SADC People’s Summit Declaration (Windhoek, Namibia, August 2010)

Following a three day conference, in August 2000, of twenty four independent peoples civil society organisations, sectoral networks and coalitions from many sectors and from all the countries of Southern Africa, the following declaration was produced. This expresses the perspectives of peoples organisations from across the region, and calls on other such organisations to endorse these positions on some of the broad economic dimensions of regional cooperation and integration that are being considered by the governments of the Southern African Development Community (SADC); and for other such peoples organisations to join together to add their own proposals and demands in other areas of concern which are all integral to a holistic program of regional development cooperation.


Declaration

“Making Southern African Development Cooperation and Integration a People-centered and People-driven Regional Challenge to Globalisation

As members of community-based development coalitions, trade union and other labour organisations, faith-based social development organisations, campaigning networks for debt cancellation and reparations, alliances against the IMF and World Bank, a women and trade network, development NGOs and popular education, information and capacity building bodies – and as participants in the ‘Southern African Peoples Solidarity Network’ (SAPSN) gathered together in Windhoek on the occasion of the Summit of the SADC Heads of State, 1-7 August 2000, we as

Peoples’ organisations state

  • We are united by our common history of colonisation and mutual support in our struggles for national liberation, as well as our shared experience of the depredations of apartheid and its destabilisation and devastation across the whole region. We are also conscious that we are part of a region enormously rich in human and natural resources which has the potential to become a community of nations enjoying peace and human security, guaranteed human rights and equitable human development. But these aims will only be achieved if peoples organisations give an effective lead to the governments of the region in order that they work together towards this historic goal.
  • We are committed to a vision of a united Southern Africa in which local and community-based development is the fundamental substance of national development programmes. These, in turn, will be strengthened by coordinated and combined programmes of people-based regional development, and the creation of an integrated development community in Southern Africa. Such an integrated region would also be a building block towards broader African peoples cooperation and unity, and could be an effective economic and political base from which to challenge capitalist globalisation.
  • We note, however, that the overwhelming majority of the people of our region are living in conditions of appalling poverty and already suffering the effects of an AIDS epidemic of potentially catastrophic proportions; but that the governments of our countries
    • have for long mainly engaged in rhetorical declarations about national development, and development cooperation and regional integration, with few effective achievements;
    • are mainly concerned with preserving and promoting their own individual and group status, power and privileges, and their personal and aspirant-class appropriation of our nations’ resources; and, for these reasons, are frequently engaged in divisive competition and even dangerous conflicts amongst themselves at the expense of the interests of the people at national and regional levels;
    • are, at the same time, committed to supporting and defending each other whenever the interests and power of the ruling elites come into conflict with the human rights, and the democratic and development aspirations of their own populations; and are using SADC as a self-serving ‘old boys’ club’ for such mutual support;
    • are increasingly responsive and subordinate to external inducements and pressures from governmental agencies in the richest industrialised countries, and their global corporations, banks and other financial organisations, and the ‘multilateral’ institutions dominated and used by them.
  • We note also the grossly uneven development within and between the countries of the
    region caused by a long history of deliberate political and economic programs in favour of the needs of South African and international companies, and privileged (mainly white) elites; and that, with the increasing penetration of the region by South African business, the dominant role of the South African economy in the region has not diminished but actually increased since 1994.

