Desafíos de la dimensión trabajo en las Américas. La sustentabilidad del desarrollo, y la urgencia de la Libertad sindical y la Negociación Colectiva

Letter from ACSC/APF 2012 Steering Committee on civil society inputs on ASEAN Human Rights Declaration (AHRD).

 

Phnom Penh, advice 24 April 2012

H.E. Om Yentieng

Chairperson

ASEAN Intergovernmental Commission on Human Rights (AICHR)

No. 3, Samdech Hun Sen Street,

Sangkat Tonle Bassac, Khan Chamcarmon,

Phnom Penh, Cambodia

Fax: + 855 23 216 144/216 141

Cc:

H.E. Chet Chealy

Alternate Representative of Cambodia to AICHR

Cambodian Human Rights Committee (CHRC)

No.3, St. VI.13 Tuol Kork Village, Sangkat Tuol Sangke,

Khan Russey Keo, Phnom Penh

Tel. +855 23 882 065, Fax. +855 23 882 065

Email: chetchealy@gmail.com

Ms. Leena Ghosh,

Assistant Director

AIPA, ASEAN Foundation, AICHR and Other ASEAN Associated Entities Division

Community Affairs Development Directorate

Corporate and Community Affairs Department

ASEAN Secretariat

E-mail: leena.ghosh@asean.org

Re:      Submission of ACSC/APF 2012 related to ASEAN Human Rights Declaration

Dear Excellencies,

On behalf of the Civil Society Committee for ASEAN Civil Society Conference/ ASEAN Peoples’ Forum (ACSC/APF 2012), we are pleased to submit to you civil society’s aspirations related to ASEAN Human Rights Declaration (AHRD). More than 1,200 people attended the ACSC/APF 2012 that was organized in Lucky Star Hotel, Phnom Penh on 29-31 March 2012. They came from all ten ASEAN countries and beyond.

We also would like to use this opportunity to convey our interest to participate in the consultation that AICHR will be planning to do in the late June 2012. To ensure that the consultation would be meaningful, we encourage AICHR to make the draft available to the public. We understand that you value the trust and credibility from the people in ASEAN which can only be obtained through a transparent process.

Furthermore, we believe that AHRD is a very important document for the daily life of the people, which requires legitimacy from the population in ASEAN. With the advance of communication technology nowadays, AICHR could create a website to release the draft of AHRD which allows more public participation in making comments and inputs.

Please feel free to contact Steering Committee should you have further question or clarification at the email samath@ngoforum.org.kh and thida_khus@silaka.org. Hard copies will follow this email.

Please, Excellency, accept our highest consideration.

Chair, Steering Committee ACSC/APF 2012

Mr. Chhith Sam Ath                        Mrs. Thida Khus

 


 Aspirations of Civil Society’s during the ACSC/APF 2012 on ASEAN Human Rights Declaration

1.    We are deeply disappointed at the secret, exclusionary and opaque drafting process of the ASEAN Human Rights Declaration (AHRD). The ASEAN Intergovernmental Commission on Human Rights (AICHR) has failed to consult ASEAN civil society to a meaningful extent on the regional level, and only a few representatives consulted on the national level. A draft produced by the Drafting Group in January was never officially published. CSO submissions were left without response, resulting in CSOs being left in the dark as to whether their input has been taken into account.

 2.    Substantively, the Working Draft, which has not been officially published, discloses worrying tendencies among the drafters which, if they prevail, would provide the ASEAN people with a lower level of human rights protection than in universal and other regional instruments. There is heavy emphasis on concepts such as duties, national and regional particularities and noninterference – all of which may be abused to legitimise human rights violations.

 3.    Problematic terms such as “good citizens” and “public morality” may open the door to abusive and discriminatory interpretations, in particular regarding women, LGBTIQ people, children, IPs and minorities and other often-marginalised groups. Several provisions for specific rights are inadequate, open to abuse, or else are missing key components. Thus freedom of expression and assembly, freedom of LGBTIQ people from discrimination and gender rights are not properly provided for.

 4.    We recommend that the AICHR, ASEAN and/or its Member States:

  • Immediately publicize the most current draft of AHRD so that civil society can participate substantively in the drafting process;
  • Continue and expand meaningful consultations on national level, in particular by those AICHR representatives who have not yet done so;
  • Conduct wide-ranging and inclusive consultations, at both national and regional levels, during which the latest drafts of the AHRD should be discussed. AICHR should seriously consider submissions from CSOs, national human rights institutes and other stakeholders, and provide them with feedback;
  • Translate drafts of the AHRD into national languages and other local languages of the ASEAN countries in order to encourage broader public engagement in the region;
  • Include a) the “Right to Peace”, b)  sexual orientation and gender identity (SOGI) provision AHRD – specifically the inclusion of reference to ‘gender identity’ and ‘sexual orientation’, and c) sexual reproductive health and rights in AHRD;

 5.    Recommendation in regard to women’s human rights perspectives in AHRD:

  • AHRD should enable women’s access to justice in Southeast Asia;
  • ASEAN governments take all appropriate measures to modify or abolish laws, regulations, customs and practices which limit women from enjoying their fundamental freedoms and rights;
  • Women’s human rights perspectives, reflected in the CEDAW and the Vienna Declaration and Programme of Action must be integrated into AHRD;
  • There is no erosion of rights in the AHRD and no inclusion of ‘morality, moral value

or traditional values’ clauses that serve to undermine rights; and

  • The AHRD drafting process must be subjected to public consultation and must involve women.

 

DOWNLOAD LETTER IN PDF

Letter from ACSC/APF 2012 Steering Committee on civil society inputs on ASEAN Human Rights Declaration (AHRD)

DOWNLOAD LETTER IN PDF


 Aspirations of Civil Society’s during the ACSC/APF 2012 on ASEAN Human Rights Declaration

1.    We are deeply disappointed at the secret, exclusionary and opaque drafting process of the ASEAN Human Rights Declaration (AHRD). The ASEAN Intergovernmental Commission on Human Rights (AICHR) has failed to consult ASEAN civil society to a meaningful extent on the regional level, sovaldi and only a few representatives consulted on the national level. A draft produced by the Drafting Group in January was never officially published. CSO submissions were left without response, resulting in CSOs being left in the dark as to whether their input has been taken into account.

 2.    Substantively, the Working Draft, which has not been officially published, discloses worrying tendencies among the drafters which, if they prevail, would provide the ASEAN people with a lower level of human rights protection than in universal and other regional instruments. There is heavy emphasis on concepts such as duties, national and regional particularities and noninterference – all of which may be abused to legitimise human rights violations.

 3.    Problematic terms such as “good citizens” and “public morality” may open the door to abusive and discriminatory interpretations, in particular regarding women, LGBTIQ people, children, IPs and minorities and other often-marginalised groups. Several provisions for specific rights are inadequate, open to abuse, or else are missing key components. Thus freedom of expression and assembly, freedom of LGBTIQ people from discrimination and gender rights are not properly provided for.

 4.    We recommend that the AICHR, ASEAN and/or its Member States:

  • Immediately publicize the most current draft of AHRD so that civil society can participate substantively in the drafting process;
  • Continue and expand meaningful consultations on national level, in particular by those AICHR representatives who have not yet done so;
  • Conduct wide-ranging and inclusive consultations, at both national and regional levels, during which the latest drafts of the AHRD should be discussed. AICHR should seriously consider submissions from CSOs, national human rights institutes and other stakeholders, and provide them with feedback;
  • Translate drafts of the AHRD into national languages and other local languages of the ASEAN countries in order to encourage broader public engagement in the region;
  • Include a) the “Right to Peace”, b)  sexual orientation and gender identity (SOGI) provision AHRD – specifically the inclusion of reference to ‘gender identity’ and ‘sexual orientation’, and c) sexual reproductive health and rights in AHRD;

 5.    Recommendation in regard to women’s human rights perspectives in AHRD:

  • AHRD should enable women’s access to justice in Southeast Asia;
  • ASEAN governments take all appropriate measures to modify or abolish laws, regulations, customs and practices which limit women from enjoying their fundamental freedoms and rights;
  • Women’s human rights perspectives, reflected in the CEDAW and the Vienna Declaration and Programme of Action must be integrated into AHRD;
  • There is no erosion of rights in the AHRD and no inclusion of ‘morality, moral value

or traditional values’ clauses that serve to undermine rights; and

  • The AHRD drafting process must be subjected to public consultation and must involve women.

 

Phnom Penh, 24 April 2012

H.E. Om Yentieng

Chairperson

ASEAN Intergovernmental Commission on Human Rights (AICHR)

No. 3, Samdech Hun Sen Street,

Sangkat Tonle Bassac, Khan Chamcarmon,

Phnom Penh, Cambodia

Fax: + 855 23 216 144/216 141

Cc:

H.E. Chet Chealy

Alternate Representative of Cambodia to AICHR

Cambodian Human Rights Committee (CHRC)

No.3, St. VI.13 Tuol Kork Village, Sangkat Tuol Sangke,

Khan Russey Keo, Phnom Penh

Tel. +855 23 882 065, Fax. +855 23 882 065

Email: chetchealy@gmail.com

Ms. Leena Ghosh,

Assistant Director

AIPA, ASEAN Foundation, AICHR and Other ASEAN Associated Entities Division

Community Affairs Development Directorate

Corporate and Community Affairs Department

ASEAN Secretariat

E-mail: leena.ghosh@asean.org

Re:      Submission of ACSC/APF 2012 related to ASEAN Human Rights Declaration

Dear Excellencies,

On behalf of the Civil Society Committee for ASEAN Civil Society Conference/ ASEAN Peoples’ Forum (ACSC/APF 2012), we are pleased to submit to you civil society’s aspirations related to ASEAN Human Rights Declaration (AHRD). More than 1,200 people attended the ACSC/APF 2012 that was organized in Lucky Star Hotel, Phnom Penh on 29-31 March 2012. They came from all ten ASEAN countries and beyond.

We also would like to use this opportunity to convey our interest to participate in the consultation that AICHR will be planning to do in the late June 2012. To ensure that the consultation would be meaningful, we encourage AICHR to make the draft available to the public. We understand that you value the trust and credibility from the people in ASEAN which can only be obtained through a transparent process.

Furthermore, we believe that AHRD is a very important document for the daily life of the people, which requires legitimacy from the population in ASEAN. With the advance of communication technology nowadays, AICHR could create a website to release the draft of AHRD which allows more public participation in making comments and inputs.

Please feel free to contact Steering Committee should you have further question or clarification at the email samath@ngoforum.org.kh and thida_khus@silaka.org. Hard copies will follow this email.

Please, Excellency, accept our highest consideration.

Chair, Steering Committee ACSC/APF 2012

Mr. Chhith Sam Ath                        Mrs. Thida Khus


Letter from ACSC/APF 2012 Steering Committee on civil society inputs on ASEAN Human Rights Declaration (AHRD).

 

Phnom Penh, shop 24 April 2012

H.E. Om Yentieng

Chairperson

ASEAN Intergovernmental Commission on Human Rights (AICHR)

No. 3, for sale Samdech Hun Sen Street,

Sangkat Tonle Bassac, Khan Chamcarmon,

Phnom Penh, Cambodia

Fax: + 855 23 216 144/216 141

Cc:

H.E. Chet Chealy

Alternate Representative of Cambodia to AICHR

Cambodian Human Rights Committee (CHRC)

No.3, St. VI.13 Tuol Kork Village, Sangkat Tuol Sangke,

Khan Russey Keo, Phnom Penh

Tel. +855 23 882 065, Fax. +855 23 882 065

Email: chetchealy@gmail.com

Ms. Leena Ghosh,

Assistant Director

AIPA, ASEAN Foundation, AICHR and Other ASEAN Associated Entities Division

Community Affairs Development Directorate

Corporate and Community Affairs Department

ASEAN Secretariat

E-mail: leena.ghosh@asean.org

Re:      Submission of ACSC/APF 2012 related to ASEAN Human Rights Declaration

Dear Excellencies,

On behalf of the Civil Society Committee for ASEAN Civil Society Conference/ ASEAN Peoples’ Forum (ACSC/APF 2012), we are pleased to submit to you civil society’s aspirations related to ASEAN Human Rights Declaration (AHRD). More than 1,200 people attended the ACSC/APF 2012 that was organized in Lucky Star Hotel, Phnom Penh on 29-31 March 2012. They came from all ten ASEAN countries and beyond.

We also would like to use this opportunity to convey our interest to participate in the consultation that AICHR will be planning to do in the late June 2012. To ensure that the consultation would be meaningful, we encourage AICHR to make the draft available to the public. We understand that you value the trust and credibility from the people in ASEAN which can only be obtained through a transparent process.

Furthermore, we believe that AHRD is a very important document for the daily life of the people, which requires legitimacy from the population in ASEAN. With the advance of communication technology nowadays, AICHR could create a website to release the draft of AHRD which allows more public participation in making comments and inputs.

Please feel free to contact Steering Committee should you have further question or clarification at the email samath@ngoforum.org.kh and thida_khus@silaka.org. Hard copies will follow this email.

Please, Excellency, accept our highest consideration.

Chair, Steering Committee ACSC/APF 2012

Mr. Chhith Sam Ath                        Mrs. Thida Khus

 


 Aspirations of Civil Society’s during the ACSC/APF 2012 on ASEAN Human Rights Declaration

1.    We are deeply disappointed at the secret, exclusionary and opaque drafting process of the ASEAN Human Rights Declaration (AHRD). The ASEAN Intergovernmental Commission on Human Rights (AICHR) has failed to consult ASEAN civil society to a meaningful extent on the regional level, and only a few representatives consulted on the national level. A draft produced by the Drafting Group in January was never officially published. CSO submissions were left without response, resulting in CSOs being left in the dark as to whether their input has been taken into account.

 2.    Substantively, the Working Draft, which has not been officially published, discloses worrying tendencies among the drafters which, if they prevail, would provide the ASEAN people with a lower level of human rights protection than in universal and other regional instruments. There is heavy emphasis on concepts such as duties, national and regional particularities and noninterference – all of which may be abused to legitimise human rights violations.

 3.    Problematic terms such as “good citizens” and “public morality” may open the door to abusive and discriminatory interpretations, in particular regarding women, LGBTIQ people, children, IPs and minorities and other often-marginalised groups. Several provisions for specific rights are inadequate, open to abuse, or else are missing key components. Thus freedom of expression and assembly, freedom of LGBTIQ people from discrimination and gender rights are not properly provided for.

 4.    We recommend that the AICHR, ASEAN and/or its Member States:

  • Immediately publicize the most current draft of AHRD so that civil society can participate substantively in the drafting process;
  • Continue and expand meaningful consultations on national level, in particular by those AICHR representatives who have not yet done so;
  • Conduct wide-ranging and inclusive consultations, at both national and regional levels, during which the latest drafts of the AHRD should be discussed. AICHR should seriously consider submissions from CSOs, national human rights institutes and other stakeholders, and provide them with feedback;
  • Translate drafts of the AHRD into national languages and other local languages of the ASEAN countries in order to encourage broader public engagement in the region;
  • Include a) the “Right to Peace”, b)  sexual orientation and gender identity (SOGI) provision AHRD – specifically the inclusion of reference to ‘gender identity’ and ‘sexual orientation’, and c) sexual reproductive health and rights in AHRD;

 5.    Recommendation in regard to women’s human rights perspectives in AHRD:

  • AHRD should enable women’s access to justice in Southeast Asia;
  • ASEAN governments take all appropriate measures to modify or abolish laws, regulations, customs and practices which limit women from enjoying their fundamental freedoms and rights;
  • Women’s human rights perspectives, reflected in the CEDAW and the Vienna Declaration and Programme of Action must be integrated into AHRD;
  • There is no erosion of rights in the AHRD and no inclusion of ‘morality, moral value

or traditional values’ clauses that serve to undermine rights; and

  • The AHRD drafting process must be subjected to public consultation and must involve women.

 

DOWNLOAD LETTER IN PDF

Bangkok, and online 27 April, prescription for sale (Asian Tribune.com):The performance of the ASEAN Intergovernmental Commission on Human Rights (AICHR) has been disappointing and wanting, epitomized by the lack of transparency, failure to consult with civil society organizations and no demonstrable progress in protecting and promoting human rights, according to a civil society assessment report on the performance of the AICHR for the period of October 2010 to December 2011.

The report, titled “A Commission Shrouded in Secrecy”, was released jointly on Thursday by the Solidarity for Asian People’s Advocacy Task Force on ASEAN and Human Rights (SAPA TFAHR) and the Asian Forum for Human Rights and Development (FORUM-ASIA).

The civil society coalition said a total reform is needed if the AICHR is to become more independent from the governments, more effective in responding to human rights violations and more relevant to the needs of the peoples in the region.

The report revealed that AICHR has systematically failed to make public any of the official documents adopted since its inception in 2009. This includes its first annual report, which was submitted to the 44th ASEAN Ministerial Meeting in July 2011.

Other official AICHR documents that have not been made public include the Guidelines on Operations of the AICHR, the Terms of Reference of the Drafting Group of the ASEAN Human Rights Declaration, the Terms of Reference of the Baseline Study on Corporate Social Responsibility and Human Rights in ASEAN, the Rules of Procedure for the AICHR Fund, the first annual report of the AICHR, the AICHR Work Plan 2013-2015, its 2012 Priority Programme and its budget, and the Terms of Reference of the Thematic Study of the Right to Peace.

“We are extremely concerned that AICHR has not even made the draft ASEAN Human Rights Declaration available for public comments. It is ironic that the peoples in the region do not have the right to access a document that is supposed to protect their human rights,” said Yap Swee Seng, executive director of FORUM-ASIA during the launch of the report.

The report found that the AICHR has continued to refuse meetings with civil society organizations and national human rights institutions in the region despite numerous requests made.

The report further slammed the AICHR for discriminating against civil society organizations in Southeast Asia whom it refused to meet, but on the other hand did not hesitate to meet with a range of international civil society organizations, including Human Rights Watch (HRW), Amnesty International (AI), the International Federation of Human Rights (FIDH) and Freedom House during its official visits to the United States and Europe.

“While we welcome the meetings between the AICHR with international human rights organizations and note that such engagements should be encouraged, the Commission’s refusal to meet with civil society organizations from its own region when it had no qualms in meeting with international civil society organizations is simply a practice of double standards,” stressed Chalida Tajaroensuk, executive director of People’s Empowerment Foundation of Thailand, a member of the SAPA TFAHR.

SAPA TFAHR first requested for a meeting with the AICHR during its first official meeting in March 2010. The request was rejected on the grounds that the AICHR had yet to establish its rules of procedure and therefore could not meet with civil society. The performance report of AICHR shows that the Commission only granted meeting request from only a single civil society organization – the Working Group for an ASEAN Human Rights Mechanism – ostensibly on the basis that they are listed as stakeholders recognized by ASEAN under Annex II of the ASEAN Charter.

The report also raised concern over the AICHR’s failures in concluding any of the studies that it has undertaken, in concretely responding to real human rights situations – either in the region generally or in specific member states – and most worryingly, failed to improve the human rights of even a single individual within the ASEAN regional, two years after its establishment.

The AICHR has identified three thematic issues for further study, namely migration, corporate social responsibility and human rights and the right to peace. So far, the terms of reference for these studies have not been made public. It was also expected to give its advisory opinion to the ASEAN member states on the issue of mandatory HIV test for migrant workers but to date has still failed to do so.

The report made numerous recommendations to the AICHR. Key among them are for the AICHR to be more transparent by publishing relevant documents, including the draft ASEAN Human Rights Declaration, via a dedicated website; and to institutionalize regular consultations at national and regional levels with key stakeholders, especially the civil society organizations, national human rights institutions and the ASEAN Commission on the Promotion and Protection of the Rights of Women and Children (ACWC).

“The AICHR must strive to improve its transparency and engagement with civil society in the coming years. Otherwise, it risks being an irrelevant body to the peoples in the region,” said Saowalak Thongkuay, Regional Development Office of the Disable Peoples’ International Asia Pacific.

Source: http://www.asiantribune.com/news/2012/04/26/total-reform-needed-make-aichr-independent-effective-and-relevant-asean-peoples

Bangkok, sickness 27 April, (Asian Tribune.com):The performance of the ASEAN Intergovernmental Commission on Human Rights (AICHR) has been disappointing and wanting, epitomized by the lack of transparency, failure to consult with civil society organizations and no demonstrable progress in protecting and promoting human rights, according to a civil society assessment report on the performance of the AICHR for the period of October 2010 to December 2011.

The report, titled “A Commission Shrouded in Secrecy”, was released jointly on Thursday by the Solidarity for Asian People’s Advocacy Task Force on ASEAN and Human Rights (SAPA TFAHR) and the Asian Forum for Human Rights and Development (FORUM-ASIA).

The civil society coalition said a total reform is needed if the AICHR is to become more independent from the governments, more effective in responding to human rights violations and more relevant to the needs of the peoples in the region.

The report revealed that AICHR has systematically failed to make public any of the official documents adopted since its inception in 2009. This includes its first annual report, which was submitted to the 44th ASEAN Ministerial Meeting in July 2011.

Other official AICHR documents that have not been made public include the Guidelines on Operations of the AICHR, the Terms of Reference of the Drafting Group of the ASEAN Human Rights Declaration, the Terms of Reference of the Baseline Study on Corporate Social Responsibility and Human Rights in ASEAN, the Rules of Procedure for the AICHR Fund, the first annual report of the AICHR, the AICHR Work Plan 2013-2015, its 2012 Priority Programme and its budget, and the Terms of Reference of the Thematic Study of the Right to Peace.

“We are extremely concerned that AICHR has not even made the draft ASEAN Human Rights Declaration available for public comments. It is ironic that the peoples in the region do not have the right to access a document that is supposed to protect their human rights,” said Yap Swee Seng, executive director of FORUM-ASIA during the launch of the report.

The report found that the AICHR has continued to refuse meetings with civil society organizations and national human rights institutions in the region despite numerous requests made.

The report further slammed the AICHR for discriminating against civil society organizations in Southeast Asia whom it refused to meet, but on the other hand did not hesitate to meet with a range of international civil society organizations, including Human Rights Watch (HRW), Amnesty International (AI), the International Federation of Human Rights (FIDH) and Freedom House during its official visits to the United States and Europe.

“While we welcome the meetings between the AICHR with international human rights organizations and note that such engagements should be encouraged, the Commission’s refusal to meet with civil society organizations from its own region when it had no qualms in meeting with international civil society organizations is simply a practice of double standards,” stressed Chalida Tajaroensuk, executive director of People’s Empowerment Foundation of Thailand, a member of the SAPA TFAHR.

SAPA TFAHR first requested for a meeting with the AICHR during its first official meeting in March 2010. The request was rejected on the grounds that the AICHR had yet to establish its rules of procedure and therefore could not meet with civil society. The performance report of AICHR shows that the Commission only granted meeting request from only a single civil society organization – the Working Group for an ASEAN Human Rights Mechanism – ostensibly on the basis that they are listed as stakeholders recognized by ASEAN under Annex II of the ASEAN Charter.

The report also raised concern over the AICHR’s failures in concluding any of the studies that it has undertaken, in concretely responding to real human rights situations – either in the region generally or in specific member states – and most worryingly, failed to improve the human rights of even a single individual within the ASEAN regional, two years after its establishment.

The AICHR has identified three thematic issues for further study, namely migration, corporate social responsibility and human rights and the right to peace. So far, the terms of reference for these studies have not been made public. It was also expected to give its advisory opinion to the ASEAN member states on the issue of mandatory HIV test for migrant workers but to date has still failed to do so.

The report made numerous recommendations to the AICHR. Key among them are for the AICHR to be more transparent by publishing relevant documents, including the draft ASEAN Human Rights Declaration, via a dedicated website; and to institutionalize regular consultations at national and regional levels with key stakeholders, especially the civil society organizations, national human rights institutions and the ASEAN Commission on the Promotion and Protection of the Rights of Women and Children (ACWC).

“The AICHR must strive to improve its transparency and engagement with civil society in the coming years. Otherwise, it risks being an irrelevant body to the peoples in the region,” said Saowalak Thongkuay, Regional Development Office of the Disable Peoples’ International Asia Pacific.

Source: http://www.asiantribune.com/news/2012/04/26/total-reform-needed-make-aichr-independent-effective-and-relevant-asean-peoples

Bangkok, seek 27 April, (Asian Tribune.com):The performance of the ASEAN Intergovernmental Commission on Human Rights (AICHR) has been disappointing and wanting, decease epitomized by the lack of transparency, failure to consult with civil society organizations and no demonstrable progress in protecting and promoting human rights, according to a civil society assessment report on the performance of the AICHR for the period of October 2010 to December 2011.

The report, titled “A Commission Shrouded in Secrecy”, was released jointly on Thursday by the Solidarity for Asian People’s Advocacy Task Force on ASEAN and Human Rights (SAPA TFAHR) and the Asian Forum for Human Rights and Development (FORUM-ASIA).

The civil society coalition said a total reform is needed if the AICHR is to become more independent from the governments, more effective in responding to human rights violations and more relevant to the needs of the peoples in the region.

The report revealed that AICHR has systematically failed to make public any of the official documents adopted since its inception in 2009. This includes its first annual report, which was submitted to the 44th ASEAN Ministerial Meeting in July 2011.

Other official AICHR documents that have not been made public include the Guidelines on Operations of the AICHR, the Terms of Reference of the Drafting Group of the ASEAN Human Rights Declaration, the Terms of Reference of the Baseline Study on Corporate Social Responsibility and Human Rights in ASEAN, the Rules of Procedure for the AICHR Fund, the first annual report of the AICHR, the AICHR Work Plan 2013-2015, its 2012 Priority Programme and its budget, and the Terms of Reference of the Thematic Study of the Right to Peace.

“We are extremely concerned that AICHR has not even made the draft ASEAN Human Rights Declaration available for public comments. It is ironic that the peoples in the region do not have the right to access a document that is supposed to protect their human rights,” said Yap Swee Seng, executive director of FORUM-ASIA during the launch of the report.

The report found that the AICHR has continued to refuse meetings with civil society organizations and national human rights institutions in the region despite numerous requests made.

The report further slammed the AICHR for discriminating against civil society organizations in Southeast Asia whom it refused to meet, but on the other hand did not hesitate to meet with a range of international civil society organizations, including Human Rights Watch (HRW), Amnesty International (AI), the International Federation of Human Rights (FIDH) and Freedom House during its official visits to the United States and Europe.

“While we welcome the meetings between the AICHR with international human rights organizations and note that such engagements should be encouraged, the Commission’s refusal to meet with civil society organizations from its own region when it had no qualms in meeting with international civil society organizations is simply a practice of double standards,” stressed Chalida Tajaroensuk, executive director of People’s Empowerment Foundation of Thailand, a member of the SAPA TFAHR.

SAPA TFAHR first requested for a meeting with the AICHR during its first official meeting in March 2010. The request was rejected on the grounds that the AICHR had yet to establish its rules of procedure and therefore could not meet with civil society. The performance report of AICHR shows that the Commission only granted meeting request from only a single civil society organization – the Working Group for an ASEAN Human Rights Mechanism – ostensibly on the basis that they are listed as stakeholders recognized by ASEAN under Annex II of the ASEAN Charter.

The report also raised concern over the AICHR’s failures in concluding any of the studies that it has undertaken, in concretely responding to real human rights situations – either in the region generally or in specific member states – and most worryingly, failed to improve the human rights of even a single individual within the ASEAN regional, two years after its establishment.

The AICHR has identified three thematic issues for further study, namely migration, corporate social responsibility and human rights and the right to peace. So far, the terms of reference for these studies have not been made public. It was also expected to give its advisory opinion to the ASEAN member states on the issue of mandatory HIV test for migrant workers but to date has still failed to do so.

The report made numerous recommendations to the AICHR. Key among them are for the AICHR to be more transparent by publishing relevant documents, including the draft ASEAN Human Rights Declaration, via a dedicated website; and to institutionalize regular consultations at national and regional levels with key stakeholders, especially the civil society organizations, national human rights institutions and the ASEAN Commission on the Promotion and Protection of the Rights of Women and Children (ACWC).

“The AICHR must strive to improve its transparency and engagement with civil society in the coming years. Otherwise, it risks being an irrelevant body to the peoples in the region,” said Saowalak Thongkuay, Regional Development Office of the Disable Peoples’ International Asia Pacific.

Source: http://www.asiantribune.com/news/2012/04/26/total-reform-needed-make-aichr-independent-effective-and-relevant-asean-peoples

Letter from ACSC/APF 2012 Steering Committee on civil society inputs on ASEAN Human Rights Declaration (AHRD)


 Aspirations of Civil Society’s during the ACSC/APF 2012 on ASEAN Human Rights Declaration

1.    We are deeply disappointed at the secret, see exclusionary and opaque drafting process of the ASEAN Human Rights Declaration (AHRD). The ASEAN Intergovernmental Commission on Human Rights (AICHR) has failed to consult ASEAN civil society to a meaningful extent on the regional level, discount and only a few representatives consulted on the national level. A draft produced by the Drafting Group in January was never officially published. CSO submissions were left without response, resulting in CSOs being left in the dark as to whether their input has been taken into account.

 2.    Substantively, the Working Draft, which has not been officially published, discloses worrying tendencies among the drafters which, if they prevail, would provide the ASEAN people with a lower level of human rights protection than in universal and other regional instruments. There is heavy emphasis on concepts such as duties, national and regional particularities and noninterference – all of which may be abused to legitimise human rights violations.

 3.    Problematic terms such as “good citizens” and “public morality” may open the door to abusive and discriminatory interpretations, in particular regarding women, LGBTIQ people, children, IPs and minorities and other often-marginalised groups. Several provisions for specific rights are inadequate, open to abuse, or else are missing key components. Thus freedom of expression and assembly, freedom of LGBTIQ people from discrimination and gender rights are not properly provided for.

 4.    We recommend that the AICHR, ASEAN and/or its Member States:

  • Immediately publicize the most current draft of AHRD so that civil society can participate substantively in the drafting process;
  • Continue and expand meaningful consultations on national level, in particular by those AICHR representatives who have not yet done so;
  • Conduct wide-ranging and inclusive consultations, at both national and regional levels, during which the latest drafts of the AHRD should be discussed. AICHR should seriously consider submissions from CSOs, national human rights institutes and other stakeholders, and provide them with feedback;
  • Translate drafts of the AHRD into national languages and other local languages of the ASEAN countries in order to encourage broader public engagement in the region;
  • Include a) the “Right to Peace”, b)  sexual orientation and gender identity (SOGI) provision AHRD – specifically the inclusion of reference to ‘gender identity’ and ‘sexual orientation’, and c) sexual reproductive health and rights in AHRD;

 5.    Recommendation in regard to women’s human rights perspectives in AHRD:

  • AHRD should enable women’s access to justice in Southeast Asia;
  • ASEAN governments take all appropriate measures to modify or abolish laws, regulations, customs and practices which limit women from enjoying their fundamental freedoms and rights;
  • Women’s human rights perspectives, reflected in the CEDAW and the Vienna Declaration and Programme of Action must be integrated into AHRD;
  • There is no erosion of rights in the AHRD and no inclusion of ‘morality, moral value

or traditional values’ clauses that serve to undermine rights; and

  • The AHRD drafting process must be subjected to public consultation and must involve women.

 

Phnom Penh, 24 April 2012

H.E. Om Yentieng

Chairperson

ASEAN Intergovernmental Commission on Human Rights (AICHR)

No. 3, Samdech Hun Sen Street,

Sangkat Tonle Bassac, Khan Chamcarmon,

Phnom Penh, Cambodia

Fax: + 855 23 216 144/216 141

Cc:

H.E. Chet Chealy

Alternate Representative of Cambodia to AICHR

Cambodian Human Rights Committee (CHRC)

No.3, St. VI.13 Tuol Kork Village, Sangkat Tuol Sangke,

Khan Russey Keo, Phnom Penh

Tel. +855 23 882 065, Fax. +855 23 882 065

Email: chetchealy@gmail.com

Ms. Leena Ghosh,

Assistant Director

AIPA, ASEAN Foundation, AICHR and Other ASEAN Associated Entities Division

Community Affairs Development Directorate

Corporate and Community Affairs Department

ASEAN Secretariat

E-mail: leena.ghosh@asean.org

Re:      Submission of ACSC/APF 2012 related to ASEAN Human Rights Declaration

Dear Excellencies,

On behalf of the Civil Society Committee for ASEAN Civil Society Conference/ ASEAN Peoples’ Forum (ACSC/APF 2012), we are pleased to submit to you civil society’s aspirations related to ASEAN Human Rights Declaration (AHRD). More than 1,200 people attended the ACSC/APF 2012 that was organized in Lucky Star Hotel, Phnom Penh on 29-31 March 2012. They came from all ten ASEAN countries and beyond.

We also would like to use this opportunity to convey our interest to participate in the consultation that AICHR will be planning to do in the late June 2012. To ensure that the consultation would be meaningful, we encourage AICHR to make the draft available to the public. We understand that you value the trust and credibility from the people in ASEAN which can only be obtained through a transparent process.

Furthermore, we believe that AHRD is a very important document for the daily life of the people, which requires legitimacy from the population in ASEAN. With the advance of communication technology nowadays, AICHR could create a website to release the draft of AHRD which allows more public participation in making comments and inputs.

Please feel free to contact Steering Committee should you have further question or clarification at the email samath@ngoforum.org.kh and thida_khus@silaka.org. Hard copies will follow this email.

Please, Excellency, accept our highest consideration.

Chair, Steering Committee ACSC/APF 2012

Mr. Chhith Sam Ath                        Mrs. Thida Khus

DOWNLOAD LETTER IN PDF

Letter from ACSC/APF 2012 Steering Committee on civil society inputs on ASEAN Human Rights Declaration (AHRD).

 

Phnom Penh, 24 April 2012

H.E. Om Yentieng

Chairperson

ASEAN Intergovernmental Commission on Human Rights (AICHR)

No. 3, buy Samdech Hun Sen Street,

Sangkat Tonle Bassac, Khan Chamcarmon,

Phnom Penh, Cambodia

Fax: + 855 23 216 144/216 141

Cc:

H.E. Chet Chealy

Alternate Representative of Cambodia to AICHR

Cambodian Human Rights Committee (CHRC)

No.3, St. VI.13 Tuol Kork Village, Sangkat Tuol Sangke,

Khan Russey Keo, Phnom Penh

Tel. +855 23 882 065, Fax. +855 23 882 065

Email: chetchealy@gmail.com

Ms. Leena Ghosh,

Assistant Director

AIPA, ASEAN Foundation, AICHR and Other ASEAN Associated Entities Division

Community Affairs Development Directorate

Corporate and Community Affairs Department

ASEAN Secretariat

E-mail: leena.ghosh@asean.org

Re:      Submission of ACSC/APF 2012 related to ASEAN Human Rights Declaration

Dear Excellencies,

On behalf of the Civil Society Committee for ASEAN Civil Society Conference/ ASEAN Peoples’ Forum (ACSC/APF 2012), we are pleased to submit to you civil society’s aspirations related to ASEAN Human Rights Declaration (AHRD). More than 1,200 people attended the ACSC/APF 2012 that was organized in Lucky Star Hotel, Phnom Penh on 29-31 March 2012. They came from all ten ASEAN countries and beyond.

