Rebuilding regions in times of crises: the future of Europe and the ‘voice’ of citizens

Lorenzo Fioramonti

Crises, like those gripping Europe, tend to expose the process and practice of regional governance as technocratic and elite-driven. But citizens and civil society may well demand more voice and power, in a ‘politicisation’ of regions.

In a globalizing world, where old and new evolutions challenge traditional decision making and (nation) states find it increasingly difficult to govern political processes and economic transactions that are ever more cross-boundary in nature, supranational regional governance has proven a powerful tool to address such growing complexity.

As a meso-level between the state and a hypothetical global government, regional organizations have been purposefully created with a view to providing more effective management structures to deal with phenomena and processes transcending the borders of national communities. Traditionally, trans-frontier natural resources were the first common goods to be placed under the administration of regional organizations. For instance, the oldest existing regional organization in the world is the Central Commission for the Navigation of the Rhine, an authority established in Europe during the 1815 Congress of Vienna. Its purpose was to manage cross-boundary transports along the river Rhine, which cuts across France, Germany, Switzerland and the Netherlands, and – in spite of its limited political clout – it set an important precedent for the future evolutions of European integration. The forerunner of the European Economic Community, which then transformed into the European Union, was the European Coal and Steal Community, a supranational authority created to provide common jurisdiction over the most fundamental natural resources of the continent, whose direct control had historically been the main source of conflict in the region.

Nowadays, there is a virtually endless list of regional organizations operating in divers sectors, entrusted with varying degrees of power and decision-making authority. Although most of them only perform specific functions (e.g. natural resources management, conflict prevention, legal advice, customs control, policing, etc.), there has been an increase in the establishment of ‘general purpose’ regional organizations, of which the EU is the most well-known and developed example. Some of them have evolved out of specific trade agreements (e.g. free trade areas), such as the Common Market of the South (Mercosur), while others have been created with a view to guaranteeing security and development, such as the Association of South East Asian Nations (ASEAN) and the African Union (AU). As famously remarked by P. Katzenstein, the contemporary international arena may very well develop into a ‘world of regions’, where openness and cooperation are reinforced by growth in cross-border exchanges and global transformations in interstate relations.

Regions and crises

According to Karl Deutsch, one of the forefathers of regional studies, the most fundamental example of region-building is constituted by so-called ‘security communities’, groupings of countries that share institutional systems to avoid internal conflicts and address common external threats. In this vein, the existence of certain threats (often in the form of fully-fledged conflicts) has been instrumental to the creation of regional organizations. The European integration project emerged out of the ashes of World War II. The Organization of African Unity (OAU) was created after the end of colonialism while its successor, the AU, was established to guarantee peace and development in a traditionally troubled continent. Similarly, ASEAN was founded to oppose the advancement of communism in South East Asia and strengthen the small countries of the region vis-à-vis their strong and powerful neighbours.

Supranational regionalism and crises have always been intimately connected, both empirically and theoretically. Yet, although most theoretical approaches appear to discuss crises as potential springboards for more and better regional cooperation/integration, the opposite is equally true. For instance, De Gaulle’s critical stance vis-à-vis the process of European integration (which led to a prolonged institutional crisis in the 1960s) prompted Ernst Haas, the founder of the neo-functionalist approach, to conclude that regional integration theory was ‘obsolete’. The current sovereign-debt crisis (often dubbed as the Euro-crisis) is raising a lot of doubts about the capacity of the EU to weather the storm and re-launch integration of the European continent. Public discourse not only in Europe, but also in the rest of the world, hints at the fact that regional cooperation/ integration does not deal well with ‘rainy days’, when member states tend to become more inward looking and seek refuge in short-sighted nationalism.

The word ‘crisis’ derives from the ancient Greek verb krinein, which means to ‘separate, decide and judge’. As such, it therefore describes events or phenomena that produce change and lead to decisions. Looking at most current events, it is not easy to gauge the extent to which these crises may lead to more regional cooperation/integration or, conversely, to gradual/abrupt disintegration. However, there is little doubt that they present fundamental turning points in the evolution of regional cooperation/integration and pose significant challenges to all stakeholders involved. At the same time, they may very well become opportunities to reassess the usefulness of supranational regions and prospectively re-design a world of new regions.

Euro-crisis and the weakening of the European model

Crises are revelatory moments. They break the repetitive continuity of ordinary processes and present us with unexpected threats and opportunities. As disruptive events, they force us to rethink conventional wisdom and become imaginative. In the evolution of political institutions, crises have been fundamental turning points opening up new space for governance innovations or, by contrast, reducing the spectrum of available options. They have ushered in phases of progress and prosperity or plummeted our societies into the darkness of parochialism and backwardness.

The current Euro-crisis may have a significant long-term impact on the ‘acceptability’ of regional integration as an end-goal for regionalism not only in Europe, but also in other regions. If the European project fails to deliver the expected outcomes of stability, well-being and solidarity, then it is likely that other regions will refrain from pushing for full-blown integration, perhaps privileging less demanding forms of cooperation. It also appears as if the EU ‘model’ of integration has been severely eroded by the global financial crisis and the turmoil in the Eurozone. There is indeed growing criticism of Eurocentric approaches to regionalism, not only among scholars, but also among leading policy makers. Especially, emerging powers in Africa, Asia and South America are becoming more assertive about the need to find different ways to promote regional governance in a world in which traditional power distributions are being fundamentally called into question. Moreover, the recent popular revolutions in North Africa and the Middle East are likely to reshape geostrategic equilibria in the Mediterranean and possibly usher in a new phase of regional cooperation within the Arab world and also with Europe.  

Citizens and regional governance

Citizens have been the underdogs of regionalism. From Europe, to Africa, Asia and Latin America, civil society has largely been on the receiving end of region-building processes. More often than not, civil society has been intentionally sidelined, while some sympathetic non-governmental organisations have been given the instrumental task of supporting institutions in their efforts at building a regional ‘identity’. In spite of rhetorical references to the importance of civic participation, regionalism has largely developed ‘without the citizens’.

Yet contemporary crises seem to bring ‘the people’ back into the picture, at least insofar as various attempts at regional cooperation and integration stumble upon the ideas, values and expectations of the citizens. The Euro-crisis is not just a matter of scarce liquidity and overexposure of a few national governments and most private banks. It is first and foremost a legitimacy crisis, which is revealing the fundamental limitations of an elite-driven regionalism model. Not disputing the pivotal role that European political elites played in setting the integration process in motion, there is little doubt that ‘deep integration’ will only be achieved when European citizens will have a say over the type of developmental trajectory that the EU should adopt as well as its ultimate goals. Looking at the astonishing amount of public resources channelled to rescue private banks in comparison to the harsh austerity plans enforced on allegedly profligate Member States, one cannot help but ask the question: what actual interests drive regionalism in the world?

Most observers have been traditionally looking at regionalization processes as politically neutral phenomena in international affairs. Research in this field has been generally restricted to the ‘quantity’ of regionalism, rather than its ‘quality’. Whether it is to explain the gradual devolution of authority from nation states to supranational institutions (as is the case with neo-functionalism) or whether it is to demonstrate the continuous bargaining process involving national governments (as is the case with intergovernmentalism), mainstream approaches to regional cooperation and integration have refrained from looking at the quality of regionalization processes. Will there be more or fewer regions in the world? Will regional institutions replace the nation state? Will regional governance become predominant in the years to come? Granted, these are very important questions and deserve to be examined in depth, especially in academic circles. Yet, the current crises force us to assess the state of regionalism in the world not only in terms of its predominance and diffusion, but also – and more importantly – in terms of how it contributes, if any, towards the well-being of our societies.  

Most ‘models’ and ‘practices’ of regionalism have tended to exclude the diversity of voices and roles in society. They have often served the specific interests of ruling elites (as in Latin America and Africa), the ambitions of hegemonic actors (as in Europe and Asia) or the agendas of industrial and financial powers. Moreover, through their apparently neutral technocratic character, most attempts at regional cooperation and integration have aimed to obscure the fact that there are always winners and losers in regionalism processes. 

This top-down model is being increasingly challenged. Overlapping crises and the redistribution of power at the global level call into question the capacity of regions to deliver on their promises, thus unveiling the unavoidable political character of any model of regionalism. In response to the growing cost of regionalism, citizens want to have more say over future regional trajectories and exercise their democratic powers. As a consequence, regionalism is evolving from a ‘closed’ process, designed and packaged by a small circle of political and economic elites, to an ‘open’ process, in which democratic participation and accountability are playing an ever more important role. Borrowing from the jargon of Internet users, one may say that regions are transitioning from a 1.0 phase dominated by technocrats to a 2.0 stage characterised by horizontal networks, alternative models and citizens’ contestations.

The EU, undoubtedly the most advanced and successful example of regionalism in the world, is now experiencing the direst consequences of such a transition. Amid rising unemployment, social malaise and growing discontent for the lack of accountability of national and regional politics, millions of citizens have been protesting against the Union and its political and economic agenda. Contrary to what eurosceptics would have us believe, these citizens do not call for less Europe: they want a different Europe. They would like regional integration to be more about connecting cultures and individuals and less about supporting capital. They would like their regional institutions to focus on helping the unemployed rather than bailing out bankrupt banks. They would like to see more solidarity across classes and generations, rather than less. They would like cooperation to be about building a different future instead of reshuffling old ideas. The future of regionalism may very well entail a growing ‘politicisation’ of regions, whereby citizens and civil society demand more voice and power in influencing not just general principles and values, but also the long-term political trajectories of their regions.

 

Source: Open Democracy

El difícil camino hacia un Mercosur Suramericano

Lorenzo Fioramonti

Crises, like those gripping Europe, tend to expose the process and practice of regional governance as technocratic and elite-driven. But citizens and civil society may well demand more voice and power, in a ‘politicisation’ of regions.

In a globalizing world, where old and new evolutions challenge traditional decision making and (nation) states find it increasingly difficult to govern political processes and economic transactions that are ever more cross-boundary in nature, supranational regional governance has proven a powerful tool to address such growing complexity.

