuerzas para resistir la ofensiva del imperio (Cuba es la excepción porque no solo logró sobrevivir, sino que edificó una sociedad cualitativamente superior, desplegando al mismo tiempo una trascendente labor de apoyo internacionalista a los países más pobres, en medio de un espantoso bloqueo por parte del imperialismo norteamericano); es con el nacimiento del ALBA que las fuerzas revolucionarias hemos podido pasar a una nueva situación que bien pudiéramos def inir como de acumulación de la fuerza política necesaria para la consolidación del cambio que se ha producido en la correlación de fuerzas políticas de nuestro continente.

Ante nosotros se abren nuevas perspectivas de integración y fusión que forman parte del salto cualitativo que están promoviendo los profundos vínculos de cooperación que hemos establecido en estos años. Por tal razón estamos comprometidos a llevar adelante la construcción de espacios económicos y productivos de nuevo tipo, que produzcan mayores beneficios a nuestros pueblos, mediante la utilización racional de los recursos y activos de nuestros países, para lo cual se requiere avanzar en la conformación de empresas Grannacionales, estableciendo y consolidando los acuerdos normativos e institucionales necesarios para la cooperación; instrumentando estrategias y programas Grannacionales conjuntos de todos nuestros países en materias como: educación, salud, energí ;a, comunicación, transporte, vivienda, vialidad, alimentación, entre otros; promoviendo de manera conciente y organizada la ampliación del Tratado de Comercio de los Pueblos con intercambios justos y equilibrados; llevando adelante programas para el uso racional de los recursos energéticos renovables y no renovables, construyendo una estrategia de seguridad alimentaria común a todas nuestras naciones; ampliando la cooperación en materia de formación de recursos humanos; y fundando nuevas estructuras para el fortalecimiento de nuestra capacidad de financiamiento de los grandes proyectos Grannacionales.

Reiteraron su convicción de que solo un proceso de integración entre los pueblos de Nuestra América, que tenga en cuenta el nivel de desarrollo de cada país y garantice que todas las naciones se beneficien de este proceso, permitirá superar la espiral degradante del subdesarrollo impuesto a nuestra región.

En esta V Cumbre hemos visto con mucho regocijo el contenido de la Declaración Política firmada el 17 de febrero en San Vicente y las Granadinas por los Primeros Ministros Roosevelt Skerrit, de la Mancomunidad de Dominica; Ralph Gonsálves, de San Vicente y las Granadinas, Winston Baldwin Spencer, de Antigua y Barbuda y Hugo Chávez Frías, Presidente de la República Bolivariana de Venezuela, en la cual manifiestan su voluntad de propiciar la más profunda cooperación y unidad entre la Comunidad del Caribe (CARICOM) y los Estados signatarios de la Alternativa Bolivariana para los Pueblos de Nuestra América y el Tratado de Comercio de los Pueblos, de manera que sus beneficios sociales y las posibilidades de un desarrollo económico sustentable con independencia y soberanía sea igual para todos, to do lo cual comienza a materializarse con la presencia en esta V Cumbre de nuestros hermanos del Caribe.

Los Jefes de Estado y de Gobierno de Cuba, Venezuela, Bolivia y Nicaragua, acordaron suscribir la presente Declaración en la convicción de que la misma abre el camino hacia una nueva fase de consolidación estratégica y avance político de la Alternativa Bolivariana para los Pueblos de Nuestra América (ALBA), en la perspectiva histórica de poder realizar los sueños de nuestros Libertadores de construcción de la Patria Grande Latinoamericana y Caribeña.

Hecho en la ciudad de Barquisimeto, República Bolivariana de Venezuela, a los 29 días del mes abril de 2007.