Peoples’ organisations demand

  • The Governments of SADC must reject claims that the transformation and development of the regional economy should (and can) be driven by national and regional ‘market forces’ and should be structured to serve and further the business interests of ‘indigenous’ private enterprise and ‘national’ capital in the countries of the region. This applies particularly to South African trading companies, banks and corporations, often operating in conjunction with their international partners, which will reinforce not reduce the inherited inequalities within, and imbalances between our countries.
  • The governments of SADC must desist from their collaboration and collusion with national and international political and economic forces and neo-liberal agencies, particularly the IMF and World Bank, to turn SADC into an ‘open region’ of free trade, free capital movements and investment rights, to the benefit of international traders, transnational corporations and financial speculators. This runs counter to the potential for full and effective, internally-generated and rooted national and regional development.
  • The governments of SADC must provide for the effective participation of organised forces of civil society, and respond to the voices and needs of the people of the region for peace and security, democracy and development; and actively commit all the governments of the region to multilaterally negotiated cooperation and equitable development throughout the region. This must go hand in hand with independent popular initiatives for the empowerment of people in their own organisations and communities and at all levels of the regional community.
  • The governments of SADC must insist upon the illegitimacy of our purported national ‘debts’ and the continuous outflow of our hard-earned national financial resources into the coffers of the governments of the richest industrialised countries, private banks and the IMF and World Bank. Our governments must actively prepare, together with other ‘debtor’ countries like ours – and with the support of international peoples movements against debt – for collective and concerted repudiation of those debts if they are not promptly and definitively canceled. This must be carried further with demands for reparations for the long-standing economic, social and ecological damages imposed by such agencies upon our countries.
  • The governments of SADC must unite and act together with other countries in Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean, Asia and the Pacific, and with democratic forces everywhere, to challenge and replace the currently dominant neo-liberal ideology and globalising capitalist system. This process must be started immediately by dealing with the dominant instruments of globalisation , particularly the IMF, World Bank and the WTO, whose policies and programmes are so manifestly detrimental to our economies, environments, societies, cultures and people.

Peoples’ organisations propose

On trade

Our governments must drop their uncritical embrace of the arguments for ‘free trade’ within our region which are reflected in the SADC trade agreement; and, instead,

  • create a negotiated variable and graduated preferential trade area within and through which to create clear and effective production development and diversification strategies for communities, national economies and the region as a whole;
  • replace the liberalisation, privatisation and deregulation policies in national and regional programmes and create trade and development cooperation agreements for Southern Africa which address region-specific issues and are not predetermined or constricted by ‘compliance’ with WTO terms and trade-related conditionalities, or any similar terms in ‘post-Lome’ agreements;
  • convince the South African government to revise its free trade agreement with the European Union where it is in conflict with the declared priority goals of cooperation and development in the SADC region, including South Africa.

On investment

Our governments have to abandon the futile illusion that foreign investors will respond to ‘positive macro-economic signals’ and an ‘open region’; and that such reliance on private capital will create development; and, instead

  • recognise that capital is a social relation not a neutral and disinterested financial instrument and, as the embodiment of social/class interests, any growth that such capital produces is distorted and incidental to its main aim of self-expansion (or profit);
  • build on the widespread experiences in the countries of the region, and elsewhere, that the free or ‘liberalised’ movement of capital is not conducive to financial stability and sound economic development, and requires strategic regulation;
  • base national and regional investment and production policies on the strategic direction of private national and international capital projects – where and in so far as they are required – for specific selected purposes, and clearly defined periods; but
  • prioritise the strategic mobilisation of inwardly-oriented and more varied and committed internal investment resources including public (governmental), parastatal, cooperative and community resources.

On labour

All the governments of the region have to recognise the vital role that labour plays in all economic projects/enterprises and national economic development, and recognise that governments have to adopt effective social and economic development policies that

  • bring to an end the forced migration of millions of workers in search of employment and survival resources for their families, for this is deeply disruptive of families and undermines community cohesion and stability;
  • tackle effectively and with urgency the dramatic growth of unemployment throughout the region, that contributes further towards the flows of economic refugees across borders and between rural and urban areas within all the countries of the region;
  • develop holistic and integrated urban and rural programmes to enable people to create their own incomes or obtain employment incomes, economic security and social and cultural fulfillment within their own communities;
  • incorporate in such social and development programmes, inter-governmental agreements to deal with the brain drain of precious skills from the poorer to the more developed and well-endowed countries of the region;
  • create economic, political and social conditions that will allow for the free movement of people throughout the region.