As a meso-level between the state and a hypothetical global government, regional organizations have been purposefully created with a view to providing more effective management structures to deal with phenomena and processes transcending the borders of national communities. Traditionally, trans-frontier natural resources were the first common goods to be placed under the administration of regional organizations. For instance, the oldest existing regional organization in the world is the Central Commission for the Navigation of the Rhine, an authority established in Europe during the 1815 Congress of Vienna. Its purpose was to manage cross-boundary transports along the river Rhine, which cuts across France, Germany, Switzerland and the Netherlands, and – in spite of its limited political clout – it set an important precedent for the future evolutions of European integration. The forerunner of the European Economic Community, which then transformed into the European Union, was the European Coal and Steal Community, a supranational authority created to provide common jurisdiction over the most fundamental natural resources of the continent, whose direct control had historically been the main source of conflict in the region.

Nowadays, there is a virtually endless list of regional organizations operating in divers sectors, entrusted with varying degrees of power and decision-making authority. Although most of them only perform specific functions (e.g. natural resources management, conflict prevention, legal advice, customs control, policing, etc.), there has been an increase in the establishment of ‘general purpose’ regional organizations, of which the EU is the most well-known and developed example. Some of them have evolved out of specific trade agreements (e.g. free trade areas), such as the Common Market of the South (Mercosur), while others have been created with a view to guaranteeing security and development, such as the Association of South East Asian Nations (ASEAN) and the African Union (AU). As famously remarked by P. Katzenstein, the contemporary international arena may very well develop into a ‘world of regions’, where openness and cooperation are reinforced by growth in cross-border exchanges and global transformations in interstate relations.

Regions and crises

According to Karl Deutsch, one of the forefathers of regional studies, the most fundamental example of region-building is constituted by so-called ‘security communities’, groupings of countries that share institutional systems to avoid internal conflicts and address common external threats. In this vein, the existence of certain threats (often in the form of fully-fledged conflicts) has been instrumental to the creation of regional organizations. The European integration project emerged out of the ashes of World War II. The Organization of African Unity (OAU) was created after the end of colonialism while its successor, the AU, was established to guarantee peace and development in a traditionally troubled continent. Similarly, ASEAN was founded to oppose the advancement of communism in South East Asia and strengthen the small countries of the region vis-à-vis their strong and powerful neighbours.

Supranational regionalism and crises have always been intimately connected, both empirically and theoretically. Yet, although most theoretical approaches appear to discuss crises as potential springboards for more and better regional cooperation/integration, the opposite is equally true. For instance, De Gaulle’s critical stance vis-à-vis the process of European integration (which led to a prolonged institutional crisis in the 1960s) prompted Ernst Haas, the founder of the neo-functionalist approach, to conclude that regional integration theory was ‘obsolete’. The current sovereign-debt crisis (often dubbed as the Euro-crisis) is raising a lot of doubts about the capacity of the EU to weather the storm and re-launch integration of the European continent. Public discourse not only in Europe, but also in the rest of the world, hints at the fact that regional cooperation/ integration does not deal well with ‘rainy days’, when member states tend to become more inward looking and seek refuge in short-sighted nationalism.

The word ‘crisis’ derives from the ancient Greek verb krinein, which means to ‘separate, decide and judge’. As such, it therefore describes events or phenomena that produce change and lead to decisions. Looking at most current events, it is not easy to gauge the extent to which these crises may lead to more regional cooperation/integration or, conversely, to gradual/abrupt disintegration. However, there is little doubt that they present fundamental turning points in the evolution of regional cooperation/integration and pose significant challenges to all stakeholders involved. At the same time, they may very well become opportunities to reassess the usefulness of supranational regions and prospectively re-design a world of new regions.

Euro-crisis and the weakening of the European model

Crises are revelatory moments. They break the repetitive continuity of ordinary processes and present us with unexpected threats and opportunities. As disruptive events, they force us to rethink conventional wisdom and become imaginative. In the evolution of political institutions, crises have been fundamental turning points opening up new space for governance innovations or, by contrast, reducing the spectrum of available options. They have ushered in phases of progress and prosperity or plummeted our societies into the darkness of parochialism and backwardness.

The current Euro-crisis may have a significant long-term impact on the ‘acceptability’ of regional integration as an end-goal for regionalism not only in Europe, but also in other regions. If the European project fails to deliver the expected outcomes of stability, well-being and solidarity, then it is likely that other regions will refrain from pushing for full-blown integration, perhaps privileging less demanding forms of cooperation. It also appears as if the EU ‘model’ of integration has been severely eroded by the global financial crisis and the turmoil in the Eurozone. There is indeed growing criticism of Eurocentric approaches to regionalism, not only among scholars, but also among leading policy makers. Especially, emerging powers in Africa, Asia and South America are becoming more assertive about the need to find different ways to promote regional governance in a world in which traditional power distributions are being fundamentally called into question. Moreover, the recent popular revolutions in North Africa and the Middle East are likely to reshape geostrategic equilibria in the Mediterranean and possibly usher in a new phase of regional cooperation within the Arab world and also with Europe.  

Citizens and regional governance

Citizens have been the underdogs of regionalism. From Europe, to Africa, Asia and Latin America, civil society has largely been on the receiving end of region-building processes. More often than not, civil society has been intentionally sidelined, while some sympathetic non-governmental organisations have been given the instrumental task of supporting institutions in their efforts at building a regional ‘identity’. In spite of rhetorical references to the importance of civic participation, regionalism has largely developed ‘without the citizens’.

Yet contemporary crises seem to bring ‘the people’ back into the picture, at least insofar as various attempts at regional cooperation and integration stumble upon the ideas, values and expectations of the citizens. The Euro-crisis is not just a matter of scarce liquidity and overexposure of a few national governments and most private banks. It is first and foremost a legitimacy crisis, which is revealing the fundamental limitations of an elite-driven regionalism model. Not disputing the pivotal role that European political elites played in setting the integration process in motion, there is little doubt that ‘deep integration’ will only be achieved when European citizens will have a say over the type of developmental trajectory that the EU should adopt as well as its ultimate goals. Looking at the astonishing amount of public resources channelled to rescue private banks in comparison to the harsh austerity plans enforced on allegedly profligate Member States, one cannot help but ask the question: what actual interests drive regionalism in the world?

Most observers have been traditionally looking at regionalization processes as politically neutral phenomena in international affairs. Research in this field has been generally restricted to the ‘quantity’ of regionalism, rather than its ‘quality’. Whether it is to explain the gradual devolution of authority from nation states to supranational institutions (as is the case with neo-functionalism) or whether it is to demonstrate the continuous bargaining process involving national governments (as is the case with intergovernmentalism), mainstream approaches to regional cooperation and integration have refrained from looking at the quality of regionalization processes. Will there be more or fewer regions in the world? Will regional institutions replace the nation state? Will regional governance become predominant in the years to come? Granted, these are very important questions and deserve to be examined in depth, especially in academic circles. Yet, the current crises force us to assess the state of regionalism in the world not only in terms of its predominance and diffusion, but also – and more importantly – in terms of how it contributes, if any, towards the well-being of our societies.  

Most ‘models’ and ‘practices’ of regionalism have tended to exclude the diversity of voices and roles in society. They have often served the specific interests of ruling elites (as in Latin America and Africa), the ambitions of hegemonic actors (as in Europe and Asia) or the agendas of industrial and financial powers. Moreover, through their apparently neutral technocratic character, most attempts at regional cooperation and integration have aimed to obscure the fact that there are always winners and losers in regionalism processes. 

This top-down model is being increasingly challenged. Overlapping crises and the redistribution of power at the global level call into question the capacity of regions to deliver on their promises, thus unveiling the unavoidable political character of any model of regionalism. In response to the growing cost of regionalism, citizens want to have more say over future regional trajectories and exercise their democratic powers. As a consequence, regionalism is evolving from a ‘closed’ process, designed and packaged by a small circle of political and economic elites, to an ‘open’ process, in which democratic participation and accountability are playing an ever more important role. Borrowing from the jargon of Internet users, one may say that regions are transitioning from a 1.0 phase dominated by technocrats to a 2.0 stage characterised by horizontal networks, alternative models and citizens’ contestations.

The EU, undoubtedly the most advanced and successful example of regionalism in the world, is now experiencing the direst consequences of such a transition. Amid rising unemployment, social malaise and growing discontent for the lack of accountability of national and regional politics, millions of citizens have been protesting against the Union and its political and economic agenda. Contrary to what eurosceptics would have us believe, these citizens do not call for less Europe: they want a different Europe. They would like regional integration to be more about connecting cultures and individuals and less about supporting capital. They would like their regional institutions to focus on helping the unemployed rather than bailing out bankrupt banks. They would like to see more solidarity across classes and generations, rather than less. They would like cooperation to be about building a different future instead of reshuffling old ideas. The future of regionalism may very well entail a growing ‘politicisation’ of regions, whereby citizens and civil society demand more voice and power in influencing not just general principles and values, but also the long-term political trajectories of their regions.

 

Source: Open Democracy

por Kintto Lucas

ALAI AMLATINA, 16/07/2013.- En los últimos años, pharm América del Sur ha dado pasos decisivos en su camino hacia la integración regional. Conscientes de los desafíos que ha generado la globalización y que se han evidenciado en las crisis económicas y políticas internacionales, buy así como en la proliferación de actividades ilícitas transnacionales que traspasan las capacidades individuales de los Estados, algunos países han comenzado a entender que las ventajas de una mayor cooperación e intercambio comercial no son el objetivo final, sino que es necesario coordinar respuestas en políticas económicas y fiscales, pero también sociales, en manejo de recursos naturales, temas ambientales, de defensa y en otros ámbitos, para enfrentar las amenazas. Pero sobre todo, que en el mundo que se va configurando es imposible caminar solos, y es fundamental caminar en colectivo

Para reforzar la integración es necesario incrementar los niveles de interdependencia económica y comercial en la región. Es un camino complejo pero no imposible. Falta todavía profundizar en una mirada colectiva y dejar de mirarse cada uno al ombligo. Es necesario que las economías más grandes sean más solidarias con las economías pequeñas, pero también es fundamental que éstas busquen un desarrollo propio, dejen de ser parasitarias y no se escondan detrás la farsa de revender productos traídos de otros países sin incorporar agregado nacional o solo colocando una etiqueta de industria nacional.