Por la República Bolivariana de Venezuela Hugo Chávez Frías, Presidente de la República

Por el Gobierno de la República de Bolivia, Evo Morales, Presidente de la República

Por la República de Cuba, Carlos Lage, Vicepresidente de la República


Por el Gobierno de la República de Nicaragua, Daniel Ortega, Presidente de la República

V Cumbre del ALBA
Tintorero – Estado Lara, 29 de abril de 2007
En ocasión de celebrarse la V Cumbre de la Alternativa Bolivariana para los Pueblos de Nuestra América (ALBA) y el primer aniversario del Tratado de Comercio de los Pueblos (TCP), hospital Hugo Chávez Frías, Presidente de la República Bolivariana de Venezuela, Evo Morales Ayma; Presidente de la República de Bolivia, Carlos Lage Dávila, Vicepresidente del Consejo de Estado de la República de Cuba; Daniel Ortega Saavedra, Presidente de la República de Nicaragua; todos representantes de los países miembros del ALBA; y contando con la presencia de René Preval, Presidente de la República de Haití; Maria Fernanda Espinosa, Canciller de la República de Ecuador; Reginald Austrie, Ministro de Energía y Obras Públicas de la Mancomunidad de Dominica; Assim Martin, Ministro de Obras Públicas, Transporte, Correos y Energía de la Federación de San Crist& oacute;bal y Nieves; Julian Francis, Ministro de la Vivienda, Asentamientos Humanos Informales, Planificación Física y Tierra de San Vicente y las Granadinas y Eduardo Bonomi, Ministro de Trabajo y Seguridad Social de la República Oriental del Uruguay, en calidad de invitados especiales y observadores de esta Cumbre, efectuada los días 28 y 29 de abril de 2007, realizaron una completa evaluación del desarrollo de los programas y proyectos aprobados en el Primer Plan Estratégico del ALBA, así como de las acciones de cooperación e integración desplegadas durante el año 2006 en la República de Bolivia y la República de Nicaragua y los hermanos países del Caribe.
En el curso del debate sostenido en un clima de fraternidad y hermandad, ratificamos la idea de que el principio rector de la Alternativa Bolivariana para los Pueblos de Nuestra América, es la solidaridad más amplia entre los pueblos de América Latina y el Caribe, sin nacionalismos egoístas ni políticas nacionales restrictivas que puedan negar el objetivo de construir la Patria Grande que soñaron los próceres y héroes de nuestras luchas emancipadoras.
La integración y unión de América Latina y el Caribe a partir de un modelo de desarrollo independiente que priorice la complementariedad económica regional, haga realidad la voluntad de promover el desarrollo de todos y fortalezca una cooperación genuina basada en el respeto mutuo y solidaridad, ya no es una simple quimera, sino una realidad tangible que se ha manifestado en estos años en los programas de alfabetización y salud, que han permitido a miles de latinoamericanos avanzar en el camino de la superación real de la pobreza; en la cooperación dada en materia energética y financiera a los países del Caribe, que está contribuyendo decisivamente al progreso de estos pueblos hermanos; en el incremento sostenido del comercio compensado y justo entre Cuba y Venezuela, y en el conjunto de empresas mixtas conformadas entre ambos en diversas ramas productivas; en el importante apoyo de financiamiento directo brindado a Bolivia para el cumplimiento de diversos programas sociales, en el conjunto de proyectos identificados para la constitución de empresas mixtas binacionales; en todo el proceso de impulso que estamos brindando al Gobierno Sandinista de Nicaragua que en tan solo escasos meses está produciendo efectos altamente positivos en las áreas de generación eléctrica, producción agrícola, suministros de insumos para la industrias, entre otras áreas.
La Alternativa Bolivariana para los Pueblos de Nuestra América que se sustenta en los principios de solidaridad, cooperación genuina y complementariedad entre nuestros países, en el aprovechamiento racional y en función del bienestar de nuestros pueblos de sus recursos naturales – incluido su potencial energético-, en la formación integral e intensiva del capital humano que requiere nuestro desarrollo y en la atención a las necesidades y aspiraciones de nuestros hombres y mujeres, ha demostrado su fuerza y viabilidad como una alternativa de justicia frente al neoliberalismo y la inequidad.