We also would like to use this opportunity to convey our interest to participate in the consultation that AICHR will be planning to do in the late June 2012. To ensure that the consultation would be meaningful, we encourage AICHR to make the draft available to the public. We understand that you value the trust and credibility from the people in ASEAN which can only be obtained through a transparent process.

Furthermore, we believe that AHRD is a very important document for the daily life of the people, which requires legitimacy from the population in ASEAN. With the advance of communication technology nowadays, AICHR could create a website to release the draft of AHRD which allows more public participation in making comments and inputs.

Please feel free to contact Steering Committee should you have further question or clarification at the email samath@ngoforum.org.kh and thida_khus@silaka.org. Hard copies will follow this email.

Please, Excellency, accept our highest consideration.

Chair, Steering Committee ACSC/APF 2012

Mr. Chhith Sam Ath                        Mrs. Thida Khus

 


 Aspirations of Civil Society’s during the ACSC/APF 2012 on ASEAN Human Rights Declaration

1.    We are deeply disappointed at the secret, exclusionary and opaque drafting process of the ASEAN Human Rights Declaration (AHRD). The ASEAN Intergovernmental Commission on Human Rights (AICHR) has failed to consult ASEAN civil society to a meaningful extent on the regional level, and only a few representatives consulted on the national level. A draft produced by the Drafting Group in January was never officially published. CSO submissions were left without response, resulting in CSOs being left in the dark as to whether their input has been taken into account.

 2.    Substantively, the Working Draft, which has not been officially published, discloses worrying tendencies among the drafters which, if they prevail, would provide the ASEAN people with a lower level of human rights protection than in universal and other regional instruments. There is heavy emphasis on concepts such as duties, national and regional particularities and noninterference – all of which may be abused to legitimise human rights violations.

 3.    Problematic terms such as “good citizens” and “public morality” may open the door to abusive and discriminatory interpretations, in particular regarding women, LGBTIQ people, children, IPs and minorities and other often-marginalised groups. Several provisions for specific rights are inadequate, open to abuse, or else are missing key components. Thus freedom of expression and assembly, freedom of LGBTIQ people from discrimination and gender rights are not properly provided for.

 4.    We recommend that the AICHR, ASEAN and/or its Member States:

  • Immediately publicize the most current draft of AHRD so that civil society can participate substantively in the drafting process;
  • Continue and expand meaningful consultations on national level, in particular by those AICHR representatives who have not yet done so;
  • Conduct wide-ranging and inclusive consultations, at both national and regional levels, during which the latest drafts of the AHRD should be discussed. AICHR should seriously consider submissions from CSOs, national human rights institutes and other stakeholders, and provide them with feedback;
  • Translate drafts of the AHRD into national languages and other local languages of the ASEAN countries in order to encourage broader public engagement in the region;
  • Include a) the “Right to Peace”, b)  sexual orientation and gender identity (SOGI) provision AHRD – specifically the inclusion of reference to ‘gender identity’ and ‘sexual orientation’, and c) sexual reproductive health and rights in AHRD;

 5.    Recommendation in regard to women’s human rights perspectives in AHRD:

  • AHRD should enable women’s access to justice in Southeast Asia;
  • ASEAN governments take all appropriate measures to modify or abolish laws, regulations, customs and practices which limit women from enjoying their fundamental freedoms and rights;
  • Women’s human rights perspectives, reflected in the CEDAW and the Vienna Declaration and Programme of Action must be integrated into AHRD;
  • There is no erosion of rights in the AHRD and no inclusion of ‘morality, moral value

or traditional values’ clauses that serve to undermine rights; and

  • The AHRD drafting process must be subjected to public consultation and must involve women.

 

DOWNLOAD LETTER IN PDF

Letter from ACSC/APF 2012 Steering Committee on civil society inputs on ASEAN Human Rights Declaration (AHRD)

DOWNLOAD LETTER IN PDF


 Aspirations of Civil Society’s during the ACSC/APF 2012 on ASEAN Human Rights Declaration

1.    We are deeply disappointed at the secret, exclusionary and opaque drafting process of the ASEAN Human Rights Declaration (AHRD). The ASEAN Intergovernmental Commission on Human Rights (AICHR) has failed to consult ASEAN civil society to a meaningful extent on the regional level, order and only a few representatives consulted on the national level. A draft produced by the Drafting Group in January was never officially published. CSO submissions were left without response, malady resulting in CSOs being left in the dark as to whether their input has been taken into account.

 2.    Substantively, the Working Draft, which has not been officially published, discloses worrying tendencies among the drafters which, if they prevail, would provide the ASEAN people with a lower level of human rights protection than in universal and other regional instruments. There is heavy emphasis on concepts such as duties, national and regional particularities and noninterference – all of which may be abused to legitimise human rights violations.

 3.    Problematic terms such as “good citizens” and “public morality” may open the door to abusive and discriminatory interpretations, in particular regarding women, LGBTIQ people, children, IPs and minorities and other often-marginalised groups. Several provisions for specific rights are inadequate, open to abuse, or else are missing key components. Thus freedom of expression and assembly, freedom of LGBTIQ people from discrimination and gender rights are not properly provided for.

 4.    We recommend that the AICHR, ASEAN and/or its Member States:

  • Immediately publicize the most current draft of AHRD so that civil society can participate substantively in the drafting process;
  • Continue and expand meaningful consultations on national level, in particular by those AICHR representatives who have not yet done so;
  • Conduct wide-ranging and inclusive consultations, at both national and regional levels, during which the latest drafts of the AHRD should be discussed. AICHR should seriously consider submissions from CSOs, national human rights institutes and other stakeholders, and provide them with feedback;
  • Translate drafts of the AHRD into national languages and other local languages of the ASEAN countries in order to encourage broader public engagement in the region;
  • Include a) the “Right to Peace”, b)  sexual orientation and gender identity (SOGI) provision AHRD – specifically the inclusion of reference to ‘gender identity’ and ‘sexual orientation’, and c) sexual reproductive health and rights in AHRD;

 5.    Recommendation in regard to women’s human rights perspectives in AHRD:

  • AHRD should enable women’s access to justice in Southeast Asia;
  • ASEAN governments take all appropriate measures to modify or abolish laws, regulations, customs and practices which limit women from enjoying their fundamental freedoms and rights;
  • Women’s human rights perspectives, reflected in the CEDAW and the Vienna Declaration and Programme of Action must be integrated into AHRD;
  • There is no erosion of rights in the AHRD and no inclusion of ‘morality, moral value

or traditional values’ clauses that serve to undermine rights; and

  • The AHRD drafting process must be subjected to public consultation and must involve women.

 

Phnom Penh, 24 April 2012

H.E. Om Yentieng

Chairperson

ASEAN Intergovernmental Commission on Human Rights (AICHR)

No. 3, Samdech Hun Sen Street,

Sangkat Tonle Bassac, Khan Chamcarmon,

Phnom Penh, Cambodia

Fax: + 855 23 216 144/216 141

Cc:

H.E. Chet Chealy

Alternate Representative of Cambodia to AICHR

Cambodian Human Rights Committee (CHRC)

No.3, St. VI.13 Tuol Kork Village, Sangkat Tuol Sangke,

Khan Russey Keo, Phnom Penh

Tel. +855 23 882 065, Fax. +855 23 882 065

Email: chetchealy@gmail.com

Ms. Leena Ghosh,

Assistant Director

AIPA, ASEAN Foundation, AICHR and Other ASEAN Associated Entities Division

Community Affairs Development Directorate

Corporate and Community Affairs Department

ASEAN Secretariat

E-mail: leena.ghosh@asean.org

Re:      Submission of ACSC/APF 2012 related to ASEAN Human Rights Declaration

Dear Excellencies,

On behalf of the Civil Society Committee for ASEAN Civil Society Conference/ ASEAN Peoples’ Forum (ACSC/APF 2012), we are pleased to submit to you civil society’s aspirations related to ASEAN Human Rights Declaration (AHRD). More than 1,200 people attended the ACSC/APF 2012 that was organized in Lucky Star Hotel, Phnom Penh on 29-31 March 2012. They came from all ten ASEAN countries and beyond.

We also would like to use this opportunity to convey our interest to participate in the consultation that AICHR will be planning to do in the late June 2012. To ensure that the consultation would be meaningful, we encourage AICHR to make the draft available to the public. We understand that you value the trust and credibility from the people in ASEAN which can only be obtained through a transparent process.

Furthermore, we believe that AHRD is a very important document for the daily life of the people, which requires legitimacy from the population in ASEAN. With the advance of communication technology nowadays, AICHR could create a website to release the draft of AHRD which allows more public participation in making comments and inputs.

Please feel free to contact Steering Committee should you have further question or clarification at the email samath@ngoforum.org.kh and thida_khus@silaka.org. Hard copies will follow this email.

Please, Excellency, accept our highest consideration.

Chair, Steering Committee ACSC/APF 2012

Mr. Chhith Sam Ath                        Mrs. Thida Khus


Foro Sindical / VI Cumbre de las Américas

DECLARACIÓN

Trabajadoras y trabajadores de las Américas, stuff
representado por su organización continental, illness la Confederación Sindical de Trabajadoras y Trabajadores de las Américas (CSA) y el Consejo Sindical de Asesoramiento Técnico (COSATE),
 nos reunimos en Cartagena, Colombia, el día 12 de abril de 2012, para debatir sobre la situación  de nuestros países y hemos adoptado esta Declaración ante la VI Cumbre de las Américas. La misma se produce en el marco de los debates que el movimiento sindical de la región viene manteniendo rumbo a la realización del segundo Congreso de la CSA, que se realiza entre el 17 y el 20 de abril próximo en la ciudad de Foz de Iguazú, Brasil, y que reúne a más de 250 delegados de 59 organizaciones sindicales de 27 países del continente representando a más de 50 millones de trabajadores.

La coyuntura económica regional desde la visión de las y los trabajadores 

La región ha presentado en los últimos años un contexto económico que distingue dos grupos: los países de Sudamérica creciendo a un ritmo más acelerado y los países de América del Norte, Central y Caribe creciendo más lentamente, tal vez con las excepciones de República Dominicana y Panamá. Mientras que la crisis mundial afectó con mucha más fuerza a los Estados Unidos y las economías de la región dependientes de su mercado.

La opción de algunos países por políticas de aumentos de los salarios mínimos nacionales, los varios programas de transferencia de ingresos y las inversiones en infraestructura, pueden explicar fundamentalmente los resultados económicos más positivos.

Por otra parte, los países que continúan manteniendo políticas fiscales y monetarias restrictivas al crecimiento, priorizando el ajuste fiscal y tasas de interés elevadas, impidieron con ellas que el crecimiento económico combine la reducción de las desigualdades sociales con el montaje de un Estado que asegure servicios públicos universales y de calidad.

En este contexto consideramos que el camino acertado es fortalecer el papel del estado con la perspectiva de la inclusión social y profundizar el proceso de integración regional para la superación de la crisis. Y en el caso de los Estados Unidos, pedimos definiciones y medidas más rápidas y la superación del impasse político, que ha trabado el avance más enérgico para superar la crisis social y política. Esto, además, es importante para el futuro de los países latinoamericanos y caribeños más dependientes de la economía estadounidense.

Consideramos que existe también una importante agenda de debates y definiciones fundamentales para una nueva estrategia de desarrollo en las Américas. El primer punto fundamental se refiere a la cuestión fiscal pues la carga impositiva en la mayor parte de nuestros países es insuficiente para asumir la inversión en la extensión de los servicios públicos básicos y de calidad para la población. Y cuando ella es suficiente, proviene de un sistema de impuestos centrado en el consumo y no sobre las ganancias, que provoca una carga tributaria fuertemente regresiva, y gran parte de los recursos recaudados son transferidos para el pago de intereses y servicios financieros.

Es importante remarcar que, como propulsor de la demanda, el gasto corriente del gobierno también es motor de la actividad económica. Es la garantía de la oferta de servicios como educación, salud, asistencia social, entre otros, de forma universal y de calidad. No alcanza con construir edificios – como escuelas y hospitales, por ejemplo – si al mismo tiempo no se contratan con remuneraciones y condiciones de trabajo dignas, a profesores y auxiliares, médicos y enfermeros, entre otros profesionales.

Al mismo tiempo, sólo el crecimiento económico no garantiza desarrollo social y ambiental sustentable. Este debe ser acompañado por políticas de generación de trabajo decente, protección social, distribución justa del ingreso y políticas ambientales.

La crisis y la especulación han explicitado también el problema cambiario que vive el continente. Es preciso reconfigurar la cuestión cambiaria en la región, considerando los procesos de integración regional en curso. Es necesario volver a regular las finanzas y los flujos de capital, dejando atrás los años de la liberalización que dejaron expuestos a los países. Este sistema ofrece ventajas a los aplicadores internacionales, volviendo más caros los costos de las inversiones productivas a nivel de los países de la región.

La desregulación de la economía, la liberalización financiera y comercial y, en particular, la flexibilización laboral, son la raíz de la actual crisis. Revertir esos mecanismos que nos condujeron a una situación explosiva es fundamental para viabilizar la construcción de alternativas de desarrollo económico en que el dinamismo y la sostenibilidad convivan con el crecimiento, la distribución del ingreso y la generación de trabajo decente.

Finalmente denunciamos que en material de inversión extranjera directa en América Latina, se constata la presencia en muchos sectores de innumerables empresas transnacionales en circunstancias que les dan privilegios en materia jurídica, laboral, arancelaria y impositiva. Exigimos a los gobiernos que respeten y hagan respetar nuestros derechos laborales, económicos, sociales y ambientales, las normas nacionales e internacionales ante los abusos y explotación salvaje de nuestros recursos naturales por parte de las transnacionales.  En especial, es urgente disponer la solución a los impactos contra el medio ambiente, las comunidades campesinas, indígenas y afrodescendientes que se ven forzadas al desplazamiento y al despojo de sus territorios.

La evolución de la política en las Américas

Los cambios políticos, económicos y sociales que tuvieron lugar en varios países latinoamericanos representan la oposición a las políticas neoliberales implementadas desde los años 80. Esta transformación fue fundamental para enfrentar la crisis actual. Los que, como Brasil, por ejemplo, lograron resistir al sismo financiero, adoptaron medidas de preservación de la inversión pública, empleo, consumo y producción. Sin embargo, la recesión fue profunda en la mayoría de los países que adoptaron medidas conservadoras de recortes de gastos y reducción de salarios y empleos.

Los cambios señalan el ascenso de fuerzas políticas y sociales que buscan formas de organización y representación distintas al Consenso de Washington. Estas corrientes tienen su origen en el enfrentamiento al neoliberalismo y la conformación de amplias alianzas que reunían sindicatos, organizaciones campesinas, indígenas, mujeres, organizaciones no gubernamentales y partidos.

La polarización política entre lo “nuevo” y lo “viejo” fue evidente en varios de estos países que eligieron gobiernos progresistas. En muchos de ellos, los grupos conservadores apelaron a intentos golpistas y movimientos de secesión, entre otros métodos ilegítimos. Estas campañas articuladas por las derechas contaron con la ayuda de la gran prensa escrita y televisiva, que viene ampliando su papel de principal “partido de oposición” a los gobiernos progresistas del continente.

El reto para las y los trabajadores es contribuir para que las transformaciones económicas, políticas y sociales se vuelvan estructurales y permanentes. En lo que se refiere a la democratización de las relaciones de trabajo, hay mucho que hacer. Fueron pocos los gobiernos que realmente promovieron políticas para fortalecer el papel de los sindicatos en la sociedad como actores del desarrollo y de la distribución del ingreso, además de la promoción de la democracia.

Existen contradicciones entre los gobiernos progresistas en lo que se refiere al diálogo social. De forma general, la cultura política y de las relaciones laborales en las Américas son autoritarias. No existe una tradición de concertación y las pocas experiencias actuales de promoción de diálogo social son frágiles. La plena libertad de asociación y el derecho a la negociación colectiva todavía son una utopía en muchos países. La actividad sindical implica arriesgar la vida en lugares como Colombia, Honduras y Guatemala. También en los Estados Unidos hay grandes retrocesos, como la ley que prohíbe la sindicalización de los y las trabajadoras del sector público en Missouri.

Hay un déficit democrático a ser superado con promoción del respeto a los derechos humanos, libertad de organización y mecanismos de consulta popular. La movilidad social, que se ha ampliado en varios países de la región, presenta también a los sindicatos el desafío organizativo de los grupos sociales que representan factores importantes en la economía y en el mundo del trabajo.

Apreciamos y respaldamos el proceso de construcción de diferentes entidades e instancias para facilitar la integración en la región y señala que es fundamental la presencia del movimiento sindical en estas dinámicas. La arquitectura que se adelanta a través de la Unión de Naciones del Sur (UNASUR) y la constitución de la Comunidad de Estados de América Latina y el Caribe (CELAC) dan cuenta del proceso de búsqueda de una respuesta regional articulada, muy conveniente e importante en tiempos de crisis y turbulencias globales. Expresamos preocupación por el retraimiento de otros procesos tradicionales como la Comunidad Andina de Naciones (CAN), el Sistema de Integración de Centroamérica (SICA), el Mercado Común del Sur (MERCOSUR) y la Alianza Bolivariana de los Pueblos de Nuestra América (ALBA).

Deploramos la exclusión de Cuba de estas Cumbres y el veto explicito de los Estados Unidos a que sea invitada. La lógica de la guerra fría ha acabado hace 20 años en el mundo, es inconcebible el mantenimiento del bloqueo a Cuba y la exclusión antidemocrática del país hermano en foros internacionales como esta Cumbre y la OEA.

A 30 años de la tragedia de la Guerra de las Malvinas, pedimos a los presidentes de la VI Cumbre de las Américas que se pronuncien por la apertura del diálogo entre Argentina y el Reino Unido, para encontrar una salida diplomática al justo reclamo de soberanía argentina sobre las Islas Malvinas, con base al principio de la integridad territorial.

En América Latina y Caribe luego de décadas de dictaduras y guerras fratricidas, la mayoría de ellas originadas y alimentadas por la guerra fría, se vive un período de estabilidad con procesos democráticos más establecidos, aunque en algunos países se registran procesos de criminalización de la lucha social.

No podemos dejar de señalar el grave atentado a la democracia, los derechos humanos y la estabilidad regional que constituyó el golpe de Estado en Honduras, en junio de 2009. Para el sindicalismo de las Américas se dejó claro que los intereses más retrógrados de nuestros países y sus articulaciones con sus socios trasnacionales, no dudarán en actuar contra la democracia y los pueblos cuando sus intereses se pongan en entredicho. Ese acto vergonzoso todavía no ha sido superado. Los criminales que irrumpieron contra la democracia están libres e impunes y ampliaron su poder e influencia a través del gobierno ilegítimo y cómplice al que dió paso el régimen de facto.

Aunque la mayoría de los países del continente ha ratificado los Convenios 87 y 98 de la OIT, en muchos de ellos la libertad sindical y la negociación colectiva son letra muerta, ya sea porque la legislación pertinente distorsiona estos convenios o por la violencia profunda e impune. En estas condiciones, será imposible que la región avance hacia la creación de trabajo decente para todos y todas. El ejercicio pleno y universal de estos derechos sigue siendo una deuda de la mayoría de los gobiernos de la región. Llamamos la atención de los gobiernos que se reivindican de izquierda en América Latina, pero consideran la acción sindical y a los sindicatos como corporativos y desconocen las libertades sindicales. Por otro lado, estos gobiernos buscan cooptar al movimiento sindical o tratan solo con aquellos que los apoyan sin restricciones. La independencia y autonomía del movimiento sindical, es una condición necesaria para el avance de los proyectos progresistas y de izquierda.   

La libertad sindical y la negociación colectiva, nuestra prioridad ante el sistema interamericano.

Para afianzar la paz social y alcanzar niveles superiores de desarrollo humano, es imprescindible reconocer la legitimidad de las organizaciones sindicales y su participación en la determinación de las condiciones de trabajo e incidencia y en la adopción, ejecución y evaluación de las políticas públicas. Sin libertad sindical, no hay democracia ni acceso a derechos en el trabajo. Es responsabilidad de cada Estado proteger los derechos de los trabajadores a nivel nacional,  regional y en el marco de instituciones internacionales.

Denunciamos que el continente americano sigue siendo el más peligroso para el ejercicio de la actividad sindical. La violencia contra el sindicalismo ha estado revestida y fortalecida por una grave impunidad que es sistemática, afectando al conjunto de trabajadores y trabajadoras y vulnerando sus derechos.

Condenamos la impunidad con la que muchos empleadores privados y públicos violentan física, económica, laboral y socialmente a los trabajadores, dirigentes y organizaciones sindicales. Denunciamos que las organizaciones sindicales también han sido duramente golpeadas por prácticas y legislaciones laborales que obstaculizan la organización sindical y la negociación colectiva, tanto en el sector privado como en el público. El despido de dirigentes y/o fundadores de sindicatos, la simulación y defraudación de la relación de trabajo, la proliferación de seudo-sindicatos dominados por los empleadores (a veces llamados “sindicatos de protección”),  así como el uso de  figuras jurídicas como la intermediación, subcontratación, cooperativas de trabajo y denominaciones sociales de “papel”, son argucias usadas para eludir los derechos laborales y sindicales de los trabajadores, flexibilizar las condiciones de trabajo y aumentar la precarización del trabajo.

Deploramos que algunos gobiernos de la región no atiendan las observaciones y recomendaciones que los órganos de control normativo de la OIT les han hecho para adecuar su legislación y práctica a los principios y postulados de esas normas internacionales.

Rechazamos la férrea oposición de algunos gobiernos a reconocer el derecho a la negociación colectiva en el sector público, así como la posición empresarial de que la negociación colectiva solo debe darse, en su caso, a nivel de la empresa y no por rama, en forma articulada y otras modalidades, incluida la internacional. Y condenamos también las prácticas de los acuerdos o pactos directos, por su profundo sentido antisindical, así como, las limitaciones en el legítimo ejercicio de la huelga, que transgreden los principios de la OIT.

Es necesario un verdadero compromiso de los gobiernos para la promoción del derecho a la sindicalización, a la negociación colectiva y a emprender acciones colectivas para todos los trabajadores/as del sector público, incluyendo la policía y las fuerzas armadas. Exigimos la ratificación de los Convenios 151 y 154 de la OIT en todos los países de las Américas; y  la garantía del derecho de los trabajadores y trabajadoras a emprender acciones industriales transfronterizas con el objeto de promover en todo el mundo el respeto de los derechos humanos fundamentales en el trabajo.

 

Sobre los otros temas de la Cumbre:

Integración regional

Apoyamos la opción estratégica de nuestros países por una integración orientada por la lógica del desarrollo sustentable. En el contexto de las crisis, los países del Sur global deben profundizar la integración regional mediante la autonomización respecto de los flujos financieros y comerciales globales y su regulación. La inserción internacional de nuestras economías no puede ser guiada por la lógica y los intereses del mercado. Las empresas, entre ellas las llamadas “translatinas, que siendo las principales favorecidas de los recursos del crédito público, han reproducido en muchos casos lo peor de las prácticas sociales, ambientales y laborales de las corporaciones del Norte.

Mantenemos la resistencia frente a los tratados de libre comercio, y proponemos la idea de comercio justo en el plano bilateral, birregional y multilateral y verdaderos procesos de integración de las economías y los pueblos a nivel subregional y regional.

Expresamos nuestra preocupación por la semi parálisis de algunos procesos de integración, mientras la dinámica de los tratados de libre comercio se ha multiplicado.  Se trata de un doble impacto negativo. Por un lado, el avance del libre comercio en las Américas que llevó a la crisis de la Comunidad Andina de Naciones (CAN) y al estancamiento del Sistema de Integración de Centroamérica (SICA)  y por otro, al retraimiento provocado, entre otros, por la crisis económica global en procesos que se mostraban más dinámicos como el Mercado Común del Sur (MERCUSUR) y la Alianza Bolivariana de los Pueblos de Nuestra América (ALBA).

Consideramos fundamental retomar la dinámica integradora de la región, fortaleciendo los procesos ya avanzados, dotándolos de un perfil cada vez más volcado al desafío de contribuir con una región más inclusiva social y políticamente. Se impone el mandato de hacer de la integración social, política y cultural, la principal tarea de los Estados y de los diversos  órganos creados para la integración subregional.

Saludamos iniciativas integracionistas que escapan de la lógica puramente comercial y que procuran una identidad basada en los valores e identidades comunes de los pueblos de la región, como la solidaridad, la cooperación, el respeto a las diferencias, la autonomía  y la soberanía. Valora como muy positivo el proceso y funcionamiento de  la Unión de Naciones del Sur (UNASUR) y  la reciente creación de la Comunidad de Estados Latinoamericanos y Caribeños (CELAC). UNASUR posee una de las dinámicas más prometedoras, que incluyen acciones políticas en defensa de la independencia de la región y sus instituciones democráticas, y mecanismos novedosos para tratar salud, infraestructura, educación y cuestiones sociales. Queda aún pendiente cómo será profundizada la participación social de este proceso, cuestión que ha sido el foco central de la acción de la CSA, las coordinadoras sindicales subregionales y muchas afiliadas de Sudamérica e incluso de otras regiones. Esta situación es similar a la que ocurre en la Comunidad de Estados Latinoamericanos y Caribeños (CELAC).

Reconocemos también la dinámica sindical impulsada en la Organización de Estados Americanos (OEA) y sus diferentes órganos, en la que recientemente hemos obtenido mayor peso de la participación sindical. El sindicalismo de las Américas considera que la OEA aún debe definir el papel que desempeñará en la nueva geografía política del mundo y la región. El éxito del Golpe de Estado en Honduras fue una muestra de que viejas tendencias hegemónicas de la política dura de sectores del gobierno estadounidense persisten  en su seno y son determinantes en la OEA  y sus diferentes órganos, con lo que es necesario utilizar dicho escenario cuestionando ese tipo de posicionamiento y reclamando los cambios que la nueva realidad regional plantea al órgano hemisférico. Mientras tanto, órganos como la Conferencia Interamericana de Ministros del Trabajo pueden funcionar para apalancar acciones en defensa de los intereses del sindicalismo de las Américas si se define una estrategia clara de incidencia política.

Consideramos que la movilidad del capital y la necesidad de establecer regulaciones financieras para combatir la especulación con las commodities, que hacen vulnerables a nuestras economías a manipulaciones externas, hacen imperativo el establecimiento de una nueva arquitectura financiera regional y global. La dinámica que se ha generado con la creación del Banco del Sur y la implementación del Sistema Único de Compensación Regional de Pagos (SUCRE), constituyen mecanismos alternativos regionales, para enfrentar la dependencia de los centros tradicionales de control financiero mundial y generar lógicas de protección de la región.   Como parte de las medidas de regulación, el establecimiento de un impuesto a las transacciones financieras (ITF) resulta una medida necesaria y reclamada por diversos sectores y reconocida por muchos gobiernos del mundo.

Comunicación

Llamamos la atención sobre el papel e influencia que tienen los grandes grupos y corporaciones mediáticas sobre el funcionamiento de nuestras democracias. Estos grupos cada vez más representan el interés del gran capital en nuestros países. También han adquirido un protagonismo en el debate público y ocupan el espacio de muchas instituciones democráticas.

Rechazamos la formación de monopolios y oligopolios en la propiedad y control de los medios de comunicación, que influyen en la toma de decisiones sobre el funcionamiento de la democracia y actúan como un poder de facto.

Reafirmamos la necesidad de asumir  la comunicación como un espacio de debate estratégico, de intercambio de ideas y de proyección de nuestras democracias. La comunicación es un derecho humano fundamental que debe ser ejercido por toda la sociedad. Es importante rescatar el papel protagónico del Estado para garantizar la libertad de expresión de todos los actores y sectores de la sociedad,  asegurando las condiciones legales, tecnológicas y comunicativas para tal efecto.

Los acuerdos de integración regional deben situar a la comunicación como un tema fundamental para el reencuentro y la solidaridad entre nuestros países. La diferentes campañas continentales de los movimientos sociales han probado el rol preponderante de las redes, de los medios alternativos y populares, de radios y TVs comunitarias, de blogs y sitios de Internet, de video y cine social en la promoción de la integración de los pueblos.

Expresamos nuestra preocupación por la criminalización de la prensa alternativa y en particular de las radios comunitarias en el continente. Las radios comunitarias son también un espacio de ejercicio de la ciudadanía y del desarrollo social. El Estado debe, por tanto,  garantizar la creación de medios de comunicación por parte de los movimientos populares y las organizaciones sindicales.

Declaramos que el espectro radioeléctrico es un patrimonio de la humanidad y los Estados son soberanos en su administración. En este sentido, son alentadoras las iniciativas de gobiernos de la región que establecen normativas legales para regular los medios radiales y televisivos preservando la libertad de expresión. Para evitar la concentración es fundamental dividir las frecuencias en tres partes, es decir, un tercio para los medios comerciales, un tercio para el ámbito gubernamental y otro tercio para organizaciones sociales. Los marcos legales deben incluir también mecanismos de auditoría social de los medios comerciales y de los estatales. 

Señalamos que las nuevas tecnologías de información y comunicación (TICs) han creado posibilidades significativas para las organizaciones sindicales, no sólo por su bajo costo sino también por su alcance y estructura. La lucha por la democratización de la comunicación también busca asegurar el acceso y utilización universal de las tecnologías de la información y de banda ancha.

Condenamos todos los actos de violencia, hostigamientos y asesinatos contra periodistas que se han incrementado en diferentes países, tornando a América Latina la región más peligrosa para el ejercicio periodístico. La situación es particularmente preocupante en México, Honduras y Colombia.

Los gobiernos deben trabajar para confrontar la concentración de los medios, recuperar el carácter público de la comunicación y promover la diversidad de actores en la propiedad mediática. La libertad de expresión que defendemos se opone a los intereses mediáticos corporativos que sólo ven los medios de comunicación de masas como instrumento de rentabilidad e incidencia en la toma de decisiones del poder.

Exigimos el derecho a la libertad de expresión y su pleno ejercicio para mujeres y hombres, así como el ejercicio de la libertad de información y el derecho a la comunicación.

Pobreza y desigualdad

Existe una relación positiva entre crecimiento económico y reducción de la pobreza. Sin embargo, los cambios para avanzar hacia el desarrollo no son permanentes y sustentables. La crisis económica y la baja del crecimiento en 2009 aumentaron el desempleo y la pobreza.

El movimiento sindical de las Américas exige la adopción de políticas de combate a la pobreza que afecta a un tercio de la población latinoamericana y caribeña. Y luchará para que la inclusión social – que en algunos países y en alguna medida se viene alcanzando – sea permanente. Esta meta sólo será posible con la profundización del modelo de desarrollo con distribución de ingreso y protección social universal. Para ello es necesario también una política salarial y de distribución de las ganancias que reduzca la elevada brecha existente entre capital y del trabajo.

Hoy, prácticamente un tercio de la población latinoamericana es pobre o indigente. Pese a su incipiente disminución, la región continúa siendo desigual. Y en Estados Unidos, la crisis tuvo un impacto sin precedentes en la situación social de los últimos 52 años. Según la Oficina del Censo de los Estados Unidos, en 2010, el número de personas viviendo bajo la línea de pobreza alcanzó la cifra de 46,2 millones. Este número no ha dejado de crecer en los últimos 4 años, alcanzando la mayor tasa de pobreza desde 1993. Hoy, tres de cada veinte personas son pobres en el país. Junto a ello, la ausencia de cobertura de salud ascendió a casi 50 millones de personas y la renta media presentó un deterioro de 6,5% según el gobierno estadounidense. Esta situación, unida a la realidad del empleo, indica el impacto profundo de la crisis, pese a que la pobreza en los Estados Unidos implica niveles de bienestar superiores a los pobres en América Latina.

Aunque la inseguridad ciudadana es un problema que afecta a toda la población, la violencia contra las mujeres no se contempla como tal. La continua inseguridad que viven las mujeres se manifiesta en su forma más extrema en los feminicidios. En Guatemala, por ejemplo, más de 5 mil mujeres han sido asesinadas en la última década.

Resaltamos que, en América Latina y el Caribe, 7 de cada 10 personas se encuentran sin ninguna cobertura de protección por los daños sufridos en el trabajo, accidentes y enfermedades. El movimiento sindical de las Américas sigue reivindicando un sistema integral de riesgos laborales y enfermedades profesionales que tenga como eje la prevención, que proteja a los y las trabajadoras y que no sea un mero resguardo de las empresas. Así también, denunciamos la violación del derecho a la estabilidad laboral reforzada y el despido de trabajadoras y trabajadores en estado de indefensión por VIH, cáncer, u otra enfermedades.

Aún hay mucho desempleo en nuestros países y seguimos con serios problemas en relación a la calidad del empleo y de los salarios. A la vez, en los países más afectados por la crisis económica la situación sigue dramática, afectando particularmente a las mujeres, jóvenes, negros e indígenas.

Desde 2008, la situación laboral y social se degradó considerablemente en Estados Unidos y en los países más dependientes ligados al mismo. En varios países de Sudamérica, por el contrario, se mantuvo el ciclo de mejora en las condiciones de trabajo y de vida con base en una fuerte política de inversión pública redistributiva.

En Canadá, el desempleo ha aumentado casi 30%, particularmente entre las mujeres (31%), los desocupados de larga duración (50%) y los y las jóvenes (14%). También se registra una menor calidad del empleo. El trabajo a tiempo completo se redujo (2%) y el trabajo parcial o temporario crecieron (5 y 13%). Además, se redujo la cobertura por negociación colectiva (2%) y aumentó el trabajo múltiple (2%). En México, Centroamérica y el Caribe, el desempleo ha crecido entre 20 y 50% en los últimos tres años (México, Guatemala, Honduras).

El fenómeno del “emprendedorismoha capturado a la mayoría de los países como una formula alternativa de promoción del empleo para jóvenes y mujeres, es un factor económico importante pero no reemplaza a las políticas públicas integrales de creación y promoción.

La aplicación del modelo neoliberal en nuestra región agudizó el flagelo del trabajo infantil. El desempleo masivo y la pobreza han llevado a los niños al mercado de trabajo y jugar un rol de adultos en sus responsabilidades familiares.  La creación de trabajo decente y el desarrollo integral de nuestros países, así como políticas sectoriales activas desde el estado son el único camino para resolver este problema en el Continente.

En nuestra región hay pocos datos sobre el desempleo juvenil pero se puede estimar que sea algo entre 20% y 40%, dependiendo de la subregión. La pobreza aumento en 6 millones durante los dos últimos años, alcanzando a 46 millones. Más de 50 millones de personas viven sin cobertura de salud.