Peoples’ organisations declare

  • We are committed to deepen and extend our experiences of cooperation and solidarity, our strong sense of mutual recognition as the people of this region of Africa, to build on our joint needs and shared aspirations for the common benefit of our people; and at the same time work to counter any negative or conflictual attitudes towards each other amongst some sectors of our populations.
  • We are also committed to deepen and extend our strategies for cooperation and joint action with other regional peoples cooperation initiatives in the rest of Africa, as well as Asia and the Pacific, Latin America and the Caribbean towards a people-driven challenge to the currently dominant processes and institutions of economic globalisation; that are anti-democratic in their functioning and effects, destabilising of weaker economies and communities throughout the world, creating ever-increasing polarisation, with inequitable and divisive effects amongst peoples, and destructive impacts upon the world’s resources and the global environment.
  • Whether or not our governments accept and act on the above vitally important demands, we as members of peoples organisations from the whole of Southern Africa will continue to pursue these aims and deepen our work in and with existing and emerging mass movements to challenge and change our governments’ policies and strategies; and – if that fails – to change our governments.


Lusaka, sovaldi sale Zambia, salve
15-16 August 2007

We, members of Civil Society Organisations, trade unions, faith based organizations, student bodies and economic justice networks from the SADC region met in Lusaka, Zambia on August 15-16, under the auspices of the Southern Africa Peoples’ Solidarity Network (SAPSN), to constitute the SADC People’s Summit held parallel to the 27th Heads of State Summit.
We exchanged views on some common trends and issues of concern in the region including the appalling state of governance, democracy and human rights, youth unemployment levels, HIV/AIDS trends, poor health service delivery, gender discrimination, land problems, the debt burden, Economic Partnership Agreements and the Zimbabwe Situation.
We noted with concern that years after the adoption of the SADC protocol on human rights, governments in the region continue to violate the rights of their citizens using draconian laws, harassment and torture of opposition leaders and civic society activists, ban on political rallies, intolerance to dissenting views as well as denial of freedom of expression and association.
We deplore attempts by governments, through introducing NGO bills across the region, to silence the civic organisations’ calls for public transparency and accountability.
We categorically condemn the deportation of over 40 Zimbabweans headed for the SADC People’s Summit on August 14 by the Zambia government and call on the immigration officials in the region to desist from such repressive acts in the future. Further, we deplore the inability of the SADC to act decisively in solving the Zimbabwe crisis and we support the calls for a national constitutional conference to solve the country’s situation.
We observe the lack of true democracy in Swaziland and we support the calls for a new constitutional dispensation in the country.
We are disappointed with the little progress made so far in improving the health sector in the region as we underscore the need for urgent actioning by governments towards meeting the Abuja Declaration of 15 percent allocation of the national budgets to the provision of essential drugs including the Anti-Retroviral Drugs. We call on other governments in the region to emulate the government of Botswana which has met the Abuja target in its budgeting process.
We note the importance of land to the livelihoods of the communities and we deplore the unscrupulous evictions of people from their ancestral land, land privatization, and capitalization of land.
We are concerned that debt repayments continue to deprive the peoples of the region essential services and to hamper sustainable development in the region. Despite the debt relief programs undertaken in some of the countries in the region, SADC governments continue to reel under a chronic debt crisis exacerbated by ‘vulture funds’- the so-called predator companies from rich governments which purchase debts owed by poor countries and litigate against the debtor countries with huge costs.
We condemn the legislative and institutional gaps in our countries for addressing internal mechanisms for the debt problems and we call on parliaments in the region to enact legislations around the loan contraction processes and the establishment of institutions that are necessary for effective debt management.
We note with concern the divisive effects of the Economic Partnership Agreements on the region and the neoliberal nature of their content as the December deadline for signing those approaches.
We believe that the EPA negotiations are between unequal partners and that the SADC region stands to lose much more than the promised gains in the process.
We deplore the continued marginalization of women and the youth in decision-making processes across the region as we note the reluctance and piece-meal inclusion of women by governments of the region in political, economic ad social arenas. We emphasize that women’s equal participation
form an integral part of any meaningful strategy towards sustainable development in the region and