El ALBA está demostrando con estadísticas concretas que el libre comercio no es capaz de generar los cambios sociales requeridos, y que puede más la voluntad política como sustento de la definición conciente de programas de acción encaminados hacia la erradicación de los dramas sociales de millones de seres humanos en nuestro continente.
En virtud de los antes expresado los Jefes de Estado de Cuba, Venezuela, Bolivia y Nicaragua, en representación de sus respectivos pueblos, reafirmaron su determinación de seguir avanzando y profundizando la construcción del ALBA, en el entendido de que esta alternativa constituye una alianza política estratégica, cuyo propósito fundamental en el mediano plazo es producir transformaciones estructurales en las formaciones económico-sociales de las naciones que la integran, para hacer posible un desarrollo compartido, capaz de garantizar la inserción exitosa y sostenible en los procesos de producción e intercambio del mundo actual, para colocar la política y la economía al servicio de los seres humanos.
En el contexto en que toma cuerpo, el ALBA constituye el primer esfuerzo histórico de construcción de un proyecto global latinoamericano desde una posición política favorable. Desde la Revolución Cubana, las fuerzas progresistas del continente, bien desde la oposición o desde el poder, lo que habían hecho era acumular fuerzas para resistir la ofensiva del imperio (Cuba es la excepción porque no solo logró sobrevivir, sino que edificó una sociedad cualitativamente superior, desplegando al mismo tiempo una trascendente labor de apoyo internacionalista a los países más pobres, en medio de un espantoso bloqueo por parte del imperialismo norteamericano); es con el nacimiento del ALBA que las fuerzas revolucionarias hemos podido pasar a una nueva situación que bien pudiéramos def inir como de acumulación de la fuerza política necesaria para la consolidación del cambio que se ha producido en la correlación de fuerzas políticas de nuestro continente.
Ante nosotros se abren nuevas perspectivas de integración y fusión que forman parte del salto cualitativo que están promoviendo los profundos vínculos de cooperación que hemos establecido en estos años. Por tal razón estamos comprometidos a llevar adelante la construcción de espacios económicos y productivos de nuevo tipo, que produzcan mayores beneficios a nuestros pueblos, mediante la utilización racional de los recursos y activos de nuestros países, para lo cual se requiere avanzar en la conformación de empresas Grannacionales, estableciendo y consolidando los acuerdos normativos e institucionales necesarios para la cooperación; instrumentando estrategias y programas Grannacionales conjuntos de todos nuestros países en materias como: educación, salud, energí ;a, comunicación, transporte, vivienda, vialidad, alimentación, entre otros; promoviendo de manera conciente y organizada la ampliación del Tratado de Comercio de los Pueblos con intercambios justos y equilibrados; llevando adelante programas para el uso racional de los recursos energéticos renovables y no renovables, construyendo una estrategia de seguridad alimentaria común a todas nuestras naciones; ampliando la cooperación en materia de formación de recursos humanos; y fundando nuevas estructuras para el fortalecimiento de nuestra capacidad de financiamiento de los grandes proyectos Grannacionales.
Reiteraron su convicción de que solo un proceso de integración entre los pueblos de Nuestra América, que tenga en cuenta el nivel de desarrollo de cada país y garantice que todas las naciones se beneficien de este proceso, permitirá superar la espiral degradante del subdesarrollo impuesto a nuestra región.
En esta V Cumbre hemos visto con mucho regocijo el contenido de la Declaración Política firmada el 17 de febrero en San Vicente y las Granadinas por los Primeros Ministros Roosevelt Skerrit, de la Mancomunidad de Dominica; Ralph Gonsálves, de San Vicente y las Granadinas, Winston Baldwin Spencer, de Antigua y Barbuda y Hugo Chávez Frías, Presidente de la República Bolivariana de Venezuela, en la cual manifiestan su voluntad de propiciar la más profunda cooperación y unidad entre la Comunidad del Caribe (CARICOM) y los Estados signatarios de la Alternativa Bolivariana para los Pueblos de Nuestra América y el Tratado de Comercio de los Pueblos, de manera que sus beneficios sociales y las posibilidades de un desarrollo económico sustentable con independencia y soberanía sea igual para todos, to do lo cual comienza a materializarse con la presencia en esta V Cumbre de nuestros hermanos del Caribe.