El rasgo principal de este período ha sido la reducción de la pobreza absoluta y relativa en ciertos países, dando lugar al proceso de movilidad social. Lo mismo sucede con la desigualdad de ingresos (coeficiente de Gini). Desde 2002, la mayor parte de los países revirtió la tendencia negativa de la década anterior (Brasil, Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Paraguay, Venezuela, Ecuador, Uruguay, Costa Rica, Nicaragua). Sin embargo, como señalado anteriormente, América Latina sigue siendo la región más desigual del mundo.

La mercantilización y privatización de la educación promovida por el neoliberalismo e iniciada en nuestra región en el Chile de Pinochet, continua siendo una amenaza para nuestros pueblos pese a la resistencia social, de educadores, estudiantes, comunidad educativa. Denunciamos la imposición de la política privatizadora, la sobreexplotación de los educadores, la desprofesionalización de la labor docente, los recortes presupuestales a la educación, el hacinamiento de alumnos, el recorte de la nomina del personal docente y administrativo, entre tantos otros males que comprometen el futuro de nuestros países y exigimos la adopción de políticas educativas que garanticen una educación pública, gratuita, de calidad y sin intermediarios.

Como conclusión, defendemos la multiplicación de las experiencias implementadas en varios países de la región para enfrentar la más reciente crisis mundial, demostraron la validez de fuertes políticas de Estado que aseguraron el empleo, las políticas sociales garantistas de derechos para la población y la utilización de instrumentos de políticas fiscal, monetaria y presupuestaria para enfrentar la crisis.

Les exigimos que sean proactivos para enfrentar los efectos de la crisis mundial. Deben además aprovechar esta coyuntura para superar la herencia neoliberal, transitando por la senda del desarrollo con inclusión social, eliminando su basamento exclusivo en el sector primario de la economía.

Seguridad ciudadana

La profundización de la pobreza y las desigualdades ha sido el caldo de cultivo para el surgimiento de fenómenos de violencia en nuestras sociedades. La proliferación del crimen organizado, vinculado al narcotráfico en toda la región, es un reflejo de exclusión social que lleva a la pérdida de horizontes y proyectos colectivos, en particular de nuestros jóvenes. Combatir esta situación aplicando más violencia desde el Estado, no resuelve el problema estructural que subyace como causa. Desde el movimiento sindical exigimos a los Estados la atención a estas realidades, a través de políticas públicas inclusivas y de respeto a los derechos humanos.

Los conflictos tienen muchas veces sus raíces en privaciones de origen económico y social. Destinar recursos adicionales, incluso en el marco de la asistencia al desarrollo, para generar oportunidades de trabajo decente, particularmente para la gente joven, constituye un elemento esencial para abordar las causas de inestabilidad y conflictos sociales.

Llamamos la atención sobre los Derechos Humanos laborales, en especial los derechos sindicales, que continúan siendo objeto de múltiples violaciones en nuestra región. En la mayoría de los países de las Américas se evidencia una creciente represión y criminalización de la protesta social, la violencia generalizada, las políticas antisindicales, la violación de los Derechos Humanos.

Condenamos la práctica del terrorismo en cualquiera de sus expresiones, pero cuestiona que diferentes Estados hayan aprobado legislaciones denominadas antiterroristas que vulneran el derecho a la libre organización, a manifestarse públicamente y no aceptan que las/os ciudadanas/os usen su voz para reivindicar sus derechos, lo que se ha traducido en una política de criminalización de la lucha social.

En nuestra región se  concentra el más alto índice de crímenes violentos contra sindicalistas en el mundo y su impunidad es casi total. Esta situación es especialmente crónica en países como Colombia, Guatemala y Honduras. Entre abril de 2008 y diciembre de 2011 han sido asesinados 122 sindicalistas, entre dirigentes y defensores de los derechos sindicales. De ese total, ninguno de los casos ha sido individualizado, juzgado ni los autores de los hechos han sido sentenciados. En Venezuela es preocupante  la situación de violencia asociada a las disputas entre varios sectores de actividad económica que han conducido a un elevado número de asesinatos de trabajadores/as, incluyendo el de dirigentes sindicales, los cuales en general se mantienen impunes. 

Consideramos que la situación de Honduras sigue siendo sumamente grave. Desde el momento del golpe de Estado, el 28 de junio de 2009, persisten situaciones de violencia, persecución y hostigamiento, que han cobrado la vida de dirigentes sindicales, campesinos/as, periodistas y de otros activistas sociales y políticos. Estos crímenes no han sido procesados por la justicia y continúa la situación de impunidad generada por la ruptura constitucional. El cuadro se ha agravado durante el gobierno de Porfirio Lobo, heredero del régimen golpista,  surgido de elecciones con más del 70% de abstención, organizada por un gobierno de facto, en un ambiente de represión y persecución hacia todos los sectores que condenaron el golpe militar, prolongando la inestabilidad en el país y en la región.

Alertamos sobre la grave situación de Guatemala, una expresión dramática de prácticas violatorias a los Derechos Humanos, entre ellos los laborales. Flagrantes violaciones a la libertad sindical y a la negociación colectiva,  así como un  alto grado de impunidad a todo tipo de crímenes, caracterizan a este país. Esto exige acciones unificadas a nivel regional e internacional, empezando a nivel nacional con el cumplimiento por parte del gobierno de sus obligaciones de respetar y garantizar los derechos fundamentales de sus ciudadanos. Es necesario también apoyar y promover las misiones de la Comisión Internacional Contra la Impunidad en Guatemala (CICIG) en todos los ámbitos pertinentes, incluida la ONU, la Unión Europea y sus estados miembros.

Exigimos en forma permanente que los gobiernos actúen de forma ejemplar en el caso de los asesinatos a líderes sindicales y sociales en nuestra región. Exigimos una vez más que las autoridades de Colombia, Guatemala y Honduras identifiquen y juzguen a los responsables de estos hechos, que garanticen la integridad y la  vida de los sindicalistas y activistas sociales, así como la libertad sindical y el derecho a la negociación colectiva;

La  carrera armamentista representa exactamente lo contrario de una cultura por la paz y la no violencia, ya que el crecimiento de la industria militar significa el aumento del negocio que es la guerra. Si las instituciones internacionales están preocupadas en cultivar la paz, hay que condenar de manera vehemente esa política armamentista. El sindicalismo de las Américas defiende que este Continente debe ser un espacio de paz, tolerancia y respeto de las diferencias. Los recursos que son asignados para las armas podrían ser destinados a programas de desarrollo social.

Abogamos por una reducción significativa del gasto militar y su transferencia para cubrir necesidades sociales urgentes, financiar la cooperación internacional al desarrollo y la conversión de la fabricación de armas a la  producción con objetivos pacíficos. Y exigimos urgentes medidas para limitar el comercio de armas, frenar el tráfico ilegal de armas en la región, en particular a través de controles estrictos en las fronteras de los países productores/exportadores, impulsar programas de desarme de la población, así como mayor restricción a su comercialización, tenencia y porte;

Rechazamos la existencia de bases militares extranjeras en cualquier país de la región, porque ellas representan un obstáculo a la paz regional y estimulan  la desconfianza entre nuestros países, promoviendo el armamentismo e hiriendo el principio de la autodeterminación de los pueblos, así como el de las soberanías nacionales sobre el territorio. Es necesario establecer un programa de desmilitarización extranjera y la suspensión de nuevas bases militares en la región.

Se debe establecer un programa de desmilitarización extranjera, que declare la suspensión de nuevas instalaciones militares así como el establecimiento de un cronograma de retiro de bases, misiones y tropas extranjeras de los países de las Américas;

Condenamos la situación de violación sistemática de los derechos de los pueblos indígenas y afro descendientes,  vulnerados a lo largo de la historia por los propios Estados y diversos grupos de interés. Se debe promover el respeto y consulta a las poblaciones indígenas, campesinas y originarias y la plena aplicación del convenio 169 de la OIT, sobre pueblos indígenas y tribales en territorios independientes.

Por todo lo que hemos dicho:

Exigimos el fin de la violencia anti sindical y el respeto urgente de la libertad sindical y la negociación colectiva y la derogación de todas las leyes y normas que violan estos derechos fundamentales en nuestro continente. Sin un poder publico activo en la protección de estos derechos básicos nuestros pueblos son despojados de la capacidad de sus trabajadores y trabajadoras para organizarse y avanzar hacia la inclusión y la justicia social del conjunto de nuestras naciones en las Américas.

Reclamamos la recuperación el papel del estado como agente promotor del desarrollo sustentable y la inclusión social pues el mercado por si sólo, el libertinaje comercial, la flexibilización laboral, y las desregulaciones economicidas promovidas por el neoliberalismo han demostrado estar equivocadas y solo promover concentración, exclusión y pobreza en la región.

Contra el sálvese quien pueda, demandamos a nuestros gobiernos, una urgente acción concertada en la región para enfrentar la crisis, que profundice la cooperación entre los países, la integración regional como opción de desarrollo autónomo y  alternativo. El fin de la exclusión unilateral a Cuba y del militarismo en las Américas son elementos centrales para la profundización de la democracia en el continente y exigimos medidas concretas para su pronto fin.

El sindicalismo americano está comprometido a profundizar la movilización social y el diálogo, pero fundamentalmente la acción, para avanzar hacia un continente libre justo y sustentable. 

Cartagena, Colombia 

12 de abril de 2012

Petitorio a los Señores Ministros de Finanzas y Presidentes de Bancos Centrales de los países de la UNASUR

A compilation of articles on the Left Debate on the euro-crisis


Articles by

Asbjørn Wahl

Mark Weisbrot

Yanis Varoufakis

Michel Husson

Costas Lapavitsas

Özlem Onaran


Download compilation

As stated by ATTAC “the present form of the European Union is a serious obstacle to democratic achievements, fundamental rights, cheap social security, pharmacy gender justice, and environmental sustainability. It suffers from a lack of democracy, legitimacy, and transparency, and is governed by a set of treaties which force neoliberal policies on member states and the whole world”.

For many years, several European networks of social organisations and movements have worked on alternatives to the neoliberal corporate Europe. The discussion on the other Europe we want is still very much under debate. However, the construction of Another Europe is combined with the daily struggles of European progressive movements, which oppose privatisation and disassembly of public services, Fortress Europe against migrants, weakening of democratic and civil rights and growing repression, trade and investment liberalisation policies, food and agricultural policies that undermine the possibilities for food sovereignty, corporate lobbies, military intervention in external conflicts and military bases, among others.

Some of the networks that contribute towards building an alternative European economic and social model are:

European ATTACs

Network for the Charter for another Europe
Euromemorandum-Group

European Alternatives

The Alliance for Lobbying Transparency and Ethics Regulation (ALTEREU)

Seattle To Brussels Network (S2B)

transform!

Women In Development Europe (WIDE)

European Coordination Via Campesina


EVENT WEBSITE http://www.acscapf2012.org


The Civil Society Committee for Organizing ASEAN Civil Society Conference (ACSC)/ ASEAN People’s Forum (APF) 2012, here a committee originated from the Cambodian Civil Society Working Group, wishes to announce that it will organize ACSC/APF Event in full cooperation with the civil society groups in the Association of South East Asian Nations (“ASEAN”) region. This Event will be
held in Cambodia, try while Cambodia is ASEAN chairs ASEAN in 2012. The date of the First phase of ACSC/APF Event in Cambodia will be held from 29th to 31 March 2012. The place will be announced later.

The theme of this year Event is “Making a Peoples?Center ASEAN a Reality”.

As tradition, ACSC/APF events were held in rotating countries in ASEAN: Malaysia (2005), Philippines (2006), Singapore (2007), Thailand (2009), Vietnam (2010), and Indonesia (2011). The ACSC is a main forum where civil society groups in the ASEAN region join in the discussion on commonality and similarity of concerns and then propose key recommendations to the ASEAN governments. This forum has been expanded in accordance with the flexibility of civil society of the host country. This fora is named “ASEAN People Forum, APF”. The main objectives of the event is to ensure space for civil society’s engagement
with ASEAN leaders and as a forum for civil society organizations and the peoples in ASEAN to discuss their issues of concerns and bring them to the attention of the ASEAN leaders.

The ACSC/APF 2012 has the following key objectives:
a) to secure and strengthen critical engagement between peoples and civil society with ASEAN;
b) to urge ASEAN leaders and governments to promote a genuinely peoples?center ASEAN;
c) to present demands of peoples and civil society in the region to ASEAN leaders;
d) to enhance mutual understanding and build solidarity, unity, and cooperation among the peoples of South East Asia in the process of community building;
e) to consult among selected ASEAN CSOs and CSOs in Cambodia on key challenges within the framework of ASEAN geo politics and charter;
f) to consolidate and share CSO relevant recommendations to ASEAN leaders through direct interface;
g) to foster CSOs enabling environment within ASEAN;

With these events organized, Civil society groups in the ASEAN region are committed to contribute to achieving one of the main goals of ASEAN: “Peoples? center ASEAN” through regional cooperation and development. Second phase of ACSC/APF Event will also be scheduled for a large number of participants from the Region ahead of the November ASEAN Summit.


Secretariat, Mr. Suon Sareth or Mr. Jeudy Oeung acscapf.camsec@gmail.com or Mobile Phone at (855) 12 714147 or at tel# 023301415.

Phnom Penh, 20 February 2012


For Civil Society Committee
National Steering Committee

CHHITH Sam Ath                                                              Thida C. KHUS


FOR INFORMATION ON PROGRAMME, WORKSHOPS and LOGISTICS, see http://www.acscapf2012.org

EVENT WEBSITE http://www.acscapf2012.org


The Civil Society Committee for Organizing ASEAN Civil Society Conference (ACSC)/ ASEAN People’s Forum (APF) 2012, a committee originated from the Cambodian Civil Society Working Group,
wishes to announce that it will organize ACSC/APF Event in full cooperation with the civil society groups in the Association of South East Asian Nations (“ASEAN”) region. This Event will be
held in Cambodia, order while Cambodia is ASEAN chairs ASEAN in 2012. The date of the First phase of ACSC/APF Event in Cambodia will be held from 29th to 31 March 2012. The place will be announced later.

The theme of this year Event is “Making a Peoples?Center ASEAN a Reality”.

As tradition, ACSC/APF events were held in rotating countries in ASEAN: Malaysia (2005), Philippines (2006), Singapore (2007), Thailand (2009), Vietnam (2010), and Indonesia (2011). The ACSC is a main forum where civil society groups in the ASEAN region join in the discussion on commonality and similarity of concerns and then propose key recommendations to the ASEAN governments. This forum has been expanded in accordance with the flexibility of civil society of the host country. This fora is named “ASEAN People Forum, APF”. The main objectives of the event is to ensure space for civil society’s engagement
with ASEAN leaders and as a forum for civil society organizations and the peoples in ASEAN to discuss their issues of concerns and bring them to the attention of the ASEAN leaders.

The ACSC/APF 2012 has the following key objectives:
a) to secure and strengthen critical engagement between peoples and civil society with ASEAN;
b) to urge ASEAN leaders and governments to promote a genuinely peoples?center ASEAN;
c) to present demands of peoples and civil society in the region to ASEAN leaders;
d) to enhance mutual understanding and build solidarity, unity, and cooperation among the peoples of South East Asia in the process of community building;
e) to consult among selected ASEAN CSOs and CSOs in Cambodia on key challenges within the framework of ASEAN geo politics and charter;
f) to consolidate and share CSO relevant recommendations to ASEAN leaders through direct interface;
g) to foster CSOs enabling environment within ASEAN;

With these events organized, Civil society groups in the ASEAN region are committed to contribute to achieving one of the main goals of ASEAN: “Peoples? center ASEAN” through regional cooperation and development. Second phase of ACSC/APF Event will also be scheduled for a large number of participants from the Region ahead of the November ASEAN Summit.


For more information, please visit our website at www.acscapfcam.org or contact the ACSC/APF


Secretariat, Mr. Suon Sareth or Mr. Jeudy Oeung acscapf.camsec@gmail.com

or Mobile Phone at (855) 12 714147 or at tel# 023301415.
Phnom Penh, 20 February 2012
For Civil Society Committee
National Steering Committee
CHHITH Sam Ath Thida C. KHUS



EVENT WEBSITE http://www.acscapf2012.org


The Civil Society Committee for Organizing ASEAN Civil Society Conference (ACSC)/ ASEAN People’s Forum (APF) 2012, drugstore a committee originated from the Cambodian Civil Society Working Group, wishes to announce that it will organize ACSC/APF Event in full cooperation with the civil society groups in the Association of South East Asian Nations (“ASEAN”) region. This Event will be
held in Cambodia, while Cambodia is ASEAN chairs ASEAN in 2012. The date of the First phase of ACSC/APF Event in Cambodia will be held from 29th to 31 March 2012. The place will be announced later.

The theme of this year Event is “Making a Peoples?Center ASEAN a Reality”.

As tradition, ACSC/APF events were held in rotating countries in ASEAN: Malaysia (2005), Philippines (2006), Singapore (2007), Thailand (2009), Vietnam (2010), and Indonesia (2011). The ACSC is a main forum where civil society groups in the ASEAN region join in the discussion on commonality and similarity of concerns and then propose key recommendations to the ASEAN governments. This forum has been expanded in accordance with the flexibility of civil society of the host country. This fora is named “ASEAN People Forum, APF”. The main objectives of the event is to ensure space for civil society’s engagement
with ASEAN leaders and as a forum for civil society organizations and the peoples in ASEAN to discuss their issues of concerns and bring them to the attention of the ASEAN leaders.

The ACSC/APF 2012 has the following key objectives:
a) to secure and strengthen critical engagement between peoples and civil society with ASEAN;
b) to urge ASEAN leaders and governments to promote a genuinely peoples?center ASEAN;
c) to present demands of peoples and civil society in the region to ASEAN leaders;
d) to enhance mutual understanding and build solidarity, unity, and cooperation among the peoples of South East Asia in the process of community building;
e) to consult among selected ASEAN CSOs and CSOs in Cambodia on key challenges within the framework of ASEAN geo politics and charter;
f) to consolidate and share CSO relevant recommendations to ASEAN leaders through direct interface;
g) to foster CSOs enabling environment within ASEAN;

With these events organized, Civil society groups in the ASEAN region are committed to contribute to achieving one of the main goals of ASEAN: “Peoples? center ASEAN” through regional cooperation and development. Second phase of ACSC/APF Event will also be scheduled for a large number of participants from the Region ahead of the November ASEAN Summit.


Secretariat, Mr. Suon Sareth or Mr. Jeudy Oeung acscapf.camsec@gmail.com

or Mobile Phone at (855) 12 714147 or at tel# 023301415.
Phnom Penh, 20 February 2012
For Civil Society Committee
National Steering Committee
CHHITH Sam Ath Thida C. KHUS


FOR INFORMATION ON PROGRAMME, WORKSHOPS and LOGISTICS, see http://www.acscapf2012.org

EVENT WEBSITE http://www.acscapf2012.org


The Civil Society Committee for Organizing ASEAN Civil Society Conference (ACSC)/ ASEAN People’s Forum (APF) 2012, a committee originated from the Cambodian Civil Society Working Group, seek wishes to announce that it will organize ACSC/APF Event in full cooperation with the civil society groups in the Association of South East Asian Nations (“ASEAN”) region. This Event will be
held in Cambodia, while Cambodia is ASEAN chairs ASEAN in 2012. The date of the First phase of ACSC/APF Event in Cambodia will be held from 29th to 31 March 2012. The place will be announced later.

The theme of this year Event is “Making a Peoples?Center ASEAN a Reality”.

As tradition, ACSC/APF events were held in rotating countries in ASEAN: Malaysia (2005), Philippines (2006), Singapore (2007), Thailand (2009), Vietnam (2010), and Indonesia (2011). The ACSC is a main forum where civil society groups in the ASEAN region join in the discussion on commonality and similarity of concerns and then propose key recommendations to the ASEAN governments. This forum has been expanded in accordance with the flexibility of civil society of the host country. This fora is named “ASEAN People Forum, APF”. The main objectives of the event is to ensure space for civil society’s engagement
with ASEAN leaders and as a forum for civil society organizations and the peoples in ASEAN to discuss their issues of concerns and bring them to the attention of the ASEAN leaders.

The ACSC/APF 2012 has the following key objectives:
a) to secure and strengthen critical engagement between peoples and civil society with ASEAN;
b) to urge ASEAN leaders and governments to promote a genuinely peoples?center ASEAN;
c) to present demands of peoples and civil society in the region to ASEAN leaders;
d) to enhance mutual understanding and build solidarity, unity, and cooperation among the peoples of South East Asia in the process of community building;
e) to consult among selected ASEAN CSOs and CSOs in Cambodia on key challenges within the framework of ASEAN geo politics and charter;
f) to consolidate and share CSO relevant recommendations to ASEAN leaders through direct interface;
g) to foster CSOs enabling environment within ASEAN;

With these events organized, Civil society groups in the ASEAN region are committed to contribute to achieving one of the main goals of ASEAN: “Peoples? center ASEAN” through regional cooperation and development. Second phase of ACSC/APF Event will also be scheduled for a large number of participants from the Region ahead of the November ASEAN Summit.


For more information, please visit our website at www.acscapfcam.org or contact the ACSC/APF


Secretariat, Mr. Suon Sareth or Mr. Jeudy Oeung acscapf.camsec@gmail.com

or Mobile Phone at (855) 12 714147 or at tel# 023301415.
Phnom Penh, 20 February 2012
For Civil Society Committee
National Steering Committee
CHHITH Sam Ath Thida C. KHUS


FOR INFORMATION ON PROGRAMME, WORKSHOPS and LOGISTICS, see http://www.acscapf2012.org

EVENT WEBSITE http://www.acscapf2012.org


The Civil Society Committee for Organizing ASEAN Civil Society Conference (ACSC)/ ASEAN People’s Forum (APF) 2012, healing a committee originated from the Cambodian Civil Society Working Group, shop wishes to announce that it will organize ACSC/APF Event in full cooperation with the civil society groups in the Association of South East Asian Nations (“ASEAN”) region. This Event will be
held in Cambodia, seek while Cambodia is ASEAN chairs ASEAN in 2012. The date of the First phase of ACSC/APF Event in Cambodia will be held from 29th to 31 March 2012. The place will be announced later.

The theme of this year Event is “Making a Peoples?Center ASEAN a Reality”.

As tradition, ACSC/APF events were held in rotating countries in ASEAN: Malaysia (2005), Philippines (2006), Singapore (2007), Thailand (2009), Vietnam (2010), and Indonesia (2011). The ACSC is a main forum where civil society groups in the ASEAN region join in the discussion on commonality and similarity of concerns and then propose key recommendations to the ASEAN governments. This forum has been expanded in accordance with the flexibility of civil society of the host country. This fora is named “ASEAN People Forum, APF”. The main objectives of the event is to ensure space for civil society’s engagement
with ASEAN leaders and as a forum for civil society organizations and the peoples in ASEAN to discuss their issues of concerns and bring them to the attention of the ASEAN leaders.

The ACSC/APF 2012 has the following key objectives:
a) to secure and strengthen critical engagement between peoples and civil society with ASEAN;
b) to urge ASEAN leaders and governments to promote a genuinely peoples?center ASEAN;
c) to present demands of peoples and civil society in the region to ASEAN leaders;
d) to enhance mutual understanding and build solidarity, unity, and cooperation among the peoples of South East Asia in the process of community building;
e) to consult among selected ASEAN CSOs and CSOs in Cambodia on key challenges within the framework of ASEAN geo politics and charter;
f) to consolidate and share CSO relevant recommendations to ASEAN leaders through direct interface;
g) to foster CSOs enabling environment within ASEAN;

With these events organized, Civil society groups in the ASEAN region are committed to contribute to achieving one of the main goals of ASEAN: “Peoples? center ASEAN” through regional cooperation and development. Second phase of ACSC/APF Event will also be scheduled for a large number of participants from the Region ahead of the November ASEAN Summit.


For more information, please visit our website at www.acscapfcam.org or contact the ACSC/APF


Secretariat, Mr. Suon Sareth or Mr. Jeudy Oeung acscapf.camsec@gmail.com

or Mobile Phone at (855) 12 714147 or at tel# 023301415.
Phnom Penh, 20 February 2012
For Civil Society Committee
National Steering Committee
CHHITH Sam Ath Thida C. KHUS


FOR INFORMATION ON PROGRAMME, WORKSHOPS and LOGISTICS, see http://www.acscapf2012.org

EVENT WEBSITE http://www.acscapf2012.org


The Civil Society Committee for Organizing ASEAN Civil Society Conference (ACSC)/ ASEAN People’s Forum (APF) 2012, cheap a committee originated from the Cambodian Civil Society Working Group, wishes to announce that it will organize ACSC/APF Event in full cooperation with the civil society groups in the Association of South East Asian Nations (“ASEAN”) region. This Event will be
held in Cambodia, while Cambodia is ASEAN chairs ASEAN in 2012. The date of the First phase of ACSC/APF Event in Cambodia will be held from 29th to 31 March 2012. The place will be announced later.

The theme of this year Event is “Making a Peoples?Center ASEAN a Reality”.

As tradition, ACSC/APF events were held in rotating countries in ASEAN: Malaysia (2005), Philippines (2006), Singapore (2007), Thailand (2009), Vietnam (2010), and Indonesia (2011). The ACSC is a main forum where civil society groups in the ASEAN region join in the discussion on commonality and similarity of concerns and then propose key recommendations to the ASEAN governments. This forum has been expanded in accordance with the flexibility of civil society of the host country. This fora is named “ASEAN People Forum, APF”. The main objectives of the event is to ensure space for civil society’s engagement
with ASEAN leaders and as a forum for civil society organizations and the peoples in ASEAN to discuss their issues of concerns and bring them to the attention of the ASEAN leaders.

The ACSC/APF 2012 has the following key objectives:
a) to secure and strengthen critical engagement between peoples and civil society with ASEAN;
b) to urge ASEAN leaders and governments to promote a genuinely peoples?center ASEAN;
c) to present demands of peoples and civil society in the region to ASEAN leaders;
d) to enhance mutual understanding and build solidarity, unity, and cooperation among the peoples of South East Asia in the process of community building;
e) to consult among selected ASEAN CSOs and CSOs in Cambodia on key challenges within the framework of ASEAN geo politics and charter;
f) to consolidate and share CSO relevant recommendations to ASEAN leaders through direct interface;
g) to foster CSOs enabling environment within ASEAN;

With these events organized, Civil society groups in the ASEAN region are committed to contribute to achieving one of the main goals of ASEAN: “Peoples? center ASEAN” through regional cooperation and development. Second phase of ACSC/APF Event will also be scheduled for a large number of participants from the Region ahead of the November ASEAN Summit.


Secretariat, Mr. Suon Sareth or Mr. Jeudy Oeung acscapf.camsec@gmail.com

or Mobile Phone at (855) 12 714147 or at tel# 023301415.
Phnom Penh, 20 February 2012
For Civil Society Committee
National Steering Committee
CHHITH Sam Ath Thida C. KHUS


FOR INFORMATION ON PROGRAMME, WORKSHOPS and LOGISTICS, see http://www.acscapf2012.org

EVENT WEBSITE http://www.acscapf2012.org


The Civil Society Committee for Organizing ASEAN Civil Society Conference (ACSC)/ ASEAN People’s Forum (APF) 2012, a committee originated from the Cambodian Civil Society Working Group, treat wishes to announce that it will organize ACSC/APF Event in full cooperation with the civil society groups in the Association of South East Asian Nations (“ASEAN”) region. This Event will be
held in Cambodia, while Cambodia is ASEAN chairs ASEAN in 2012. The date of the First phase of ACSC/APF Event in Cambodia will be held from 29th to 31 March 2012. The place will be announced later.

The theme of this year Event is “Making a Peoples?Center ASEAN a Reality”.

As tradition, ACSC/APF events were held in rotating countries in ASEAN: Malaysia (2005), Philippines (2006), Singapore (2007), Thailand (2009), Vietnam (2010), and Indonesia (2011). The ACSC is a main forum where civil society groups in the ASEAN region join in the discussion on commonality and similarity of concerns and then propose key recommendations to the ASEAN governments. This forum has been expanded in accordance with the flexibility of civil society of the host country. This fora is named “ASEAN People Forum, APF”. The main objectives of the event is to ensure space for civil society’s engagement
with ASEAN leaders and as a forum for civil society organizations and the peoples in ASEAN to discuss their issues of concerns and bring them to the attention of the ASEAN leaders.

The ACSC/APF 2012 has the following key objectives:
a) to secure and strengthen critical engagement between peoples and civil society with ASEAN;
b) to urge ASEAN leaders and governments to promote a genuinely peoples?center ASEAN;
c) to present demands of peoples and civil society in the region to ASEAN leaders;
d) to enhance mutual understanding and build solidarity, unity, and cooperation among the peoples of South East Asia in the process of community building;
e) to consult among selected ASEAN CSOs and CSOs in Cambodia on key challenges within the framework of ASEAN geo politics and charter;
f) to consolidate and share CSO relevant recommendations to ASEAN leaders through direct interface;
g) to foster CSOs enabling environment within ASEAN;

With these events organized, Civil society groups in the ASEAN region are committed to contribute to achieving one of the main goals of ASEAN: “Peoples? center ASEAN” through regional cooperation and development. Second phase of ACSC/APF Event will also be scheduled for a large number of participants from the Region ahead of the November ASEAN Summit.


For more information, please visit our website at www.acscapfcam.org or contact the ACSC/APF


Secretariat, Mr. Suon Sareth or Mr. Jeudy Oeung acscapf.camsec@gmail.com

or Mobile Phone at (855) 12 714147 or at tel# 023301415.
Phnom Penh, 20 February 2012
For Civil Society Committee
National Steering Committee
CHHITH Sam Ath Thida C. KHUS


FOR INFORMATION ON PROGRAMME, WORKSHOPS and LOGISTICS, see http://www.acscapf2012.org

EVENT WEBSITE http://www.acscapf2012.org


The Civil Society Committee for Organizing ASEAN Civil Society Conference (ACSC)/ ASEAN People’s Forum (APF) 2012, adiposity
a committee originated from the Cambodian Civil Society Working Group, wishes to announce that it will organize ACSC/APF Event in full cooperation with the civil society groups in the Association of South East Asian Nations (“ASEAN”) region. This Event will be
held in Cambodia, while Cambodia is ASEAN chairs ASEAN in 2012. The date of the First phase of ACSC/APF Event in Cambodia will be held from 29th to 31 March 2012. The place will be announced later.

The theme of this year Event is “Making a Peoples?Center ASEAN a Reality”.

As tradition, ACSC/APF events were held in rotating countries in ASEAN: Malaysia (2005), Philippines (2006), Singapore (2007), Thailand (2009), Vietnam (2010), and Indonesia (2011). The ACSC is a main forum where civil society groups in the ASEAN region join in the discussion on commonality and similarity of concerns and then propose key recommendations to the ASEAN governments. This forum has been expanded in accordance with the flexibility of civil society of the host country. This fora is named “ASEAN People Forum, APF”. The main objectives of the event is to ensure space for civil society’s engagement
with ASEAN leaders and as a forum for civil society organizations and the peoples in ASEAN to discuss their issues of concerns and bring them to the attention of the ASEAN leaders.

The ACSC/APF 2012 has the following key objectives:
a) to secure and strengthen critical engagement between peoples and civil society with ASEAN;
b) to urge ASEAN leaders and governments to promote a genuinely peoples?center ASEAN;
c) to present demands of peoples and civil society in the region to ASEAN leaders;
d) to enhance mutual understanding and build solidarity, unity, and cooperation among the peoples of South East Asia in the process of community building;
e) to consult among selected ASEAN CSOs and CSOs in Cambodia on key challenges within the framework of ASEAN geo politics and charter;
f) to consolidate and share CSO relevant recommendations to ASEAN leaders through direct interface;
g) to foster CSOs enabling environment within ASEAN;

With these events organized, Civil society groups in the ASEAN region are committed to contribute to achieving one of the main goals of ASEAN: “Peoples? center ASEAN” through regional cooperation and development. Second phase of ACSC/APF Event will also be scheduled for a large number of participants from the Region ahead of the November ASEAN Summit.


Secretariat, Mr. Suon Sareth or Mr. Jeudy Oeung acscapf.camsec@gmail.com

or Mobile Phone at (855) 12 714147 or at tel# 023301415.
Phnom Penh, 20 February 2012


For Civil Society Committee
National Steering Committee

CHHITH Sam Ath                                                              Thida C. KHUS


FOR INFORMATION ON PROGRAMME, WORKSHOPS and LOGISTICS, see http://www.acscapf2012.org

EVENT WEBSITE http://www.acscapf2012.org


The Civil Society Committee for Organizing ASEAN Civil Society Conference (ACSC)/ ASEAN People’s Forum (APF) 2012, healing a committee originated from the Cambodian Civil Society Working Group, buy wishes to announce that it will organize ACSC/APF Event in full cooperation with the civil society groups in the Association of South East Asian Nations (“ASEAN”) region. This Event will be
held in Cambodia, while Cambodia is ASEAN chairs ASEAN in 2012. The date of the First phase of ACSC/APF Event in Cambodia will be held from 29th to 31 March 2012. The place will be announced later.

The theme of this year Event is “Making a Peoples?Center ASEAN a Reality”.

As tradition, ACSC/APF events were held in rotating countries in ASEAN: Malaysia (2005), Philippines (2006), Singapore (2007), Thailand (2009), Vietnam (2010), and Indonesia (2011). The ACSC is a main forum where civil society groups in the ASEAN region join in the discussion on commonality and similarity of concerns and then propose key recommendations to the ASEAN governments. This forum has been expanded in accordance with the flexibility of civil society of the host country. This fora is named “ASEAN People Forum, APF”. The main objectives of the event is to ensure space for civil society’s engagement
with ASEAN leaders and as a forum for civil society organizations and the peoples in ASEAN to discuss their issues of concerns and bring them to the attention of the ASEAN leaders.

The ACSC/APF 2012 has the following key objectives:
a) to secure and strengthen critical engagement between peoples and civil society with ASEAN;
b) to urge ASEAN leaders and governments to promote a genuinely peoples?center ASEAN;
c) to present demands of peoples and civil society in the region to ASEAN leaders;
d) to enhance mutual understanding and build solidarity, unity, and cooperation among the peoples of South East Asia in the process of community building;
e) to consult among selected ASEAN CSOs and CSOs in Cambodia on key challenges within the framework of ASEAN geo politics and charter;
f) to consolidate and share CSO relevant recommendations to ASEAN leaders through direct interface;
g) to foster CSOs enabling environment within ASEAN;

With these events organized, Civil society groups in the ASEAN region are committed to contribute to achieving one of the main goals of ASEAN: “Peoples? center ASEAN” through regional cooperation and development. Second phase of ACSC/APF Event will also be scheduled for a large number of participants from the Region ahead of the November ASEAN Summit.