beyond.
On the basis of the above factors we demand:
1. All SADC governments to adopt and ratify the SADC protocol on human rights and gender; uphold regional integration as a participatory, people-driven and democratically negotiated process; respect the rule of law; allow free and fair elections; and make all constitutional reforms a consultative process.
2. All SADC governments and peoples to accept duty to de-stigmatise HIV/AIDS, uphold the rights of people living with HIV/AIDS and empower them to live positively.
3. Governments in the region to prioritize the sustainable livelihoods of the rural communities, and equity in the land reform processes.
4. Total and Unconditional debt cancellation for all the SADC countries.
5. Governments of SADC to Stop EPAS!
We commit ourselves to continue mobilizing the peoples of the SADC in solidarity with other regions of the continent to contribute to sustainable solutions to the region’s social, economic, and political problems; to engage governments at national levels on regional integration, the Zimbabwe problem, Economic Partnership Agreements, adoption of gender sensitive policies, adequate resources for HIV/AIDS, unemployment for the youth and better working conditions for workers; and to forge active partnership with other actors across the region.
ANOTHER SADC IS POSSIBLE!
Gauteng – South Africa
More than four hundred representatives of Social Movements, labor organizations, economic justice networks, faith and community based and youth organizations, developmental, health environmental, human Rights and other NGOs that work closely with them gathered in Gauteng South Africa to discuss our common concerns and present our Demands and alternatives to the governments of SADC meeting here at this time.
This is the fourth annual SAPSN Summit and it takes place in a period of deepening political tensions within SADC and deteriorating social and economic situations for the majority of our peoples. In this context our discussions focused on our concerns, proposals and demands on the following:
1. Democracy and human rights abuses disrupting and destabilizing our region, with particular emphasis on the gross denial of democratic and human rights in Zimbabwe and Swaziland but also (to other degrees) throughout SADC, especially DRC and Angola. In this context we repeat our demand on all SADC governments to ensure the implementation of full democratic principles and all human rights (including women’s, labor, all NGOs to carry out their work with their people). We demand that SADC governments rapidly ensure that:
– All the people of Zimbabwe themselves are enabled to create the means and find the solutions to the crisis in their country, and SADC must terminate Mbeki’s role as mediator since he is about to become the SADC Chair;
– Apply targeted sanctions on the Swazi royal family, and do not confirm Swaziland’s Chairship of the SADC Organ on Peace and Security until a full democratic regime is established in that country by the people of Swaziland.
2. Poverty and Unemployment continues to devastate our people caused by the neo-liberal market- driven policies of SADC governments and their tolerance and promotion of self-serving corrupt practices in their own ranks. Of the many counter actions that must be undertaken, we demand that SADC:
-Must create regional economic development and diversification strategies to combat poverty and prioritize the creation of decent employment and the right to work.
– Must develop such policies with the active and full participation of the unemployed youth, women, small traders, fisher people and so on.
3. Food Insecurity and Hunger is the other compelling evidence of the growth of poverty in large sectors of our populations and the undermining of secure rural livelihoods. Of the many measure required, we demand that SADC governments:
– Must develop a regional agricultural strategy to secure equitable access to necessary agricultural resources for rural populations especially for women, as they are the main producers.
– Must deal with the skewed patterns of land ownership especially against women, and including extensive privatization of land and foreign appropriation.
must create, in consultation with rural producers, full governmental support for sustainable and organic (not GMOs) food production for family food security and regional food sovereignty.
4. Health crisis and social insecurity are central aspects of the poverty and increasing suffering of large numbers of our people especially the disproportionate numbers of women affected by HIV and AIDS personally and as nurturers of their families and the growing numbers of orphans. This requires free ARVs and special grant and food support. But we also demand that SADC governments
– Must create a regional strategy for universal access to free quality health care as a right for all, especially for the most vulnerable sectors of our people such as those who are differently abled;
– Must stop the practice of government leaders using public funds for health treatment overseas;
– Must ensure the training/retraining of health personnel and their just working conditions and remuneration.
5. Privatization of services, above all health, water and other social services removes these from the people, especially for women and children, and undermines the services provisions that are necessary for national and regional development (such as in public transport and affordable, secure public housing).