Los Jefes de Estado y de Gobierno de Cuba, Venezuela, Bolivia y Nicaragua, acordaron suscribir la presente Declaración en la convicción de que la misma abre el camino hacia una nueva fase de consolidación estratégica y avance político de la Alternativa Bolivariana para los Pueblos de Nuestra América (ALBA), en la perspectiva histórica de poder realizar los sueños de nuestros Libertadores de construcción de la Patria Grande Latinoamericana y Caribeña.
Hecho en la ciudad de Barquisimeto, República Bolivariana de Venezuela, a los 29 días del mes abril de 2007.
Por la República Bolivariana de Venezuela Hugo Chávez Frías, Presidente de la República
Por el Gobierno de la República de Bolivia, Evo Morales, Presidente de la República
Por la República de Cuba, Carlos Lage, Vicepresidente de la República
Por el Gobierno de la República de Nicaragua, Daniel Ortega, Presidente de la República
V Cumbre del ALBA
Tintorero – Estado Lara, advice 29 de abril de 2007
En ocasión de celebrarse la V Cumbre de la Alternativa Bolivariana para los Pueblos de Nuestra América (ALBA) y el primer aniversario del Tratado de Comercio de los Pueblos (TCP), treat Hugo Chávez Frías, Presidente de la República Bolivariana de Venezuela, Evo Morales Ayma; Presidente de la República de Bolivia, Carlos Lage Dávila, Vicepresidente del Consejo de Estado de la República de Cuba; Daniel Ortega Saavedra, Presidente de la República de Nicaragua; todos representantes de los países miembros del ALBA; y contando con la presencia de René Preval, Presidente de la República de Haití; Maria Fernanda Espinosa, Canciller de la República de Ecuador; Reginald Austrie, Ministro de Energía y Obras Públicas de la Mancomunidad de Dominica; Assim Martin, Ministro de Obras Públicas, Transporte, Correos y Energía de la Federación de San Crist& oacute;bal y Nieves; Julian Francis, Ministro de la Vivienda, Asentamientos Humanos Informales, Planificación Física y Tierra de San Vicente y las Granadinas y Eduardo Bonomi, Ministro de Trabajo y Seguridad Social de la República Oriental del Uruguay, en calidad de invitados especiales y observadores de esta Cumbre, efectuada los días 28 y 29 de abril de 2007, realizaron una completa evaluación del desarrollo de los programas y proyectos aprobados en el Primer Plan Estratégico del ALBA, así como de las acciones de cooperación e integración desplegadas durante el año 2006 en la República de Bolivia y la República de Nicaragua y los hermanos países del Caribe.
En el curso del debate sostenido en un clima de fraternidad y hermandad, ratificamos la idea de que el principio rector de la Alternativa Bolivariana para los Pueblos de Nuestra América, es la solidaridad más amplia entre los pueblos de América Latina y el Caribe, sin nacionalismos egoístas ni políticas nacionales restrictivas que puedan negar el objetivo de construir la Patria Grande que soñaron los próceres y héroes de nuestras luchas emancipadoras.
La integración y unión de América Latina y el Caribe a partir de un modelo de desarrollo independiente que priorice la complementariedad económica regional, haga realidad la voluntad de promover el desarrollo de todos y fortalezca una cooperación genuina basada en el respeto mutuo y solidaridad, ya no es una simple quimera, sino una realidad tangible que se ha manifestado en estos años en los programas de alfabetización y salud, que han permitido a miles de latinoamericanos avanzar en el camino de la superación real de la pobreza; en la cooperación dada en materia energética y financiera a los países del Caribe, que está contribuyendo decisivamente al progreso de estos pueblos hermanos; en el incremento sostenido del comercio compensado y justo entre Cuba y Venezuela, y en el conjunto de empresas mixtas conformadas entre ambos en diversas ramas productivas; en el importante apoyo de financiamiento directo brindado a Bolivia para el cumplimiento de diversos programas sociales, en el conjunto de proyectos identificados para la constitución de empresas mixtas binacionales; en todo el proceso de impulso que estamos brindando al Gobierno Sandinista de Nicaragua que en tan solo escasos meses está produciendo efectos altamente positivos en las áreas de generación eléctrica, producción agrícola, suministros de insumos para la industrias, entre otras áreas.