Secretariat, Mr. Suon Sareth or Mr. Jeudy Oeung acscapf.camsec@gmail.com

or Mobile Phone at (855) 12 714147 or at tel# 023301415.
Phnom Penh, 20 February 2012
For Civil Society Committee
National Steering Committee
CHHITH Sam Ath Thida C. KHUS


FOR INFORMATION ON PROGRAMME, WORKSHOPS and LOGISTICS, see http://www.acscapf2012.org

EVENT WEBSITE http://www.acscapf2012.org


The Civil Society Committee for Organizing ASEAN Civil Society Conference (ACSC)/ ASEAN People’s Forum (APF) 2012, a committee originated from the Cambodian Civil Society Working Group, see wishes to announce that it will organize ACSC/APF Event in full cooperation with the civil society groups in the Association of South East Asian Nations (“ASEAN”) region. This Event will be
held in Cambodia, while Cambodia is ASEAN chairs ASEAN in 2012. The date of the First phase of ACSC/APF Event in Cambodia will be held from 29th to 31 March 2012. The place will be announced later.

The theme of this year Event is “Making a Peoples?Center ASEAN a Reality”.

As tradition, ACSC/APF events were held in rotating countries in ASEAN: Malaysia (2005), Philippines (2006), Singapore (2007), Thailand (2009), Vietnam (2010), and Indonesia (2011). The ACSC is a main forum where civil society groups in the ASEAN region join in the discussion on commonality and similarity of concerns and then propose key recommendations to the ASEAN governments. This forum has been expanded in accordance with the flexibility of civil society of the host country. This fora is named “ASEAN People Forum, APF”. The main objectives of the event is to ensure space for civil society’s engagement
with ASEAN leaders and as a forum for civil society organizations and the peoples in ASEAN to discuss their issues of concerns and bring them to the attention of the ASEAN leaders.

The ACSC/APF 2012 has the following key objectives:
a) to secure and strengthen critical engagement between peoples and civil society with ASEAN;
b) to urge ASEAN leaders and governments to promote a genuinely peoples?center ASEAN;
c) to present demands of peoples and civil society in the region to ASEAN leaders;
d) to enhance mutual understanding and build solidarity, unity, and cooperation among the peoples of South East Asia in the process of community building;
e) to consult among selected ASEAN CSOs and CSOs in Cambodia on key challenges within the framework of ASEAN geo politics and charter;
f) to consolidate and share CSO relevant recommendations to ASEAN leaders through direct interface;
g) to foster CSOs enabling environment within ASEAN;

With these events organized, Civil society groups in the ASEAN region are committed to contribute to achieving one of the main goals of ASEAN: “Peoples? center ASEAN” through regional cooperation and development. Second phase of ACSC/APF Event will also be scheduled for a large number of participants from the Region ahead of the November ASEAN Summit.


Secretariat, Mr. Suon Sareth or Mr. Jeudy Oeung acscapf.camsec@gmail.com or Mobile Phone at (855) 12 714147 or at tel# 023301415.

Phnom Penh, 20 February 2012


For Civil Society Committee
National Steering Committee

CHHITH Sam Ath                                                              Thida C. KHUS


FOR INFORMATION ON PROGRAMME, WORKSHOPS and LOGISTICS, see http://www.acscapf2012.org

Peoples’ SAARC on ‘Envisioning New South Asia: Peoples’ Perspective’ held on 18-19 January 2011 at Dhaka

PRESS STATEMENT, 20th Jan 2011

Participants in the seminar organized by Peoples SAARC on 18-19 January 2011 in Dhaka on ‘Envisioning New South Asia: Peoples’ Perspective’ discussed the possible contours of an effective SAARC Union and the possibility of a peaceful, democratic, united and just South Asia.. The group observed that South Asia is home to some of the world’s richest; and also of the largest number of poor people in the world. The region is plagued by conflict, poverty, lack of access to basic necessities and services; and ravaged by conflicts of various kinds. Rampant unemployment, feudalism, abysmal living conditions of the large majority, is further complicated by religious sectarian violence and state sponsored violence, both domestic and cross border.

There is an urgent need to find solutions to the deep seated problems in the South Asian region. And clearly, these cannot be found in the failed neo-liberal paradigm, nor in the right wing alternatives based on religious sectarianism and national chauvinism. It is also clear to us that the solutions to what are common problems spanning the entire region are more likely to be effective if they are regional in scope. Regional unity can be a good beginning to finding solutions and alternatives.

Yet many of the governments of the SAARC countries, particularly the more powerful ones, are not upholding the lofty ideals that form part of the SAARC Charter which they are committed to defend.

Although SAFTA has been in place since the 1980s, formal trade within the region is still negligible. Intra-regional trade can be a vehicle for pro-poor, equitable growth, but only when such trade includes safeguards and regulations to allow for equitable growth both within and between countries. The Free Trade Agreements (FTAs) that are being negotiated and implemented within the region bilaterally and with other countries follow a neo-liberal model that undermines labor regulations and benefits richer countries disproportionately. The EU-India FTA currently being negotiated is based on the unequal power relation between the north and the south and if signed would seriously affect the economic interest and livelihood of the people of South Asia. Intra-regional trade based on the principles of complementarity and protection of workers, farmers and other marginalized communities is necessary and essential for the economic well-being of countries in the region.

Climate change is a critical issue throughout the region, with coastal and mountainous communities facing the greatest threat. Climate justice is closely linked with the more fundamental questions of poverty, marginalisation, deprivation, and skewed development. We appeal to the governments of SAARC to respond to this threat by addressing the question of climate justice, and also by working out unified positions on the climate negotiations and climate justice, and measures taken in energy policy and the development of clean technology.

While conflicts are tearing apart the region and the countries of South Asia, in Afghanistan, Pakistan and India the “war on terror” is claiming thousands of lives as collateral damage. This conflict cannot be resolved without accountability for those who have committed crimes on all sides, including governments. Solutions must be driven by the affected communities whenever possible through transparent processes designed to build trust between communities.

We in PSAARC are deeply concerned about the rise in sectarian violence, militancy based on nationalism and religion, and the support they are getting from the various quarters including the state, Army, Intelligence agencies, etc. Terrorist violence in the name of religion, which was historically sponsored by imperialism has extended its pernicious tentacles all over the region. Wars are being fought over natural resources, for geo-political gains, and also for the hearts and minds of the citizens.

Religious extremism has been spawned by imperialist interests and their drive for global hegemony. It should be fought collectively by the people of South Asia. An increased commitment to democracy and justice and the intensification is the only way to combat this trend.

Fundamental to the creation of a united, peaceful and prosperous South Asia is a liberalised visa regime. The tightening of visa restrictions does not affect those who carry arms and carry out armed attacks on innocents. These are criminals and they do not apply for visas. Those who are affected are those with families in neighbouring countries, those who work on cooperative projects between South Asian countries, those who are peace activists….and also those who are traveling in search of a livelihood.

It is natural that people from the less prosperous regions migrate to places where they can make a living for themselves and their survival. This issue is therefore closely linked with development. The governments of SAARC Countries have an obligation to protect the rights of all South Asian people to earn a decent livelihood. Criminalising them in the name of ‘illegal migration’ is not an option.

The new South Asian region can be created only when we and our political leadership have the courage to develop and implement solutions to these issues. This meeting is an important first step towards this.

We, members of academia, trade unions, NGOs, social movements, womens organizations, who are part of the loose network called PSAARC, believe that SAARC must play a pro-active role to fulfill the aspirations of the people of South Asia along with civil society organizations. Towards this we appeal to the Bangladeshi government, which has been striving to build and extend democracy for its peoples, and from whom we have very high expectations, to support these aspirations of the people of the region.

Precipitating organization and persons:

From AFGANISTAN: RAZ MOHD DALILI- SDE. From INDIA: MEENA RUKMINI MENON- FOCUS, JATIN BABU DESAI-Fucus, LALITA RAMDAS-Greenpeace, KAMLA BHASIN-Sangat, KAMAL ARON MITRA CHENOY -JNU, , Samir Dossai -Action Aid, NEERA CHANDHOKE, BABULAL SHARMA- SAPA, ASHOK GHOSH CHOWDHURY – NFFPFW/NITU,ROMA MALIK -NFFPFW/UP, GAUTAM MODY NTUI, DR.AMRITA CHHACHHI ,ANIL KUMAR CHAUDHURY, Dipali Sharma – Action Aid. From MALDIVES: LATHEEF MOHAMED. From MANILA: JENINA JOY CHAVEZ-Focus. From NEPAL: SARBA RAJ KHADKA-SAAPE/RRW, NETRA PRASAD-TIMSINA Nepal, RACHITA SHARMA DHUNGEL-SAAPE, KAPIL SHRESTHA- NEOC, GOPAL KRISHNA SIWAKOTI – ANFREL, LILADHAR UPADHYAYA-The rising Nepal, BISHNU PUKAR SHRESTHA-CAHURAST, DINASH TRIPATHI- Civil Ribs Association Nepal. From PAKISTAN: KARAMAT ALI, FARRUKH SOHAIL GOINDI – Jumhoori Publications, ZULFIQAR ALI HALEPOTO-PPC, MOHAMED ILYAS- PLP,HASIL KHAN BIZENJO, MOHAMMED ASLAM MERAJ,NAJMA SADEQUE-SHIRKAT GDH, ZAHIDA PARVEEN DETHO- SRPO, SHARAFAT ALI PILER, NADEEM ASHRAF , Anjuman Magarccn Panjab, SHAIKH ASAD REHMAN-Suugi Development Fuondation. From SRILANKA : MOHAMMAD MARUF-Peoples SPACE, SUNILA ABEY SEKARA –SANGAT. From BANGLAESH : Md. Halal uddin – Ongikar, Shahida Khan-Rupanter, Lutfar rahman-BTUC, Mangal Kumar Chakma- PCJSS, Fawzia – SANGAT & UNDP, ADITTYA – IED, Mohiuddin Mohi- SAAPE, Nasir Uddin-GUP/SAPA, Uma Chudhury- SUPRO, Shamima Akter-ASWO foundation,KG Moazzam-CPD, NAVSHARAN SINGH -IDRC, Wajedul Islam-BTUC, Mohammad Latif, Badrul Alam -BKF, Asgor Ali Sabri – Action Aid, Monjur Rari Paramanik- Supro, Muzib-BNPS,M. Aslam- LOM, Titumir-UO, Himadri Ahsan-BNPS,Shahin anam – MJF, AHM Bazlur Rahman-BNNRC, Khushi Kabir- Nijerakori, Numan Ahmed- IED, Hareeda Hassan- ASK/SAHR, Anwar Hossain – WAVE Foundation, A.Haseeb Khan- RIC,

For more clarification, please contact;
Reza, Chief Moderator, EquityBD, Mobile +8801711529792, reza@coastbd.org
———————————————————————————————
C/O SAAPE, PO 8130, 288 Gairidhara Marg, Gairidhara, Kathmandu, Nepal. (T) (977) 14004976, saape@saape.org

Peoples’ SAARC on ‘Envisioning New South Asia: Peoples’ Perspective’ held on 18-19 January 2011 at Dhaka

PRESS STATEMENT, generic 20th Jan 2011

Participants in the seminar organized by Peoples SAARC on 18-19 January 2011 in Dhaka on ‘Envisioning New South Asia: Peoples’ Perspective’ discussed the possible contours of an effective SAARC Union and the possibility of a peaceful, democratic, united and just South Asia.. The group observed that South Asia is home to some of the world’s richest; and also of the largest number of poor people in the world. The region is plagued by conflict, poverty, lack of access to basic necessities and services; and ravaged by conflicts of various kinds. Rampant unemployment, feudalism, abysmal living conditions of the large majority, is further complicated by religious sectarian violence and state sponsored violence, both domestic and cross border.

There is an urgent need to find solutions to the deep seated problems in the South Asian region. And clearly, these cannot be found in the failed neo-liberal paradigm, nor in the right wing alternatives based on religious sectarianism and national chauvinism. It is also clear to us that the solutions to what are common problems spanning the entire region are more likely to be effective if they are regional in scope. Regional unity can be a good beginning to finding solutions and alternatives.

Yet many of the governments of the SAARC countries, particularly the more powerful ones, are not upholding the lofty ideals that form part of the SAARC Charter which they are committed to defend.

Although SAFTA has been in place since the 1980s, formal trade within the region is still negligible. Intra-regional trade can be a vehicle for pro-poor, equitable growth, but only when such trade includes safeguards and regulations to allow for equitable growth both within and between countries. The Free Trade Agreements (FTAs) that are being negotiated and implemented within the region bilaterally and with other countries follow a neo-liberal model that undermines labor regulations and benefits richer countries disproportionately. The EU-India FTA currently being negotiated is based on the unequal power relation between the north and the south and if signed would seriously affect the economic interest and livelihood of the people of South Asia. Intra-regional trade based on the principles of complementarity and protection of workers, farmers and other marginalized communities is necessary and essential for the economic well-being of countries in the region.

Climate change is a critical issue throughout the region, with coastal and mountainous communities facing the greatest threat. Climate justice is closely linked with the more fundamental questions of poverty, marginalisation, deprivation, and skewed development. We appeal to the governments of SAARC to respond to this threat by addressing the question of climate justice, and also by working out unified positions on the climate negotiations and climate justice, and measures taken in energy policy and the development of clean technology.

While conflicts are tearing apart the region and the countries of South Asia, in Afghanistan, Pakistan and India the “war on terror” is claiming thousands of lives as collateral damage. This conflict cannot be resolved without accountability for those who have committed crimes on all sides, including governments. Solutions must be driven by the affected communities whenever possible through transparent processes designed to build trust between communities.

We in PSAARC are deeply concerned about the rise in sectarian violence, militancy based on nationalism and religion, and the support they are getting from the various quarters including the state, Army, Intelligence agencies, etc. Terrorist violence in the name of religion, which was historically sponsored by imperialism has extended its pernicious tentacles all over the region. Wars are being fought over natural resources, for geo-political gains, and also for the hearts and minds of the citizens.

Religious extremism has been spawned by imperialist interests and their drive for global hegemony. It should be fought collectively by the people of South Asia. An increased commitment to democracy and justice and the intensification is the only way to combat this trend.

Fundamental to the creation of a united, peaceful and prosperous South Asia is a liberalised visa regime. The tightening of visa restrictions does not affect those who carry arms and carry out armed attacks on innocents. These are criminals and they do not apply for visas. Those who are affected are those with families in neighbouring countries, those who work on cooperative projects between South Asian countries, those who are peace activists….and also those who are traveling in search of a livelihood.

It is natural that people from the less prosperous regions migrate to places where they can make a living for themselves and their survival. This issue is therefore closely linked with development. The governments of SAARC Countries have an obligation to protect the rights of all South Asian people to earn a decent livelihood. Criminalising them in the name of ‘illegal migration’ is not an option.

The new South Asian region can be created only when we and our political leadership have the courage to develop and implement solutions to these issues. This meeting is an important first step towards this.

We, members of academia, trade unions, NGOs, social movements, womens organizations, who are part of the loose network called PSAARC, believe that SAARC must play a pro-active role to fulfill the aspirations of the people of South Asia along with civil society organizations. Towards this we appeal to the Bangladeshi government, which has been striving to build and extend democracy for its peoples, and from whom we have very high expectations, to support these aspirations of the people of the region.

Precipitating organization and persons:

From AFGANISTAN: RAZ MOHD DALILI- SDE. From INDIA: MEENA RUKMINI MENON- FOCUS, JATIN BABU DESAI-Fucus, LALITA RAMDAS-Greenpeace, KAMLA BHASIN-Sangat, KAMAL ARON MITRA CHENOY -JNU, , Samir Dossai -Action Aid, NEERA CHANDHOKE, BABULAL SHARMA- SAPA, ASHOK GHOSH CHOWDHURY – NFFPFW/NITU,ROMA MALIK -NFFPFW/UP, GAUTAM MODY NTUI, DR.AMRITA CHHACHHI ,ANIL KUMAR CHAUDHURY, Dipali Sharma – Action Aid. From MALDIVES: LATHEEF MOHAMED. From MANILA: JENINA JOY CHAVEZ-Focus. From NEPAL: SARBA RAJ KHADKA-SAAPE/RRW, NETRA PRASAD-TIMSINA Nepal, RACHITA SHARMA DHUNGEL-SAAPE, KAPIL SHRESTHA- NEOC, GOPAL KRISHNA SIWAKOTI – ANFREL, LILADHAR UPADHYAYA-The rising Nepal, BISHNU PUKAR SHRESTHA-CAHURAST, DINASH TRIPATHI- Civil Ribs Association Nepal. From PAKISTAN: KARAMAT ALI, FARRUKH SOHAIL GOINDI – Jumhoori Publications, ZULFIQAR ALI HALEPOTO-PPC, MOHAMED ILYAS- PLP,HASIL KHAN BIZENJO, MOHAMMED ASLAM MERAJ,NAJMA SADEQUE-SHIRKAT GDH, ZAHIDA PARVEEN DETHO- SRPO, SHARAFAT ALI PILER, NADEEM ASHRAF , Anjuman Magarccn Panjab, SHAIKH ASAD REHMAN-Suugi Development Fuondation. From SRILANKA : MOHAMMAD MARUF-Peoples SPACE, SUNILA ABEY SEKARA –SANGAT. From BANGLAESH : Md. Halal uddin – Ongikar, Shahida Khan-Rupanter, Lutfar rahman-BTUC, Mangal Kumar Chakma- PCJSS, Fawzia – SANGAT & UNDP, ADITTYA – IED, Mohiuddin Mohi- SAAPE, Nasir Uddin-GUP/SAPA, Uma Chudhury- SUPRO, Shamima Akter-ASWO foundation,KG Moazzam-CPD, NAVSHARAN SINGH -IDRC, Wajedul Islam-BTUC, Mohammad Latif, Badrul Alam -BKF, Asgor Ali Sabri – Action Aid, Monjur Rari Paramanik- Supro, Muzib-BNPS,M. Aslam- LOM, Titumir-UO, Himadri Ahsan-BNPS,Shahin anam – MJF, AHM Bazlur Rahman-BNNRC, Khushi Kabir- Nijerakori, Numan Ahmed- IED, Hareeda Hassan- ASK/SAHR, Anwar Hossain – WAVE Foundation, A.Haseeb Khan- RIC,

For more clarification, please contact;
Reza, Chief Moderator, EquityBD, Mobile +8801711529792, reza@coastbd.org
———————————————————————————————
C/O SAAPE, PO 8130, 288 Gairidhara Marg, Gairidhara, Kathmandu, Nepal. (T) (977) 14004976, saape@saape.org

Peoples’ SAARC on ‘Envisioning New South Asia: Peoples’ Perspective’ held on 18-19 January 2011 at Dhaka

PRESS STATEMENT, 20th Jan 2011

Participants in the seminar organized by Peoples SAARC on 18-19 January 2011 in Dhaka on ‘Envisioning New South Asia: Peoples’ Perspective’ discussed the possible contours of an effective SAARC Union and the possibility of a peaceful, no rx democratic, united and just South Asia.. The group observed that South Asia is home to some of the world’s richest; and also of the largest number of poor people in the world. The region is plagued by conflict, poverty, lack of access to basic necessities and services; and ravaged by conflicts of various kinds. Rampant unemployment, feudalism, abysmal living conditions of the large majority, is further complicated by religious sectarian violence and state sponsored violence, both domestic and cross border.

There is an urgent need to find solutions to the deep seated problems in the South Asian region. And clearly, these cannot be found in the failed neo-liberal paradigm, nor in the right wing alternatives based on religious sectarianism and national chauvinism. It is also clear to us that the solutions to what are common problems spanning the entire region are more likely to be effective if they are regional in scope. Regional unity can be a good beginning to finding solutions and alternatives.

Yet many of the governments of the SAARC countries, particularly the more powerful ones, are not upholding the lofty ideals that form part of the SAARC Charter which they are committed to defend.

Although SAFTA has been in place since the 1980s, formal trade within the region is still negligible. Intra-regional trade can be a vehicle for pro-poor, equitable growth, but only when such trade includes safeguards and regulations to allow for equitable growth both within and between countries. The Free Trade Agreements (FTAs) that are being negotiated and implemented within the region bilaterally and with other countries follow a neo-liberal model that undermines labor regulations and benefits richer countries disproportionately. The EU-India FTA currently being negotiated is based on the unequal power relation between the north and the south and if signed would seriously affect the economic interest and livelihood of the people of South Asia. Intra-regional trade based on the principles of complementarity and protection of workers, farmers and other marginalized communities is necessary and essential for the economic well-being of countries in the region.

Climate change is a critical issue throughout the region, with coastal and mountainous communities facing the greatest threat. Climate justice is closely linked with the more fundamental questions of poverty, marginalisation, deprivation, and skewed development. We appeal to the governments of SAARC to respond to this threat by addressing the question of climate justice, and also by working out unified positions on the climate negotiations and climate justice, and measures taken in energy policy and the development of clean technology.

While conflicts are tearing apart the region and the countries of South Asia, in Afghanistan, Pakistan and India the “war on terror” is claiming thousands of lives as collateral damage. This conflict cannot be resolved without accountability for those who have committed crimes on all sides, including governments. Solutions must be driven by the affected communities whenever possible through transparent processes designed to build trust between communities.

We in PSAARC are deeply concerned about the rise in sectarian violence, militancy based on nationalism and religion, and the support they are getting from the various quarters including the state, Army, Intelligence agencies, etc. Terrorist violence in the name of religion, which was historically sponsored by imperialism has extended its pernicious tentacles all over the region. Wars are being fought over natural resources, for geo-political gains, and also for the hearts and minds of the citizens.

Religious extremism has been spawned by imperialist interests and their drive for global hegemony. It should be fought collectively by the people of South Asia. An increased commitment to democracy and justice and the intensification is the only way to combat this trend.

Fundamental to the creation of a united, peaceful and prosperous South Asia is a liberalised visa regime. The tightening of visa restrictions does not affect those who carry arms and carry out armed attacks on innocents. These are criminals and they do not apply for visas. Those who are affected are those with families in neighbouring countries, those who work on cooperative projects between South Asian countries, those who are peace activists….and also those who are traveling in search of a livelihood.

It is natural that people from the less prosperous regions migrate to places where they can make a living for themselves and their survival. This issue is therefore closely linked with development. The governments of SAARC Countries have an obligation to protect the rights of all South Asian people to earn a decent livelihood. Criminalising them in the name of ‘illegal migration’ is not an option.

The new South Asian region can be created only when we and our political leadership have the courage to develop and implement solutions to these issues. This meeting is an important first step towards this.

We, members of academia, trade unions, NGOs, social movements, womens organizations, who are part of the loose network called PSAARC, believe that SAARC must play a pro-active role to fulfill the aspirations of the people of South Asia along with civil society organizations. Towards this we appeal to the Bangladeshi government, which has been striving to build and extend democracy for its peoples, and from whom we have very high expectations, to support these aspirations of the people of the region.

Precipitating organization and persons:

From AFGANISTAN: RAZ MOHD DALILI- SDE. From INDIA: MEENA RUKMINI MENON- FOCUS, JATIN BABU DESAI-Fucus, LALITA RAMDAS-Greenpeace, KAMLA BHASIN-Sangat, KAMAL ARON MITRA CHENOY -JNU, , Samir Dossai -Action Aid, NEERA CHANDHOKE, BABULAL SHARMA- SAPA, ASHOK GHOSH CHOWDHURY – NFFPFW/NITU,ROMA MALIK -NFFPFW/UP, GAUTAM MODY NTUI, DR.AMRITA CHHACHHI ,ANIL KUMAR CHAUDHURY, Dipali Sharma – Action Aid. From MALDIVES: LATHEEF MOHAMED. From MANILA: JENINA JOY CHAVEZ-Focus. From NEPAL: SARBA RAJ KHADKA-SAAPE/RRW, NETRA PRASAD-TIMSINA Nepal, RACHITA SHARMA DHUNGEL-SAAPE, KAPIL SHRESTHA- NEOC, GOPAL KRISHNA SIWAKOTI – ANFREL, LILADHAR UPADHYAYA-The rising Nepal, BISHNU PUKAR SHRESTHA-CAHURAST, DINASH TRIPATHI- Civil Ribs Association Nepal. From PAKISTAN: KARAMAT ALI, FARRUKH SOHAIL GOINDI – Jumhoori Publications, ZULFIQAR ALI HALEPOTO-PPC, MOHAMED ILYAS- PLP,HASIL KHAN BIZENJO, MOHAMMED ASLAM MERAJ,NAJMA SADEQUE-SHIRKAT GDH, ZAHIDA PARVEEN DETHO- SRPO, SHARAFAT ALI PILER, NADEEM ASHRAF , Anjuman Magarccn Panjab, SHAIKH ASAD REHMAN-Suugi Development Fuondation. From SRILANKA : MOHAMMAD MARUF-Peoples SPACE, SUNILA ABEY SEKARA –SANGAT. From BANGLAESH : Md. Halal uddin – Ongikar, Shahida Khan-Rupanter, Lutfar rahman-BTUC, Mangal Kumar Chakma- PCJSS, Fawzia – SANGAT & UNDP, ADITTYA – IED, Mohiuddin Mohi- SAAPE, Nasir Uddin-GUP/SAPA, Uma Chudhury- SUPRO, Shamima Akter-ASWO foundation,KG Moazzam-CPD, NAVSHARAN SINGH -IDRC, Wajedul Islam-BTUC, Mohammad Latif, Badrul Alam -BKF, Asgor Ali Sabri – Action Aid, Monjur Rari Paramanik- Supro, Muzib-BNPS,M. Aslam- LOM, Titumir-UO, Himadri Ahsan-BNPS,Shahin anam – MJF, AHM Bazlur Rahman-BNNRC, Khushi Kabir- Nijerakori, Numan Ahmed- IED, Hareeda Hassan- ASK/SAHR, Anwar Hossain – WAVE Foundation, A.Haseeb Khan- RIC,

For more clarification, please contact;
Reza, Chief Moderator, EquityBD, Mobile +8801711529792, reza@coastbd.org
———————————————————————————————
C/O SAAPE, PO 8130, 288 Gairidhara Marg, Gairidhara, Kathmandu, Nepal. (T) (977) 14004976, saape@saape.org

En ocasión del primer encuentro del Consejo Suramericano de Economía y Finanzas
Buenos Aires,   12 de Agosto de 2011

Nos dirigimos a los señores Ministros de Finanzas y Presidentes de Bancos Centrales de los países de la UNASUR, en ocasión de este primer encuentro del Consejo Suramericano de Economía y Finanzas, como organizaciones y movimientos populares, instituciones, legisladores y personas de la región, comprometidos en la promoción de la vida y la justicia social. Desde por lo menos la primera Cumbre de la entonces Comunidad de Naciones del Sur, celebrada en Bolivia, en diciembre de 2006, venimos impulsando campañas y acciones en pos de la creación y fortalecimiento de alternativas de financiamiento soberano y solidario, en un marco de integración desde los pueblos y en defensa de los derechos humanos, los derechos de los pueblos y los derechos de la Madre Tierra.

Consideramos importante la reunión extraordinaria de las y los Presidentes y Jefes de Estado de UNASUR y la reunión técnica que los Ministros de Economía acaban de realizar, ambas en Lima, con la finalidad de adoptar medidas conjuntas para evitar mayores consecuencias para los pueblos de nuestros países, como efecto de la crisis que se sigue propagando desde el centro del sistema económico-financiero capitalista en Estados Unidos y Europa.

La agudización de esta crisis acrecienta la necesidad y las expectativas en la articulación económica regional. Es la oportunidad para pensar más allá de la lógica del capital, ya que esa “racionalidad” lleva hoy el sello del ajuste fiscal suscripto por demócratas y republicanos en EEUU, o el desmantelamiento del remanente Estado benefactor en Europa. El resultado es el deterioro de las condiciones de vida y trabajo de la mayoría de la población.

Es en ese espíritu y en la convicción que nos une de la necesidad, la urgencia y la clara posibilidad de una mayor participación democrática para avanzar y profundizar la integración regional como camino hacia el buen vivir de los pueblos, que saludamos la creación de este Consejo como espacio permanente para avanzar en estos temas y ofrecemos las siguientes consideraciones y propuestas:

1. Entendemos la necesidad de dar prioridad a la integración regional ya no sólo como cumplimiento de un largo sueño de complementación, sino en particular por la imperiosa necesidad de generar respuestas comunes ante un marco económico y financiero internacional altamente inestable e incierto y la exigencia de una transformación profunda del actual modelo de producción y consumo. La crisis económica internacional claramente no ha cesado, aumentando los riesgos para la región y poniendo de manifiesto la urgencia de avanzar en transformaciones de fondo. La existencia simultánea de un marco circunstancial favorable, en la mayor parte de los países de la UNASUR, acentúa el potencial de nuestras sociedades y torna imprescindible aprovechar el momento para lograr los cambios estructurales que posibilitarían una distribución equitativa de los beneficios y los costos de los procesos económicos junto con la restauración del equilibrio con la naturaleza.

2. Alertamos sobre el peligro que los Estados involucrados intenten avanzar en la integración regional sin consolidar mecanismos permanentes de participación de la sociedad y sus organizaciones. Es precisa la más amplia participación democrática y transparencia y, que ello se haga en relación al diagnóstico de los problemas como en el diseño, ejecución y control de las políticas y programas que desde el espacio de la UNASUR puedan impulsarse de manera conjunta y en cada uno de los países. Reclamamos una política consecuente con el fomento y concreción de dicha participación en todos los ámbitos y niveles de consideración, incluyendo al Consejo Suramericano de Economía y Finanzas.

3. Observamos con enorme preocupación la demora en poner en marcha una nueva arquitectura financiera regional, que contribuya a evitar que la región sea golpeada por las crisis externas y afirme que los recursos de ahorro sean canalizados hacia necesidades prioritarias de inversión social y productiva como son garantizar la soberanía y complementación alimentaria, energética y de atención a la salud, la educación, la vivienda, el trabajo, la seguridad social y demás derechos económicos, sociales y culturales. Al respecto, esperamos que el interés en avanzar en este sentido, manifestado en los últimos días por las máximas autoridades de la UNASUR, redunde en la concreción de las iniciativas que desde hace tiempo, languidecen en la agenda regional.

4. Entre ellas, entendemos impostergable la puesta en marcha de un Banco del Sur solidario con una transición justa hacia un nuevo modelo productivo equitativo, menos contaminante, determinado regionalmente y afín a estas necesidades y derechos. Tal Banco pueda además contribuir con el financiamiento necesario para hacer frente al cambio climático, canalizando los recursos del pago de la deuda ecológica y climática del Norte para que sean administrados desde la región y no a través del Banco Mundial, el BID, la CAF u otras entidades similares.

5. Otras iniciativas cuya adopción seguimos reclamado, y que puedan contribuir a los fines señalados y proteger a nuestra región de los eventuales nuevos embates de la crisis desatada en EE.UU. y Europa, incluyen la concreción de un Fondo de Reservas del Sur, el control cambiario común y la creación de mecanismos de intercambio, como podría ser una unidad de cuenta regional, que reemplacen la dependencia actual del dólar estadounidense.

6. Reconociendo la preocupación manifestada por los señores Ministros y Presidentes de Bancos Centrales, por la carestía y las condicionalidades del crédito planteadas históricamente por los mercados internacionales y organismos/entidades financieras, apoyamos la decisión de abocarse a medidas comunes para favorecer la inversión y uso más eficaz de los capitales que se generan en la región. Llamamos en especial a que se avance con el establecimiento de mecanismos de regulación financiera regional, incluyendo entre otras posibilidades, controles coordinados sobre los flujos de capitales, la implementación de sistemas equitativos de tributación y el cierre de los paraísos fiscales. Es urgente protegernos de la volatilidad especulativa de los flujos de capitales, que afecta a la economía en su conjunto, y avanzar en la adopción de impuestos a las transacciones financieras en favor de la región.

7. Asimismo, llamamos con particular urgencia a que se realicen auditorías integrales y participativas de los reclamos de deuda que enfrentan nuestros países, de manera coordinada regionalmente, para avanzar además en la concreción de estrategias de acción colectiva para poner fin a las presiones, los cobros y la impunidad de quienes, incluyendo a los fondos buitres, se proclamen acreedores con reclamos ilegítimos e injustos. Sobre esa base es necesario además, iniciar caminos de restitución y de reparaciones. Esta auditoría y control público y parlamentario sobre los movimientos de capitales y los procesos de endeudamiento debería extenderse también hacia el presente y futuro, abarcando las deudas sociales, históricas y ambientales relacionadas.

8. Expresamos nuestra profunda preocupación ante el avance continuo de los megaproyectos de infraestructura y el apoyo a las agroindustrias y proyectos extractivistas altamente contaminantes social y ambientalmente. Llamamos a los Ministros de Finanzas y Presidentes de Bancos Centrales a establecer una moratoria sobre estas inversiones y al Consejo Suramericano de Economía y Finanzas a iniciar un proceso de estudio estratégico en torno a las alternativas necesarias.

9. Llamamos a los señores Ministros y Presidentes de Bancos Centrales a coordinar acciones en los diversos organismos e instituciones internacionales tanto financieros como comerciales y de otro índole, que tienen un impacto notorio en las condiciones político-económicas que enfrentan los países de la región, y a coordinarse solidariamente con los derechos y necesidades de los demás pueblos y estados del Sur. Resulta imprescindible avanzar, en común, por ejemplo, en el camino ya abierto por países miembros de la UNASUR, hacia una moratoria en la firma de nuevos acuerdos y la denuncia de los tratados y regímenes de libre comercio e inversión, así como también de la cesión de jurisdicción en caso de conflictos. En especial, es necesario que los países de la región abandonen su participación en el CIADI, organismo anti-democrático y dependiente del Banco Mundial. Debemos seguir pensando en el fortalecimiento y la construcción de mecanismos soberanos o eventualmente regionales o internacionales, no parcializados hacia la inversión y las transnacionales.

10. Entendemos que también es urgente, vista la recurrente experiencia histórica, que los países de la región introduzcan inmediatamente, antes que sea demasiado tarde, firmes medidas comunes contra la burbuja especulativa en los mercados de productos primarios como así también contra la ampliación de los nuevos mercados de clima y biodiversidad, teniendo presente que los crímenes del hambre y del saqueo y colonización ecológica son prevenibles y deben ser sancionados a todos niveles. Llamamos a poner coto a las diversas corrientes especulativas y de vaciamiento que conllevan, hoy, a revaluaciones monetarias y una mayor inflación que golpea, en particular, a los sectores más desprotegidos, y que de no revertirse la tendencia, pueden devenir en corridas cambiarias, dilapidación de reservas, ajustes regresivos y vaciamiento de ahorros regionales con consecuencias irreversibles para los pueblos y el planeta.