De a poco América del Sur se va alejando de la teoría de integración regional que promueve el divorcio entre Economía y Política, y que terminó por arrastrar a muchos países a la falacia del “mercado auto regulador” como promotor del desarrollo. Sin embargo, es preocupante observar que después de las nefastas experiencias con la aplicación de la terapias de shock de mercado –en palabras de Naomi Klein-, este tipo de medidas políticas se siguen vendiendo desde algunos países de la OCDE, organizaciones financieras multilaterales, sectores políticos de derecha y ciertos empresarios, como la panacea para la proyección económica de nuestros países.

Desde el Norte se promueven los tratados de libre comercio y la liberalización y desregulación financiera, así como la privatización y la flexibilización del mercado de trabajo como los mecanismos fundamentales para la integración a la economía internacional. En América del Sur hay quienes escuchan esos cantos de sirena y defienden la necesidad urgente de crear un área de libre comercio estilo ALCA. Pretenden así reponer los fracasos del modelo neoliberal.

La integración regional de Suramérica debe recuperar el rol del Estado sobre el mercado, y de la sociedad sobre el Estado y el mercado. Los Estados Suramericanos integrados deben controlar el mercado suramericano integrado. Y la sociedad suramericana debe jugar un papel fundamental con su participación para controlar los Estados y los mercados integrados. Esa integración debe generar vías para un modelo de desarrollo que permita la proyección de cada país y la proyección conjunta. La eficacia y el aprovechamiento de las sinergias regionales dependen de la capacidad de entender que es un proyecto colectivo, no individual, y del tejido institucional que se consolide en el proceso de integración.

Fortalecer y profundizar la integración en América del Sur, pasa por fortalecer y profundizar Unasur, y en ese camino es fundamental fortalecer y profundizar el Mercosur caminando hacia un Mercosur Suramericano. Pero eso depende de la capacidad que muestren nuestros Estados para reconfigurar sus estructuras productivas. Esto será posible si los gobiernos van de a poco trascendiendo el ámbito de la mera racionalidad económica y se comprometen en la construcción de una Política Económica Común e Inclusiva, que aproveche las ventajas de la región en recursos alimenticios, hídricos, materias primas industriales y energéticas, generando una integración productiva y la complementariedad entre los países.

En el nuevo orden mundial, la importancia de América del Sur en la economía internacional es innegable. Es uno de los polos económicos más dinámicos. Actualmente, el PIB de los países de la Suramérica representa el 73 por ciento del de América Latina y el Caribe, que a su vez representa el 8 por ciento del comercio mundial. A pesar del peso económico, la matriz productiva y exportadora de nuestros países continúa centrada en el sector primario y en las manufacturas intensivas en materias primas y recursos naturales. Este fenómeno responde a los altos precios de los commodities en el mercado internacional, pero también a la concentración de la inversión, tanto nacional como extranjera, en la explotación de materias primas. Como consecuencia, los países suramericanos enfrentan la amenaza de la desindustrialización y reprimariziación de sus economías. Estos procesos conllevan el aparecimiento de enclaves productivos cuya generación de riqueza no se transmite al total de la economía, dadas las escasas concatenaciones productivas que generan y la fuga de capitales en forma de repatriación de ganancias y beneficios y de incremento desmedido de las importaciones. Esos enclaves, muchas veces son parte de la parasitaria inversión extranjera que no paga impuestos y aporta muy poco a nuestros países.

La forma independiente que los países suramericanos han concebido su desarrollo económico, ha dado origen al establecimiento de estructuras productivas orientadas a satisfacer solamente necesidades extra regionales, llevando a que la dinámica económica de los países de la región contribuya en poco o nada a la dinámica económica colectiva de la región. Debido a este modo individualista de concebir el crecimiento económico y de aplicar políticas comerciales fundamentadas en aperturismos indiscriminados, la mayor parte de las economías suramericanas han experimentado procesos de desmantelamiento productivo o pérdida de dinamismo económico en los sectores industriales. Paralelamente grandes segmentos de nuestras poblaciones ven disminuir el desempleo pero crecer el empleo precario. Y observan que, si bien se nota una clara disminución de la pobreza, la desigualdad se mantiene y a veces es más evidente.

Es necesario que la integración económica suramericana gire en torno a la articulación de las economías nacionales, que las estructuras productivas busquen satisfacer las necesidades de los habitantes de la región, de modo que podamos desarrollar nuestros sectores manufactureros y de servicios. En ese sentido se debe asegurar las condiciones jurídicas y técnicas para promover inversiones productivas regionales. Y finalmente hay que configurar ordenamientos productivos que contribuyan a que todas y cada una de las economías de la región alcancen niveles altos de competitividad para poder, en otra fase, competir en los mercados de servicios y manufacturas de mediano y alto valor agregado internacionales.

En el difícil camino hacia un Mercosur Suramericano, Mercosur debe transformarse en la cabeza de puente para formar un bloque comercial suramericano, que se rija por los principios de solidaridad, complementariedad y consideración de las asimetrías en los niveles de desarrollo económico y social de los diferentes miembros, que priorice el papel del Estado, que tenga como finalidad el bienestar de la población en lugar de las ganancias del gran capital, y que sirva como ejemplo de un modelo de regionalismo diferente, frente a los esquemas tradicionales que se basan en el fundamentalismo de mercado.

– Kintto Lucas es Embajador Itinerante de Uruguay para Unasur, Celac y Alba. Ex Vicecanciller de Ecuador.

Fuente: http://alainet.org/active/65704&lang=es

The hard road to a South American Mercosur

Por Kintto Lucas

En su genial novela El año de la muerte de Ricardo Reis, José Saramago señala “A esta ciudad le basta saber que la rosa de los vientos existe, este no es el lugar donde los rumbos se abren, tampoco es el punto magnífico donde los rumbos convergen, aquí precisamente cambian los rumbos”.

Trasladando las palabras de Saramago al sistema mundo, como diría Immanuel Wallerstein, podríamos decir que cambiarán los rumbos el día que construyamos un sistema mundial multipolar que contribuya a crear un mundo democrático, justo y equitativo.

En ese necesario cambio de rumbos, la integración es un objetivo estratégico para lograr la independencia de América Latina. En ese sentido, es importante fortalecer los distintos niveles de integración y consolidar un bloque suramericano y latinoamericano.

América del Sur vive un momento importante en términos de integración regional, capitalizada más claramente en la Unasur (Unión de Naciones Suramericanas). Un bloque que más allá de las diferencias políticas o económicas de los países que lo integran, ha logrado levantarse como espacio de acuerdos y entendimientos desde la diversidad y ha generado un proceso integrador diferente.

Unasur es la propuesta más importante de integración desde toda América del Sur. Las que surgieron antes, además de ser regionales fueron condicionadas por el libre comercio, porque apostaban a eso, no a la integración.

El Mercosur (Mercado Común del Sur), por ejemplo, fue una propuesta surgida desde el libre comercio desde el neoliberalismo. Si bien luego fue procesando cambios positivos con la irrupción de gobiernos progresistas y es una confluencia fundamental, todavía le falta mucho para consolidarse como Mercosur Suramericano, que sea eje de un modelo de integración productiva de Américas del Sur dentro de Unasur.
La CAN (Comunidad Andina de Naciones), en cambio, surgió como una propuesta integradora distinta, pero finalmente terminó absorbida por la hegemonía neoliberal en los años 90.

Unasur surgió de una forma diferente, y se posicionó como una propuesta de integración desde lo político, llevando adelante acciones trascendentes para solucionar conflictos, consolidar una mirada de defensa de la democracia en común, fortalecer políticas de defensa y sociales integradoras, e inclusive posicionándose como un bloque a tener en cuenta a nivel mundial en el desarrollo de un mundo multipolar.

Unasur ha demostrado que, dentro de las diferencias, se puede llegar a ciertos acuerdos que parten de un punto central: para competir, para ser escuchados en un mundo que va a ser de bloques, tenemos que participar como un todo más compacto, que en este caso es el bloque de América del Sur.

Por ejemplo, el acuerdo del Consejo de Defensa en Unasur, de transparentar gastos militares, de parar la instalación de bases militares estadounidenses, son temas que se han resuelto, con discrepancias pero finalmente llegando a ciertos consensos. También a nivel económico, hubo algunos acuerdos, desde los presidentes, quienes creían que Unasur debía jugar un papel importante para enfrentar la crisis económica internacional en conjunto. Lamentablemente los ministros de Economía han desentonado.

Ahora es necesario consolidar Unasur como bloque de poder e interlocución mundial. Y dentro de ese proceso es fundamental consolidar la institucionalidad de Unasur en sus diferentes instancias, y particularmente la Secretaría General.

Néstor Kirchner, cuando fue secretario general, puso las bases políticas de la Secretaría. Ecuador, cuando fue Presidencia Pro Tempore puso las bases materiales y constitutivas, y le dio institucionalidad. Ema Mejía y Alí Rodríguez consolidaron la institucionalidad. Rodríguez, además, aportó una base teórico-práctica a Unasur con su propuesta sobre los recursos naturales como eje integrador. Es necesario consolidar la gestión de Unasur desde la Secretaría, para fortalecer las acciones del bloque a nivel regional y mundial.

Por su parte la Celac (Comunidad de Estados Latinoamericanos y Caribeños), surgió con la necesidad de consolidar un espacio amplio que promueva un proceso integrador desde la pluralidad latinoamericana, desde procesos más diversos y complejos, pero sin la tutela de Estados Unidos.

Mientras la OEA (Organización de Estados Americanos) surgió como la opción de un determinado momento histórico en que los países vivían sometidos al “liderazgo” de Estados Unidos, que en realidad era una imposición desde ese país, Celac y Unasur surgieron desde los propios países latinoamericanos y suramericanos. La OEA fue un proceso de imposición, Unasur y Celac son, con todas sus dificultades, procesos de integración.

El Alba (Alianza Bolivariana para los Pueblos de Nuestra América), que surgió como una propuesta frente a otro intento de imposición estadounidense como el Alca (Área de Libre Comercio de las Américas), ha implementado procesos de complementariedad y solidaridad creando propuestas de integración productiva interesantes. Es necesario establecer un puente entre el Mercosur y el Alba, buscando instancias de cooperación y complementación. Uruguay podría ser un país puente entre el Mercosur y el Alba promoviendo la cooperación y complementación. Uruguay debe fortalecer el Mercosur y fortalecerse en el Mercosur, y paralelamente consolidar su presencia en el Alba y actuar como puente Alba-Mercosur.