La Alternativa Bolivariana para los Pueblos de Nuestra América que se sustenta en los principios de solidaridad, cooperación genuina y complementariedad entre nuestros países, en el aprovechamiento racional y en función del bienestar de nuestros pueblos de sus recursos naturales – incluido su potencial energético-, en la formación integral e intensiva del capital humano que requiere nuestro desarrollo y en la atención a las necesidades y aspiraciones de nuestros hombres y mujeres, ha demostrado su fuerza y viabilidad como una alternativa de justicia frente al neoliberalismo y la inequidad.
El ALBA está demostrando con estadísticas concretas que el libre comercio no es capaz de generar los cambios sociales requeridos, y que puede más la voluntad política como sustento de la definición conciente de programas de acción encaminados hacia la erradicación de los dramas sociales de millones de seres humanos en nuestro continente.
En virtud de los antes expresado los Jefes de Estado de Cuba, Venezuela, Bolivia y Nicaragua, en representación de sus respectivos pueblos, reafirmaron su determinación de seguir avanzando y profundizando la construcción del ALBA, en el entendido de que esta alternativa constituye una alianza política estratégica, cuyo propósito fundamental en el mediano plazo es producir transformaciones estructurales en las formaciones económico-sociales de las naciones que la integran, para hacer posible un desarrollo compartido, capaz de garantizar la inserción exitosa y sostenible en los procesos de producción e intercambio del mundo actual, para colocar la política y la economía al servicio de los seres humanos.
En el contexto en que toma cuerpo, el ALBA constituye el primer esfuerzo histórico de construcción de un proyecto global latinoamericano desde una posición política favorable. Desde la Revolución Cubana, las fuerzas progresistas del continente, bien desde la oposición o desde el poder, lo que habían hecho era acumular fuerzas para resistir la ofensiva del imperio (Cuba es la excepción porque no solo logró sobrevivir, sino que edificó una sociedad cualitativamente superior, desplegando al mismo tiempo una trascendente labor de apoyo internacionalista a los países más pobres, en medio de un espantoso bloqueo por parte del imperialismo norteamericano); es con el nacimiento del ALBA que las fuerzas revolucionarias hemos podido pasar a una nueva situación que bien pudiéramos def inir como de acumulación de la fuerza política necesaria para la consolidación del cambio que se ha producido en la correlación de fuerzas políticas de nuestro continente.
Ante nosotros se abren nuevas perspectivas de integración y fusión que forman parte del salto cualitativo que están promoviendo los profundos vínculos de cooperación que hemos establecido en estos años. Por tal razón estamos comprometidos a llevar adelante la construcción de espacios económicos y productivos de nuevo tipo, que produzcan mayores beneficios a nuestros pueblos, mediante la utilización racional de los recursos y activos de nuestros países, para lo cual se requiere avanzar en la conformación de empresas Grannacionales, estableciendo y consolidando los acuerdos normativos e institucionales necesarios para la cooperación; instrumentando estrategias y programas Grannacionales conjuntos de todos nuestros países en materias como: educación, salud, energí ;a, comunicación, transporte, vivienda, vialidad, alimentación, entre otros; promoviendo de manera conciente y organizada la ampliación del Tratado de Comercio de los Pueblos con intercambios justos y equilibrados; llevando adelante programas para el uso racional de los recursos energéticos renovables y no renovables, construyendo una estrategia de seguridad alimentaria común a todas nuestras naciones; ampliando la cooperación en materia de formación de recursos humanos; y fundando nuevas estructuras para el fortalecimiento de nuestra capacidad de financiamiento de los grandes proyectos Grannacionales.