11. Resaltamos la importancia de que la integración regional abra para todos los pueblos de la región y, en especial para las mujeres, los pueblos originarios, los y las afrodescendientes y otras poblaciones históricamente oprimidas, un horizonte de dignidad e igualdad, superando las dominaciones y la explotación y revirtiendo las asimetrías construidas entre países y pueblos. En ese mismo sentido, llamamos a este Consejo Suramericano de Economía y Finanzas y al conjunto de la UNASUR, a obrar decididamente a favor de la consolidación de nuevas relaciones de solidaridad y cooperación entre todos los países del Sur, manteniendo como eje de las políticas adoptadas la plena vigencia de los derechos humanos y de la naturaleza, la soberanía y la autodeterminación de los pueblos. En especial, y ante el enorme drama del pueblo hermano de Haití y la notoria mora de la prometida cooperación internacional luego del terremoto de enero de 2010, llamamos a los países de UNASUR a que elaboren un programa más enérgico de cooperación común, revirtiendo la larga e inexplicable ocupación militar y concentrando el apoyo en la reconstrucción productiva y social y la defensa irrestricta de los derechos humanos, ponderando las enormes potencialidades de integración y la complementación regional.

Con la sincera expectativa que estas opiniones y propuestas sean consideradas positivamente, hacemos propicia la oportunidad para saludar a Uds. muy atentamente.

PRIMERAS FIRMAS:

Adolfo Pérez Esquivel, Premio Nobel de la Paz – Nora Cortiñas y Mirta Baravalle, Madres de Plaza de Mayo Línea Fundadora

Regionales: Jubileo Sur/Américas – Alianza Social Continental ASC – Amigos de la Tierra América Latina y el Caribe ATALC – Cadtm/AYNA – Confederación Sindical de las Américas CSA – Encuentro Sindical Nuestra América ESNA – Convergencia de Movimientos de los Pueblos de las Américas COMPA – Federación Luterana Mundial/Programa de Deuda Ilegítima – Observatorio Latinoamericano de Conflictos Ambientales – Servicio Paz y Justicia en América Latina – Marcha Mundial de las Mujeres/ Américas Comisión de Justicia y Paz Misioneros Claretianos (Argentina – Chile – Paraguay – Uruguay, Fernando Guzmán, Coordinador Regional) Latindadd – GRAIN – Grupo de Estudios sobre América Latina y el Caribe GEAL

Argentina: Diálogo 2000/Jubileo Sur – Central de Trabajadores de la Argentina CTA – ATTAC – Asamblea Permanente de los Derechos Humanos APDH – Fundación Servicio Paz y Justicia SERPAJ – Movimiento Libres del Sur – Federación Judicial Argentina FJA – Espacio Ecuménico – Movimiento Ecuménico de Derechos Humanos MEDHAl Dorso Programa Radial sobre la Deuda – Asociación de DDHH de Cañada de Gómez, Pcia. Santa Fe – Programa Argentina Sustentable – Comisión Política de la Iglesia Dimensión de Fe – Instituto de Relaciones Ecuménicas – Iglesia Evangélica Metodista Argentina IEMA – Pastoral Popular, Iglesia Metodista Bolivia: Fundación ARAKUAARENDA Brasil: Rede Jubileu Sul BrasilRede Brasil sobre Instituições Financeiras Multilaterais Instituto Políticas Alternativas para el Cono Sur (PACS) – Rede Social de Justiça e Direitos Humanos – Instituto Mais Democracia Associação Central do Brasil (Lausanne, Suiza) – Rede Brasil por la Integración de los Pueblos REBRIP – Movimento dos Trabalhadores Desempregados Chile: Capítulo Chile de la Alianza Social Continental Colectivo Viento Sur – Programa Chile Sustentable – Ecoceanos – Fundación Terram – CEH AnoVio (Gonzalo González Ibáñez, Co-Director) – Asamblea Ciudadana Autoconvocados Colombia: Campaña Colombiana “En Deuda con los Derechos” – Centro de Estudios e Investigaciones Sociales Afrocolombianas (CEISAFROCOL) – Comité por la Anulación de la Deuda del Tercer Mundo “CADTM” capítulo Colombia – Corporación Mujeres y Economía – Federación Nacional de Empleados Bancarios, Aseguradoras y empresas afines de Colombia “FENASIBANCOL” – Marcha Mundial de Mujeres Colombia – Unión Nacional de Empleados Bancarios “UNEB” Ecuador: Grupo Nacional de Deuda – Jubileo 2000 Red Guayaquil – Pueblo Montubio del Ecuador Oswaldo Mosquera Zambrano, Presidente Nacional Paraguay: Cordinadora Nacional por la Integracion y la Soberania Energetica, CONISE Venezuela: Acción Ecuménica de Venezuela – Red Venezolana Contra la Deuda – Movimiento Unido Socialista Haitiano Venezolano por el ALBA, MOUSHVA El Salvador: Red de Acción Ciudadana frente al Libre Comercio e Inversiones Sinti Techán – Unión Nacional de Ecologistas Salvadoreños UNES – Campaña Mesoamericana de Justicia Climática Haití: Plateforme Haitiënne de Plaidoyer pour un Développement Alternatif PAPDA Honduras: Consejo Cívico de Organizaciones Populares e Indígenas de Honduras, COPINH – Organización Fraternal Negra Hondureña, OFRANEH – Movimiento Insurreccional Autónomo – Comité de Familiares de Desaparecidos de Honduras, COFADEH (Berta Oliva, Presidenta) México: Jubileo Sur México – Marea Creciente México – Movimiento Mexicano de Afectados por las Represas MAPDER – Otros Mundos AC/Chiapas – Red Mexicana de Acción frente al Libre Comercio RMALC – Red Mexicana de Afectados por la Minería (REMA)Alianza Mexicana por la Autodeterminación de los Pueblos AMAP – Grupo Cultural Floricanto, Eduardo Lucio Molina y Vedia Nicaragua: Movimiento Social Nicaragüense Panamá: Colectivo Voces Ecológicas Trinidad y Tobago: Federacion de Sindicatos y ONGs Independientes FITUN

Planteamiento politico de las mujeres a la Cumbre del ALBA

Watch online the video recording from the International Conference of Governments and Social Movements “Regional Integration: an opportunity to face the crises” held 21-22 July 2009 in Paraguay.

The Conference was organised as a series of round tables for dialogue bringing together parliamentarians, governments and civil society representatives from Latin America, Africa, Asia and Europe.

The objective of this International Conference was to advance the debate among governments, regional/international bodies, policy makers, parliamentarians and social movements from the four regions about the possibilities to respond to these crises through regional alternatives and a model of regional integration that promotes a change in the development model of the regions.


CONFERENCE INTRODUCTION
– Gonzalo Berron, ASC/CSA (Brasil)
– Brid Brennan, TNI/Peoples’ Agenda for Alternative Regionalisms, (Netherlands)
– Gustavo Codas, Presidencia Gobierno (Paraguay)

PANEL 1: SYSTEMIC CRISIS, IMPACTS OF THE CRISIS ON REGIONAL INTEGRATION PROCESSES

PANEL 2: REGIONAL RESPONSES TO THE CRISES

PANEL 3: REGIONAL INTEGRATION: RE-THINKING THE DEVELOPMENT MODEL. Complementarity versus competition. Integration and Asymmetries

PANEL 4: DEVELOPMENT MODEL AND INFRASTRUCTURE

PANEL 5: ENERGY CRISIS AND CLIMATE CHANGE: THE CHALLENGE TO FIND REGIONAL SOLUTIONS

PANEL 6: PRODUCTION MODEL AND FOOD SOVEREIGNTY

PANEL 7: FINANCES AND DEVELOPMENT MODEL: NEW REGIONAL FINANCIAL STRUCTURES

PANEL 8: REGIONAL PEACE, DEMOCRACY AND HUMAN RIGHTS

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE of GOVERNMENTS and SOCIAL MOVEMENTS “Regional Integration: an opportunity to face the crises” (21 and 22 July 2009)

PANEL 4: DEVELOPMENT MODEL AND INFRASTRUCTURE
– Michelle Pressend, Trade Strategy Group, South Africa
– Guilherme Carvalho, Rede Brasil sobre Instituições Financeiras Multilaterais, Brazil
– Ricardo Miranda, Confederación Sindical Única de Trabajadores Campesinos de Bolivia (CSUTCB), Bolivia

Presentation by Michelle Pressend, Trade Strategy Group, South Africa

Presentation by Guilherme Carvalho, Rede Brasil sobre Instituições Financeiras Multilaterais, Brazil

Presentation by Ricardo Miranda, Confederación Sindical Única de Trabajadores Campesinos de Bolivia (CSUTCB), Bolivia

QUESTIONS FROM THE FLOOR
Thomas Wallgren, Coalition for comprehensive democracy – Vasudhaiva Kutumkakam (Finland)

Beverly Keen, Jubileo Sur (Argentina)

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE of GOVERNMENTS and SOCIAL MOVEMENTS “Regional Integration: an opportunity to face the crises” (21 and 22 July 2009)

PANEL 6: PRODUCTION MODEL AND FOOD SOVEREIGNTY
– Juan José Domínguez, Parlamentario, MPP – FA Uruguay
– Rabindra Adhikari, Member of Parliament, Nepal
– Indra Lubis, La Via Campesina, Indonesia
– Lodwick Chizarura, SEATINI, Zimbabwe
– Francisca Rodríguez, ANAMURI/CLOC, Chile

Presentation by Juan José Domínguez, Parlamentario, MPP – FA Uruguay

Presentation by Rabindra Adhikari, Member of Parliament, Nepal

Presentation by Indra Lubis, La Via Campesina, Indonesia

Presentation by Lodwick Chizarura, SEATINI, Zimbabwe

Presentation by Francisca Rodríguez, ANAMURI/CLOC, Chile

DEBATE FORUM: QUESTIONS AND REFLECTIONS FROM THE FLOOR
Tom Kucharz, Ecologistas en Acción, España

Maureen Santos, REBRIP, Brasil

Brid Brennan, Transnational Institute, Netherlands

Martín Drago, REDES-Amigos de la Tierra, Uruguay

RESPONSES FROM THE PANEL
Juan José Domínguez, Parlamentario, MPP – FA Uruguay

Indra Lubis, La Via Campesina, Indonesia

Rabindra Adhikari, Member of Parliament, Nepal

Lodwick Chizarura, SEATINI, Zimbabwe

Francisca Rodríguez, ANAMURI/CLOC, Chile

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE of GOVERNMENTS and SOCIAL MOVEMENTS “Regional Integration: an opportunity to face the crises” (21 and 22 July 2009)

PANEL 8: REGIONAL PEACE, DEMOCRACY AND HUMAN RIGHTS
– Lee, pharm Seung-Heon, diagnosis Chief External Relations Department of the Korea Democratic Labor Party, South Korea
– Ramon Corvalan, SERPAJ Paraguay/ Iniciativa Paraguaya por la integracion de los Pueblos
– Meena Menon, Focus on the Global South, India
– Thomas Wallgren, Coalition for comprehensive democracy – Vasudhaiva Kutumkakam, Finland
– Pezo Mateo-Phiri, Southern Africa People’s Solidarity Network, Zambia

Presentation by Lee, Seung-Heon, Chief External Relations Department of the Korea Democratic Labor Party, South Korea

Presentation by Ramon Corvalan, SERPAJ Paraguay/ Iniciativa Paraguaya por la integracion de los Pueblos

Presentation by Meena Menon, Focus on the Global South, India

Presentation by Thomas Wallgren, Coalition for comprehensive democracy – Vasudhaiva Kutumkakam, Finland

Presentation by Pezo Mateo-Phiri, Southern Africa People’s Solidarity Network, Zambia

DEBATE FORUM: QUESTIONS AND REFLECTIONS FROM THE FLOOR
Paulo Bustillos, Fundacion Solon, Bolivia

RESPONSES FROM THE PANEL
Ramon Corvalan, SERPAJ Paraguay/ Iniciativa Paraguaya por la integracion de los Pueblos

Thomas Wallgren, Coalition for comprehensive democracy – Vasudhaiva Kutumkakam, Finland

Miguel Monserrat, Presidente de la Asamblea Permanente por los Derechos Humanos, Argentina

Meena Menon, Focus on the Global South, India

Pezo Mateo-Phiri, Southern Africa People’s Solidarity Network, Zambia

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE of GOVERNMENTS and SOCIAL MOVEMENTS “Regional Integration: an opportunity to face the crises” (21 and 22 July 2009)

CLOSING PANEL: REGIONAL INTEGRATION: CHALLENGES FOR THE MOVEMENTS AND THE GOVERNMENTS
– Héctor de la Cueva, treat Red Mexicana de Acción frente al Libre Comercio, help México
– Brid Brennan, Transnational Institute, Netherlands
– Edgardo Lander, Universidad Central de Venezuela/Consejo Hemisférico del Foro Social Mundial, Venezuela
– Nalu Faria, Marcha Mundial de las Mujeres, Brasil
– Walden Bello, Member of Parliament/President Freedom from Debt Coalition, Philippines
– Dot Keet, Southern Africa People’s Solidarity Network, South Africa
– Héctor de la Cueva, RMALC, México

Introduction by Héctor de la Cueva, Red Mexicana de Acción frente al Libre Comercio, México

Presentation by Brid Brennan, Transnational Institute, Netherlands
Edgardo Lander, Universidad Central de Venezuela/Consejo Hemisférico del Foro Social Mundial, Venezuela
Nalu Faria, Marcha Mundial de las Mujeres, Brasil
Walden Bello, Member of Parliament/President Freedom from Debt Coalition, Philippines
Dot Keet, Southern Africa People’s Solidarity Network, South Africa
Héctor de la Cueva, RMALC, México

RESPONSES FROM GOVERNMENT REPRESENTATIVES
Chacho Alvarez, Presidente de la Comisión de Representantes Permanentes del MERCOSUR, Argentina

Embajador Franklin Gonzalez, Representante Permanente ante el Mercosur de la Republica Bolivariana de Venezuela

CONCLUDING WORDS
Gonzalo Berrón, Confederación Sindical de las Americas/Alianza Social Continental, Brasil

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE of GOVERNMENTS and SOCIAL MOVEMENTS “Regional Integration: an opportunity to face the crises” (21 and 22 July 2009)

CLOSING PANEL: REGIONAL INTEGRATION: CHALLENGES FOR THE MOVEMENTS AND THE GOVERNMENTS
– Héctor de la Cueva, sick Red Mexicana de Acción frente al Libre Comercio, México
– Brid Brennan, Transnational Institute, Netherlands
– Edgardo Lander, Universidad Central de Venezuela/Consejo Hemisférico del Foro Social Mundial, Venezuela
– Nalu Faria, Marcha Mundial de las Mujeres, Brasil
– Walden Bello, Member of Parliament/President Freedom from Debt Coalition, Philippines
– Dot Keet, Southern Africa People’s Solidarity Network, South Africa
– Héctor de la Cueva, RMALC, México

Introduction by Héctor de la Cueva, Red Mexicana de Acción frente al Libre Comercio, México

Presentation by Brid Brennan, Transnational Institute, Netherlands
Edgardo Lander, Universidad Central de Venezuela/Consejo Hemisférico del Foro Social Mundial, Venezuela
Nalu Faria, Marcha Mundial de las Mujeres, Brasil
Walden Bello, Member of Parliament/President Freedom from Debt Coalition, Philippines
Dot Keet, Southern Africa People’s Solidarity Network, South Africa
Héctor de la Cueva, RMALC, México

RESPONSES FROM GOVERNMENT REPRESENTATIVES
Chacho Alvarez, Presidente de la Comisión de Representantes Permanentes del MERCOSUR, Argentina

Chacho Alvarez, Presidente de la Comisión de Representantes Permanentes del MERCOSUR, Argentina

Embajador Franklin Gonzalez, Representante Permanente ante el Mercosur de la Republica Bolivariana de Venezuela

CONCLUDING WORDS
Gonzalo Berrón, Confederación Sindical de las Americas/Alianza Social Continental, Brasil

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE of GOVERNMENTS and SOCIAL MOVEMENTS “Regional Integration: an opportunity to face the crises” (21 and 22 July 2009)

CLOSING PANEL: REGIONAL INTEGRATION: CHALLENGES FOR THE MOVEMENTS AND THE GOVERNMENTS
– Héctor de la Cueva, health Red Mexicana de Acción frente al Libre Comercio, physician México
– Brid Brennan, sales Transnational Institute, Netherlands
– Edgardo Lander, Universidad Central de Venezuela/Consejo Hemisférico del Foro Social Mundial, Venezuela
– Nalu Faria, Marcha Mundial de las Mujeres, Brasil
– Walden Bello, Member of Parliament/President Freedom from Debt Coalition, Philippines
– Dot Keet, Southern Africa People’s Solidarity Network, South Africa
– Héctor de la Cueva, RMALC, México

Introduction by Héctor de la Cueva, Red Mexicana de Acción frente al Libre Comercio, México

Presentation by Brid Brennan, Transnational Institute, Netherlands
Edgardo Lander, Universidad Central de Venezuela/Consejo Hemisférico del Foro Social Mundial, Venezuela
Nalu Faria, Marcha Mundial de las Mujeres, Brasil
Walden Bello, Member of Parliament/President Freedom from Debt Coalition, Philippines
Dot Keet, Southern Africa People’s Solidarity Network, South Africa
Héctor de la Cueva, RMALC, México

RESPONSES FROM GOVERNMENT REPRESENTATIVES
Chacho Alvarez, Presidente de la Comisión de Representantes Permanentes del MERCOSUR, Argentina

Embajador Franklin Gonzalez, Representante Permanente ante el Mercosur de la Republica Bolivariana de Venezuela

CONCLUDING WORDS
Gonzalo Berrón, Confederación Sindical de las Americas/Alianza Social Continental, Brasil

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE of GOVERNMENTS and SOCIAL MOVEMENTS “Regional Integration: an opportunity to face the crises” (21 and 22 July 2009)

PANEL 8: REGIONAL PEACE, click DEMOCRACY AND HUMAN RIGHTS
– Lee, Seung-Heon, Chief External Relations Department of the Korea Democratic Labor Party, South Korea
– Ramon Corvalan, SERPAJ Paraguay/ Iniciativa Paraguaya por la integracion de los Pueblos
– Meena Menon, Focus on the Global South, India
– Thomas Wallgren, Coalition for comprehensive democracy – Vasudhaiva Kutumkakam, Finland
– Pezo Mateo-Phiri, Southern Africa People’s Solidarity Network, Zambia

Presentation by Lee, Seung-Heon, Chief External Relations Department of the Korea Democratic Labor Party, South Korea

Presentation by Ramon Corvalan, SERPAJ Paraguay/ Iniciativa Paraguaya por la integracion de los Pueblos

Presentation by Meena Menon, Focus on the Global South, India

Presentation by Thomas Wallgren, Coalition for comprehensive democracy – Vasudhaiva Kutumkakam, Finland

Presentation by Pezo Mateo-Phiri, Southern Africa People’s Solidarity Network, Zambia

DEBATE FORUM: QUESTIONS AND REFLECTIONS FROM THE FLOOR
Paulo Bustillos, Fundacion Solon, Bolivia

RESPONSES FROM THE PANEL
Ramon Corvalan, SERPAJ Paraguay/ Iniciativa Paraguaya por la integracion de los Pueblos

Thomas Wallgren, Coalition for comprehensive democracy – Vasudhaiva Kutumkakam, Finland

Miguel Monserrat, Presidente de la Asamblea Permanente por los Derechos Humanos, Argentina

Meena Menon, Focus on the Global South, India

Pezo Mateo-Phiri, Southern Africa People’s Solidarity Network, Zambia

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE of GOVERNMENTS and SOCIAL MOVEMENTS “Regional Integration: an opportunity to face the crises” (21 and 22 July 2009)

PANEL 8: REGIONAL PEACE,
DEMOCRACY AND HUMAN RIGHTS

– Lee, online Seung-Heon, Chief External Relations Department of the Korea Democratic Labor Party, South Korea
– Ramon Corvalan, SERPAJ Paraguay/ Iniciativa Paraguaya por la integracion de los Pueblos
– Meena Menon, Focus on the Global South, India
– Thomas Wallgren, Coalition for comprehensive democracy – Vasudhaiva Kutumkakam, Finland
– Pezo Mateo-Phiri, Southern Africa People’s Solidarity Network, Zambia

Presentation by Lee, Seung-Heon, Chief External Relations Department of the Korea Democratic Labor Party, South Korea

Presentation by Ramon Corvalan, SERPAJ Paraguay/ Iniciativa Paraguaya por la integracion de los Pueblos

Presentation by Meena Menon, Focus on the Global South, India

Presentation by Thomas Wallgren, Coalition for comprehensive democracy – Vasudhaiva Kutumkakam, Finland

Presentation by Pezo Mateo-Phiri, Southern Africa People’s Solidarity Network, Zambia

DEBATE FORUM: QUESTIONS AND REFLECTIONS FROM THE FLOOR
Paulo Bustillos, Fundacion Solon, Bolivia

RESPONSES FROM THE PANEL
Ramon Corvalan, SERPAJ Paraguay/ Iniciativa Paraguaya por la integracion de los Pueblos

Thomas Wallgren, Coalition for comprehensive democracy – Vasudhaiva Kutumkakam, Finland

Miguel Monserrat, Presidente de la Asamblea Permanente por los Derechos Humanos, Argentina

Meena Menon, Focus on the Global South, India

Pezo Mateo-Phiri, Southern Africa People’s Solidarity Network, Zambia

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE of GOVERNMENTS and SOCIAL MOVEMENTS “Regional Integration: an opportunity to face the crises” (21 and 22 July 2009)

PANEL 7: FINANCES AND DEVELOPMENT MODEL: NEW REGIONAL FINANCIAL STRUCTURES
– Introduction: Veronique Sandoval, Espace Marx, France
– Pedro Páez, ailment Presidente Comisión Técnica Presidencial Ecuatoriana para la Nueva Arquitectura Financiera Regional y el Banco del Sur, Ecuador
– Ivan Lukas, Glopolis, Czech Republic
– Beverly Keene, Jubileo Sur, Argentina

Presentation by Veronique Sandoval, Espace Marx, France

Presentation by Pedro Páez, Presidente Comisión Técnica Presidencial Ecuatoriana para la Nueva Arquitectura Financiera Regional y el Banco del Sur, Ecuador

Presentation by Ivan Lukas, Glopolis, Czech Republic

Presentation by Beverly Keene, Jubileo Sur, Argentina

DEBATE FORUM: QUESTIONS AND REFLECTIONS FROM THE FLOOR
Luciana Ghiotto, ATTAC, Argentina and Graciela Rodriguez, IGTN/REBRIP, Brasil

RESPONSES FROM THE PANEL
Pedro Páez, Presidente Comisión Técnica Presidencial Ecuatoriana para la Nueva Arquitectura Financiera Regional y el Banco del Sur, Ecuador

Beverly Keene, Jubileo Sur, Argentina

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE of GOVERNMENTS and SOCIAL MOVEMENTS “Regional Integration: an opportunity to face the crises” (21 and 22 July 2009)

PANEL 6: PRODUCTION MODEL AND FOOD SOVEREIGNTY
– Juan José Domínguez, find Parlamentario, treatment MPP – FA Uruguay
– Rabindra Adhikari, Member of Parliament, Nepal
– Indra Lubis, La Via Campesina, Indonesia
– Lodwick Chizarura, SEATINI, Zimbabwe
– Francisca Rodríguez, ANAMURI/CLOC, Chile

Presentation by Juan José Domínguez, Parlamentario, MPP – FA Uruguay

Presentation by Rabindra Adhikari, Member of Parliament, Nepal

Presentation by Lodwick Chizarura, SEATINI, Zimbabwe

Presentation by Francisca Rodríguez, ANAMURI/CLOC, Chile

DEBATE FORUM: QUESTIONS AND REFLECTIONS FROM THE FLOOR
Tom Kucharz, Ecologistas en Acción, España

Maureen Santos, REBRIP, Brasil

Brid Brennan, Transnational Institute, Netherlands

Martín Drago, REDES-Amigos de la Tierra, Uruguay

RESPONSES FROM THE PANEL
Juan José Domínguez, Parlamentario, MPP – FA Uruguay

Indra Lubis, La Via Campesina, Indonesia

Rabindra Adhikari, Member of Parliament, Nepal

Lodwick Chizarura, SEATINI, Zimbabwe

Francisca Rodríguez, ANAMURI/CLOC, Chile

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE of GOVERNMENTS and SOCIAL MOVEMENTS “Regional Integration: an opportunity to face the crises” (21 and 22 July 2009)

PANEL 6: PRODUCTION MODEL AND FOOD SOVEREIGNTY
– Juan José Domínguez, cheap Parlamentario, MPP – FA Uruguay
– Rabindra Adhikari, sales Member of Parliament, Nepal
– Indra Lubis, La Via Campesina, Indonesia
– Lodwick Chizarura, SEATINI, Zimbabwe
– Francisca Rodríguez, ANAMURI/CLOC, Chile

Presentation by Juan José Domínguez, Parlamentario, MPP – FA Uruguay

Presentation by Rabindra Adhikari, Member of Parliament, Nepal

Presentation by Indra Lubis, La Via Campesina, Indonesia

Presentation by Lodwick Chizarura, SEATINI, Zimbabwe

Presentation by Francisca Rodríguez, ANAMURI/CLOC, Chile

DEBATE FORUM: QUESTIONS AND REFLECTIONS FROM THE FLOOR
Tom Kucharz, Ecologistas en Acción, España

Maureen Santos, REBRIP, Brasil

Brid Brennan, Transnational Institute, Netherlands

Martín Drago, REDES-Amigos de la Tierra, Uruguay

RESPONSES FROM THE PANEL
Juan José Domínguez, Parlamentario, MPP – FA Uruguay

Indra Lubis, La Via Campesina, Indonesia

Rabindra Adhikari, Member of Parliament, Nepal

Lodwick Chizarura, SEATINI, Zimbabwe

Francisca Rodríguez, ANAMURI/CLOC, Chile

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE of GOVERNMENTS and SOCIAL MOVEMENTS “Regional Integration: an opportunity to face the crises” (21 and 22 July 2009)

PANEL 5: ENERGY CRISIS AND CLIMATE CHANGE: THE CHALLENGE TO FIND REGIONAL SOLUTIONS
– Walden Bello, Member of Parliament, Philippines
– Pablo Bertinat, Cono Sur Sustentable, Argentina
– Roberto Colman, Coordinadora Soberanía Energética, Paraguay
– Tom Kucharz, Ecologistas en Acción, España

Presentation by Walden Bello, Member of Parliament, Philippines

Presentation by Pablo Bertinat, Cono Sur Sustentable, Argentina

Presentation by Roberto Colman, Coordinadora Soberanía Energética, Paraguay

Presentation by Tom Kucharz, Ecologistas en Acción, España

DEBATE FORUM: QUESTIONS AND REFLEXIONS FROM THE FLOOR
Michelle Pressend, Trade Strategy Group, South Africa

Frederic Viale, ATTAC France

Dot Keet, SAPSN, South Africa

Ligia Prieto, Ex Parlamentaria, Paraguay

Pedro Páez, Presidente Comisión Técnica Presidencial Ecuatoriana para la Nueva Arquitectura Financiera Regional y el Banco del Sur, Ecuador

Elizabeth Gautier, Espace Marx, France

RESPONSES FROM THE PANEL
Tom Kucharz, Ecologistas en Acción, España

Walden Bello, Member of Parliament, Philippines

Pablo Bertinat, Cono Sur Sustentable, Argentina

Roberto Colman, Coordinadora Soberanía Energética, Paraguay

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE of GOVERNMENTS and SOCIAL MOVEMENTS “Regional Integration: an opportunity to face the crises” (21 and 22 July 2009)

CLOSING PANEL: REGIONAL INTEGRATION: CHALLENGES FOR THE MOVEMENTS AND THE GOVERNMENTS
– Héctor de la Cueva, sale Red Mexicana de Acción frente al Libre Comercio, help México
– Brid Brennan, Transnational Institute, Netherlands
– Edgardo Lander, Universidad Central de Venezuela/Consejo Hemisférico del Foro Social Mundial, Venezuela
– Nalu Faria, Marcha Mundial de las Mujeres, Brasil
– Walden Bello, Member of Parliament/President Freedom from Debt Coalition, Philippines
– Dot Keet, Southern Africa People’s Solidarity Network, South Africa
– Héctor de la Cueva, RMALC, México

Introduction by Héctor de la Cueva, Red Mexicana de Acción frente al Libre Comercio, México

Presentation by Brid Brennan, Transnational Institute, Netherlands
Edgardo Lander, Universidad Central de Venezuela/Consejo Hemisférico del Foro Social Mundial, Venezuela
Nalu Faria, Marcha Mundial de las Mujeres, Brasil
Walden Bello, Member of Parliament/President Freedom from Debt Coalition, Philippines
Dot Keet, Southern Africa People’s Solidarity Network, South Africa
Héctor de la Cueva, RMALC, México

RESPONSES FROM GOVERNMENT REPRESENTATIVES
Chacho Alvarez, Presidente de la Comisión de Representantes Permanentes del MERCOSUR, Argentina

Ana Cristina Betancourt García, Coordinadora Nacional del Proyecto de Desarrollo Regional, Ministerio de Autonomía, Bolivia

Embajador Franklin Gonzalez, Representante Permanente ante el Mercosur de la Republica Bolivariana de Venezuela

CONCLUDING WORDS
Gonzalo Berrón, Confederación Sindical de las Americas/Alianza Social Continental, Brasil

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE of GOVERNMENTS and SOCIAL MOVEMENTS “Regional Integration: an opportunity to face the crises” (21 and 22 July 2009)

CLOSING PANEL: REGIONAL INTEGRATION: CHALLENGES FOR THE MOVEMENTS AND THE GOVERNMENTS
– Héctor de la Cueva, Red Mexicana de Acción frente al Libre Comercio, México
– Brid Brennan, Transnational Institute, Netherlands
– Edgardo Lander, Universidad Central de Venezuela/Consejo Hemisférico del Foro Social Mundial, Venezuela
– Nalu Faria, Marcha Mundial de las Mujeres, Brasil
– Walden Bello, Member of Parliament/President Freedom from Debt Coalition, Philippines
– Dot Keet, Southern Africa People’s Solidarity Network, South Africa
– Héctor de la Cueva, RMALC, México

Introduction by Héctor de la Cueva, Red Mexicana de Acción frente al Libre Comercio, México

Presentation by Brid Brennan, Transnational Institute, Netherlands
Edgardo Lander, Universidad Central de Venezuela/Consejo Hemisférico del Foro Social Mundial, Venezuela
Nalu Faria, Marcha Mundial de las Mujeres, Brasil
Walden Bello, Member of Parliament/President Freedom from Debt Coalition, Philippines
Dot Keet, Southern Africa People’s Solidarity Network, South Africa
Héctor de la Cueva, RMALC, México

RESPONSES FROM GOVERNMENT REPRESENTATIVES
Chacho Alvarez, Presidente de la Comisión de Representantes Permanentes del MERCOSUR, Argentina

Ana Cristina Betancourt García, Coordinadora Nacional del Proyecto de Desarrollo Regional, Ministerio de Autonomía, Bolivia

Embajador Franklin Gonzalez, Representante Permanente ante el Mercosur de la Republica Bolivariana de Venezuela

Gustavo Codas, Asesor Presidencia del Gobierno de Paraguay

CONCLUDING WORDS
Gonzalo Berrón, Confederación Sindical de las Americas/Alianza Social Continental, Brasil

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE of GOVERNMENTS and SOCIAL MOVEMENTS “Regional Integration: an opportunity to face the crises” (21 and 22 July 2009)

CLOSING PANEL: REGIONAL INTEGRATION: CHALLENGES FOR THE MOVEMENTS AND THE GOVERNMENTS
– Héctor de la Cueva, cheap Red Mexicana de Acción frente al Libre Comercio, see México
– Brid Brennan, see Transnational Institute, Netherlands
– Edgardo Lander, Universidad Central de Venezuela/Consejo Hemisférico del Foro Social Mundial, Venezuela
– Nalu Faria, Marcha Mundial de las Mujeres, Brasil
– Walden Bello, Member of Parliament/President Freedom from Debt Coalition, Philippines
– Dot Keet, Southern Africa People’s Solidarity Network, South Africa
– Héctor de la Cueva, RMALC, México

Introduction by Héctor de la Cueva, Red Mexicana de Acción frente al Libre Comercio, México

Presentation by Brid Brennan, Transnational Institute, Netherlands
Edgardo Lander, Universidad Central de Venezuela/Consejo Hemisférico del Foro Social Mundial, Venezuela
Nalu Faria, Marcha Mundial de las Mujeres, Brasil
Walden Bello, Member of Parliament/President Freedom from Debt Coalition, Philippines
Dot Keet, Southern Africa People’s Solidarity Network, South Africa
Héctor de la Cueva, RMALC, México

RESPONSES FROM GOVERNMENT REPRESENTATIVES
Chacho Alvarez, Presidente de la Comisión de Representantes Permanentes del MERCOSUR, Argentina

Ana Cristina Betancourt García, Coordinadora Nacional del Proyecto de Desarrollo Regional, Ministerio de Autonomía, Bolivia

Embajador Franklin Gonzalez, Representante Permanente ante el Mercosur de la Republica Bolivariana de Venezuela

Gustavo Codas, Asesor Presidencia del Gobierno de Paraguay

QUESTIONS FROM THE FLOOR
Gonzalo Berrón, Confederación Sindical de las Americas/Alianza Social Continental, Brasil

CONCLUDING WORDS
Gonzalo Berrón, Confederación Sindical de las Americas/Alianza Social Continental, Brasil

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE of GOVERNMENTS and SOCIAL MOVEMENTS “Regional Integration: an opportunity to face the crises” (21 and 22 July 2009)

CLOSING PANEL: REGIONAL INTEGRATION: CHALLENGES FOR THE MOVEMENTS AND THE GOVERNMENTS
– Héctor de la Cueva, Red Mexicana de Acción frente al Libre Comercio, México
– Brid Brennan, Transnational Institute, Netherlands
– Edgardo Lander, Universidad Central de Venezuela/Consejo Hemisférico del Foro Social Mundial, Venezuela
– Nalu Faria, Marcha Mundial de las Mujeres, Brasil
– Walden Bello, Member of Parliament/President Freedom from Debt Coalition, Philippines
– Dot Keet, Southern Africa People’s Solidarity Network, South Africa
– Héctor de la Cueva, RMALC, México

Introduction by Héctor de la Cueva, Red Mexicana de Acción frente al Libre Comercio, México

Presentation by Brid Brennan, Transnational Institute, Netherlands
Edgardo Lander, Universidad Central de Venezuela/Consejo Hemisférico del Foro Social Mundial, Venezuela
Nalu Faria, Marcha Mundial de las Mujeres, Brasil
Walden Bello, Member of Parliament/President Freedom from Debt Coalition, Philippines
Dot Keet, Southern Africa People’s Solidarity Network, South Africa
Héctor de la Cueva, RMALC, México

RESPONSES FROM GOVERNMENT REPRESENTATIVES
Chacho Alvarez, Presidente de la Comisión de Representantes Permanentes del MERCOSUR, Argentina

Ana Cristina Betancourt García, Coordinadora Nacional del Proyecto de Desarrollo Regional, Ministerio de Autonomía, Bolivia