In this context, we commit ourselves to further mass campaigns to reverse this privatization, corporatization and commercialization (cost-recovery) policies, and we will pressure SADC governments to create national and regional programmes to ensure free accessible and accountable public services including public housing and free education for all, that are essential for our people’s well-being and human-based development;
6. Debt burdens and aid dependency continue to contradict the obligations of our governments and their responsiveness to our needs, because they are under the control of creditor banks and financial institutions, above all the IMF and World Bank, and donor governments. These constrain or dictate what policies governments can or should follow. Thus we demand that SADC governments:
– Create a combined regional response, in collaboration with civil society, to audit the sources, nature (especially illegitimate and odious debts), scale and their effects on our people especially the most vulnerable sectors such as women;
– reject externally imposed IMF/WB SAP-type conditionalities for ‘‘debt relief’’ or aid; and instead base their criteria on full consultations with their own people;
– put an end to the continual outflow of financial resources through debt payments, and instead demand reparations for these debt payments and the colonial and neo-colonial plunder of African people and resources.
7. Trade deficits and capital outflows are the other forms of financial drainage from our countries. These are created and reinforced by the trade and financial liberalization policies of SADC governments. These counter-developmental policies will be reinforced if SADC governments continue down the road of negotiating so-called Economic Partnership Agreements (EPAs) with the European Union. Thus we demand that SADC governments:
– must reunite as a region and, together, firmly resist the EU’s recolonising EPAs; instead of maneuvering separately to get EU trade and “aid support” which is splitting SADC apart;
– must recognize that the free trade area they are creating within SADC will further serve to create an open integrated market for EU exporters, investors and service corporations under policies of eternal trade and investment liberalization;
– must recognize that such a SADC free trade area will also serve the expansionist aims and interests of South African companies, not the equitable and more balanced trade development that enables cross-border trade, especially by small women traders;
– must stop the vast financial outflows from our countries and region through international financial speculation (gambling), “legal” investors transfers , and huge transfers overseas of public money through embezzlement by government leaders.
8. Climate Change Dangers and Energy Crises are partly the result of global factors and forces but also result from the policies of our governments colluding with colonial and neo-colonial forces and allowing uncontrolled exploitation of our mineral and other resources. Industrialized countries are responsible for the historical and current global climate change crisis, therefore we demand that SADC governments
– ensure that those responsible assume the proportionate burden, on the “polluter pays principle”, and provide our countries with all the necessary resources towards a low carbon society;
– institutes strong regulations to reduce carbon emissions and pursue sustainable production and consumption patterns, including a regional strategy to ensure universal access to clean and renewable energy, which is a social justice issue;
– Impose environmental responsibility on industries operating our region, and end to dumping of damaging toxic waste affecting our people and workers;
– stop the diversion of land and agricultural production to produce agro-fuels to feed the auto industries and rich countries to the detriment of food production;
– must develop a joint regional energy strategy to ensure effective access to clean and renewable energy resources for us as this is a social justice issue which must not be based on market principles as they are anti-people approaches, and it is uncontrolled transitional corporations that have been the prime cause of global warming with accompanying ecological crisis that will disproportionately affect the poor especially in Africa.
OUR PEOPLES’ RESPONSES AND SOLIDARITY
All these adverse factors are being confronted by most of our people with creativity and courage. But some marginalized and desperate people resort to desperate measures. This is what fundamentally drove the recent escalation of verbal abuse and violent attacks by some elements of the South African population against their fellow Africans from the region and elsewhere on the continent.
We call for carefully planned and just reintegration of internally displaced people resulting from the above deeply deplorable events.
It is also in this context that we participants from all the countries in the SADC region welcome the opportunity to share experiences on our common concerns and deepen our mutual support. Thus we stress that this is a Peoples’ Solidarity Summit and we commit ourselves to make this a real active expression of Solidarity towards each other and a means to ensure that the governments of SADC respond and fulfill the key demands we have outlined here, advance the developmental integration of our region and of the whole African continent.