Reiteraron su convicción de que solo un proceso de integración entre los pueblos de Nuestra América, que tenga en cuenta el nivel de desarrollo de cada país y garantice que todas las naciones se beneficien de este proceso, permitirá superar la espiral degradante del subdesarrollo impuesto a nuestra región.
En esta V Cumbre hemos visto con mucho regocijo el contenido de la Declaración Política firmada el 17 de febrero en San Vicente y las Granadinas por los Primeros Ministros Roosevelt Skerrit, de la Mancomunidad de Dominica; Ralph Gonsálves, de San Vicente y las Granadinas, Winston Baldwin Spencer, de Antigua y Barbuda y Hugo Chávez Frías, Presidente de la República Bolivariana de Venezuela, en la cual manifiestan su voluntad de propiciar la más profunda cooperación y unidad entre la Comunidad del Caribe (CARICOM) y los Estados signatarios de la Alternativa Bolivariana para los Pueblos de Nuestra América y el Tratado de Comercio de los Pueblos, de manera que sus beneficios sociales y las posibilidades de un desarrollo económico sustentable con independencia y soberanía sea igual para todos, to do lo cual comienza a materializarse con la presencia en esta V Cumbre de nuestros hermanos del Caribe.
Los Jefes de Estado y de Gobierno de Cuba, Venezuela, Bolivia y Nicaragua, acordaron suscribir la presente Declaración en la convicción de que la misma abre el camino hacia una nueva fase de consolidación estratégica y avance político de la Alternativa Bolivariana para los Pueblos de Nuestra América (ALBA), en la perspectiva histórica de poder realizar los sueños de nuestros Libertadores de construcción de la Patria Grande Latinoamericana y Caribeña.
Hecho en la ciudad de Barquisimeto, República Bolivariana de Venezuela, a los 29 días del mes abril de 2007.
Por la República Bolivariana de Venezuela Hugo Chávez Frías, Presidente de la República
Por el Gobierno de la República de Bolivia, Evo Morales, Presidente de la República
Por la República de Cuba, Carlos Lage, Vicepresidente de la República
Por el Gobierno de la República de Nicaragua, Daniel Ortega, Presidente de la República
V Cumbre del ALBA
Tintorero – Estado Lara, 29 de abril de 2007
En ocasión de celebrarse la V Cumbre de la Alternativa Bolivariana para los Pueblos de Nuestra América (ALBA) y el primer aniversario del Tratado de Comercio de los Pueblos (TCP), sovaldi sale Hugo Chávez Frías, malady Presidente de la República Bolivariana de Venezuela, Evo Morales Ayma; Presidente de la República de Bolivia, Carlos Lage Dávila, Vicepresidente del Consejo de Estado de la República de Cuba; Daniel Ortega Saavedra, Presidente de la República de Nicaragua; todos representantes de los países miembros del ALBA; y contando con la presencia de René Preval, Presidente de la República de Haití; Maria Fernanda Espinosa, Canciller de la República de Ecuador; Reginald Austrie, Ministro de Energía y Obras Públicas de la Mancomunidad de Dominica; Assim Martin, Ministro de Obras Públicas, Transporte, Correos y Energía de la Federación de San Crist& oacute;bal y Nieves; Julian Francis, Ministro de la Vivienda, Asentamientos Humanos Informales, Planificación Física y Tierra de San Vicente y las Granadinas y Eduardo Bonomi, Ministro de Trabajo y Seguridad Social de la República Oriental del Uruguay, en calidad de invitados especiales y observadores de esta Cumbre, efectuada los días 28 y 29 de abril de 2007, realizaron una completa evaluación del desarrollo de los programas y proyectos aprobados en el Primer Plan Estratégico del ALBA, así como de las acciones de cooperación e integración desplegadas durante el año 2006 en la República de Bolivia y la República de Nicaragua y los hermanos países del Caribe.