Embajador Franklin Gonzalez, Representante Permanente ante el Mercosur de la Republica Bolivariana de Venezuela

Gustavo Codas, Asesor Presidencia del Gobierno de Paraguay

QUESTIONS FROM THE FLOOR
Graciela Rodriguez, IGTN/REBRIP, Brasil

CONCLUDING WORDS
Gonzalo Berrón, Confederación Sindical de las Americas/Alianza Social Continental, Brasil

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE of GOVERNMENTS and SOCIAL MOVEMENTS “Regional Integration: an opportunity to face the crises” (21 and 22 July 2009)

CLOSING PANEL: REGIONAL INTEGRATION: CHALLENGES FOR THE MOVEMENTS AND THE GOVERNMENTS
– Héctor de la Cueva, Red Mexicana de Acción frente al Libre Comercio, capsule México
– Brid Brennan, Transnational Institute, Netherlands
– Edgardo Lander, Universidad Central de Venezuela/Consejo Hemisférico del Foro Social Mundial, Venezuela
– Nalu Faria, Marcha Mundial de las Mujeres, Brasil
– Walden Bello, Member of Parliament/President Freedom from Debt Coalition, Philippines
– Dot Keet, Southern Africa People’s Solidarity Network, South Africa
– Héctor de la Cueva, RMALC, México

Introduction by Héctor de la Cueva, Red Mexicana de Acción frente al Libre Comercio, México

Presentation by Brid Brennan, Transnational Institute, Netherlands
Edgardo Lander, Universidad Central de Venezuela/Consejo Hemisférico del Foro Social Mundial, Venezuela
Nalu Faria, Marcha Mundial de las Mujeres, Brasil
Walden Bello, Member of Parliament/President Freedom from Debt Coalition, Philippines
Dot Keet, Southern Africa People’s Solidarity Network, South Africa
Héctor de la Cueva, RMALC, México

RESPONSES FROM GOVERNMENT REPRESENTATIVES
Chacho Alvarez, Presidente de la Comisión de Representantes Permanentes del MERCOSUR, Argentina

Ana Cristina Betancourt García, Coordinadora Nacional del Proyecto de Desarrollo Regional, Ministerio de Autonomía, Bolivia

Embajador Franklin Gonzalez, Representante Permanente ante el Mercosur de la Republica Bolivariana de Venezuela

Gustavo Codas, Asesor Presidencia del Gobierno de Paraguay

QUESTIONS FROM THE FLOOR
Graciela Rodriguez, IGTN/REBRIP, Brasil

Beverly Keene, Jubileo Sur, Argentina

Tom Kucharz, Ecologistas en Acción, España

CONCLUDING WORDS
Gonzalo Berrón, Confederación Sindical de las Americas/Alianza Social Continental, Brasil

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE of GOVERNMENTS and SOCIAL MOVEMENTS “Regional Integration: an opportunity to face the crises” (21 and 22 July 2009)

CLOSING PANEL: REGIONAL INTEGRATION: CHALLENGES FOR THE MOVEMENTS AND THE GOVERNMENTS
– Héctor de la Cueva, Red Mexicana de Acción frente al Libre Comercio, seek México
– Brid Brennan, Transnational Institute, Netherlands
– Edgardo Lander, Universidad Central de Venezuela/Consejo Hemisférico del Foro Social Mundial, Venezuela
– Nalu Faria, Marcha Mundial de las Mujeres, Brasil
– Walden Bello, Member of Parliament/President Freedom from Debt Coalition, Philippines
– Dot Keet, Southern Africa People’s Solidarity Network, South Africa
– Héctor de la Cueva, RMALC, México

Introduction by Héctor de la Cueva, Red Mexicana de Acción frente al Libre Comercio, México

Presentation by Brid Brennan, Transnational Institute, Netherlands
Edgardo Lander, Universidad Central de Venezuela/Consejo Hemisférico del Foro Social Mundial, Venezuela
Nalu Faria, Marcha Mundial de las Mujeres, Brasil
Walden Bello, Member of Parliament/President Freedom from Debt Coalition, Philippines
Dot Keet, Southern Africa People’s Solidarity Network, South Africa
Héctor de la Cueva, RMALC, México

RESPONSES FROM GOVERNMENT REPRESENTATIVES
Chacho Alvarez, Presidente de la Comisión de Representantes Permanentes del MERCOSUR, Argentina

Ana Cristina Betancourt García, Coordinadora Nacional del Proyecto de Desarrollo Regional, Ministerio de Autonomía, Bolivia

Embajador Franklin Gonzalez, Representante Permanente ante el Mercosur de la Republica Bolivariana de Venezuela

Gustavo Codas, Asesor Presidencia del Gobierno de Paraguay

QUESTIONS FROM THE FLOOR
Graciela Rodriguez, IGTN/REBRIP, Brasil

Beverly Keene, Jubileo Sur, Argentina

Tom Kucharz, Ecologistas en Acción, España

RESPONSES FROM GOVERNMENT REPRESENTATIVES
Chacho Alvarez, Presidente de la Comisión de Representantes Permanentes del MERCOSUR, Argentina

Ana Cristina Betancourt García, Coordinadora Nacional del Proyecto de Desarrollo Regional, Ministerio de Autonomía, Bolivia

Embajador Franklin Gonzalez, Representante Permanente ante el Mercosur de la Republica Bolivariana de Venezuela

Gustavo Codas, Asesor Presidencia del Gobierno de Paraguay

CONCLUDING WORDS
Gonzalo Berrón, Confederación Sindical de las Americas/Alianza Social Continental, Brasil

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE of GOVERNMENTS and SOCIAL MOVEMENTS “Regional Integration: an opportunity to face the crises” (21 and 22 July 2009)

CLOSING PANEL: REGIONAL INTEGRATION: CHALLENGES FOR THE MOVEMENTS AND THE GOVERNMENTS
– Héctor de la Cueva, ampoule Red Mexicana de Acción frente al Libre Comercio, unhealthy México
– Brid Brennan, Transnational Institute, Netherlands
– Edgardo Lander, Universidad Central de Venezuela/Consejo Hemisférico del Foro Social Mundial, Venezuela
– Nalu Faria, Marcha Mundial de las Mujeres, Brasil
– Walden Bello, Member of Parliament/President Freedom from Debt Coalition, Philippines
– Dot Keet, Southern Africa People’s Solidarity Network, South Africa
– Héctor de la Cueva, RMALC, México

Introduction by Héctor de la Cueva, Red Mexicana de Acción frente al Libre Comercio, México

Presentation by Brid Brennan, Transnational Institute, Netherlands
Edgardo Lander, Universidad Central de Venezuela/Consejo Hemisférico del Foro Social Mundial, Venezuela
Nalu Faria, Marcha Mundial de las Mujeres, Brasil
Walden Bello, Member of Parliament/President Freedom from Debt Coalition, Philippines
Dot Keet, Southern Africa People’s Solidarity Network, South Africa
Héctor de la Cueva, RMALC, México

RESPONSES FROM GOVERNMENT REPRESENTATIVES
Chacho Alvarez, Presidente de la Comisión de Representantes Permanentes del MERCOSUR, Argentina

Ana Cristina Betancourt García, Coordinadora Nacional del Proyecto de Desarrollo Regional, Ministerio de Autonomía, Bolivia

Embajador Franklin Gonzalez, Representante Permanente ante el Mercosur de la Republica Bolivariana de Venezuela

Gustavo Codas, Asesor Presidencia del Gobierno de Paraguay

QUESTIONS FROM THE FLOOR
Graciela Rodriguez, IGTN/REBRIP, Brasil

Beverly Keene, Jubileo Sur, Argentina

Tom Kucharz, Ecologistas en Acción, España

RESPONSES FROM GOVERNMENT REPRESENTATIVES
Chacho Alvarez, Presidente de la Comisión de Representantes Permanentes del MERCOSUR, Argentina

Ana Cristina Betancourt García, Coordinadora Nacional del Proyecto de Desarrollo Regional, Ministerio de Autonomía, Bolivia

Embajador Franklin Gonzalez, Representante Permanente ante el Mercosur de la Republica Bolivariana de Venezuela

CONCLUDING WORDS
Gonzalo Berrón, Confederación Sindical de las Americas/Alianza Social Continental, Brasil

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE of GOVERNMENTS and SOCIAL MOVEMENTS “Regional Integration: an opportunity to face the crises” (21 and 22 July 2009)

CLOSING PANEL: REGIONAL INTEGRATION: CHALLENGES FOR THE MOVEMENTS AND THE GOVERNMENTS
– Héctor de la Cueva, check sales Red Mexicana de Acción frente al Libre Comercio, online discount México
– Brid Brennan, Transnational Institute, Netherlands
– Edgardo Lander, Universidad Central de Venezuela/Consejo Hemisférico del Foro Social Mundial, Venezuela
– Nalu Faria, Marcha Mundial de las Mujeres, Brasil
– Walden Bello, Member of Parliament/President Freedom from Debt Coalition, Philippines
– Dot Keet, Southern Africa People’s Solidarity Network, South Africa
– Héctor de la Cueva, RMALC, México

Introduction by Héctor de la Cueva, Red Mexicana de Acción frente al Libre Comercio, México

Presentation by Brid Brennan, Transnational Institute, Netherlands
Edgardo Lander, Universidad Central de Venezuela/Consejo Hemisférico del Foro Social Mundial, Venezuela
Nalu Faria, Marcha Mundial de las Mujeres, Brasil
Walden Bello, Member of Parliament/President Freedom from Debt Coalition, Philippines
Dot Keet, Southern Africa People’s Solidarity Network, South Africa
Héctor de la Cueva, RMALC, México

RESPONSES FROM GOVERNMENT REPRESENTATIVES
Chacho Alvarez, Presidente de la Comisión de Representantes Permanentes del MERCOSUR, Argentina

Ana Cristina Betancourt García, Coordinadora Nacional del Proyecto de Desarrollo Regional, Ministerio de Autonomía, Bolivia

Embajador Franklin Gonzalez, Representante Permanente ante el Mercosur de la Republica Bolivariana de Venezuela

CONCLUDING WORDS
Gonzalo Berrón, Confederación Sindical de las Americas/Alianza Social Continental, Brasil

Dirigido a la Cumbre de la Alianza Bolivariana para los Pueblos de Nuestra América –ALBA-

Cochabamba, help seek 16 y 17 de octubre 2009

La ALBA es coincidente en su propuesta con principios y reivindicaciones históricas planteadas por el movimiento de mujeres. Sus principios de solidaridad, and treatment cooperación, reciprocidad, complementariedad, diversidad e igualdad, han sido la base de las prácticas y contribuciones económicas de las mujeres, ligadas prioritariamente a la reproducción integral de procesos y condiciones de vida, y son también el eje de nuestras visiones sobre un nuevo sistema económico. Así, la ALBA confluye con la aspiración de las mujeres latinoamericanas y caribeñas de levantar una sociedad integrada desde una perspectiva incluyente, que recoja y potencie la policroma diversidad de sus pueblos, superando injusticias y desigualdades.

Nosotras, que participamos activamente en las luchas y resistencias contra los proyectos de integración pautados por el capital, reconocemos a la ALBA como expresión de la búsqueda de un proyecto propio, en el cual los movimientos sociales y los pueblos, con nuestra participación activa, podamos contribuir y consensuar un proceso de construcción de sociedades alternativas.

Apreciamos el potencial de la ALBA para plantear un proyecto latinoamericano basado en transformaciones mayores: el socialismo del siglo XXI –que, como lo han asumido ya algunos presidentes, ‘solo podrá ser feminista’-; el paradigma del Buen Vivir / Vivir Bien y la riqueza de la plurinacionalidad, que redefinen ya los estados de algunos de sus países miembros.

Valoramos el hecho de que, en su corta vida, la ALBA registra ya logros en el terreno del intercambio solidario, en los dominios de educación, salud,  cooperación energética; es notable su proyección como espacio de concertación política y resolución de conflictos, de construcción de posiciones comunes, “en defensa de la independencia, la soberanía, la autodeterminación y la identidad de los países que la integran y de los intereses y las aspiraciones de los pueblos del Sur frente a los intentos de dominación política y económica”.

Como parte de los movimientos sociales y como protagonistas históricas de experiencias no mercantilizadas, hemos planteado, al igual que la ALBA, que nuestras sociedades se construyan sobre la base de la “unión de los pueblos, la autodeterminación, la complementariedad económica, el comercio justo, la lucha contra la pobreza, la preservación de la identidad cultural, la integración energética, la defensa del ambiente y la justicia”; desde esta coincidencia de perspectivas nos proponemos mancomunar esfuerzos para lograr los objetivos comunes de construcción de una Latinoamérica autodeterminada, solidaria, libre de relaciones patriarcales y levantada bajo los designios del Buen Vivir / Vivir Bien.

La consolidación de la ALBA como un espacio de soberanía política, económica, social, institucional, cultural, de la diversidad, de lo popular y de lo público demanda cambios de fondo en la manera de pensar, diseñar, decidir y materializar las políticas. Se trata de construir un nuevo paradigma societal, que va más allá de rediseñar el existente. Este es un reto que requiere aunar toda la inteligencia, comprensión y capacidad de diálogo entre los gobiernos de los países de la ALBA y los movimientos sociales, de manera fluida y permanente.

La creación del Consejo Ministerial de Mujeres y del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales, es paso importante para la articulación efectiva entre los gobiernos y los pueblos.  Saludamos esta decisión, a la vez que ofrecemos nuestro concurso para contribuir con el desarrollo de una perspectiva feminista en el conjunto de iniciativas y de políticas de la ALBA, como también para visualizar las medidas específicas que deberían tomarse para propiciar la igualdad de las mujeres y para erradicar el patriarcado.

Consideramos que los cambios que plantea la ALBA son alcanzables en tanto se amplíen y profundicen cambios como los que ya han emprendido algunos de nuestros países con un sentido de transformación estructural, que incluyen el reconocimiento de la diversidad económica y productiva y en ese marco la visibilización de las mujeres como actoras económicas, la equiparación entre el trabajo productivo y el reproductivo, el desarrollo de éticas de igualdad, diversidades y no violencia, el reconocimiento de la soberanía alimentaria, entre otros aspectos que podrían convertirse en punto común para todas las políticas públicas de la ALBA, colocando como eje el Buen Vivir / Vivir Bien y la sostenibilidad de la vida.

Con especial interés seguimos la propuesta de construir una Zona Económica de Desarrollo Compartido entre los países de la ALBA; consideramos que a su amparo y bajo un enfoque de economía diversa, social y solidaria, se pueden desarrollar iniciativas compartidas de soberanía alimentaria, de reconocimiento y desarrollo de los conocimientos de las mujeres,  de rescate y curaduría de las semillas nativas y de transgenosis natural, de producción y distribución cooperativa y asociativa, de generación de infraestructura y tecnologías orientadas al cuidado humano y ambiental.

La creación de núcleos de desarrollo endógeno binacionales o trinacionales, que transformen las condiciones de trabajo y empleo para las mujeres del campo y la ciudad, sería una importante experiencia de integración y preservación regional de la cultura productiva y solidaria acumulada históricamente por nuestros pueblos.
De igual manera, la creación de un Instituto de Estudios Feministas de los países de la ALBA, que organice intercambios de conocimientos y saberes entre los países, desarrolle proyectos de investigación sobre políticas públicas e internacionales, recupere los múltiples aportes de las mujeres a lo largo de nuestra historia, y juegue un papel activo en la generación de propuestas y desarrollo de asesorías a los gobiernos en esta materia, contribuirá significativamente al fortalecimiento de nuestro proceso de cambio regional.

La ALBA es un espacio privilegiado para el impulso de un proyecto de integración alternativo que no debe repetir el déficit democrático de las propuestas precedentes. La participación en la concepción, diseño y ejecución de proyectos debe ser una divisa, por ello proponemos, como forma inicial de materialización de esa participación, que en la  instancia técnica del Consejo Social encargada de elaborar estudios, preparar propuestas y formular proyectos relacionados con las políticas sociales de la ALBA, así como de coordinar y darles seguimiento, se contemple la participación paritaria de las mujeres, la misma que deberá hacerse extensiva a todas las instancias, incluidas aquellas de decisión, gestión y representación.

La ALBA tiene la particularidad de reunir a países de la Región Andina, Centroamérica y el Caribe, con problemáticas comunes y diferentes en materia de salud y vulnerabilidad frente a los fenómenos climáticos. Sería pertinente la creación de redes de intercambio y ayuda de las organizaciones de mujeres ante situaciones de emergencia epidemiológica y catástrofes naturales.

Si bien el surgimiento y desarrollo de la ALBA ha sido un factor reconfortante en la senda de nuestras luchas, persisten en el mundo y en la región tendencias y procesos que constituyen zonas de riesgo y/o amenazas para los procesos de cambio, ante los cuales debemos permanecer alerta y desplegar toda la capacidad en defensa de nuestros procesos de transformación.  Declarar a los países de la ALBA como territorios de paz y libres de bases militares extrajeras es una propuesta de gran coherencia y defensa de la soberanía.

Con preocupación vemos el avance en la región de un modelo de crecimiento focalizado en megaproyectos, que avanzan sin el consentimiento de los pueblos y atentan contra sus derechos, soberanía y autodeterminación.  El auge de monumentales obras de infraestructura bajo el amparo de proyectos como IIRSA y el Plan Mesoamérica, involucran a países de toda América Latina, incluso países de la ALBA. Tales obras son el sustento para la profundización y ampliación de economías de enclave, basadas en la racionalidad extractivista, deprededadora en su relación con la naturaleza y reproductora de las condiciones de relegamiento de nuestros pueblos. Estas obras tienen un notorio impacto sobre las mujeres, en especial las indígenas, comprometen la soberanía alimentaria de esas localidades y alteran la geografía, los ecosistemas y los patrones de consumo tradicional; algunas de ellas abren paso a la depredación de los recursos localizados en la Amazonía y en los bosques tropicales de Centroamérica.

Creemos que es urgente que los gobiernos de la ALBA consideren colectivamente una crítica y distanciamiento de tales iniciativas del capitalismo neoliberal y asuman, sin ambigüedades, un nuevo enfoque de desarrollo congruente con la propuesta del Buen Vivir / Vivir Bien y con el proceso de cambios y estructurales que la ALBA conlleva.
Con inquietud hemos visto, asimismo, el relanzamiento del Fondo Monetario Internacional en varios foros internacionales, como instancia reguladora frente a la actual crisis; resulta ofensivo hacia nuestros pueblos ignorar la responsabilidad de esa institución no sólo en las dinámicas que condujeron a la propia crisis, sino también en la aplicación de las políticas neoliberales que aún nos afectan duramente.  Ratificamos nuestra convicción, expresada en el último Foro Social Mundial (Belém 2009), de que el enfrentamiento a la crisis demanda alternativas anticapitalistas, antirracistas,  anti-imperialistas, socialistas, feministas y ecologistas.

Es igualmente preocupante que se mantengan injustificadas expectativas en que la conclusión de la Ronda Doha de la OMC pueda resolver los problemas de acceso al mercado para los países ‘en desarrollo’. Los pueblos reclamamos el comercio justo y solidario frente al libre comercio; la apertura indiscriminada de nuestros mercados desplazó a las y los productores locales, la sustitución de importaciones fue demonizada para abrir nuestros mercados a los productos importados, la competencia se impuso a la lógica de la complementariedad y cooperación regional.

La ALBA es un espacio invaluable para el rescate y el desarrollo de las producciones locales que fortalezcan las relaciones entre los pueblos y favorezcan formas de gestión colectiva, definida en torno al interés social y a los derechos de la naturaleza, por lo mismo debería extender la influencia de su filosofía a los acuerdos internacionales  con otras regiones.

La ALBA es un espacio privilegiado para la construcción de soberanía financiera. Recuperar el control sobre nuestros ahorros y recursos financieros y reorientar su utilización hacia nuestros objetivos estratégicos, con criterios de democratización y redistribución es fundamental. Resalta como mecanismo el Banco de la ALBA, que puede ser uno de los puntales para desarrollo de iniciativas económicas de carácter social y solidario de alcance regional, nacional y local, que se fundamenten en visiones de complementariedad entre los países y de justicia de género, integrando medidas eficaces para asegurar el acceso de las mujeres a los recursos y a la toma de decisiones. En igual sentido valoramos la importancia de la adopción del SUCRE como medio de intercambio soberano y eficaz en el comercio internacional entre nuestros países.

Finalmente, es un desafío común para los países de la ALBA avanzar en políticas y medidas conjuntas para:

Reconocer, dentro de las modalidades de trabajo, a las labores de autosustento y cuidado humano no remunerado que se realiza en los hogares. Los Estados deberían comprometerse a facilitar servicios e infraestructura para la atención pública y comunitaria de las necesidades básicas de todos los grupos dependientes (niñas/os, personas con discapacidad, adultas/os mayores), definir horarios de trabajo adecuados, impulsando la corresponsabilidad y reciprocidad de hombres y mujeres en el trabajo doméstico y en las obligaciones familiares, así como extender la seguridad social a quienes hacen esas labores.

Impulsar reformas agrarias integrales y sostenibles, con una visión holística de la tierra como fuente de vida, que propicien la diversidad económica y productiva, la redistribución y la prohibición del latifundio.

Impulsar la integración energética de América Latina y El Caribe bajo los principios del Buen Vivir / Vivir Bien, priorizando dentro de las estrategias de cooperación, proyectos de generación de energías limpias para fortalecer las capacidades de las pequeñas unidades productivas y las condiciones de vida de las poblaciones más empobrecidas.

ALBA, un nuevo amanecer para nuestros pueblos
con igualdad para las mujeres!

Red Latinoamericana Mujeres Transformando la Economía –REMTE-
Articulación de Mujeres de la CLOC- Vía Campesina
Federación de Mujeres Cubanas
Federación Democrática Internacional de Mujeres
FEDAEPS


Declaración de la Cumbre de los Pueblos del Sur “Protagonismo popular, construyendo soberanía”

By Thomas Wallgren

* Presentation given at International Conference of governments and social movements “Regional Integration: an opportunity to face the crises” (21 and 22 July 2009, ask Asunción del Paraguay)


Because of systemic constraints in the so called leading nations we cannot wait for the Obamas and even Lulas of the world to show the way for the deep changes we need. Political, cultural and moral initiative that will inspire hope on all continents can and needs to come from many places.

In the golden age of the Nordic model, the small North European area that I come from, had disproportionate global significance in pro-people politics. Many of us in these countries still work to preserve and take further the Nordic tradition. We must, however, humbly admit that the Nordic identity has weakened in the last 15 years as we have been been overwhelmed by globalisation and EU-integration.

In this spirit I want to join the large number of people on all continents who enthusiastically welcome the recent wave of positive developments in Latin America, including also many smaller countries, such as Bolivia, Ecuador and Paraguay. I recognise the enormous difficulties you are facing, including the current crisis in Honduras. Nevertheless I want to welcome the quality and direction of development in many South and Latin American countries in the last few years and the efforts and the decisive contribution of ordinary people from the struggling classes to them.

A. GLOBAL AND HISTORICAL PREMISES OF REGIONAL COOPERATION

Regional integration in the context of collapsing neo-liberalism, authoritarian capitalism and the search for cultural alternatives

1. “Neoliberalism died in 2008-2009. ” Is this statement true or false?
It is true in a limited sense. The state is back in the economy. Simultaneously deregulation, privatisation and trade liberalisation are all on a hold or they are rolled back. George W. Bush goes down in the books as the greatest socialiser of banks and enterprises in world history. Market fundamentalism will not come back easily as an economic orthodoxy. So far so good.


Nevertheless, as we have seen during the past months the demise of neo-liberalism does not mean the end of capitalism nor does it automatically change the balance of power or fundamental policies. Banks are bailed out and the costs of enterprise failures are carried by tax-payers. In the EU the centralising and liberalising Lissabon treaty is back on track. In India the elections were won by a centre right still pursuing growth through exports, international competitiveness, intensified exploitation of domestic natural resources and deepened integration into global markets. Obama brings the US back on a more Keynesian track and into multilateral cooperation, but his victory was more due to the catastrophic results of Bush’s politics than of a desire for fundamental redirection of US power. Financial regulation remains weak, tax havens still work as usual and even the Tobin tax awaits its implementation. In the global arenas, at WTO, the World Bank or even in the climate negotiations positive news are yet to come. All in all, it is clear by now that radical shifts in power structures, economic distribution or national or international policies are not easily within reach.


The main lesson of the past winter is that neo-liberalism was always only a radical fashion, a tip of the iceberg. When it goes away we can see again clearly that the modern state in most countries remains committed to a development model in which a mix of capitalist, growth dependent exploitative economy and consumerist, individualistic, civilisational values remains central. The global trend in the last years and months is not that neo-liberal capitalism is replaced by socialism, a new green politics or even social liberalism but, unfortunately, by authoritarian capitalism. In fact, what we witness on all continents is a colossal lack of political and cultural creativity in the state and corporate sector. Hence, and this is my first point today, people seeking social and ecological justice need to recognise that the shift to politics for sustainable futures that the world so badly needs will not come about just because neo-liberalism goes away.

The good news is that with neo-liberalism gone, with George Bush down and out and with the states and business sector at a loss both intellectually and morally we can begin to understand our responsibility and define our tasks and challenges more clearly than has been possible during the past ten years.


Everywhere people recognise that the ruling elites are failing and at a loss. We need a new internationalism that is not founded on state to state cooperation or market integration. The regional cooperation we are looking for must protect and build upon people-to-people solidarity and conviviality. It must draw its strength from the confidence and creativity of ordinary people who are engaged in a multitude of local struggles and in a plurality of efforts towards decolonisation and civilisational renewal.

2. Too often only the global and national level are recognized as relevant political arenas. They are important, but should not make us overlook the relevance of the local and regional levels. From the perspective of radical and comprehensive democracy building from below and strengthening the disempowered is essential in all responses to the crisis. Democratising the politics and economy of globalisation is important but difficult. In global efforts large corporations and states still have a relative advantage over other actors. Hence, as long as power structure are not altered, we should not expect too much good to come out from institutions working on global regulation of e.g. finance and climate.


The experience of the past years has shown clearly the inadequacy of the current structure, instruments and policies of global financial regulation and economic development. The Bretton Woods institutions and the WTO-framwork have been insufficient or even dysfunctional for development, ecological responsibility and economic stability, especially for the global South. This much should now be uncontroversial. It remains open, however, what the implications are for the politics of global governance and the role of regional and national politics.

My second point today is that regional politics needs to be recognised more than before as a relevant arena of political initiative in its own right. The regional arena is too often considered to be only complementary to nation states and global institutional arrangements and global governance. Regional cooperation in the South can provide protection from dysfunctional and failing global institutions. It can also strengthen the bargaining power of the South, especially the smaller countries of the South, in global politics. Thirdly regional political instruments may play a huge role in achieving at the regional level governance services and functions that are not available at the global level. These can include for instance protection and support of micro and small enterprise as well as of local knowledge systems and forms or democracy, the launch of local and regional currencies with high social and ecological value, and so forth.

3. State borders are becoming more porous than before, people are meeting and mixing more than before. The future belongs, as Indian social philosoper Lohia said fifty years ago, increasingly to “the bastards.” We see every day along the Southern borders of the US and the EU that efforts to keep borders closed and nations clean lead to disaster. Regional cooperation presents major opportunities if the physical and cultural mobility of peoples in the region and between them is enhanced. The opposite politics of regional integration which allows mobility only internally and is closed to the outer world, with exceptions allowed only for selfish reasons or on market premises is a false and dangerous model.


In societies atomised socially and empoverished culturally by late capitalism and consumerism nation state are often seen as competitors. The sense of competition fosters widely felt anxiety. As we have seen in South Asia, Europe, North America and elsewhere the consequence is often un upsurge of xenophobic identity-politics, increasing militarisation and securitisation and even terror by states and non-state agencies.

Regional protection and strategic cooperation should be built with a clear commitment to global solidarity.

In building regionalism for a new internationalism it is essential that we go beyond the current logic of competetive identity politics. In this a people-to-people cooperation and diplomacy, as pursued for instance in the World Social Forum and by a multitude of innovative smaller groups and movementsduring the past years, can play an important role. The legitimacy and need for non-state political cooperation is obvious and  in regional cooperation as well tax-payers money and other public resources should not be exclusively spent on state and market driven integration.

Having said this let me stress that our efforts must complement and give life to, but not undermine the UN centred multilateral system. The G-192 that met in June 2009 for a UN General Assembly on the financial crisis and its impact on development also needs strengthening.

4. Regional cooperation in the South should not only protect the weak. It should also lead the world out of its multiple crises on the long-term. Globally the political debates seem to be moving from a discussion of separate crises to a discussion of inter-connected crises: of the finance sector, the world economy, political governance, food, water, development and climate. I welcome the synthetic framework of this conference. I only want to add that not only are the different areas of crisis interconnected and systemic. They should all be seen as symptoms of an underlying cultural crisis; a crisis of development models and the fundamental aspirations and ideals of modernization.

My fourth suggestion is that all political reforms and initiatives now of the short and medium term should be shaped so as not to hamper but rather support a civilisational shift in which the ultimate goals and ideals of development are reconsidered. It is clear that people, states and corporations in Europe and America must be pressed to responsibility and that we must pay for the mess we have caused during five hundred years through exploitation of other continents and mother earth. Nevertheless, for historical, cultural and social reasons the global North cannot be trusted too much in the search for new civilisational visions and new socially and ecologically enriching models for progress and development. The global South must take the lead. Regional cooperation in the global South and between increasingly self-reliant but co-operating Southern regional blocs can be essential for gaining economic, political and cultural autonomy from Europe and the US, serving global solidarity and environmental responsibility.

Latin America, with its strong tradition of mass participation in politics, progressive left movements, liberation theology and its great cultural variety should be a strong region in this search. In recent years the increasingly lively alliances throughout the region of indigenous and other emancipatory movements, that has given one country a president coming from the indigenous movements and another country a constitution that recognises Mother Earth is of particular interest for people on all continents who are searching for new political tools, ideas and visions. In decolonising development, art iculating new visions of good life (buen vivir) and building radical democracy the movements South America are today a great source of energy and hope for people on all continents. It is important for us all that this political and cultural resurgence is placed at the centre of regional integration here.

6. Nuclear proliferation, the totalisation of war through the war on terror and anti-hegemonic insurgency with little or no dependence on states, and the largely uncalculable threats of new military technologies combining e.g. new IT, nano-technology and genetic engineering make 21st century questions of war and peace more intractable than before. For this reason pro-people regional cooperation should systematically promote cultures and economies of sustainability and peace.

Peace-politics cannot imply thoughtless pacifism. We can still draw insight and inspiration from the Gandhian notion of and experiments with truth-force (“satyagraha”). This year 100 years have passed since Gandhi wrote his definitive statement, the pivotal pamphlet Hind Swaraj or Indian Home Rule on board a ship between Britain and South  Africa. The new politics of global security that we need, must, as Gandhi and others have clearly seen long back, be linked to the construction of pro-people and environmentally sound development models. These can emerge on the basis of the variety of sustainable life-styles, democracies and civilisational values existing today especially in the global South.

The industrial growth centred development model that first emerged in Europe and North America in the 18th to 20th century needs to be seriously reconsidered. The global record seems to be that industrial growth economies are not capable of overcoming poverty and deprivation everywhere. Without a commitment to peaceful cooperation and civilisational alternatives zero-sum competition for growth and unsustainable life-styles among nations and regions is likely to dominate global politics in the 21st century. Regions are then more than likely to develop into competing, protectionist blocs forming strategic alliances. Even under the condition of functional interdependence globally of the competing blocs, climate change, development failures and resource depletion combined with nuclear proliferation and the evolution of new military technologies may easily lead to completely new types of wars with planetary consequences. Hence, regional cooperation in Latin America, in other Southern regions and between them needs to be globally oriented towards cooperation and solidarity, not competition. It may be helpful in this regard to think of the global North in a new way: not as the developed regions that have made it, but as regions suffering from serious development failures. Even quite conservative new models for measuring overall success in development, such as the so called Happy Planet Index, indicate that life-conditions in the US, Sweden, Germany and other similar countries reached an all-time high in th 1970s and haved steadily deteriorated since then.

B. LESSONS FROM THE EUROPEAN MODEL

Since the early 1950s the emergence of, first the European Economic Community, EEC, and later, its sequel, the European Union, has been the dynamic centre of European  integration. The EU is now the most advanced model of regional integration globally. It has the largest internal market, the most ambitious common political instruments and the tightest juridical integration.

European integration has gained popular support and political legitimacy from two great promises. It has been seen, first, as a peace project and, secondly, increasingly in later years, as a project for benign, political governance of corporate driven globalisation. Without these impressive ideas European integration could not have been brought to its present level. Both ideas are now in a crisis.

I wish to bring out some lessons for regional integration from the fifty years of building the European Union:

(1) Peace ambitions may undermine democracy:
Since its inception in the 1950s the EU has been seen as a device to overcome the belligerent tendencies of nation-states. Drawing on analysis and inspiration coming from the 18th century German enlightenment philosopher Immanuel Kant and others, the idea has been to promote peace through functional integration of the national economies in the region.
The dark side of this idea was that EU integration has worked top-down. The people have been seen as prone to aggressive sentiment. Integration has proceeded on the initiative and under the leadership of bureaucratic elites. Economic integration has intentionally been built as a device that will promote political and other integration later, behind the backs of the reluctant citizens. For this reason the EU carries a vast democratic deficit. In recent years the democratic deficit in Europe has become obvious to all. The repeated side-stepping of the outcome of national referenda on EU-issues, such as the French and Dutch rejection of the EU constitution  and the Irish rejection of the Lisbon Treaty is rapidly leading Europe to a very serious and deep crisis in democratic legitimacy and participation.
The deficit is structural: decision-making in the EU is so undemocratic that, ironically, the EU, if it would be a nation, would not qualify for membership in the EU.  Because of the post-war technocratic logic of EU-integration the democratic crisis in Europe is also very deep-seated. It will take time to overcome it. At the moment, the effort by EU-leaders to enforce the Lisbin treaty show that so far the EU is on the wrong track in this regard.
The lesson to be learnt is that regional cooperation must, much more than has been the case in Europe, be built democratically, with explicit consent and support by the citizens.

(2) Peace ambitions regionally may be counterproductive for peace globally:

In the aftermath of the second world war the sound ambition of the architects of European integration was to prevent the outbreak of war between European nations. Less attention has, for understandable reasons, been paid to the contribution of Europe to global security. The consequence is that wars between the leading countries of Europe has become highly unlikely but that their integration between them may become, or has perhaps already become, counter-productive for global security. In the great wars of the Bush regime – on Iraq and Afghanistan – a new obscene division of labour is emerging between the trans-Atlantic forces. The USA carries the main burden of classical warfare, the EU steps in economically and logistically in the aftermath of the war, takinmg care of crisis management. This, it may be argued, is the new logic of Western, imperial military hegemony.
If other regions follow the EU model and see regional integration of foreign policy, security policy and trade policy as an instrument for selfish and hegemonic ambitions the ensuing world order may easily end up repeating the calamities of what we in Europe call the westphalian order of competing, sovereign nation states, at a new, higher level.