Gauteng – South Africa

More than four hundred representatives of Social Movements, buy labor organizations, cheap economic justice networks, there faith and community based and youth organizations, developmental, health environmental, human Rights and other NGOs that work closely with them gathered in Gauteng South Africa to discuss our common concerns and present our Demands and alternatives to the governments of SADC meeting here at this time.

This is the fourth annual SAPSN Summit and it takes place in a period of deepening political tensions within SADC and deteriorating social and economic situations for the majority of our peoples. In this context our discussions focused on our concerns, proposals and demands on the following:

1. Democracy and human rights abuses disrupting and destabilizing our region, with particular emphasis on the gross denial of democratic and human rights in Zimbabwe and Swaziland but also (to other degrees) throughout SADC, especially DRC and Angola. In this context we repeat our demand on all SADC governments to ensure the implementation of full democratic principles and all human rights (including women’s, labor, all NGOs to carry out their work with their people). We demand that SADC governments rapidly ensure that:

– All the people of Zimbabwe themselves are enabled to create the means and find the solutions to the crisis in their country, and SADC must terminate Mbeki’s role as mediator since he is about to become the SADC Chair;

– Apply targeted sanctions on the Swazi royal family, and do not confirm Swaziland’s Chairship of the SADC Organ on Peace and Security until a full democratic regime is established in that country by the people of Swaziland.

2. Poverty and Unemployment continues to devastate our people caused by the neo-liberal market- driven policies of SADC governments and their tolerance and promotion of self-serving corrupt practices in their own ranks. Of the many counter actions that must be undertaken, we demand that SADC:
-Must create regional economic development and diversification strategies to combat poverty and prioritize the creation of decent employment and the right to work.
– Must develop such policies with the active and full participation of the unemployed youth, women, small traders, fisher people and so on.

3. Food Insecurity and Hunger is the other compelling evidence of the growth of poverty in large sectors of our populations and the undermining of secure rural livelihoods. Of the many measure required, we demand that SADC governments:
– Must develop a regional agricultural strategy to secure equitable access to necessary agricultural resources for rural populations especially for women, as they are the main producers.
– Must deal with the skewed patterns of land ownership especially against women, and including extensive privatization of land and foreign appropriation.
must create, in consultation with rural producers, full governmental support for sustainable and organic (not GMOs) food production for family food security and regional food sovereignty.

4. Health crisis and social insecurity are central aspects of the poverty and increasing suffering of large numbers of our people especially the disproportionate numbers of women affected by HIV and AIDS personally and as nurturers of their families and the growing numbers of orphans. This requires free ARVs and special grant and food support. But we also demand that SADC governments
– Must create a regional strategy for universal access to free quality health care as a right for all, especially for the most vulnerable sectors of our people such as those who are differently abled;
– Must stop the practice of government leaders using public funds for health treatment overseas;
– Must ensure the training/retraining of health personnel and their just working conditions and remuneration.

5. Privatization of services, above all health, water and other social services removes these from the people, especially for women and children, and undermines the services provisions that are necessary for national and regional development (such as in public transport and affordable, secure public housing).

In this context, we commit ourselves to further mass campaigns to reverse this privatization, corporatization and commercialization (cost-recovery) policies, and we will pressure SADC governments to create national and regional programmes to ensure free accessible and accountable public services including public housing and free education for all, that are essential for our people’s well-being and human-based development;

6. Debt burdens and aid dependency continue to contradict the obligations of our governments and their responsiveness to our needs, because they are under the control of creditor banks and financial institutions, above all the IMF and World Bank, and donor governments. These constrain or dictate what policies governments can or should follow. Thus we demand that SADC governments:
– Create a combined regional response, in collaboration with civil society, to audit the sources, nature (especially illegitimate and odious debts), scale and their effects on our people especially the most vulnerable sectors such as women;
– reject externally imposed IMF/WB SAP-type conditionalities for ‘‘debt relief’’ or aid; and instead base their criteria on full consultations with their own people;
– put an end to the continual outflow of financial resources through debt payments, and instead demand reparations for these debt payments and the colonial and neo-colonial plunder of African people and resources.

7. Trade deficits and capital outflows are the other forms of financial drainage from our countries. These are created and reinforced by the trade and financial liberalization policies of SADC governments. These counter-developmental policies will be reinforced if SADC governments continue down the road of negotiating so-called Economic Partnership Agreements (EPAs) with the European Union. Thus we demand that SADC governments:
– must reunite as a region and, together, firmly resist the EU’s recolonising EPAs; instead of maneuvering separately to get EU trade and “aid support” which is splitting SADC apart;
– must recognize that the free trade area they are creating within SADC will further serve to create an open integrated market for EU exporters, investors and service corporations under policies of eternal trade and investment liberalization;
– must recognize that such a SADC free trade area will also serve the expansionist aims and interests of South African companies, not the equitable and more balanced trade development that enables cross-border trade, especially by small women traders;
– must stop the vast financial outflows from our countries and region through international financial speculation (gambling), “legal” investors transfers , and huge transfers overseas of public money through embezzlement by government leaders.