En el curso del debate sostenido en un clima de fraternidad y hermandad, ratificamos la idea de que el principio rector de la Alternativa Bolivariana para los Pueblos de Nuestra América, es la solidaridad más amplia entre los pueblos de América Latina y el Caribe, sin nacionalismos egoístas ni políticas nacionales restrictivas que puedan negar el objetivo de construir la Patria Grande que soñaron los próceres y héroes de nuestras luchas emancipadoras.
La integración y unión de América Latina y el Caribe a partir de un modelo de desarrollo independiente que priorice la complementariedad económica regional, haga realidad la voluntad de promover el desarrollo de todos y fortalezca una cooperación genuina basada en el respeto mutuo y solidaridad, ya no es una simple quimera, sino una realidad tangible que se ha manifestado en estos años en los programas de alfabetización y salud, que han permitido a miles de latinoamericanos avanzar en el camino de la superación real de la pobreza; en la cooperación dada en materia energética y financiera a los países del Caribe, que está contribuyendo decisivamente al progreso de estos pueblos hermanos; en el incremento sostenido del comercio compensado y justo entre Cuba y Venezuela, y en el conjunto de empresas mixtas conformadas entre ambos en diversas ramas productivas; en el importante apoyo de financiamiento directo brindado a Bolivia para el cumplimiento de diversos programas sociales, en el conjunto de proyectos identificados para la constitución de empresas mixtas binacionales; en todo el proceso de impulso que estamos brindando al Gobierno Sandinista de Nicaragua que en tan solo escasos meses está produciendo efectos altamente positivos en las áreas de generación eléctrica, producción agrícola, suministros de insumos para la industrias, entre otras áreas.
La Alternativa Bolivariana para los Pueblos de Nuestra América que se sustenta en los principios de solidaridad, cooperación genuina y complementariedad entre nuestros países, en el aprovechamiento racional y en función del bienestar de nuestros pueblos de sus recursos naturales – incluido su potencial energético-, en la formación integral e intensiva del capital humano que requiere nuestro desarrollo y en la atención a las necesidades y aspiraciones de nuestros hombres y mujeres, ha demostrado su fuerza y viabilidad como una alternativa de justicia frente al neoliberalismo y la inequidad.
El ALBA está demostrando con estadísticas concretas que el libre comercio no es capaz de generar los cambios sociales requeridos, y que puede más la voluntad política como sustento de la definición conciente de programas de acción encaminados hacia la erradicación de los dramas sociales de millones de seres humanos en nuestro continente.
En virtud de los antes expresado los Jefes de Estado de Cuba, Venezuela, Bolivia y Nicaragua, en representación de sus respectivos pueblos, reafirmaron su determinación de seguir avanzando y profundizando la construcción del ALBA, en el entendido de que esta alternativa constituye una alianza política estratégica, cuyo propósito fundamental en el mediano plazo es producir transformaciones estructurales en las formaciones económico-sociales de las naciones que la integran, para hacer posible un desarrollo compartido, capaz de garantizar la inserción exitosa y sostenible en los procesos de producción e intercambio del mundo actual, para colocar la política y la economía al servicio de los seres humanos.
En el contexto en que toma cuerpo, el ALBA constituye el primer esfuerzo histórico de construcción de un proyecto global latinoamericano desde una posición política favorable. Desde la Revolución Cubana, las fuerzas progresistas del continente, bien desde la oposición o desde el poder, lo que habían hecho era acumular fuerzas para resistir la ofensiva del imperio (Cuba es la excepción porque no solo logró sobrevivir, sino que edificó una sociedad cualitativamente superior, desplegando al mismo tiempo una trascendente labor de apoyo internacionalista a los países más pobres, en medio de un espantoso bloqueo por parte del imperialismo norteamericano); es con el nacimiento del ALBA que las fuerzas revolucionarias hemos podido pasar a una nueva situación que bien pudiéramos def inir como de acumulación de la fuerza política necesaria para la consolidación del cambio que se ha producido en la correlación de fuerzas políticas de nuestro continente.