(3) Regional cooperation for global governance needs to be built democratically from below. Special care must be taken at every step to keep economic policies within democratic control and to avoid spill-over from economic policies on social protection, environmental protection and other vital policy areas:

Since the 1980s the main left and centre argument in favour of deepening European integration has no longer been the argument from peace. The new argument has been the argument from globalization. The main ideas are familiar to all by now. Technological changes have made possible deep changes in the economy. Deepening economic interdependence between nations and regions, the increasing importance of a globalised capital market and the increasing size and power of transnational corporations have overburdened the steering and regulating capacity of nation states. For these reasons new instruments for political regulations are called for. The European Union has been seen by many as a much needed instrument for improved global governance of the economy at first, and now increasingly also of climate change, migration etc.
For this and other reasons the primacy of economic policy instruments is a deep-seated feature of European integration. The creation of a common internal market and of common external economic policies, especially as regards trade, has been a priority in European integration.
In this tradition markets and trade have often been given politically very expansive interpretations: in the EU (as in the WTO) the free movement of trade in goods has not been enough. Free movement of capital, labour and services have been seen as equally natural parts of economic integration on liberal premises. In consequence, the more the economic instruments have developed the more they have dominated over other policy areas in which decision-making has been more confined to the national level. Social policy, workers rights, health and education, environment have all suffered from a subordination to common economic policies. The strong efforts by trade unions, left governments, environmentalists, women’s movements and others to change the balance of forces in Europe have so far met with, at best, half-success. Recent key developments, such as the text and ratification process of the Lisbon Treaty, the formation of Europe’s new global economic policy, and the struggles over the working time, services and chemical legislation at the European level, show that corporate interests and narrowly defined economic goals still tend to dominate EU-policies.


The lesson for other regions is again negative. It is extremely dangerous for democracy, ecology and social justice to make economic cooperation the heart of regional integration.

(4) Regional integration is possible but needs to be democratic:
Let me close on a more positive note with some recommendations drawn from the European experience:

* Regional integration needs to be built democratically. Economic integration should be subservient to social justice and radical democracy.
To this end, there are four  fundamental conditions:
One: the fundamental principle of democracy, that all state power and all power of regional authorities belongs to the people, must always be recognized formally. (In the EU this is still not the case!)
Two: It is imperative that the juridical hierarchy, including the effective control of constitutional rights and freedoms of people and nature, is never subordinated to economic policies or juridical agreements regulating the economy. In the European Union the primacy of economic rights and freedoms at the level of the common regional market and in trade agreements infringes more and more on the human rights achievements. This is not only a concern at the international level where bilateral and multilateral free trade agreements are known to undermine human rights. Also internally in Europe social rights achievements have some times been undermined by the economic logic of integration.
Three: the peoples must always have effective control, before the fact and after the fact, of the balance of powers between regional and national authorities. In practice, referenda about that powers to hold at the national level and what powers to confer to regional authorities are essential. But these must be complemented by stronger powers to question and interfere in the formation of this balance by national parliaments.
Four: the political logic of democratic regionalism by the people and for the people should be pluralistic and decentred. When the peoples are in effective control of the balance of powers different countries will participate in different ways in regional cooperation, taking exceptions as they see fit and forming sub-units of tighter cooperation as they see fit. This should not be seen as a problem. The example of the European Union shows that even when integration is rigidly designed to create a Union of just one kind of members the end-result will be something else. In actual fact different European countries have different between them quite different kinds of membership in the EU both politically and juridically.

* Economic policies of regions should learn from the failures of the neo-liberal experiments in the EU and elsewhere:

+ A Latin American Central Bank issuing a common currencie that may in the long run function as a (regional?) reserve currency must work under democratic political guidance and pursue socially and ecologically responsible monetary policies;
+  The political weight and influence of large corporations tends to be relatively greater on regional than on national and local levels of political decision-making. In order to curb excess corporate influence strong measures must be taken at all times. They need to include very tight transparency regulation and, as I believe, innovative, radical anti-trust regulation. I suggest that a maximum size of corporations is considered as well as sealings on individual ownership and control of corporate activity.

* Regional cooperation may have democratizing effects on the relations between big and small countries. For this, effective, almost excessive formal veto powers by smaller members states in the regional organisations are needed to counter the effective and lasting, greater political weight of larger members.

* Regional, elected parliaments can play an important role in a new regionalism. The elected parliament should not be subordinate to regional non-elected bodies, but the extent of its powers needs to be controlled from lower levels.

* The world has seen the emergence of many special economic zones lately. In a new kind of regionalism special zones for people’s power from below can be created, where people and nature are protected against corporations and states. In Bolivia there seems to be encouraging experiments along this line that could serve as a model for further work.

* The European experience shows that regional cooperation can be effective in enhancing the power and  economic and social status of oppressed minorities and underprivileged regions. The mechanisms to achieve this need careful attention.

* If we manage to correct the imbalances mentioned the European Union shows that cultural and social solidarity between peoples with a long negative record of wars is possible and can be promoted through regional cooperation.

* Lastly, as compared with Europe, Latin America (as well as e.g. South Asia) has four distinct advantages as compared with Europe in its effort to build pro-people, ecologically sustainable regional cooperation to the benefit of the global community.
+ The first is a commonality of cultural values and identity. I do not want to under underestimate the cultural diversity of the Americas. But it seems to me as an outside observer that the experience of more than 500 years of colonialism and imperialism serves as a source of solidarity between the peoples in Latin America.
+ The second is common languages: Spanish and Portuguese are closely related. Again I hope that I do not offend the many people with other  languages as their first language if I say that the conditions for a common public space, and hence for radical regional democracy is more happy in Latin America than in some other regions. In view of recent experiences elsewhere this is likely to be more important for post-national democracy than computer-intensity.
+ The third is common interest. Again, I do not want to overstate the case, but it appears to me that all countries in Latin Ameica could gain in economic and cultural terns from deepened cooperation between them and also with other Southern regions, even if it has to happen at the cost of laxer links to Europe and North America.
+ The fourth is the mere fact that Latin Ametican efforts towards regional integration can learn from the European experience, positively and negatively. For instance, it appears to me that it can be advantageous to build relatively more on existing sub-regional organizations than has been done in the European context where Benelux, Nordic and other sub-regional cooperation structures have been eroded by European institutions when a better policy could have been to sustain and strengthen them as parts of a multilayered regional cooperation structure.

Latin American regional cooperation may also benefit from solidarity and cooperation with regional cooperation in other regions of the South. Together the cooperating regions may make historic contributions to a post-colonial and post-imperial, pluricentric and peaceful world order

With these remarks I wish Paraguay and all countries in Mercosur and South and Latin America at large determination and democratic energy for regional cooperation that will enhance a new internationalism and civilisational renewal world-wide.

Thank you for your attention.

Thomas Wallgren
E-mail:  thomas.wallgren@helsinki.fi



[1] The author is the secretary of Coalition for comprehensive democracy, Vasudhaiva Kutumbakam in Finland. He is affiliated with the Brussels based organisation Corporate Europe Observatory, chair of the Finnish Refugee Council and co-chair of Alternative to the EU – Finland. He serves as an elected member of the city council of Helsinki and is co-chair of the social-democratic group. Wallgren is the head of the Department of Philosophy at the University of Helsinki, Finland. – All references are given for purposes of identification and transparency only. The author claims no ownership of his ideas nor originality for his views. He carries sole responsibility for the views expressed and all shortcomings of his remarks.



INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE of GOVERNMENTS and SOCIAL MOVEMENTS “Regional Integration: an opportunity to face the crises”

DATES: 21 and 22 July 2009
VENUE: PRODEPA, Sala 1, drugstore Consejo Nacional del Deporte, Asunción del Paraguay
TIME: 9am-20pm


PROGRAME


21 JULY

09:00–09:30

Opening: Greeting from organisers

– Enrique Daza, Executive Secretary, Hemispheric Social Alliance, Colombia
– Brid Brennan, TNI/Peoples’ Agenda for Alternative Regionalisms, Netherlands
– Guillermo Ortega, Base IS, Iniciativa Paraguaya por la Integración de los Pueblos, Paraguay
– Héctor Lacognata, Minister of Foreign Affairs, Paraguay

09:30–11:30 Systemic Crisis, impacts of the crisis on regional integration processes

– Juan Gonzalez, MOSIP, Argentina
– Walden Bello, Member of Parliament, Philippines
– Tetteh Hormeku, TWN/ATN, Ghana

Moderation

Cecilia Olivet,

TNI, Netherlands

11:30-13:30 Regional responses to the crises

– Juan Castillo, Secretary for International Relations PIT-CNT, Uruguay

– Demba Moussa Dembele, African Forum on Alternatives, Senegal
– Joy Chavez, Focus on the Global South, Philippines
– Frederic Viale, ATTAC France

Moderation

José Miguel Hernández,

CTC Nacional/ CC-ASC, Cuba

13:30-15:00 Lunch
15:00-17:30 Regional Integration: Re-thinking the development model. Complementarity versus competition. Integration and Asymmetries

– Jorge Lara Castro, Vice-Minister of Foreign Affairs, Paraguay
– Oscar Laborde, Government Argentina

– Tomas Palau, Base IS, Iniciativa Paraguaya por la Integración de los Pueblos, Paraguay

– Graciela Rodriguez, REBRIP, Brazil

– Dot Keet, SAPSN, South Africa

– Charles Santiago, Member of Parliament, Malaysia

Moderation

Gonzalo Berrón,

ASC/CSA, Brazil

17:30-18:00 Coffee break
18:00-20:00 Development Model and Infrastructure
– Guilherme Carvalho, Rede Brasil sobre  Instituições Financeiras Multilaterais, Brazil
– Ricardo Miranda, Confederación Sindical Única de Trabajadores Campesinos de Bolivia (CSUTCB), Bolivia
– Michelle Pressend, Trade Strategy Group, South Africa

Moderation

Ximana Centellas,

Directora General de

Gestión Pública,

Viceministerio de

Coordinación y Gestión Gubernamental, Bolivia


22 JULY


09:00-10:45 Energy Crisis and Climate Change: the challenge to find regional solutions

– Walden Bello, Member of Parliament, Philippines

– Pablo Bertinat, Cono Sur Sustentable, Argentina
– Roberto Colman, Coordinadora Soberanía Energética, Paraguay
– Tom Kucharz, Ecologistas en Accion, Spain

Moderation
Fernando Rojas, Decidamos,

Iniciativa Paraguaya por la

Integración de los Pueblos, Paraguay

10:45-11:00 Coffe Break
11:00-13:00 Production model and Food Sovereignty

– Juan José Dominguez, Member of Parliament, MPP–FA, Uruguay

– Rabindra Adhikari, Member of Parliament, Nepal
– Indra Lubis, La Via Campesina, Indonesia
– Lodwick Chizarura, SEATINI, Zimbabwe
– Francisca Rodriguez, CONAMURI/CLOC, Chile

Moderation

Sebastián Valdomir, Redes Amigos de la Tierra, Uruguay

13:00-14:00 Lunch
14:00–16:00 Finances and development model: New financial structures: (Bank of the South, regional currencies, etc)
– Pedro Paez, President of the Ecuadorian Presidential Technical Commission for the New Regional Financial Architecture and Bank of the South, Ecuador
– Beverly Keene, Jubilee South, Argentina
– Ivan Lukas, Glopolis, Czech Republic

Moderation

Veronique Sandoval, Espace Marx, France

16:00-17:00 Regional Peace, Democracy and Human Rights

– Lee, Seung-Heon, Chief External Relations Department of the Korea Democratic Labor Party, South Korea
– Camille Chalmers, Campaign for Demilitarisation of the Americas, Haiti

– Meena Menon, Focus on the Global South, India
Thomas Wallgren, Coalition for comprehensive democracy – Vasudhaiva Kutumkakam, Finland (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION)
– Pezo Mateo-Phiri, SAPSN, Zambia

Moderation

Ramon Corvalan, SERPAJ

Paraguay/ Iniciativa

Paraguaya por la integracion de los Pueblos, Paraguay

17:00–17:30 Coffee break
17:30–20:00

Round Table: Regional Integration: challenges for the movements and the governments


– Chacho Alvarez, President Committee of Permanent Representatives of MERCOSUR, Argentina
– Ana Cristina Betancourt Garcia, Ministerio de Autonomía, Bolivia
– Gustavo Codas, Government Paraguay
– Franklin Gonzalez, Government Venezuela
– Edgardo Lander, Universidad Central de Venezuela/TNI, Venezuela
– Walden Bello, Focus on the Global South/MP, Philippines
– Nalu Farias, World March of Women, Brazil
– Brid Brennan, TNI, Netherlands
– Dot Keet, SAPSN, South Africa
Moderation
Héctor de la Cueva, RMALC, México


Co- Organisers
Hemispheric Social Alliance (HSA), Iniciativa Paraguaya para la Integración de los Pueblos, People’s Agenda for Alternative Regionalisms (PAAR), Focus on the Global South and Transnational Institute (TNI)

In cooperation with
Trade Union Confederation of the Americas (TUCA), Southern African People’s Solidarity Network (SAPSN), People’s SAARC, Solidarity for Asian People’s Advocacy (SAPA), TWN Africa, Trade Strategy Group, Jubilee South, REBRIP, Transform Europe, ATTAC France, Coalition for comprehensive democracy – Vasudhaiva Kutumkakam and Ecologistas en Acción

Supported by
Paraguayan Presidency Pro-tempore of Mercosur

With the contribution of
Oxfam/Novib, Oxfam Internacional, Christian Aid and Action Aid


INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE of GOVERNMENTS and SOCIAL MOVEMENTS “Regional Integration: an opportunity to face the crises”

DATES: 21 and 22 July 2009
VENUE: PRODEPA, check Sala 1, Consejo Nacional del Deporte, Asunción del Paraguay
TIME: 9am-20pm


PROGRAME


21 JULY

09:00–09:30

Opening: Greeting from organisers

– Enrique Daza, Executive Secretary, Hemispheric Social Alliance, Colombia
– Brid Brennan, TNI/Peoples’ Agenda for Alternative Regionalisms, Netherlands
– Guillermo Ortega, Base IS, Iniciativa Paraguaya por la Integración de los Pueblos, Paraguay
– Héctor Lacognata, Minister of Foreign Affairs, Paraguay

09:30–11:30 Systemic Crisis, impacts of the crisis on regional integration processes

– Juan Gonzalez, MOSIP, Argentina
– Walden Bello, Member of Parliament, Philippines
– Tetteh Hormeku, TWN/ATN, Ghana

Moderation

Cecilia Olivet,

TNI, Netherlands

11:30-13:30 Regional responses to the crises

– Juan Castillo, Secretary for International Relations PIT-CNT, Uruguay

– Demba Moussa Dembele, African Forum on Alternatives, Senegal
– Joy Chavez, Focus on the Global South, Philippines
– Frederic Viale, ATTAC France

Moderation

José Miguel Hernández,

CTC Nacional/ CC-ASC, Cuba

13:30-15:00 Lunch
15:00-17:30 Regional Integration: Re-thinking the development model. Complementarity versus competition. Integration and Asymmetries

– Jorge Lara Castro, Vice-Minister of Foreign Affairs, Paraguay
– Oscar Laborde, Government Argentina

– Tomas Palau, Base IS, Iniciativa Paraguaya por la Integración de los Pueblos, Paraguay

– Graciela Rodriguez, REBRIP, Brazil

– Dot Keet, SAPSN, South Africa

– Charles Santiago, Member of Parliament, Malaysia

Moderation

Gonzalo Berrón,

ASC/CSA, Brazil

17:30-18:00 Coffee break
18:00-20:00 Development Model and Infrastructure
– Guilherme Carvalho, Rede Brasil sobre  Instituições Financeiras Multilaterais, Brazil
– Ricardo Miranda, Confederación Sindical Única de Trabajadores Campesinos de Bolivia (CSUTCB), Bolivia
– Michelle Pressend, Trade Strategy Group, South Africa

Moderation

Ximana Centellas,

Directora General de

Gestión Pública,

Viceministerio de

Coordinación y Gestión Gubernamental, Bolivia


22 JULY


09:00-10:45 Energy Crisis and Climate Change: the challenge to find regional solutions

– Walden Bello, Member of Parliament, Philippines

– Pablo Bertinat, Cono Sur Sustentable, Argentina
– Roberto Colman, Coordinadora Soberanía Energética, Paraguay
– Tom Kucharz, Ecologistas en Accion, Spain

Moderation
Fernando Rojas, Decidamos,

Iniciativa Paraguaya por la

Integración de los Pueblos, Paraguay

10:45-11:00 Coffe Break
11:00-13:00 Production model and Food Sovereignty

– Juan José Dominguez, Member of Parliament, MPP–FA, Uruguay

– Rabindra Adhikari, Member of Parliament, Nepal
– Indra Lubis, La Via Campesina, Indonesia
– Lodwick Chizarura, SEATINI, Zimbabwe
– Francisca Rodriguez, CONAMURI/CLOC, Chile

Moderation

Sebastián Valdomir, Redes Amigos de la Tierra, Uruguay

13:00-14:00 Lunch
14:00–16:00 Finances and development model: New financial structures: (Bank of the South, regional currencies, etc)
– Pedro Paez, President of the Ecuadorian Presidential Technical Commission for the New Regional Financial Architecture and Bank of the South, Ecuador
– Beverly Keene, Jubilee South, Argentina
– Ivan Lukas, Glopolis, Czech Republic

Moderation

Veronique Sandoval, Espace Marx, France

16:00-17:00 Regional Peace, Democracy and Human Rights

– Lee, Seung-Heon, Chief External Relations Department of the Korea Democratic Labor Party, South Korea
– Camille Chalmers, Campaign for Demilitarisation of the Americas, Haiti

– Meena Menon, Focus on the Global South, India
Thomas Wallgren, Coalition for comprehensive democracy – Vasudhaiva Kutumkakam, Finland
– Pezo Mateo-Phiri, SAPSN, Zambia

Moderation

Ramon Corvalan, SERPAJ

Paraguay/ Iniciativa

Paraguaya por la integracion de los Pueblos, Paraguay

17:00–17:30 Coffee break
17:30–20:00

Round Table: Regional Integration: challenges for the movements and the governments


– Chacho Alvarez, President Committee of Permanent Representatives of MERCOSUR, Argentina
– Ana Cristina Betancourt Garcia, Ministerio de Autonomía, Bolivia
– Gustavo Codas, Government Paraguay
– Franklin Gonzalez, Government Venezuela
– Edgardo Lander, Universidad Central de Venezuela/TNI, Venezuela
– Walden Bello, Focus on the Global South/MP, Philippines
– Nalu Farias, World March of Women, Brazil
– Brid Brennan, TNI, Netherlands
– Dot Keet, SAPSN, South Africa
Moderation
Héctor de la Cueva, RMALC, México


Co- Organisers
Hemispheric Social Alliance (HSA), Iniciativa Paraguaya para la Integración de los Pueblos, People’s Agenda for Alternative Regionalisms (PAAR), Focus on the Global South and Transnational Institute (TNI)

In cooperation with
Trade Union Confederation of the Americas (TUCA), Southern African People’s Solidarity Network (SAPSN), People’s SAARC, Solidarity for Asian People’s Advocacy (SAPA), TWN Africa, Trade Strategy Group, Jubilee South, REBRIP, Transform Europe, ATTAC France, Coalition for comprehensive democracy – Vasudhaiva Kutumkakam and Ecologistas en Acción

Supported by
Paraguayan Presidency Pro-tempore of Mercosur

With the contribution of
Oxfam/Novib, Oxfam Internacional, Christian Aid and Action Aid


INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE of GOVERNMENTS and SOCIAL MOVEMENTS “Regional Integration: an opportunity to face the crises”

DATES: 21 and 22 July 2009
VENUE: PRODEPA, pills Sala 1, sick Consejo Nacional del Deporte, Asunción del Paraguay
TIME: 9am-20pm


PROGRAME


21 JULY

09:00–09:30

Opening: Greeting from organisers

– Enrique Daza, Executive Secretary, Hemispheric Social Alliance, Colombia
– Brid Brennan, TNI/Peoples’ Agenda for Alternative Regionalisms, Netherlands
– Guillermo Ortega, Base IS, Iniciativa Paraguaya por la Integración de los Pueblos, Paraguay
– Héctor Lacognata, Minister of Foreign Affairs, Paraguay

09:30–11:30 Systemic Crisis, impacts of the crisis on regional integration processes

– Juan Gonzalez, MOSIP, Argentina
– Walden Bello, Member of Parliament, Philippines
– Tetteh Hormeku, TWN/ATN, Ghana

Moderation

Cecilia Olivet,

TNI, Netherlands

11:30-13:30 Regional responses to the crises

– Juan Castillo, Secretary for International Relations PIT-CNT, Uruguay

– Demba Moussa Dembele, African Forum on Alternatives, Senegal
– Joy Chavez, Focus on the Global South, Philippines
– Frederic Viale, ATTAC France

Moderation

José Miguel Hernández,

CTC Nacional/ CC-ASC, Cuba

13:30-15:00 Lunch
15:00-17:30 Regional Integration: Re-thinking the development model. Complementarity versus competition. Integration and Asymmetries

– Jorge Lara Castro, Vice-Minister of Foreign Affairs, Paraguay
– Oscar Laborde, Government Argentina

– Tomas Palau, Base IS, Iniciativa Paraguaya por la Integración de los Pueblos, Paraguay

– Graciela Rodriguez, REBRIP, Brazil

– Dot Keet, SAPSN, South Africa

– Charles Santiago, Member of Parliament, Malaysia

Moderation

Gonzalo Berrón,

ASC/CSA, Brazil

17:30-18:00 Coffee break
18:00-20:00 Development Model and Infrastructure
– Guilherme Carvalho, Rede Brasil sobre  Instituições Financeiras Multilaterais, Brazil
– Ricardo Miranda, Confederación Sindical Única de Trabajadores Campesinos de Bolivia (CSUTCB), Bolivia
– Michelle Pressend, Trade Strategy Group, South Africa

Moderation

Ximana Centellas,

Directora General de

Gestión Pública,

Viceministerio de

Coordinación y Gestión Gubernamental, Bolivia


22 JULY


09:00-10:45 Energy Crisis and Climate Change: the challenge to find regional solutions

– Walden Bello, Member of Parliament, Philippines

– Pablo Bertinat, Cono Sur Sustentable, Argentina
– Roberto Colman, Coordinadora Soberanía Energética, Paraguay
– Tom Kucharz, Ecologistas en Accion, Spain

Moderation
Fernando Rojas, Decidamos,

Iniciativa Paraguaya por la

Integración de los Pueblos, Paraguay

10:45-11:00 Coffe Break
11:00-13:00 Production model and Food Sovereignty

– Juan José Dominguez, Member of Parliament, MPP–FA, Uruguay

– Rabindra Adhikari, Member of Parliament, Nepal
– Indra Lubis, La Via Campesina, Indonesia
– Lodwick Chizarura, SEATINI, Zimbabwe
– Francisca Rodriguez, CONAMURI/CLOC, Chile

Moderation

Sebastián Valdomir, Redes Amigos de la Tierra, Uruguay

13:00-14:00 Lunch
14:00–16:00 Finances and development model: New financial structures: (Bank of the South, regional currencies, etc)
– Pedro Paez, President of the Ecuadorian Presidential Technical Commission for the New Regional Financial Architecture and Bank of the South, Ecuador
– Beverly Keene, Jubilee South, Argentina
– Ivan Lukas, Glopolis, Czech Republic

Moderation

Veronique Sandoval, Espace Marx, France

16:00-17:00 Regional Peace, Democracy and Human Rights

– Lee, Seung-Heon, Chief External Relations Department of the Korea Democratic Labor Party, South Korea
– Camille Chalmers, Campaign for Demilitarisation of the Americas, Haiti

– Meena Menon, Focus on the Global South, India
– Thomas Wallgren, Coalition for comprehensive democracy – Vasudhaiva Kutumkakam, Finland (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION)
– Pezo Mateo-Phiri, SAPSN, Zambia

Moderation

Ramon Corvalan, SERPAJ

Paraguay/ Iniciativa

Paraguaya por la integracion de los Pueblos, Paraguay

17:00–17:30 Coffee break
17:30–20:00

Round Table: Regional Integration: challenges for the movements and the governments


– Chacho Alvarez, President Committee of Permanent Representatives of MERCOSUR, Argentina
– Ana Cristina Betancourt Garcia, Ministerio de Autonomía, Bolivia
– Gustavo Codas, Government Paraguay
– Franklin Gonzalez, Government Venezuela
– Edgardo Lander, Universidad Central de Venezuela/TNI, Venezuela
– Walden Bello, Focus on the Global South/MP, Philippines
– Nalu Farias, World March of Women, Brazil
– Brid Brennan, TNI, Netherlands
– Dot Keet, SAPSN, South Africa
Moderation
Héctor de la Cueva, RMALC, México


Co- Organisers
Hemispheric Social Alliance (HSA), Iniciativa Paraguaya para la Integración de los Pueblos, People’s Agenda for Alternative Regionalisms (PAAR), Focus on the Global South and Transnational Institute (TNI)

In cooperation with
Trade Union Confederation of the Americas (TUCA), Southern African People’s Solidarity Network (SAPSN), People’s SAARC, Solidarity for Asian People’s Advocacy (SAPA), TWN Africa, Trade Strategy Group, Jubilee South, REBRIP, Transform Europe, ATTAC France, Coalition for comprehensive democracy – Vasudhaiva Kutumkakam and Ecologistas en Acción

Supported by
Paraguayan Presidency Pro-tempore of Mercosur

With the contribution of
Oxfam/Novib, Oxfam Internacional, Christian Aid and Action Aid


By Demba Moussa Dembele [1]

* Presentation given at International Conference of governments and social movements “Regional Integration: an opportunity to face the crises” (21 and 22 July 2009, Asunción del Paraguay)


THE IMPACT OF THE CRISES ON AFRICA

The financial crisis and its transmission to the real economy are having devastating effects on Africa. According to the African Development Bank (AfDB), the average growth of the continent will be cut in half this year, from 5.9% to 2.8%, as a result of falling international demand and falling commodity prices. One illustration of that is the decline of exports projected to fall by 40% in 2009. The shortfall in exports will be compounded by the decrease in official development assistance (ODA) and remittances by African migrant workers. In 2007, these remittances were estimated at 28 billion US dollars, accounting for about 3% of the continent’s GDP. In several countries, these remittances are much higher than ODA. Private investments, in the form of foreign direct investments (FDIs) are also expected to fall sharply.

This bleak picture shows that Africa is paying a heavy price for the crises in which it has no responsibility. This situation in which Africa finds itself is the result of a set of neoliberal policies implemented over nearly three decades at the urging of the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank, joined later by the World Trade Organization (WTO). The food crisis has hit very hard several African countries and led to numerous food riots punctuated with dozens of deaths and hundreds of arrests. The food crisis has increased the external dependence of many countries and given a golden opportunity to the IMF and World Bank to expand their control over African economic policies.

REGIONAL RESPONSES FROM AFRICA
The above bleak picture shows that Africa is paying a heavy price for the crises in which it has no responsibility. Africa has been the main victim of ruthless neoliberal policies imposed by the IMF and World for nearly three decades, with the catastrophic economic, social and political consequences the African people are still witnessing. Therefore, the crises should be used as an opportunity by Africa to free itself from the shackles of neoliberal capitalism and explore new paths to an endogenous development with regional economic integration and cooperation as a key element in that process.

A) Challenge “Free Trade” Model and Theory.
The first step should be to challenge neoliberal models, especially the “free trade” model. In that perspective, African regional communities must challenge “free trade” agreements, such as the African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA) with the United
States and the Economic Partnership Agreements (EPAs) with the European Union.
In connection with this challenge, it is the whole ideology of “free trade” that must be challenged and rejected. Indeed, it is that theory that underpins trade liberalization. It was in the name of “free trade” and “comparative advantage” that African countries were forced to accept sweeping trade liberalization that entailed huge economic and social costs, by increasing Africa’s external dependence, destroying domestic industries, accelerating deindustrialization and hampering sub-regional economic integration.

By contrast, none of the “benefits” that were supposed to accrue from trade liberalization, according to the IMF and World Bank, was achieved. Africa’s trade performance did not improve. Assessing the record of trade liberalization in Africa since the early 1980s, UNCTAD[2]  came to the conclusion that the results were far from expectations. Indeed, the outcome of trade liberalization in Africa could hardly be different. While the IFIs and the WTO were extolling the virtues of “free trade”, the staggering subsidies that Western countries were providing to their agricultural exporters and the disguised or open trade barriers they erected to protect their markets have made “free trade” a farce.

B) Reclaim the Debate on Africa’s Development
The collapse of market fundamentalism and the discredit of IFIs provide Africa with a golden opportunity to reclaim the debate on its development. No external force can “develop” Africa. So, Africans should restore their self-confidence, trust African expertise and promote the use of African endogenous knowledge and technology. Since development should be viewed as a multidimensional and complex process of transformation, there can be no genuine development without an active State. Proponents of State intervention have been vindicated by the demise of laisser-faire and the active State intervention in the United States and leading European countries.

However, the State is no longer the only player. It has to contend with civil society organizations which have become key players in the debate on Africa’s development. Therefore, African sub-regional and continental institutions should work with these organizations to explore an alternative development paradigm in Africa.

In the search for that paradigm, a number of key documents should be revisited. They include the Lagos Plan of Action (LPA, 1981); the African Alternative Framework to structural adjustment programs (AAF-SAPs, 1989); the Arusha Declaration on popular participation to development (1990); the Abuja Treaty on economic integration (1991), among others. All these documents were published under the leadership of the Economic Commission for Africa (ECA) and the Organization of African Unity, which was replaced by the African Union in 2001. This shows that African sub-regional and continental institutions had played a leading role in the debate on the continent’s development before the onslaught of the neoliberal ideology. They can play that role again by initiating the update of the above documents and taking into account the contributions made by civil society organizations in the areas of gender equality, trade; debt; food sovereignty, human and social rights and so forth.

C) Accelerate Regional Integration
One of the key issues in reclaiming the debate on Africa’s development is sub-regional and continental integration. It necessary to stress again that integration is one of the keys to Africa’s survival and long-term development. This was reiterated during the Summit of African Heads of State in Sirte (Libya) on July 1-3, 2009 and stressed by UNCTAD in its latest report on Africa[3].   
Despite an experience of sub-regional integration for more than 30 years, Africa is lagging behind other continents in terms of concrete achievements. In 1991, African countries tried to revive the spirit of integration by signing the Abuja Treaty, which projected an African Economic Community (AEC) by 2025. In the pursuit of that objective, the Treaty called for the rationalization of sub-regional economic communities in the continent’s five sub-regions. But years later, this recommendation has yet to be implemented.

1) Integration Trough Development or Market Model?
One of the main causes of the failure or mixed results of economic integration in Africa is the model used in the sub-regional groupings. Sub-regional groupings followed the European model of integration, the market model characterized by trade liberalization aimed at stimulating trade of goods and services. The European model was justified because European countries had mature industries and saturated internal markets. Therefore, the possibility of further growth depended on access to new markets. Hence, the model of trade liberalization aimed at opening up national markets to neighboring countries’ goods and services.

In Africa, the situation was different. These countries were at the early stages of their industrialization and were exporting mainly raw materials and semi-finished goods. Even today, roughly two-thirds of the continent’s exports are composed of raw materials and semi-processed goods, according to UNCTAD[4].  Therefore, following the market model would not lead to integration. This is exactly what happened. After decades of integration, intra-African exports in several sub-regions account for about 10% of their overall exports. Between 2004 and 2006, intra-African exports accounted for 8.7% of the continent’s total exports while intra-African imports were estimated at 9.6% of Africa’s total imports. However, for Sub-Saharan Africa, intra-African exports accounted for 12% of total exports [5]. 
The level of trade is low or negligible even among countries sharing the same currency, the cfa franc, like the West African Economic and Monetary Union (WAEMU) and the Central African Economic and Monetary Community (CAEMC).Yet, the common currency was supposed to be an integrating factor by eliminating exchange rate risks and providing some kind of “economic stability” to these countries! In CAEMC, intra-regional trade is less than 2%. In WAEMU, intra-regional trade is less than 10%. Only the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS)[6]  and the Southern African Development Community (SADC) seem to have significant levels of intra-regional trade flows. For instance in 2006, UEMOA exports to ECOWAS and other African countries accounted for respectively 26% and 32%, while UEMOA imports from these groupings were respectively 20% and 23%, according to UNCTAD[7].

Trade should serve production and development, not the other way around. Trade cannot be an end in itself. This is why integration through the market model makes no sense in most sub-regions in Africa since sub-regional economic communities have little to exchange because the bulk of their exports is composed of commodities. By contrast, the production model could provide the economies of scale indispensable to an effective and successful industrialization strategy that would help build industries capable to transform raw materials and commodities to meet people’s basic needs. By adding more value to Africa’s products, the production model may also lay the ground for a viable regional market, which in turn would support a regional demand-led growth strategy as opposed to the export-led growth strategy imposed by the IFIs and the WTO.

2) Create Regional Currencies and New Regional Institutions
One of the obstacles to economic integration in West and Central Africa is the use of a currency inherited from French colonization, the cfa franc. Its use by the WAEMU has hampered efforts to merge that Union into ECOWAS, as recommended by the 1991 Abuja Treaty. Instead of the “benefits” the use of the cfa franc was supposed to bring, the 14 African countries using it are all classified as either “Least Developed Countries” (LDCs) and/or “Heavily Indebted Poor Countries” (HIPCs)! Moreover, while trade flows among these countries account for 10% or less of their overall trade, as already indicated, at the bilateral level, France continues to be the main trading partner of most of these countries. Their trade with the European Union (EU) accounts for more than half of their overall trade. This means that the common currency has reinforced these countries’ external dependence and the outward orientation of their economies.

The experience with the cfa franc has convinced African leaders that development cannot occur without exercising a sovereign control over their monetary policies. And it is now widely accepted that real progress toward economic integration requires abandoning the cfa franc in favor of common currencies in West and Central Africa. But so far discussions on the issue have been slow. One may hope that the current crises may open the eyes of policy makers and make them take the decisive steps toward creating new regional currencies, which can serve not only the process of economic integration but also the wider goal of an endogenous development.

Along with regional currencies, African countries need to move toward new institutions. There is a debate within the African Union Commission on setting up an African Monetary Fund (AMF) and an African Central Bank (ACB). Beyond technical difficulties, however, the main obstacle to achieving these projects is the African leadership. Building a consensus on these issues and on other key objectives depends on the political will and strong commitment of African leaders.