8. Climate Change Dangers and Energy Crises are partly the result of global factors and forces but also result from the policies of our governments colluding with colonial and neo-colonial forces and allowing uncontrolled exploitation of our mineral and other resources. Industrialized countries are responsible for the historical and current global climate change crisis, therefore we demand that SADC governments
– ensure that those responsible assume the proportionate burden, on the “polluter pays principle”, and provide our countries with all the necessary resources towards a low carbon society;
– institutes strong regulations to reduce carbon emissions and pursue sustainable production and consumption patterns, including a regional strategy to ensure universal access to clean and renewable energy, which is a social justice issue;
– Impose environmental responsibility on industries operating our region, and end to dumping of damaging toxic waste affecting our people and workers;
– stop the diversion of land and agricultural production to produce agro-fuels to feed the auto industries and rich countries to the detriment of food production;
– must develop a joint regional energy strategy to ensure effective access to clean and renewable energy resources for us as this is a social justice issue which must not be based on market principles as they are anti-people approaches, and it is uncontrolled transitional corporations that have been the prime cause of global warming with accompanying ecological crisis that will disproportionately affect the poor especially in Africa.

OUR PEOPLES’ RESPONSES AND SOLIDARITY

All these adverse factors are being confronted by most of our people with creativity and courage. But some marginalized and desperate people resort to desperate measures. This is what fundamentally drove the recent escalation of verbal abuse and violent attacks by some elements of the South African population against their fellow Africans from the region and elsewhere on the continent.

We call for carefully planned and just reintegration of internally displaced people resulting from the above deeply deplorable events.

It is also in this context that we participants from all the countries in the SADC region welcome the opportunity to share experiences on our common concerns and deepen our mutual support. Thus we stress that this is a Peoples’ Solidarity Summit and we commit ourselves to make this a real active expression of Solidarity towards each other and a means to ensure that the governments of SADC respond and fulfill the key demands we have outlined here, advance the developmental integration of our region and of the whole African continent.

sapsnThe Southern African People’s Solidarity Network (SAPSN) is a network of civil society organizations from the Southern Africa region challenging globalization by promoting pro-people socio-economic policies at national, find regional, continental and global levels.

SAPSN was formed in 1999 with its secretariat housed by South African-based Alternative Information Development Centre (AIDC) between 2000-2003 on a rotational basis. Since then, ZIMCODD hosting the . Malawi Economic Justice Network – MEJN

Vision: SAPSN envisions economic, environmental, social and political equity and justice in Southern Africa.

Mission: To mobilize regional solidarity, build members’ capacities and support people-based regional co-operation, integration and unity in the fight against the debt crisis, global trade injustices and neo-liberal policies in Southern Africa.

Membership is drawn from civil society organizations, trade unions, faith based organizations, student bodies and economic justice networks working on capacity building around global trade injustices, poverty, the debt crisis and globalization as well as seeking alternatives to neo-liberalism in Southern Africa.

For more information on SAPSN: http://www.sapsn.org

 

 

sapsnThe Southern African People’s Solidarity Network (SAPSN) is a network of civil society organizations from the Southern Africa region challenging globalization by promoting pro-people socio-economic policies at national, regional, >
continental and global levels.

SAPSN was formed in 1999 with its secretariat housed by South African-based Alternative Information Development Centre (AIDC) between 2000-2003 on a rotational basis. Since then, help SAPSN Secretariat was hosted by ZIMCODD in Zimbawe until 2011 when it moved to Malawi to be hosted by Malawi Economic Justice Network (MEJN).

Vision: SAPSN envisions economic, environmental, social and political equity and justice in Southern Africa.