Ante nosotros se abren nuevas perspectivas de integración y fusión que forman parte del salto cualitativo que están promoviendo los profundos vínculos de cooperación que hemos establecido en estos años. Por tal razón estamos comprometidos a llevar adelante la construcción de espacios económicos y productivos de nuevo tipo, que produzcan mayores beneficios a nuestros pueblos, mediante la utilización racional de los recursos y activos de nuestros países, para lo cual se requiere avanzar en la conformación de empresas Grannacionales, estableciendo y consolidando los acuerdos normativos e institucionales necesarios para la cooperación; instrumentando estrategias y programas Grannacionales conjuntos de todos nuestros países en materias como: educación, salud, energí ;a, comunicación, transporte, vivienda, vialidad, alimentación, entre otros; promoviendo de manera conciente y organizada la ampliación del Tratado de Comercio de los Pueblos con intercambios justos y equilibrados; llevando adelante programas para el uso racional de los recursos energéticos renovables y no renovables, construyendo una estrategia de seguridad alimentaria común a todas nuestras naciones; ampliando la cooperación en materia de formación de recursos humanos; y fundando nuevas estructuras para el fortalecimiento de nuestra capacidad de financiamiento de los grandes proyectos Grannacionales.
Reiteraron su convicción de que solo un proceso de integración entre los pueblos de Nuestra América, que tenga en cuenta el nivel de desarrollo de cada país y garantice que todas las naciones se beneficien de este proceso, permitirá superar la espiral degradante del subdesarrollo impuesto a nuestra región.
En esta V Cumbre hemos visto con mucho regocijo el contenido de la Declaración Política firmada el 17 de febrero en San Vicente y las Granadinas por los Primeros Ministros Roosevelt Skerrit, de la Mancomunidad de Dominica; Ralph Gonsálves, de San Vicente y las Granadinas, Winston Baldwin Spencer, de Antigua y Barbuda y Hugo Chávez Frías, Presidente de la República Bolivariana de Venezuela, en la cual manifiestan su voluntad de propiciar la más profunda cooperación y unidad entre la Comunidad del Caribe (CARICOM) y los Estados signatarios de la Alternativa Bolivariana para los Pueblos de Nuestra América y el Tratado de Comercio de los Pueblos, de manera que sus beneficios sociales y las posibilidades de un desarrollo económico sustentable con independencia y soberanía sea igual para todos, to do lo cual comienza a materializarse con la presencia en esta V Cumbre de nuestros hermanos del Caribe.
Los Jefes de Estado y de Gobierno de Cuba, Venezuela, Bolivia y Nicaragua, acordaron suscribir la presente Declaración en la convicción de que la misma abre el camino hacia una nueva fase de consolidación estratégica y avance político de la Alternativa Bolivariana para los Pueblos de Nuestra América (ALBA), en la perspectiva histórica de poder realizar los sueños de nuestros Libertadores de construcción de la Patria Grande Latinoamericana y Caribeña.
Hecho en la ciudad de Barquisimeto, República Bolivariana de Venezuela, a los 29 días del mes abril de 2007.
Por la República Bolivariana de Venezuela Hugo Chávez Frías, Presidente de la República
Por el Gobierno de la República de Bolivia, Evo Morales, Presidente de la República
Por la República de Cuba, Carlos Lage, Vicepresidente de la República
Por el Gobierno de la República de Nicaragua, Daniel Ortega, Presidente de la República

Rosalba Icaza, treat Peter Newell and Marcelo Saguier

The latest wave of trade integration schemes promoted in the Americas since the 1990s has been subject to mounting criticism about the social and environmental costs trade liberalisation brings in its wake. Opposition to neo-liberal models of regional trade integration forms part of broader movements that define themselves in opposition to neo-liberal globalisation in general, medicine which register concern about the imbalance between investor rights and responsibilities and the lack of checks on rising corporate power. Amid accusations of rich clubs of economic elites crafting the terms of agreements that serve narrow economic interests, it is unsurprising that there have been calls to democratise trade policy; to open it up to plurality of participants, interests and agendas, to revisit fundamentally the question of who and what is trade for.
>Read more (PDF)