Un gran reto en Unasur y en todos los niveles de integración, es involucrar a las organizaciones sociales y a los movimientos sociales en una confluencia desde abajo, desde los pueblos. Obviamente no todas las organizaciones sociales representan al pueblo en general pero sí son instancias importantes que dan base social a los procesos integradores. Si no se produce una integración desde los pueblos, si no hay una integración cultural y de procesos culturales conjuntos de los países, es muy difícil consolidar un proceso integrador de largo plazo.

El mayor enemigo de la integración es el modelo de desarrollo. En este momento los procesos de integración están en medio de dos modelos de desarrollo que se encuentran en disputa. Un modelo de desarrollo que es más soberano, vinculado a la producción nacional, con la idea de cambiar la matriz productiva y dejar de ser solo países primarios exportadores, con una visión desde el sur, desde nuestros países. El otro modelo, por ahora hegemónico, apuesta al libre comercio mal entendido, donde quienes dirigen el mercado terminan siendo las grandes corporaciones, la política comercial se basa en los tratados de libre comercio con las grandes potencias, tratados neocoloniales que van contra la integración y la política económica favorecen la especulación financiera, las importaciones y el consumismo. Ese modelo de desarrollo a veces disfrazado de progresista es el mayor enemigo de la integración. Si no es derrotado a nivel regional y dentro de cada uno de nuestros países no habrá integración y seremos cada día más dependientes. Ahí seguramente recordemos aquella frase del final de Ensayo sobre la ceguera de Saramago cuando dice “Creo que no nos quedamos ciegos, creo que estamos ciegos, Ciegos que ven, Ciegos que, viendo, no ven”.

 

Lee el articulo completo aqui.

Marcelo Saguier

ALAI AMLATINA, 27/07/2012.- Los procesos de integración regional en Sudamérica han dado importantes pasos en la construcción de una comunidad política en base a valores y expectativas comunes. La defensa de la democracia, la resolución de conflictos mediante la diplomacia, el resguardo de la paz y la reivindicación conjunta de la soberanía argentina sobre las islas Malvinas ante los diferendos con el Reino Unido han sido algunos de campos en donde se logró alcanzar un inédito dinamismo y convergencia regional. Muchos de estos consensos acompañaron el surgimiento de nuevas formas institucionales como la UNASUR, ALBA y la Comunidad de Estados Latinoamericana y Caribeños (CELAC).

No obstante tales avances, existe otra dimensión del proceso regional en la que es menos evidente que consensos se expresan. Las dinámicas de la región, como espacio socio-político en construcción, actualmente está regida por los patrones de conflictos y cooperación entre gobiernos, empresas y actores sociales en torno a la utilización de los recursos naturales para fines de exportación y de insumos para la industria. Este es el caso de los recursos minerales y del agua de ríos para la generación de energía hidroeléctrica. A diferencia de las avances alcanzados en materia de construcción política regional en otros campos, el lugar que hoy ocupan los recursos naturales en la integración es más inquietante y potencialmente una fuente de tensiones.

Las políticas de utilización de tales recursos, y los conflictos socio-ambientales que se producen por las mismas, en su mayoría son de carácter nacional o sub-nacional. Sin embargo, al mismo tiempo se despliegan algunas iniciativas de carácter regional impulsadas por gobiernos o por actores sociales que regionalizan sus disputas como estrategias de acción frente a la orientación extractivista de algunos proyectos. Es decir que las dinámicas socio-políticas de construcción de un espacio político regional en Sudamérica van más allá de las distintas iniciativas intergubernamentales que se puedan emprender desde los estados. Los recursos naturales constituyen un eje de articulación tanto para iniciativas de cooperación interestatal como también para la movilización social transfronteriza.

La propuesta de este articulo es la de pensar las dinámicas de la construcción política regional desde ésta perspectiva, en la que las interacciones de cooperación y conflicto entre actores públicos, empresariales y sociales moldean el escenario regional, sus posibilidades y limitaciones.

La minería en zonas de frontera es una de las formas que se redefine el escenario social y político regional. El caso más paradigmático de ello es la frontera entre Argentina y Chile. Tradicionalmente, las fronteras internacionales eran zonas en donde no se permitía emprendimientos productivos (o extractivos) dado que constituían lugares sensibles a la defensa del territorio nacional. Los procesos de democratización e integración económica llevados a cabo en la región permitieron desactivar las hipótesis de conflicto que fundamentaron el imaginario geopolítico de gobiernos y sociedades nacionales durante gran parte del siglo veinte. Sin embargo, estos cambios estuvieron asimismo signados por la orientación neoliberal que marcó las políticas de integración durante la década del 90. Una de las características de ello fue el establecimiento de nuevas mecanismos institucionales para atraer y resguardar inversiones. La minería de frontera entre Argentina y Chile es producto de ello, y su expresión más acabada es el acuerdo binacional minero que fuera firmado en 1997 y ratificado en los parlamentos en el 2000.

El territorio comprendido por el acuerdo binacional cubre un área sobre la cordillera de los Andes de más de 200.000 kilómetros cuadrados, lo que equivale al 95% de la frontera internacional de ambos países. El acuerdo concede a las empresas la disponibilidad de minerales y agua para sus procesos de extracción, así como poder de control fronterizo. Pascua Lama es el proyecto binacional de megaminería que fue posible con este acuerdo. Las empresas que desarrollan el proyecto son: Barrick Exploraciones Argentina y Exploraciones Mineras Argentinas, en la Republica Argentina, y Compañía Minera Nevada en Chile. Otros proyectos mineros ya han sido aprobados, amparados en el tratado binacional, se encuentran actualmente en diferentes etapas de desarrollo. Entre ellos, está el proyecto El Pachón en la provincia de San Juan.

El acuerdo minero binacional consiste en un modelo de integración territorial y representa un hito internacional, considerando la extensión del área cubierta, los volúmenes de minerales e inversiones que potencialmente se verían implicados y la posible replicabilidad de este modelo en otras zonas de frontera con comparables condiciones geológicas. Evidentemente, la replicabilidad de este enfoque para la explotación conjunta de depósitos minerales en zonas de jurisdicción nacional compartida está expuesta también a los vaivenes de las presiones sociales frente al extractivismo y al creciente grado de concientización sobre la necesidad de fundar nuevos paradigmas del desarrollo con criterios de sostenibilidad.

La tendencia de minería de frontera se confirma asimismo en otros países latinoamericanos sin que exista necesariamente ningún acuerdo entre los países. Este es caso de los proyectos de exploración minera que actualmente tienen lugar en la frontera de Costa Rica y Nicaragua, de El Salvador y Guatemala y de Perú y Ecuador en la llamada Cordillera del Cóndor – región que en 1995 fue epicentro de un conflicto bélico entre ambos países. En este ultimo caso, desde la resolución del conflicto bélico han habido grandes inversiones mineras atraídas por la riqueza de de yacimientos de oro de este lugar. Incluso sin un acuerdo minero entre ambos países, entre 2005 y 2010 se han triplicado el número de concesiones de exploración a empresas interesadas, en su mayoría del lado peruano de la frontera. Las empresas transnacionales mineras sin duda constituyen actores de creciente influencia en la redefinición del espacio regional y es de suponer que asimismo constituyen factores de influencia en los gobiernos para promover acuerdos mineros internacionales (los gobiernos de Alan García en Perú y Correa en Ecuador habían comenzado a explorar esta posibilidad).

La minería en zonas de frontera contribuye a regionalizar conflictos que se suscitan desde hace años en toda América Latina. Son conocidas las expresiones de resistencia a proyectos mineros llevados a por comunidades rurales en distintas provincias argentinas como Chubut, San Juan, Catamarca, La Rioja y Tucumán. Sin embargo, éstos no son casos aislados sino que se enmarcan en una tendencia generalizada de creciente conflictividad en zonas de exploración minera. Evidencia de ello es que actualmente existen 155 conflictos relacionados a esta actividad en todo Latinoamérica y el Caribe, en las que se ven implicadas 205 comunidades en relación a 168 proyectos mineros. Asimismo, según un informe a cargo del ex Representante Especial del Secretario General de las Naciones Unidas, John Ruggie, las industrias extractivas representan el 28 % de los casos de los casos de violaciones a los Derechos Humanos con complicidad de las empresas. Esta tendencia global se profundiza en América Latina. Un elemento común a tales conflictos es la ausencia de debate público sobre los cuáles son los beneficios y costos de estos proyectos – definidos en términos económicos, sociales y ambientales – así de cómo arbitrar equitativamente los derechos y responsabilidades de los principales beneficiarios y damnificados de los mismos. Las comunidades tampoco son consultadas previamente, según lo establece el Convenio 169 de la OIT, sin bien algunos cambios en esta dirección comienzan a promoverse en Bolivia, Perú y Ecuador.

Las resistencias sociales a la minería a cielo abierto, y especialmente en zonas de frontera, se traducen crecientemente en la búsqueda de estrategias de incidencia mediante la movilización transnacional. Ejemplo de ello es la realización de tribunales de opinión, en donde comunidades afectadas por la minería pueden denunciar simbólicamente los estragos de la minería en el ambiente y su impacto sobre los derechos de las poblaciones. Se realizó el primer “Tribunal Ético de Minería de Frontera” organizado por el Observatorio de Conflictos Minero de América Latina en Chile en el 2010. También el “Tribunal Permanente de los Pueblos sobre Empresas Transnacionales” sesionó en Austria 2006, Perú/Colombia 2008 y España 2010 para denunciar la complicidad de empresas transnacionales en casos de violación de derechos humanos en Latinoamérica. Muchos de los casos denunciados están relacionados con la minería, además de la explotación de hidrocarburos, agronegocios, etc. Asimismo, se han creado redes de acción global para el intercambio de información y coordinación de campañas conjuntas. Estas son algunas de las formas que adquiere el activismo transnacional en respuesta a la minería y demás instancias de violaciones de derechos humanos en los que estados y empresas se ven acusados. En este sentido, la minería de frontera actúa como catalizador tanto de nuevos relacionamientos entre empresas y gobiernos, así como también de nuevas formas de resistencias sociales que intervienen en la redefinición del debate regional sobre los vínculos entre desarrollo sustentable y derechos humanos.