Mission: To mobilize regional solidarity, build members’ capacities and support people-based regional co-operation, integration and unity in the fight against the debt crisis, global trade injustices and neo-liberal policies in Southern Africa.

Membership is drawn from civil society organizations, trade unions, faith based organizations, student bodies and economic justice networks working on capacity building around global trade injustices, poverty, the debt crisis and globalization as well as seeking alternatives to neo-liberalism in Southern Africa.

For more information on SAPSN: http://www.sapsn.org

 

 

sapsnThe Southern African People’s Solidarity Network (SAPSN) is a network of civil society organizations from the Southern Africa region challenging globalization by promoting pro-people socio-economic policies at national, capsule regional,
continental and global levels.

SAPSN was formed in 1999 with its secretariat housed by South African-based Alternative Information Development Centre (AIDC) between 2000-2003 on a rotational basis. Since then, and ZIMCODD has been hosting the SAPSN Secretariat.

Vision: SAPSN envisions economic, environmental, social and political equity and justice in Southern Africa.

Mission: To mobilize regional solidarity, build members’ capacities and support people-based regional co-operation, integration and unity in the fight against the debt crisis, global trade injustices and neo-liberal policies in Southern Africa.

Membership is drawn from civil society organizations, trade unions, faith based organizations, student bodies and economic justice networks working on capacity building around global trade injustices, poverty, the debt crisis and globalization as well as seeking alternatives to neo-liberalism in Southern Africa.

For more information on SAPSN: http://www.sapsn.org

 

RECLAIMING AND REUNITING SADC FOR PEOPLES’ POLITICAL, drugstore SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC RIGHTS DECLARATION OF THE PEOPLES’ SUMMIT

Windhoek, there Namibia, AUGUST 16, 2010

More than 350 representatives of grassroots movements, community-based organizations, and faith based organizations, women’s organizations, labor, students, youth, economic justice and human rights networks and other social movements met in Windhoek, Namibia on 15-16 August at the sixth SADC People’s Summit organised by the Southern Africa Peoples’ Solidarity Network (SAPSN), supported by the local host organization NANGOF Trust.

The summit- which was inspired by lively cultural presentations and energized by the participants’ singing and chanting-received solidarity greetings from all fellow citizens of SADC, and brief reports on our respective areas of work and the key concerns in our national terrains.

We had plenary sessions and discussions on regional solidarity and development; the global financial and economic, climate and related crises facing Africa and the world; and Eu‘s imposed Economic Partnership Agreements (EPAs). Discussions were also held and testimonies received in commissions on the state of democracy and human rights in SADC countries; on the rights of workers and social and  economic protections; on the scourge of unemployment especially amongst the youth, and the necessity of affordable education for all; on the continuing adverse situation of women; on preventing further debt creation through guaranteed popular oversight; on natural resources and land rights; on public provision of full social and economic rights; on social exclusion and marginalization, with particular  reference  to the San  people; on the rights to health, especially with regards to HIV/Aids; and on the relatively new themes for people’s movements in our region arising from climate change which is adding to the many other crises already being experienced by our peoples. All these issues and demands on SADC governments and our joint programs for further action will be energetically followed through in the coming year.

At this point, the most pressing common concerns to all our countries, and the demands of our peoples arising out of the powerful presentations, first hand testimonies and the key demands expressed throughout this summit, were on:

  • The ratification and rapid implementation of the SADC Declaration and Treaty and all SADC Protocols on social and economic rights, particularly the original protocol on the free movement of all SADC citizens within their region, including the  right of assembly and freedom of expression.
  • The full institutionalization of all democratic processes and bodies (including to ensure fully free and fair elections), the guarantee of all human and cultural rights and  the protection of human rights defenders and political activists, with particular reference to Zimbabwe, Swaziland and Madagascar, and DRC which is still suffering the effects of war.
  • The rejection of all free trade agreements and especially the EU-imposed Economic Partnership Agreements which are dividing and threatening the very survival and future development of SACU and SADC.

We the peoples of SADC have been strengthened by our sharing of experiences and aspirations within this Peoples’s Summit and we commit ourselves to achieve these by all means necessary.

Viva the Peoples of SADC! Viva the Solidarity and rights of the Peoples of SADC!