Además de la minería de frontera, las dinámicas de la integración regional en Sudamérica están regidas también por una serie de proyectos de infraestructura para la generación y transporte de energía hidroeléctrica. La abundancia de agua en la cuenca del Amazonas hace de esta zona el epicentro de una serie de redes interconectadas de represas y líneas de transmisión que se proyecta vincularán lugares de producción y consumo. La creciente demanda de energía esta dada por el crecimiento económico en las economías de los países sudamericanos, y especialmente del sector industrial brasileño y minero (esta actividad es gran demandante de agua para sus procesos de extracción del mineral). Estos cambios están dando lugar a nuevos patrones de la cooperación regional internacional en el que las empresas brasileñas juegan un papel clave como las concesionarias principales de los proyectos de infraestructura de energía hidroeléctrica.

La Iniciativa para la Infraestructura Regional Suramericana (IIRSA), establece la financiación para estos proyectos. IIRSA es un mecanismo institucional creado en 2000 para la coordinación de las organizaciones intergubernamentales acciones con el objetivo de “promover el proceso de integración política, social y económica de América del Sur, incluyendo la modernización de la infraestructura regional y acciones específicas para estimular la integración y el desarrollo de las regiones aisladas de los subsistemas. IIRSA cuenta una cartera 524 proyectos de infraestructura en las áreas de transporte, energía y las comunicaciones, que se agrupan en 47 grupos de proyectos que representan una inversión estimada de dólares EE.UU. 96,119.2 millones de dólares. El Banco Nacional de Desarrollo de Brasil (BNDES) es también un actor regional clave en la movilización de recursos para los proyectos patrocinados por la IIRSA, tanto en territorio brasileño como también en países vecinos.

El Complejo Hidroeléctrico rio Madeira es uno de los proyectos más emblemáticos y la principal iniciativa hidroeléctrica del IIRSA. Una vez terminado, contará con cuatro represas interconectadas y será el de mayor tamaño de la cuenca del Amazonas. El BNDES provee parte del financiamiento para su construcción. Dos de las represas estarán emplazadas en Brasil mientras que una de ellas estará en territorio boliviano y la última en un río que demarca la frontera internacional entre Bolivia y Brasil.

Además, Brasil y Perú procuran la construcción de un mega-complejo hidroeléctrico en la Amazonía peruana financiado por Brasil. El objetivo de esta iniciativa es para generar electricidad en Perú para ser transportada sobre a Brasil para satisfacer su creciente demanda de energía. Para ello, ambos gobiernos negociaron un Acuerdo Energético que establece que Perú se compromete a exportar el 70% de la energía que produzcan sus centrales hidroeléctricas a Brasil durante un plazo de 50 años. Su construcción tendrá un costo de 4.000 millones de dólares e incluye también una línea de 357 kilómetros para tener la electricidad a la frontera brasileña. Una vez terminada la construcción del complejo, este será el mayor proyecto de energía hidroeléctrica en Perú y el quinto más grande en América Latina. Este proyecto y acuerdo energético ha sido objeto de grande críticas en Perú. El acuerdo fue firmado por los gobiernos de Alan García y de Ignácio Lula da Silva en 2010, pero actualmente está pendiente la ratificación del congreso peruano.

El acuerdo y proyecto ha sido objeto de serios cuestionamientos por los impactos ambientales y sociales de estas obras. En octubre de 2011 la principal concesionaria de este proyecto, la brasileña Odebrecht, decidió retirarse de la construcción de dos des las represas proyectadas como consecuencia de la oposición que este mega-proyecto genera en las poblaciones locales, sobre todo de pueblos originarios. El interés del gobierno brasileño por asegurar un acuerdo que le permita proveerse de energía a costos rentables se mantiene. Seguramente veremos nuevos intentos por reflotar el debate sobre este acuerdo, tal vez tomando en consideración las más recientes resistencias sociales que se han manifestado en repudio al mismo. Evidencia de ello es el proceso de revisión que emprenden los ocho países amazónicos de los mecanismos nacionales de consulta a grupos étnicos en el marco del Tratado de Cooperación Amazónica.

En la medida que avanzan las iniciativas de integración sudamericana se pone en evidencia la ausencia de consensos sobre ciertas áreas sensibles como es el caso de los recursos naturales. Muchos cuestionamientos comienzan a aflorar en el debate regional, como las tensiones entre visiones productivistas del desarrollo y de ecología política en las que se propician formas de desarrollo sustentable, vinculadas a los derechos humanos, la armonía ambiental y formas de producción y consumo más inclusivas. Asimismo, se manifiesta la necesidad de nuevos mecanismos de toma de decisión en materia de recursos naturales, no sólo a nivel nacional sino especialmente en lo relacionado a proyectos regionales que involucran acuerdos entre estados e instrumentos de financiamiento regionales. Es fundamental abordar en profundidad las nuevas asimetrías que genera este tipo de integración, no solo entre economías de mayor y menor tamaño, perfiles productivos especializados como industriales y proveerdores de materias primas, sino también en la necesidad de formular marcos regionales regulatorios y de políticas específicamente sobre recursos naturales (coordinación fiscales, normas de protección ambiental, derecho a de consulta a las poblaciones, eficiencia energética, entre otras).

En un contexto de creación de una comunidad política sudamericana, los conflictos y desafíos del desarrollo sustentable se vuelven invariablemente preocupaciones de todo el bloque regional. Mientras antes podamos avanzar sobre nuevos consensos en materia de recursos naturales, mejor estaremos preparados para avanzar en la profundización de nuevas bases de soberanía.

Nota: Las ideas que aquí se exponen están desarrolladas en un artículo recientemente publicado como: Saguier, Marcelo (2012) ‘Socio-environmental regionalism in South America: tensions in the new development models’, The Rise of Post-Hegemonic Regionalism: The Case of Latin America, Pia Riggirozzi and Diana Tussie, eds., Series United Nations University Series on Regionalism, Springer.

– Dr. Marcelo Saguier es profesor de estudios internacionales e investigador CONICET/FLACSO

Fuente: http://alainet.org/active/56815

by Kintto Lucas

ALAI AMLAT-en, sildenafil 17/07/2013.- In the past few years, case South America has taken some decisive steps toward regional integration. Aware of the challenges of globalization, which have surfaced in international political and economic crises, as well as in the proliferation of transnational illicit activities that are beyond the capacities of individual states to control, some countries have begun to understand that the advantages of greater cooperation and commercial interchange are not the final goal. Rather it is necessary to coordinate responses not only in economic and fiscal policy, but also in social policy, the control of natural resources, environmental issues, defence and other areas, in order to face the threats that impinge on them. Above all, in the world as it is now developing, it is impossible to walk alone. It is essential to walk together.

To reinforce integration we need to increase levels of economic and commercial interdependence in the region. It is a complex but not impossible course. We need to develop a collective vision and cease to contemplate our own navels. The bigger economies must show greater solidarity with the smaller ones, but it is fundamental that the latter look to their own development, stop being parasites and stop hiding behind the farce of re-selling products brought in from other places without any local value-added, but simply adding labels that proclaim the product to be of national industry.

Little by little South America is moving away from a theory of regional integration that supposes a divorce between economics and politics, and which ended up imposing on many countries the fallacy of a “self-regulating market” as a force for development. Nevertheless, it is worrying to see that after the disastrous experiences with the application of market shock theories — in the words of Naomi Klein – these political measures are still being pushed by some OECD countries, multinational financial organizations, rightwing politicians and some businessmen, as a panacea for the economic protection of our countries.

From the North, we are plied with free trade treaties and liberalization and deregulation of financial structures, along with privatization and flexible labour markets as basic mechanisms for international economic integration. In South America there are people who hear these siren songs and defend the urgent need to create a free trade area along the lines of the FTAA/ALCA. With this they propose to cure the failures of the neoliberal model.

The regional integration of South America must retrieve the role of the State over the market, of society over the State and the market. The integrated South American states should take control of an integrated South American market. And Latin American society should play a fundamental role in participating to control States and integrated markets. This integration should open the way for a development model that allows for the advancement of each country as well as common advancement. The efficacy and the ability for channeling regional synergies depend on the ability to understand that this is a collective project, not an individual one, and to understand that this is an institutional fabric that is created through the process of integration.

To expand and strengthen South American integration, Unasur must be strengthened and extended. It is fundamental to move Mercosur towards a South American Mercosur(1). This depends on the capacity of our States to reconfigure their productive structures.

This will be possible if governments can transcend the limits of mere economic rationality and commit themselves to work towards a Common and Inclusive Economic Policy, which can take advantage of the region’s assets in food and hydraulic resources, raw materials and energy resources, generating a productive integration of a complementary character between countries.

In the new world order, the importance of South America for the international economy is undeniable. It is one of the most dynamic economic poles. At the present time, the GDP of the countries of South America represents 73 per cent of that of Latin America and the Caribbean, which in turn represents 8 per cent of world trade. In spite of its economic weight, the productive and export matrix of our countries continues to be centred on the primary sector and on intensive manufactures in primary resources and natural resources. This phenomenon responds to the high prices of commodities in the international market, but also to the concentration of investment, both national and foreign, in the exploitation of primary resources. In consequence, South American countries face the threat of deindustrialization and of economies centred on the primary sector. These processes lead to the emergence of productive enclaves whose wealth creation does not reach the whole economy, given the few productive networks they generate, as well as capital flight in the form of the repatriation of profits and benefits and the unlimited increase in imports. These enclaves in many cases are part of parasitical foreign investment that does not pay taxes and brings very little to our countries.

The way that Latin American countries have conceived their economic development has given rise to productive structures that are engineered to satisfy extra-regional needs. Because of this, the economic dynamics of the countries of the region contribute little or nothing to the collective economic dynamics of the region. Due to this individualist way of thinking of economic growth and the application of commercial policies based on indiscriminate opening to foreign economies, the greater part of South American economies have undergone processes of productive dismantling or the loss of economic dynamism in industrial sectors. At the same time large segments of our populations have experienced a fall in unemployment but growth in precarious employment. Here, if there is a diminishing amount of poverty, inequality is maintained and is at times even more evident.

It is necessary for South American economic integration to move towards the articulation of national economies, and for productive structures to look to satisfying the needs of the people of the region, in a way that allows us to develop our manufacturing sectors and services. In this sense it is important to establish legal and technical conditions to promote regional productive investment. Finally, it is necessary to set up productive conditions that make it possible for each and every one of the economies of the region to reach high levels of competitiveness in order, at a later moment, to be able to compete in the international markets of manufacturing and service sectors of medium and high added value.

In the difficult path towards a South American Mercosur, Mercosur should become the bridgehead to establish a South American commercial bloc, animated by principles of solidarity, complementarity and the consideration of the asymmetries in the levels of social and economic development of different members, that prioritizes the role of the State, and has as its goal the well-being of the population rather than the profits of big capital, and which can serve as an example of a different regionalist model, in the face of traditional schemes that are based on market fundamentalism.
(Translation: Jordan Bishop, for ALAI)

– Kintto Lucas is the Roaming Ambassador of Uruguay for Unasur, Celac, and Alba. Former vice foreign minister of Ecuador.

(1) Unasur: Union of South American Nations. Mercosur: Southern Common Market.

 

Source: http://www.alainet.org/active/65768

The EU has never been a European solidarity organisation. The European peoples must create their own unity

Lorenzo Fioramonti

Crises, sale like those gripping Europe, tend to expose the process and practice of regional governance as technocratic and elite-driven. But citizens and civil society may well demand more voice and power, in a ‘politicisation’ of regions.

In a globalizing world, where old and new evolutions challenge traditional decision making and (nation) states find it increasingly difficult to govern political processes and economic transactions that are ever more cross-boundary in nature, supranational regional governance has proven a powerful tool to address such growing complexity.

As a meso-level between the state and a hypothetical global government, regional organizations have been purposefully created with a view to providing more effective management structures to deal with phenomena and processes transcending the borders of national communities. Traditionally, trans-frontier natural resources were the first common goods to be placed under the administration of regional organizations. For instance, the oldest existing regional organization in the world is the Central Commission for the Navigation of the Rhine, an authority established in Europe during the 1815 Congress of Vienna. Its purpose was to manage cross-boundary transports along the river Rhine, which cuts across France, Germany, Switzerland and the Netherlands, and – in spite of its limited political clout – it set an important precedent for the future evolutions of European integration. The forerunner of the European Economic Community, which then transformed into the European Union, was the European Coal and Steal Community, a supranational authority created to provide common jurisdiction over the most fundamental natural resources of the continent, whose direct control had historically been the main source of conflict in the region.

Nowadays, there is a virtually endless list of regional organizations operating in divers sectors, entrusted with varying degrees of power and decision-making authority. Although most of them only perform specific functions (e.g. natural resources management, conflict prevention, legal advice, customs control, policing, etc.), there has been an increase in the establishment of ‘general purpose’ regional organizations, of which the EU is the most well-known and developed example. Some of them have evolved out of specific trade agreements (e.g. free trade areas), such as the Common Market of the South (Mercosur), while others have been created with a view to guaranteeing security and development, such as the Association of South East Asian Nations (ASEAN) and the African Union (AU). As famously remarked by P. Katzenstein, the contemporary international arena may very well develop into a ‘world of regions’, where openness and cooperation are reinforced by growth in cross-border exchanges and global transformations in interstate relations.

Regions and crises

According to Karl Deutsch, one of the forefathers of regional studies, the most fundamental example of region-building is constituted by so-called ‘security communities’, groupings of countries that share institutional systems to avoid internal conflicts and address common external threats. In this vein, the existence of certain threats (often in the form of fully-fledged conflicts) has been instrumental to the creation of regional organizations. The European integration project emerged out of the ashes of World War II. The Organization of African Unity (OAU) was created after the end of colonialism while its successor, the AU, was established to guarantee peace and development in a traditionally troubled continent. Similarly, ASEAN was founded to oppose the advancement of communism in South East Asia and strengthen the small countries of the region vis-à-vis their strong and powerful neighbours.

Supranational regionalism and crises have always been intimately connected, both empirically and theoretically. Yet, although most theoretical approaches appear to discuss crises as potential springboards for more and better regional cooperation/integration, the opposite is equally true. For instance, De Gaulle’s critical stance vis-à-vis the process of European integration (which led to a prolonged institutional crisis in the 1960s) prompted Ernst Haas, the founder of the neo-functionalist approach, to conclude that regional integration theory was ‘obsolete’. The current sovereign-debt crisis (often dubbed as the Euro-crisis) is raising a lot of doubts about the capacity of the EU to weather the storm and re-launch integration of the European continent. Public discourse not only in Europe, but also in the rest of the world, hints at the fact that regional cooperation/ integration does not deal well with ‘rainy days’, when member states tend to become more inward looking and seek refuge in short-sighted nationalism.

The word ‘crisis’ derives from the ancient Greek verb krinein, which means to ‘separate, decide and judge’. As such, it therefore describes events or phenomena that produce change and lead to decisions. Looking at most current events, it is not easy to gauge the extent to which these crises may lead to more regional cooperation/integration or, conversely, to gradual/abrupt disintegration. However, there is little doubt that they present fundamental turning points in the evolution of regional cooperation/integration and pose significant challenges to all stakeholders involved. At the same time, they may very well become opportunities to reassess the usefulness of supranational regions and prospectively re-design a world of new regions.

Euro-crisis and the weakening of the European model

Crises are revelatory moments. They break the repetitive continuity of ordinary processes and present us with unexpected threats and opportunities. As disruptive events, they force us to rethink conventional wisdom and become imaginative. In the evolution of political institutions, crises have been fundamental turning points opening up new space for governance innovations or, by contrast, reducing the spectrum of available options. They have ushered in phases of progress and prosperity or plummeted our societies into the darkness of parochialism and backwardness.

The current Euro-crisis may have a significant long-term impact on the ‘acceptability’ of regional integration as an end-goal for regionalism not only in Europe, but also in other regions. If the European project fails to deliver the expected outcomes of stability, well-being and solidarity, then it is likely that other regions will refrain from pushing for full-blown integration, perhaps privileging less demanding forms of cooperation. It also appears as if the EU ‘model’ of integration has been severely eroded by the global financial crisis and the turmoil in the Eurozone. There is indeed growing criticism of Eurocentric approaches to regionalism, not only among scholars, but also among leading policy makers. Especially, emerging powers in Africa, Asia and South America are becoming more assertive about the need to find different ways to promote regional governance in a world in which traditional power distributions are being fundamentally called into question. Moreover, the recent popular revolutions in North Africa and the Middle East are likely to reshape geostrategic equilibria in the Mediterranean and possibly usher in a new phase of regional cooperation within the Arab world and also with Europe.  

Citizens and regional governance

Citizens have been the underdogs of regionalism. From Europe, to Africa, Asia and Latin America, civil society has largely been on the receiving end of region-building processes. More often than not, civil society has been intentionally sidelined, while some sympathetic non-governmental organisations have been given the instrumental task of supporting institutions in their efforts at building a regional ‘identity’. In spite of rhetorical references to the importance of civic participation, regionalism has largely developed ‘without the citizens’.

Yet contemporary crises seem to bring ‘the people’ back into the picture, at least insofar as various attempts at regional cooperation and integration stumble upon the ideas, values and expectations of the citizens. The Euro-crisis is not just a matter of scarce liquidity and overexposure of a few national governments and most private banks. It is first and foremost a legitimacy crisis, which is revealing the fundamental limitations of an elite-driven regionalism model. Not disputing the pivotal role that European political elites played in setting the integration process in motion, there is little doubt that ‘deep integration’ will only be achieved when European citizens will have a say over the type of developmental trajectory that the EU should adopt as well as its ultimate goals. Looking at the astonishing amount of public resources channelled to rescue private banks in comparison to the harsh austerity plans enforced on allegedly profligate Member States, one cannot help but ask the question: what actual interests drive regionalism in the world?

Most observers have been traditionally looking at regionalization processes as politically neutral phenomena in international affairs. Research in this field has been generally restricted to the ‘quantity’ of regionalism, rather than its ‘quality’. Whether it is to explain the gradual devolution of authority from nation states to supranational institutions (as is the case with neo-functionalism) or whether it is to demonstrate the continuous bargaining process involving national governments (as is the case with intergovernmentalism), mainstream approaches to regional cooperation and integration have refrained from looking at the quality of regionalization processes. Will there be more or fewer regions in the world? Will regional institutions replace the nation state? Will regional governance become predominant in the years to come? Granted, these are very important questions and deserve to be examined in depth, especially in academic circles. Yet, the current crises force us to assess the state of regionalism in the world not only in terms of its predominance and diffusion, but also – and more importantly – in terms of how it contributes, if any, towards the well-being of our societies.  

Most ‘models’ and ‘practices’ of regionalism have tended to exclude the diversity of voices and roles in society. They have often served the specific interests of ruling elites (as in Latin America and Africa), the ambitions of hegemonic actors (as in Europe and Asia) or the agendas of industrial and financial powers. Moreover, through their apparently neutral technocratic character, most attempts at regional cooperation and integration have aimed to obscure the fact that there are always winners and losers in regionalism processes. 

This top-down model is being increasingly challenged. Overlapping crises and the redistribution of power at the global level call into question the capacity of regions to deliver on their promises, thus unveiling the unavoidable political character of any model of regionalism. In response to the growing cost of regionalism, citizens want to have more say over future regional trajectories and exercise their democratic powers. As a consequence, regionalism is evolving from a ‘closed’ process, designed and packaged by a small circle of political and economic elites, to an ‘open’ process, in which democratic participation and accountability are playing an ever more important role. Borrowing from the jargon of Internet users, one may say that regions are transitioning from a 1.0 phase dominated by technocrats to a 2.0 stage characterised by horizontal networks, alternative models and citizens’ contestations.

The EU, undoubtedly the most advanced and successful example of regionalism in the world, is now experiencing the direst consequences of such a transition. Amid rising unemployment, social malaise and growing discontent for the lack of accountability of national and regional politics, millions of citizens have been protesting against the Union and its political and economic agenda. Contrary to what eurosceptics would have us believe, these citizens do not call for less Europe: they want a different Europe. They would like regional integration to be more about connecting cultures and individuals and less about supporting capital. They would like their regional institutions to focus on helping the unemployed rather than bailing out bankrupt banks. They would like to see more solidarity across classes and generations, rather than less. They would like cooperation to be about building a different future instead of reshuffling old ideas. The future of regionalism may very well entail a growing ‘politicisation’ of regions, whereby citizens and civil society demand more voice and power in influencing not just general principles and values, but also the long-term political trajectories of their regions.

 

Source: Open Democracy

por Kintto Lucas

ALAI AMLATINA, treat 16/07/2013.- En los últimos años, pharm América del Sur ha dado pasos decisivos en su camino hacia la integración regional. Conscientes de los desafíos que ha generado la globalización y que se han evidenciado en las crisis económicas y políticas internacionales, buy así como en la proliferación de actividades ilícitas transnacionales que traspasan las capacidades individuales de los Estados, algunos países han comenzado a entender que las ventajas de una mayor cooperación e intercambio comercial no son el objetivo final, sino que es necesario coordinar respuestas en políticas económicas y fiscales, pero también sociales, en manejo de recursos naturales, temas ambientales, de defensa y en otros ámbitos, para enfrentar las amenazas. Pero sobre todo, que en el mundo que se va configurando es imposible caminar solos, y es fundamental caminar en colectivo

Para reforzar la integración es necesario incrementar los niveles de interdependencia económica y comercial en la región. Es un camino complejo pero no imposible. Falta todavía profundizar en una mirada colectiva y dejar de mirarse cada uno al ombligo. Es necesario que las economías más grandes sean más solidarias con las economías pequeñas, pero también es fundamental que éstas busquen un desarrollo propio, dejen de ser parasitarias y no se escondan detrás la farsa de revender productos traídos de otros países sin incorporar agregado nacional o solo colocando una etiqueta de industria nacional.

De a poco América del Sur se va alejando de la teoría de integración regional que promueve el divorcio entre Economía y Política, y que terminó por arrastrar a muchos países a la falacia del “mercado auto regulador” como promotor del desarrollo. Sin embargo, es preocupante observar que después de las nefastas experiencias con la aplicación de la terapias de shock de mercado –en palabras de Naomi Klein-, este tipo de medidas políticas se siguen vendiendo desde algunos países de la OCDE, organizaciones financieras multilaterales, sectores políticos de derecha y ciertos empresarios, como la panacea para la proyección económica de nuestros países.

Desde el Norte se promueven los tratados de libre comercio y la liberalización y desregulación financiera, así como la privatización y la flexibilización del mercado de trabajo como los mecanismos fundamentales para la integración a la economía internacional. En América del Sur hay quienes escuchan esos cantos de sirena y defienden la necesidad urgente de crear un área de libre comercio estilo ALCA. Pretenden así reponer los fracasos del modelo neoliberal.

La integración regional de Suramérica debe recuperar el rol del Estado sobre el mercado, y de la sociedad sobre el Estado y el mercado. Los Estados Suramericanos integrados deben controlar el mercado suramericano integrado. Y la sociedad suramericana debe jugar un papel fundamental con su participación para controlar los Estados y los mercados integrados. Esa integración debe generar vías para un modelo de desarrollo que permita la proyección de cada país y la proyección conjunta. La eficacia y el aprovechamiento de las sinergias regionales dependen de la capacidad de entender que es un proyecto colectivo, no individual, y del tejido institucional que se consolide en el proceso de integración.

Fortalecer y profundizar la integración en América del Sur, pasa por fortalecer y profundizar Unasur, y en ese camino es fundamental fortalecer y profundizar el Mercosur caminando hacia un Mercosur Suramericano. Pero eso depende de la capacidad que muestren nuestros Estados para reconfigurar sus estructuras productivas. Esto será posible si los gobiernos van de a poco trascendiendo el ámbito de la mera racionalidad económica y se comprometen en la construcción de una Política Económica Común e Inclusiva, que aproveche las ventajas de la región en recursos alimenticios, hídricos, materias primas industriales y energéticas, generando una integración productiva y la complementariedad entre los países.

En el nuevo orden mundial, la importancia de América del Sur en la economía internacional es innegable. Es uno de los polos económicos más dinámicos. Actualmente, el PIB de los países de la Suramérica representa el 73 por ciento del de América Latina y el Caribe, que a su vez representa el 8 por ciento del comercio mundial. A pesar del peso económico, la matriz productiva y exportadora de nuestros países continúa centrada en el sector primario y en las manufacturas intensivas en materias primas y recursos naturales. Este fenómeno responde a los altos precios de los commodities en el mercado internacional, pero también a la concentración de la inversión, tanto nacional como extranjera, en la explotación de materias primas. Como consecuencia, los países suramericanos enfrentan la amenaza de la desindustrialización y reprimariziación de sus economías. Estos procesos conllevan el aparecimiento de enclaves productivos cuya generación de riqueza no se transmite al total de la economía, dadas las escasas concatenaciones productivas que generan y la fuga de capitales en forma de repatriación de ganancias y beneficios y de incremento desmedido de las importaciones. Esos enclaves, muchas veces son parte de la parasitaria inversión extranjera que no paga impuestos y aporta muy poco a nuestros países.

La forma independiente que los países suramericanos han concebido su desarrollo económico, ha dado origen al establecimiento de estructuras productivas orientadas a satisfacer solamente necesidades extra regionales, llevando a que la dinámica económica de los países de la región contribuya en poco o nada a la dinámica económica colectiva de la región. Debido a este modo individualista de concebir el crecimiento económico y de aplicar políticas comerciales fundamentadas en aperturismos indiscriminados, la mayor parte de las economías suramericanas han experimentado procesos de desmantelamiento productivo o pérdida de dinamismo económico en los sectores industriales. Paralelamente grandes segmentos de nuestras poblaciones ven disminuir el desempleo pero crecer el empleo precario. Y observan que, si bien se nota una clara disminución de la pobreza, la desigualdad se mantiene y a veces es más evidente.

Es necesario que la integración económica suramericana gire en torno a la articulación de las economías nacionales, que las estructuras productivas busquen satisfacer las necesidades de los habitantes de la región, de modo que podamos desarrollar nuestros sectores manufactureros y de servicios. En ese sentido se debe asegurar las condiciones jurídicas y técnicas para promover inversiones productivas regionales. Y finalmente hay que configurar ordenamientos productivos que contribuyan a que todas y cada una de las economías de la región alcancen niveles altos de competitividad para poder, en otra fase, competir en los mercados de servicios y manufacturas de mediano y alto valor agregado internacionales.

En el difícil camino hacia un Mercosur Suramericano, Mercosur debe transformarse en la cabeza de puente para formar un bloque comercial suramericano, que se rija por los principios de solidaridad, complementariedad y consideración de las asimetrías en los niveles de desarrollo económico y social de los diferentes miembros, que priorice el papel del Estado, que tenga como finalidad el bienestar de la población en lugar de las ganancias del gran capital, y que sirva como ejemplo de un modelo de regionalismo diferente, frente a los esquemas tradicionales que se basan en el fundamentalismo de mercado.

– Kintto Lucas es Embajador Itinerante de Uruguay para Unasur, Celac y Alba. Ex Vicecanciller de Ecuador.

Fuente: http://alainet.org/active/65704&lang=es

por Kintto Lucas

ALAI AMLATINA, 16/07/2013.- En los últimos años,
América del Sur ha dado pasos decisivos en su camino hacia la integración regional. Conscientes de los desafíos que ha generado la globalización y que se han evidenciado en las crisis económicas y políticas internacionales, check así como en la proliferación de actividades ilícitas transnacionales que traspasan las capacidades individuales de los Estados, algunos países han comenzado a entender que las ventajas de una mayor cooperación e intercambio comercial no son el objetivo final, sino que es necesario coordinar respuestas en políticas económicas y fiscales, pero también sociales, en manejo de recursos naturales, temas ambientales, de defensa y en otros ámbitos, para enfrentar las amenazas. Pero sobre todo, que en el mundo que se va configurando es imposible caminar solos, y es fundamental caminar en colectivo

Para reforzar la integración es necesario incrementar los niveles de interdependencia económica y comercial en la región. Es un camino complejo pero no imposible. Falta todavía profundizar en una mirada colectiva y dejar de mirarse cada uno al ombligo. Es necesario que las economías más grandes sean más solidarias con las economías pequeñas, pero también es fundamental que éstas busquen un desarrollo propio, dejen de ser parasitarias y no se escondan detrás la farsa de revender productos traídos de otros países sin incorporar agregado nacional o solo colocando una etiqueta de industria nacional.

De a poco América del Sur se va alejando de la teoría de integración regional que promueve el divorcio entre Economía y Política, y que terminó por arrastrar a muchos países a la falacia del “mercado auto regulador” como promotor del desarrollo. Sin embargo, es preocupante observar que después de las nefastas experiencias con la aplicación de la terapias de shock de mercado –en palabras de Naomi Klein-, este tipo de medidas políticas se siguen vendiendo desde algunos países de la OCDE, organizaciones financieras multilaterales, sectores políticos de derecha y ciertos empresarios, como la panacea para la proyección económica de nuestros países.

Desde el Norte se promueven los tratados de libre comercio y la liberalización y desregulación financiera, así como la privatización y la flexibilización del mercado de trabajo como los mecanismos fundamentales para la integración a la economía internacional. En América del Sur hay quienes escuchan esos cantos de sirena y defienden la necesidad urgente de crear un área de libre comercio estilo ALCA. Pretenden así reponer los fracasos del modelo neoliberal.

La integración regional de Suramérica debe recuperar el rol del Estado sobre el mercado, y de la sociedad sobre el Estado y el mercado. Los Estados Suramericanos integrados deben controlar el mercado suramericano integrado. Y la sociedad suramericana debe jugar un papel fundamental con su participación para controlar los Estados y los mercados integrados. Esa integración debe generar vías para un modelo de desarrollo que permita la proyección de cada país y la proyección conjunta. La eficacia y el aprovechamiento de las sinergias regionales dependen de la capacidad de entender que es un proyecto colectivo, no individual, y del tejido institucional que se consolide en el proceso de integración.

Fortalecer y profundizar la integración en América del Sur, pasa por fortalecer y profundizar Unasur, y en ese camino es fundamental fortalecer y profundizar el Mercosur caminando hacia un Mercosur Suramericano. Pero eso depende de la capacidad que muestren nuestros Estados para reconfigurar sus estructuras productivas. Esto será posible si los gobiernos van de a poco trascendiendo el ámbito de la mera racionalidad económica y se comprometen en la construcción de una Política Económica Común e Inclusiva, que aproveche las ventajas de la región en recursos alimenticios, hídricos, materias primas industriales y energéticas, generando una integración productiva y la complementariedad entre los países.

En el nuevo orden mundial, la importancia de América del Sur en la economía internacional es innegable. Es uno de los polos económicos más dinámicos. Actualmente, el PIB de los países de la Suramérica representa el 73 por ciento del de América Latina y el Caribe, que a su vez representa el 8 por ciento del comercio mundial. A pesar del peso económico, la matriz productiva y exportadora de nuestros países continúa centrada en el sector primario y en las manufacturas intensivas en materias primas y recursos naturales. Este fenómeno responde a los altos precios de los commodities en el mercado internacional, pero también a la concentración de la inversión, tanto nacional como extranjera, en la explotación de materias primas. Como consecuencia, los países suramericanos enfrentan la amenaza de la desindustrialización y reprimariziación de sus economías. Estos procesos conllevan el aparecimiento de enclaves productivos cuya generación de riqueza no se transmite al total de la economía, dadas las escasas concatenaciones productivas que generan y la fuga de capitales en forma de repatriación de ganancias y beneficios y de incremento desmedido de las importaciones. Esos enclaves, muchas veces son parte de la parasitaria inversión extranjera que no paga impuestos y aporta muy poco a nuestros países.

La forma independiente que los países suramericanos han concebido su desarrollo económico, ha dado origen al establecimiento de estructuras productivas orientadas a satisfacer solamente necesidades extra regionales, llevando a que la dinámica económica de los países de la región contribuya en poco o nada a la dinámica económica colectiva de la región. Debido a este modo individualista de concebir el crecimiento económico y de aplicar políticas comerciales fundamentadas en aperturismos indiscriminados, la mayor parte de las economías suramericanas han experimentado procesos de desmantelamiento productivo o pérdida de dinamismo económico en los sectores industriales. Paralelamente grandes segmentos de nuestras poblaciones ven disminuir el desempleo pero crecer el empleo precario. Y observan que, si bien se nota una clara disminución de la pobreza, la desigualdad se mantiene y a veces es más evidente.

Es necesario que la integración económica suramericana gire en torno a la articulación de las economías nacionales, que las estructuras productivas busquen satisfacer las necesidades de los habitantes de la región, de modo que podamos desarrollar nuestros sectores manufactureros y de servicios. En ese sentido se debe asegurar las condiciones jurídicas y técnicas para promover inversiones productivas regionales. Y finalmente hay que configurar ordenamientos productivos que contribuyan a que todas y cada una de las economías de la región alcancen niveles altos de competitividad para poder, en otra fase, competir en los mercados de servicios y manufacturas de mediano y alto valor agregado internacionales.

En el difícil camino hacia un Mercosur Suramericano, Mercosur debe transformarse en la cabeza de puente para formar un bloque comercial suramericano, que se rija por los principios de solidaridad, complementariedad y consideración de las asimetrías en los niveles de desarrollo económico y social de los diferentes miembros, que priorice el papel del Estado, que tenga como finalidad el bienestar de la población en lugar de las ganancias del gran capital, y que sirva como ejemplo de un modelo de regionalismo diferente, frente a los esquemas tradicionales que se basan en el fundamentalismo de mercado.

– Kintto Lucas es Embajador Itinerante de Uruguay para Unasur, Celac y Alba. Ex Vicecanciller de Ecuador.

Fuente: http://alainet.org/active/65704&lang=es

16 July by Eric Toussaint

 

Interview by Monique Van Dieren and Claudia Benedetto for Contrastes magazine |1|.

The EU and the Eurozone were created solely to favour capital and apply its principles: total liberty of movement for capital,
free circulation of goods and services, unrestricted commercial competition and the undermining of the very principle of public services, among others.

Capital is given a free rein to maximise its profits, wrongly supposing that if private initiative is favoured all will be well. In following this principle and in reducing state intervention to a minimum in terms of regulations and budgets, we now have a Europe which costs only 1% of its GDP whereas the budgets of the most industrialised countries are at about 40% to 50% of their GDP! This 1% is scrawny and nearly half of it goes to the Common Agricultural Policy. In consequence Europe has not developed the means to reduce the differences between its strongest economies and the others. When these economies are put onto the same playing field their differences are aggravated.

Are there other points of division?

Not only do we have opposition between, on the one hand, countries like Greece, Ireland , Portugal, Spain and the East European countries, and on the other hand, the strongest EU countries, but also inside each of these countries, where income disparities have increased following reforms of the labour markets.
The policies that have been applied by the EU member states have contributed to these inequalities. A prime example is Germany, where counter-reforms, that aim to create a greater variety of employment models, have been put into place. There are currently 7 million full time employees earning less than 400 euros a month!

Tax policy is known to be at the heart of the European problem and of the indebtedness of member states. How can the fact that most European countries are maintaining internal competition be explained?

Europe has refused fiscal harmonisation. The result is that there is enormous disparity between systems of taxation. In Cyprus, corporation tax is 10%. That should change with the present crisis. In Ireland corporation tax is 12.5% and in Belgium, 33.99%. These differences allow companies to declare their revenues where the tax bite is the least. Current European fiscal policy protects tax evasion. Tax havens exist within the European Union – notably the City of London – and the Eurozone, with the Grand Duchy of Luxemburg.

It is quite possible to implement measures of fiscal justice at a national level. The common belief that “being in the Eurozone it is impossible to apply major fiscal measures” is false. We are told there are no alternatives. Those who invoke these arguments are protecting the fraudsters. We can see that solutions previously considered impossible are being imagined in the “case” of Cyprus: bank deposits of over 100,000 euros are to be taxed; controls of capital movements are being put into place. I am against the plan imposed on Cyprus by the Troika because the goals are to impose global antisocial policies; but certain measures show the clear possibility of controlling capital flows and of greatly increasing tax-rates above a given level of wealth.
In spite of EU regulations, it is perfectly possible for countries to refuse the policies of the commission and impose renegotiations at the European level. Europe must be reconstructed democratically. In the meantime the left-wing governments must break ranks. If François Hollande really represented the will of the French people that elected him he would have insisted on renegotiating the European Fiscal Compact with Angela Merkel and if she refused he could have refused to vote it in. This would have prevented its adoption.

The euro crisis is clearly the result of an absence of sound political governance (lack of coherent economic, financial, fiscal and social policies). The lack of real European support for Greece in the face of its debt problems shows the fragility of a union that is not based on solidarity. Does this euro crisis toll the bell for European solidarity? Is the dream of European federalism dead and buried?

The EU as it exists has never hinged on solidarity, unless it be in favour of the big European companies. The European governments have continually applied measures that favour them and the European banks. When it comes to helping the weaker people and the weaker economies, there is no solidarity. One could say that there is one kind of solidarity: a class solidarity, a solidarity between capitalists.
Federalism is possible but it must be constituted by the peoples. Guy Verhofstadt and Daniel Cohn-Bendit advocate a federalism imposed from above. We need a federalism that arises from the will of the people.
Federation is possible and necessary, but that implies that the solution to the European crisis should come from the base. That does not mean a withdrawal behind national frontiers, but solidarity between European peoples and a European constitution decided by the people themselves.

What must be done to make the European institutions more democratic?

The existing non democratic institutions must be taken apart and replaced by new ones, created by a peoples’ constituent assembly! The legislative power (the European Parliament) is extremely weak, too much in the thrall of the Executive.

Awaiting this miracle remedy, do you have a concrete idea of how to reconcile Europe’s citizens with Europe?

Within national frontiers, initiatives must be taken by the social movements and corresponding left-wing organisations towards defining common objectives. At the European level, through the Alter Summit movement, we are trying to create a maximum of convergence between citizens’ movements, social movements and European trade unions |2|. It is not easy, up to now it has been too slow, but a coalition of European social movements must nevertheless be created. Relaunching the “Indignés” movement must be encouraged if it is possible, supporting Blockupy in Frankfurt against the ECB. |3| Also, feminist movements and actions against austerity programmes in Europe must be given all possible support
 |4|. Along with this, other European initiatives must be reinforced, such as the the European and Mediterranean citizens’ audits networks (ICAN) |5|, the European network against the privatisation of health services |6| and the efforts to create a European anti-fascist movement |7|, the ” European peoples against the Troika”, which organised actions in dozens of towns and cities across Europe on 1st June 2013 |8|.

Europe has a purpose because…
Solidarity between the peoples is necessary and undoubtedly possible.

Europe has a purpose on condition that…
The process comes from the people. A constituent assembly of the European peoples must found a completely new Europe!
It is time to abandon the dominant ideology that has reigned for so long. There are several possible ways to resolve the crisis. The austerity measures currently applied can only make it worse. We are facing 10 to 15 years of crisis and very limited growth. Unless, that is, the social movements manage to put structural reforms into place, such as the socialisation of the banks; the consolidation of public services; the reconstruction of a Europe based on a peoples’constituent assembly; a Europe in solidarity with the rest of the World. Illegitimate public debt must also be abolished by developing initiatives of citizens’ audits as is the case in Belgium today |9|. This solution presupposes that the social movements and the radical left are capable of proposing real alternatives, with a coherent programme that goes beyond neo-Keynesianism. I would be disappointed if this capitalist crisis were to achieve no more than slightly better discipline. Regulated green capitalism is not a solution to the fundamental problem of climate change. We must abolish the capitalist system.

Translated by Vickie Briault and Mike Krolikowski

Footnotes

|1| The original version of this interview (in French only) is available on the Equipes populaires website which publishes Contrastes magazine: http://www.equipespopulaires.be/sit…

This version has been especially adapted for the CADTM website www.cadtm.org

|2| See http://www.altersummit.eu/

|3| See (in French only) http://cadtm.org/Francfort-ein-zwei…

|4| See (in French only) http://cadtm.org/Femmes-d-Europe-en… and http://cadtm.org/Une-tres-prometteu…

|5| See http://www.citizen-audit.net/ and http://cadtm.org/Coordinated-effort… and cadtm.org/ICAN

|6| See (in French only) http://reseau-europeen-droit-sante…. and http://www.sante-solidarite.be/acti…

|7| See http://cadtm.org/For-a-European-ant…

|8| See http://cadtm.org/From-the-crisis-ed…

|9| See (in French only) http://cadtm.org/Declaration-pour-l…

 

Source: http://cadtm.org/Eric-Toussaint-The-EU-has-never