There is no doubt that Western countries and international financial institutions will do what they can to foil these projects and keep Africa under their control. For example, if African countries accept to sign the Economic Partnership Agreements (EPAs), on the terms dictated by the European Union, these projects are likely to be put on hold for the foreseeable future. On the other hand, so long as African countries continue to listen to the IMF and World Bank, they will never reclaim their sovereign right to design their own policies, which is the indispensable step toward exploring an alternative development paradigm.

3) Better Continental Coordination
The acceleration of sub-regional integration should go hand in hand with a greater and more effective coordination at the continental level. In November 2008, the African Union Commission, the Economic Commission for Africa and the African Development Bank organized a meeting of African Finance Ministers and Central Bank Governors to discuss Africa’s position on the responses to the financial crisis before the first G20 Summit in Washington, DC. At that meeting, a Committee, composed of 10 African Finance Ministers and Central and Regional Bank Governors (C10)[8],  was formed with the mission to make recommendations on how Africa should respond to the global crises at the sub-regional and continental level.

So the crises seem to have given a new momentum to coordination of policies and greater cooperation at the continental level. Indeed, since the creation of the African Union (AU) in 2001, there seems to be a new consciousness about African economic integration and cooperation and the need for Africa to speak with one voice. The African Union Commission has taken a number of initiatives to strengthen that consciousness. It was under its sponsorship that African Ministers in charge of Economic Integration and Cooperation met in Burkina Faso in 2008 to assess the state of the integration process.

But once again, the issue of economic integration in Africa is essentially a political issue. Without a strong political commitment and will to move toward economic integration and a united Africa, nothing significant will happen. Therefore, African leaders should learn from the experiences of other regions of the Global South, especially South America. In that region, the Bolivarian Alternatives of the Americas (ALBA) and the South Bank are strengthening the solidarity and cooperation of States and peoples through closer economic, financial and political ties. .

D) Promote Policies of Collective Food Sovereignty
As indicated earlier, in the name of “free market”, structural adjustment programs (SAPs) destroyed agricultural policies put in place after independence, by dismantling parastatals that used to provide services to farmers. The IMF and World Bank compelled African countries to give priority to cash crops for exports in order to repay the external debt. As a result, food production was neglected which led to greater dependence on food imports to feed African citizens. For example, net food imports in Sub-Saharan Africa have increased from 1.3% to 1.9% of GDP between 2000 and 2007 and from 1.4% to 2.0% of GDP in West Africa during the same period[9].
Now the IMF and the World Bank are using the food crisis to make a comeback, while trying to hide their responsibility in the crisis of the agricultural sector in Africa.

What African countries need is to move toward policies of collective self-sufficiency in food production. Africa leaders should listen to their citizens and trust small-scale African farmers and other agricultural producers who need good public policies that would enable them to produce enough to feed the African population. Africa has water aplenty and vast arable lands, most of which are not exploited. In 2003 during an African Summit in Maputo (Mozambique), a recommendation was made to invest each year at least 10% of national budgets in agriculture. Only a few countries followed through this recommendation. The African Union Summit held in Libya (July 1-3, 2009) held a special session on agricultural policies and heads of State reiterated the pledge to invest more in agriculture to achieve “food security”. One may hope that African leaders have learned a good lesson from the food crisis and understood the urgent necessity to reverse current agricultural policies and pursue the objective food sovereignty.

E) Resources for Financing Africa’s Development
In the short run, all financial flows to Africa in response to the financial, food and energy crises should be in the form of grants and concessional financing, not new loans, since Africa has no responsibility, whatsoever, in these crises. From that perspective, any flows to the continent by the IFIs and Western countries in the form of loans will be deemed illegitimate by African civil society organizations and pressure will bear on African governments not to repay these illegitimate loans.

1) Moratorium and Debt Cancellation
On the other hand, in May 2009 the Secretary General of UNCTAD called for a moratorium on the debt of “poor” countries”. African countries should support this proposal. However, African governments and institutions should seize this opportunity and take that proposal a step further by calling for the unconditional cancellation of the continent’s debt. In 2005, the African Union Commission had taken a number of initiatives to build a strong continental consensus on the continent’s external debt and this common position was instrumental in the decision made by G8 leaders at their Summit in Gleneagles in July of that year. The current crises offer an even greater opportunity to the African Union Commission to intensify the call for debt cancellation.

One of the most important lessons to be learned by African leaders from the financial crisis is that Africa cannot count on its so-called “traditional partners”, i.e. Western countries and international financial institutions under their control. It is well known that none of the promises of “aid” to Africa has been completely fulfilled, including the one made at the G8 Summit in Scotland in 2005 to double “aid” to Africa to $50 billion a year beginning in 2010. By contrast, in 2008 and earlier this year, in just a few weeks, the United States and Europe had mobilized trillions of dollars to rescue their banks and industries. The first rescue package for AIG ($152 billion) by the US government was higher than the amount of “aid” promised in 2007 by the United States and European Union to all developing countries, estimated at $91 billion!

Therefore, African leaders should understand once for all that there must be a significant shift in the sources of financing for Africa’s development. Reclaiming its sovereign right to design its own policies goes with vigorous efforts to raise financial resources internally and the necessity to bear a greater part of the burden to finance its development. The African Development Bank (AfDB) rightly claims that “The continent needs to boost domestic resource mobilization – through financial and fiscal instruments- to support growth and investment. Addressing these issues require strategic interventions at various levels”[10].

2) Domestic Resource Mobilization
So, African countries must put a greater emphasis on domestic resource mobilization. In this regard, African countries should adopt new monetary and fiscal policies aimed at increasing domestic savings. And the potential is huge indeed, if African countries give themselves the means to achieve this objective. In a study, Christian Aid indicates that African countries are losing close to $160 billion each year in tax revenues, as a result of tax exemptions and for lack of enforcement of agreements with foreign companies investing in various sectors, especially in the mining industry[11].  Dealing with weak and ineffective States, these companies resort to various means to pay lower taxes or avoid paying taxes at all.

Therefore, to compel foreign companies to fulfill their obligations and expand the tax base, African countries need to reorganize their States into effective States able to enforce agreements and mobilize resources for development. Several international institutions have made this recommendation. UNCTAD devoted one of its reports on Africa to that issue[12].  It argues that it is time to build developmental States and put them at the centre of the development process in order for African countries to recover the policy space lost to neoliberal institutions over the last three decades. The Report says that such States should help African governments improve tax collection; formalize the informal sector; stop capital flight; make more productive use of remittances from African expatriates and adopt effective measures to repatriate resources held abroad.

Coordination of financial and monetary policies at the sub-regional level would put African countries in a stronger position to achieve this goal. Therefore, sub-regional economic communities have a crucial role to play in domestic resource mobilization by proposing common legalizations on capital flows and common tax policies vis a vis foreign investors.

3) South-South Cooperation and Solidarity
African economic integration will greatly benefit from building closer ties between Africa and other Southern regions. In particular, it would open a number of possibilities for non traditional financing for Africa. With the rise of new powers with substantial foreign exchange reserves and willing to build a new type of cooperation with African countries, the continent has new opportunities that should be used wisely. Already, several African countries are turning more and more to these powers, like China, India, Iran, Venezuela and Gulf countries, for loans, direct investments and joint-ventures. The South-South trade has increased from $577 billion to $1,700 billion between 1995 and 2005 and it keeps rising[13].  In 2008, trade between Africa and China was estimated at $107 billion, with a favorable balance for Africa.

Economic and political ties with South America are also growing. In June 2009, the President of the African Union Commission, Mr. Jean Ping, in a visit to Venezuela was quoted as saying that African countries would strengthen their cooperation with ALBA countries. He hailed the cooperation between Africa and South America in general and called for strengthening their ties at all levels. At the political level, the second Africa-South America Summit will be held in Caracas in September 2009 (9-14), after the first Summit held in November 2006 in Abuja (Nigeria).
These are very encouraging signs that a growing consciousness is taking place at the level of African leaders on the need to “look South”. Indeed, by developing its economic and financial cooperation as well as the political solidarity with the rest of the South, Africa will not only benefit from new sources of financing but also strengthen the policy space it needs to weaken the influence of “traditional partners”, especially the international financial institutions.

4) Repatriation of Stolen/Illegal Wealth
The African Union Commission and the African Development Bank and the Economic Commission for Africa (ECA) have issued a joint document calling for the cooperation of Western countries and international institutions in Africa’s efforts to get back the wealth that rightfully belongs to the African people. This is a positive development that gives a new momentum to the demand made several years ago by African civil society organizations working on the issue of Africa’s illegitimate.
This campaign for the repatriation of the wealth stolen from the African people and illegally kept abroad with the complicity of Western States and financial institutions is long overdue. Therefore, sub-regional and continental institutions should work closely with civil society organizations for a strong and sustained mobilization on that issue. With only half of the wealth illegally kept in Western banks, Africa’s development financing could be largely covered[14].




NOTES

[1] Director of the African Forum on Alternatives & Member of Jubilee South International Coordinating Committee (JS/ICC), Dakar (Senegal).

[2]UNCTAD, Economic Development in Africa 2008. Export Performance Following Trade Liberalization: Some Patterns and Policy Perspectives. United Nations: New York & Geneva, 2008.
[3] UNCTAD, Economic Development in Africa Report 2009: Strengthening Regional Economic Integration for Africa’s Development. New York & Geneva: United Nations, 2009

[4] UNCTAD. Economic Development in Africa. Trade Performance and Commodity Dependence. New York & Geneva: United Nations, 2004.
[5] UNCTAD, Economic Development in Africa Report 2009, op.cit, p.29
[6] ECOWAS is composed of 15 countries. It includes all 8 WAEMU members and 7 other countries, like Nigeria, Ghana, etc. Each of these 7 countries has its own currency.
[7] UNCTAD, Trade and Development Report, 2007, p.99

[8] The Committee is composed of the Finance Ministers of South Africa, Egypt, Nigeria, Cameroon and Tanzania and Central Bank Governors of Algeria, Botswana, Kenya, West African Central Bank (BCEAO), Central Bank of Central African States (BEAC) and African Development Bank President.  
[9] UNCTAD, Trade and Development Report, 2008, p. 34, table 2.3

[10] African Development Bank (2008), Ministerial Conference on the Financial Crisis, Tunis, November 12, 2008. Briefing Note No. 1: The Current Financial Crisis: Impact on African Economies
[11] Christian Aid (2008), Death and Taxes: the true toll of tax dodging. London, A Christian Aid Report (May)
[12] UNCTAD (2007), Economic Development in Africa. Reclaiming Policy Space: Domestic Resource Mobilisation and Developmental States. New York & Geneva: United Nations
[13] Le Monde Diplomatique, L’Atlas, February 2009, p. 183
[14]See Léonce Ndukumana and Hippolyte Fofack (2008), Capital Flight Repatriation. Investigation Into its Potential Gains for Sub-Saharan African countries (October 2008).



By <!– /* Style Definitions */ p.MsoNormal, no rx li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal {mso-style-parent:””; margin:0cm; margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:”Times New Roman”; mso-fareast-font-family:”Times New Roman”; mso-ansi-language:EN-US;} p.MsoFootnoteText, li.MsoFootnoteText, div.MsoFootnoteText {margin:0cm; margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:”Times New Roman”; mso-fareast-font-family:”Times New Roman”; mso-ansi-language:EN-US;} p.MsoFooter, li.MsoFooter, div.MsoFooter {margin:0cm; margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; tab-stops:center 216.0pt right 432.0pt; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:”Times New Roman”; mso-fareast-font-family:”Times New Roman”; mso-ansi-language:EN-US;} span.MsoFootnoteReference {vertical-align:super;} p.MsoBodyText, li.MsoBodyText, div.MsoBodyText {margin:0cm; margin-bottom:.0001pt; text-align:center; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; mso-hyphenate:none; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Arial; mso-fareast-font-family:”Times New Roman”; mso-bidi-font-family:”Times New Roman”; mso-ansi-language:EN-US; mso-fareast-language:AR-SA; font-weight:bold;} @page Section1 {size:612.0pt 792.0pt; margin:72.0pt 90.0pt 72.0pt 90.0pt; mso-header-margin:36.0pt; mso-footer-margin:36.0pt; mso-paper-source:0;} div.Section1 {page:Section1;} /* List Definitions */ @list l0 {mso-list-id:55590121; mso-list-type:hybrid; mso-list-template-ids:-1141632860 -266690746 67698713 67698715 67698703 67698713 67698715 67698703 67698713 67698715;} @list l0:level1 {mso-level-number-format:roman-upper; mso-level-text:”%1)”; mso-level-tab-stop:54.0pt; mso-level-number-position:left; margin-left:54.0pt; text-indent:-36.0pt;} ol {margin-bottom:0cm;} ul {margin-bottom:0cm;} –> Demba Moussa Dembele*



By Demba Moussa Dembele [1]

THE IMPACT OF THE CRISES ON AFRICA

The financial crisis and its transmission to the real economy are having devastating effects on Africa. According to the African Development Bank (AfDB), the average growth of the continent will be cut in half this year, from 5.9% to 2.8%, as a result of falling international demand and falling commodity prices. One illustration of that is the decline of exports projected to fall by 40% in 2009. The shortfall in exports will be compounded by the decrease in official development assistance (ODA) and remittances by African migrant workers. In 2007, these remittances were estimated at 28 billion US dollars, accounting for about 3% of the continent’s GDP. In several countries, these remittances are much higher than ODA. Private investments, in the form of foreign direct investments (FDIs) are also expected to fall sharply.

This bleak picture shows that Africa is paying a heavy price for the crises in which it has no responsibility. This situation in which Africa finds itself is the result of a set of neoliberal policies implemented over nearly three decades at the urging of the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank, joined later by the World Trade Organization (WTO). The food crisis has hit very hard several African countries and led to numerous food riots punctuated with dozens of deaths and hundreds of arrests. The food crisis has increased the external dependence of many countries and given a golden opportunity to the IMF and World Bank to expand their control over African economic policies.

REGIONAL RESPONSES FROM AFRICA
The above bleak picture shows that Africa is paying a heavy price for the crises in which it has no responsibility. Africa has been the main victim of ruthless neoliberal policies imposed by the IMF and World for nearly three decades, with the catastrophic economic, social and political consequences the African people are still witnessing. Therefore, the crises should be used as an opportunity by Africa to free itself from the shackles of neoliberal capitalism and explore new paths to an endogenous development with regional economic integration and cooperation as a key element in that process.

A) Challenge “Free Trade” Model and Theory.      
The first step should be to challenge neoliberal models, especially the “free trade” model. In that perspective, African regional communities must challenge “free trade” agreements, such as the African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA) with the United
States and the Economic Partnership Agreements (EPAs) with the European Union.
In connection with this challenge, it is the whole ideology of “free trade” that must be challenged and rejected. Indeed, it is that theory that underpins trade liberalization. It was in the name of “free trade” and “comparative advantage” that African countries were forced to accept sweeping trade liberalization that entailed huge economic and social costs, by increasing Africa’s external dependence, destroying domestic industries, accelerating deindustrialization and hampering sub-regional economic integration.

By contrast, none of the “benefits” that were supposed to accrue from trade liberalization, according to the IMF and World Bank, was achieved. Africa’s trade performance did not improve. Assessing the record of trade liberalization in Africa since the early 1980s, UNCTAD  came to the conclusion that the results were far from expectations. Indeed, the outcome of trade liberalization in Africa could hardly be different. While the IFIs and the WTO were extolling the virtues of “free trade”, the staggering subsidies that Western countries were providing to their agricultural exporters and the disguised or open trade barriers they erected to protect their markets have made “free trade” a farce.

B) Reclaim the Debate on Africa’s Development
The collapse of market fundamentalism and the discredit of IFIs provide Africa with a golden opportunity to reclaim the debate on its development. No external force can “develop” Africa. So, Africans should restore their self-confidence, trust African expertise and promote the use of African endogenous knowledge and technology. Since development should be viewed as a multidimensional and complex process of transformation, there can be no genuine development without an active State. Proponents of State intervention have been vindicated by the demise of laisser-faire and the active State intervention in the United States and leading European countries.

However, the State is no longer the only player. It has to contend with civil society organizations which have become key players in the debate on Africa’s development. Therefore, African sub-regional and continental institutions should work with these organizations to explore an alternative development paradigm in Africa.

In the search for that paradigm, a number of key documents should be revisited. They include the Lagos Plan of Action (LPA, 1981); the African Alternative Framework to structural adjustment programs (AAF-SAPs, 1989); the Arusha Declaration on popular participation to development (1990); the Abuja Treaty on economic integration (1991), among others. All these documents were published under the leadership of the Economic Commission for Africa (ECA) and the Organization of African Unity, which was replaced by the African Union in 2001. This shows that African sub-regional and continental institutions had played a leading role in the debate on the continent’s development before the onslaught of the neoliberal ideology. They can play that role again by initiating the update of the above documents and taking into account the contributions made by civil society organizations in the areas of gender equality, trade; debt; food sovereignty, human and social rights and so forth.

C) Accelerate Regional Integration
One of the key issues in reclaiming the debate on Africa’s development is sub-regional and continental integration. It necessary to stress again that integration is one of the keys to Africa’s survival and long-term development. This was reiterated during the Summit of African Heads of State in Sirte (Libya) on July 1-3, 2009 and stressed by UNCTAD in its latest report on Africa.   
Despite an experience of sub-regional integration for more than 30 years, Africa is lagging behind other continents in terms of concrete achievements. In 1991, African countries tried to revive the spirit of integration by signing the Abuja Treaty, which projected an African Economic Community (AEC) by 2025. In the pursuit of that objective, the Treaty called for the rationalization of sub-regional economic communities in the continent’s five sub-regions. But years later, this recommendation has yet to be implemented.

1) Integration Trough Development or Market Model?
One of the main causes of the failure or mixed results of economic integration in Africa is the model used in the sub-regional groupings. Sub-regional groupings followed the European model of integration, the market model characterized by trade liberalization aimed at stimulating trade of goods and services. The European model was justified because European countries had mature industries and saturated internal markets. Therefore, the possibility of further growth depended on access to new markets. Hence, the model of trade liberalization aimed at opening up national markets to neighboring countries’ goods and services.

In Africa, the situation was different. These countries were at the early stages of their industrialization and were exporting mainly raw materials and semi-finished goods. Even today, roughly two-thirds of the continent’s exports are composed of raw materials and semi-processed goods, according to UNCTAD.  Therefore, following the market model would not lead to integration. This is exactly what happened. After decades of integration, intra-African exports in several sub-regions account for about 10% of their overall exports. Between 2004 and 2006, intra-African exports accounted for 8.7% of the continent’s total exports while intra-African imports were estimated at 9.6% of Africa’s total imports. However, for Sub-Saharan Africa, intra-African exports accounted for 12% of total exports  
The level of trade is low or negligible even among countries sharing the same currency, the cfa franc, like the West African Economic and Monetary Union (WAEMU) and the Central African Economic and Monetary Community (CAEMC).Yet, the common currency was supposed to be an integrating factor by eliminating exchange rate risks and providing some kind of “economic stability” to these countries! In CAEMC, intra-regional trade is less than 2%. In WAEMU, intra-regional trade is less than 10%. Only the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS)  and the Southern African Development Community (SADC) seem to have significant levels of intra-regional trade flows. For instance in 2006, UEMOA exports to ECOWAS and other African countries accounted for respectively 26% and 32%, while UEMOA imports from these groupings were respectively 20% and 23%, according to UNCTAD.

Trade should serve production and development, not the other way around. Trade cannot be an end in itself. This is why integration through the market model makes no sense in most sub-regions in Africa since sub-regional economic communities have little to exchange because the bulk of their exports is composed of commodities. By contrast, the production model could provide the economies of scale indispensable to an effective and successful industrialization strategy that would help build industries capable to transform raw materials and commodities to meet people’s basic needs. By adding more value to Africa’s products, the production model may also lay the ground for a viable regional market, which in turn would support a regional demand-led growth strategy as opposed to the export-led growth strategy imposed by the IFIs and the WTO.

2) Create Regional Currencies and New Regional Institutions
One of the obstacles to economic integration in West and Central Africa is the use of a currency inherited from French colonization, the cfa franc. Its use by the WAEMU has hampered efforts to merge that Union into ECOWAS, as recommended by the 1991 Abuja Treaty. Instead of the “benefits” the use of the cfa franc was supposed to bring, the 14 African countries using it are all classified as either “Least Developed Countries” (LDCs) and/or “Heavily Indebted Poor Countries” (HIPCs)! Moreover, while trade flows among these countries account for 10% or less of their overall trade, as already indicated, at the bilateral level, France continues to be the main trading partner of most of these countries. Their trade with the European Union (EU) accounts for more than half of their overall trade. This means that the common currency has reinforced these countries’ external dependence and the outward orientation of their economies.

The experience with the cfa franc has convinced African leaders that development cannot occur without exercising a sovereign control over their monetary policies. And it is now widely accepted that real progress toward economic integration requires abandoning the cfa franc in favor of common currencies in West and Central Africa. But so far discussions on the issue have been slow. One may hope that the current crises may open the eyes of policy makers and make them take the decisive steps toward creating new regional currencies, which can serve not only the process of economic integration but also the wider goal of an endogenous development.

Along with regional currencies, African countries need to move toward new institutions. There is a debate within the African Union Commission on setting up an African Monetary Fund (AMF) and an African Central Bank (ACB). Beyond technical difficulties, however, the main obstacle to achieving these projects is the African leadership. Building a consensus on these issues and on other key objectives depends on the political will and strong commitment of African leaders.

There is no doubt that Western countries and international financial institutions will do what they can to foil these projects and keep Africa under their control. For example, if African countries accept to sign the Economic Partnership Agreements (EPAs), on the terms dictated by the European Union, these projects are likely to be put on hold for the foreseeable future. On the other hand, so long as African countries continue to listen to the IMF and World Bank, they will never reclaim their sovereign right to design their own policies, which is the indispensable step toward exploring an alternative development paradigm.

3) Better Continental Coordination
The acceleration of sub-regional integration should go hand in hand with a greater and more effective coordination at the continental level. In November 2008, the African Union Commission, the Economic Commission for Africa and the African Development Bank organized a meeting of African Finance Ministers and Central Bank Governors to discuss Africa’s position on the responses to the financial crisis before the first G20 Summit in Washington, DC. At that meeting, a Committee, composed of 10 African Finance Ministers and Central and Regional Bank Governors (C10),  was formed with the mission to make recommendations on how Africa should respond to the global crises at the sub-regional and continental level.

So the crises seem to have given a new momentum to coordination of policies and greater cooperation at the continental level. Indeed, since the creation of the African Union (AU) in 2001, there seems to be a new consciousness about African economic integration and cooperation and the need for Africa to speak with one voice. The African Union Commission has taken a number of initiatives to strengthen that consciousness. It was under its sponsorship that African Ministers in charge of Economic Integration and Cooperation met in Burkina Faso in 2008 to assess the state of the integration process.

But once again, the issue of economic integration in Africa is essentially a political issue. Without a strong political commitment and will to move toward economic integration and a united Africa, nothing significant will happen. Therefore, African leaders should learn from the experiences of other regions of the Global South, especially South America. In that region, the Bolivarian Alternatives of the Americas (ALBA) and the South Bank are strengthening the solidarity and cooperation of States and peoples through closer economic, financial and political ties. .

D) Promote Policies of Collective Food Sovereignty
As indicated earlier, in the name of “free market”, structural adjustment programs (SAPs) destroyed agricultural policies put in place after independence, by dismantling parastatals that used to provide services to farmers. The IMF and World Bank compelled African countries to give priority to cash crops for exports in order to repay the external debt. As a result, food production was neglected which led to greater dependence on food imports to feed African citizens. For example, net food imports in Sub-Saharan Africa have increased from 1.3% to 1.9% of GDP between 2000 and 2007 and from 1.4% to 2.0% of GDP in West Africa during the same period.
Now the IMF and the World Bank are using the food crisis to make a comeback, while trying to hide their responsibility in the crisis of the agricultural sector in Africa.

What African countries need is to move toward policies of collective self-sufficiency in food production. Africa leaders should listen to their citizens and trust small-scale African farmers and other agricultural producers who need good public policies that would enable them to produce enough to feed the African population. Africa has water aplenty and vast arable lands, most of which are not exploited. In 2003 during an African Summit in Maputo (Mozambique), a recommendation was made to invest each year at least 10% of national budgets in agriculture. Only a few countries followed through this recommendation. The African Union Summit held in Libya (July 1-3, 2009) held a special session on agricultural policies and heads of State reiterated the pledge to invest more in agriculture to achieve “food security”. One may hope that African leaders have learned a good lesson from the food crisis and understood the urgent necessity to reverse current agricultural policies and pursue the objective food sovereignty.

E) Resources for Financing Africa’s Development
In the short run, all financial flows to Africa in response to the financial, food and energy crises should be in the form of grants and concessional financing, not new loans, since Africa has no responsibility, whatsoever, in these crises. From that perspective, any flows to the continent by the IFIs and Western countries in the form of loans will be deemed illegitimate by African civil society organizations and pressure will bear on African governments not to repay these illegitimate loans.

1) Moratorium and Debt Cancellation   
On the other hand, in May 2009 the Secretary General of UNCTAD called for a moratorium on the debt of “poor” countries”. African countries should support this proposal. However, African governments and institutions should seize this opportunity and take that proposal a step further by calling for the unconditional cancellation of the continent’s debt. In 2005, the African Union Commission had taken a number of initiatives to build a strong continental consensus on the continent’s external debt and this common position was instrumental in the decision made by G8 leaders at their Summit in Gleneagles in July of that year. The current crises offer an even greater opportunity to the African Union Commission to intensify the call for debt cancellation.

One of the most important lessons to be learned by African leaders from the financial crisis is that Africa cannot count on its so-called “traditional partners”, i.e. Western countries and international financial institutions under their control. It is well known that none of the promises of “aid” to Africa has been completely fulfilled, including the one made at the G8 Summit in Scotland in 2005 to double “aid” to Africa to $50 billion a year beginning in 2010. By contrast, in 2008 and earlier this year, in just a few weeks, the United States and Europe had mobilized trillions of dollars to rescue their banks and industries. The first rescue package for AIG ($152 billion) by the US government was higher than the amount of “aid” promised in 2007 by the United States and European Union to all developing countries, estimated at $91 billion!

Therefore, African leaders should understand once for all that there must be a significant shift in the sources of financing for Africa’s development. Reclaiming its sovereign right to design its own policies goes with vigorous efforts to raise financial resources internally and the necessity to bear a greater part of the burden to finance its development. The African Development Bank (AfDB) rightly claims that “The continent needs to boost domestic resource mobilization – through financial and fiscal instruments- to support growth and investment. Addressing these issues require strategic interventions at various levels”

2) Domestic Resource Mobilization
So, African countries must put a greater emphasis on domestic resource mobilization. In this regard, African countries should adopt new monetary and fiscal policies aimed at increasing domestic savings. And the potential is huge indeed, if African countries give themselves the means to achieve this objective. In a study, Christian Aid indicates that African countries are losing close to $160 billion each year in tax revenues, as a result of tax exemptions and for lack of enforcement of agreements with foreign companies investing in various sectors, especially in the mining industry.  Dealing with weak and ineffective States, these companies resort to various means to pay lower taxes or avoid paying taxes at all.

Therefore, to compel foreign companies to fulfill their obligations and expand the tax base, African countries need to reorganize their States into effective States able to enforce agreements and mobilize resources for development. Several international institutions have made this recommendation. UNCTAD devoted one of its reports on Africa to that issue.  It argues that it is time to build developmental States and put them at the centre of the development process in order for African countries to recover the policy space lost to neoliberal institutions over the last three decades. The Report says that such States should help African governments improve tax collection; formalize the informal sector; stop capital flight; make more productive use of remittances from African expatriates and adopt effective measures to repatriate resources held abroad.

Coordination of financial and monetary policies at the sub-regional level would put African countries in a stronger position to achieve this goal. Therefore, sub-regional economic communities have a crucial role to play in domestic resource mobilization by proposing common legalizations on capital flows and common tax policies vis a vis foreign investors.

3) South-South Cooperation and Solidarity
African economic integration will greatly benefit from building closer ties between Africa and other Southern regions. In particular, it would open a number of possibilities for non traditional financing for Africa. With the rise of new powers with substantial foreign exchange reserves and willing to build a new type of cooperation with African countries, the continent has new opportunities that should be used wisely. Already, several African countries are turning more and more to these powers, like China, India, Iran, Venezuela and Gulf countries, for loans, direct investments and joint-ventures. The South-South trade has increased from $577 billion to $1,700 billion between 1995 and 2005 and it keeps rising.  In 2008, trade between Africa and China was estimated at $107 billion, with a favorable balance for Africa.

Economic and political ties with South America are also growing. In June 2009, the President of the African Union Commission, Mr. Jean Ping, in a visit to Venezuela was quoted as saying that African countries would strengthen their cooperation with ALBA countries. He hailed the cooperation between Africa and South America in general and called for strengthening their ties at all levels. At the political level, the second Africa-South America Summit will be held in Caracas in September 2009 (9-14), after the first Summit held in November 2006 in Abuja (Nigeria).
These are very encouraging signs that a growing consciousness is taking place at the level of African leaders on the need to “look South”. Indeed, by developing its economic and financial cooperation as well as the political solidarity with the rest of the South, Africa will not only benefit from new sources of financing but also strengthen the policy space it needs to weaken the influence of “traditional partners”, especially the international financial institutions.

4) Repatriation of Stolen/Illegal Wealth
The African Union Commission and the African Development Bank and the Economic Commission for Africa (ECA) have issued a joint document calling for the cooperation of Western countries and international institutions in Africa’s efforts to get back the wealth that rightfully belongs to the African people. This is a positive development that gives a new momentum to the demand made several years ago by African civil society organizations working on the issue of Africa’s illegitimate.
This campaign for the repatriation of the wealth stolen from the African people and illegally kept abroad with the complicity of Western States and financial institutions is long overdue. Therefore, sub-regional and continental institutions should work closely with civil society organizations for a strong and sustained mobilization on that issue. With only half of the wealth illegally kept in Western banks, Africa’s development financing could be largely covered.




NOTES

[1] Director of the African Forum on Alternatives & Member of Jubilee South International Coordinating Committee (JS/ICC), Dakar (Senegal).

[2]UNCTAD, Economic Development in Africa 2008. Export Performance Following Trade Liberalization: Some Patterns and Policy Perspectives. United Nations: New York & Geneva, 2008.
[3] UNCTAD, Economic Development in Africa Report 2009: Strengthening Regional Economic Integration for Africa’s Development. New York & Geneva: United Nations, 2009

[4] UNCTAD. Economic Development in Africa. Trade Performance and Commodity Dependence. New York & Geneva: United Nations, 2004.
[5] UNCTAD, Economic Development in Africa Report 2009, op.cit, p.29
[6] ECOWAS is composed of 15 countries. It includes all 8 WAEMU members and 7 other countries, like Nigeria, Ghana, etc. Each of these 7 countries has its own currency.
[7] UNCTAD, Trade and Development Report, 2007, p.99

[8] The Committee is composed of the Finance Ministers of South Africa, Egypt, Nigeria, Cameroon and Tanzania and Central Bank Governors of Algeria, Botswana, Kenya, West African Central Bank (BCEAO), Central Bank of Central African States (BEAC) and African Development Bank President.  
[9] UNCTAD, Trade and Development Report, 2008, p. 34, table 2.3

[10] African Development Bank (2008), Ministerial Conference on the Financial Crisis, Tunis, November 12, 2008. Briefing Note No. 1: The Current Financial Crisis: Impact on African Economies
[11] Christian Aid (2008), Death and Taxes: the true toll of tax dodging. London, A Christian Aid Report (May)
[12] UNCTAD (2007), Economic Development in Africa. Reclaiming Policy Space: Domestic Resource Mobilisation and Developmental States. New York & Geneva: United Nations
[13] Le Monde Diplomatique, L’Atlas, February 2009, p. 183
[14]See Léonce Ndukumana and Hippolyte Fofack (2008), Capital Flight Repatriation. Investigation Into its Potential Gains for Sub-Saharan African countries (October 2008).



By Demba Moussa Dembele [1]

THE IMPACT OF THE CRISES ON AFRICA

The financial crisis and its transmission to the real economy are having devastating effects on Africa. According to the African Development Bank (AfDB), the average growth of the continent will be cut in half this year, from 5.9% to 2.8%, as a result of falling international demand and falling commodity prices. One illustration of that is the decline of exports projected to fall by 40% in 2009. The shortfall in exports will be compounded by the decrease in official development assistance (ODA) and remittances by African migrant workers. In 2007, these remittances were estimated at 28 billion US dollars, accounting for about 3% of the continent’s GDP. In several countries, these remittances are much higher than ODA. Private investments, in the form of foreign direct investments (FDIs) are also expected to fall sharply.

This bleak picture shows that Africa is paying a heavy price for the crises in which it has no responsibility. This situation in which Africa finds itself is the result of a set of neoliberal policies implemented over nearly three decades at the urging of the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank, joined later by the World Trade Organization (WTO). The food crisis has hit very hard several African countries and led to numerous food riots punctuated with dozens of deaths and hundreds of arrests. The food crisis has increased the external dependence of many countries and given a golden opportunity to the IMF and World Bank to expand their control over African economic policies.

REGIONAL RESPONSES FROM AFRICA
The above bleak picture shows that Africa is paying a heavy price for the crises in which it has no responsibility. Africa has been the main victim of ruthless neoliberal policies imposed by the IMF and World for nearly three decades, with the catastrophic economic, social and political consequences the African people are still witnessing. Therefore, the crises should be used as an opportunity by Africa to free itself from the shackles of neoliberal capitalism and explore new paths to an endogenous development with regional economic integration and cooperation as a key element in that process.

A) Challenge “Free Trade” Model and Theory.      
The first step should be to challenge neoliberal models, especially the “free trade” model. In that perspective, African regional communities must challenge “free trade” agreements, such as the African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA) with the United
States and the Economic Partnership Agreements (EPAs) with the European Union.
In connection with this challenge, it is the whole ideology of “free trade” that must be challenged and rejected. Indeed, it is that theory that underpins trade liberalization. It was in the name of “free trade” and “comparative advantage” that African countries were forced to accept sweeping trade liberalization that entailed huge economic and social costs, by increasing Africa’s external dependence, destroying domestic industries, accelerating deindustrialization and hampering sub-regional economic integration.

By contrast, none of the “benefits” that were supposed to accrue from trade liberalization, according to the IMF and World Bank, was achieved. Africa’s trade performance did not improve. Assessing the record of trade liberalization in Africa since the early 1980s, UNCTAD  came to the conclusion that the results were far from expectations. Indeed, the outcome of trade liberalization in Africa could hardly be different. While the IFIs and the WTO were extolling the virtues of “free trade”, the staggering subsidies that Western countries were providing to their agricultural exporters and the disguised or open trade barriers they erected to protect their markets have made “free trade” a farce.

B) Reclaim the Debate on Africa’s Development
The collapse of market fundamentalism and the discredit of IFIs provide Africa with a golden opportunity to reclaim the debate on its development. No external force can “develop” Africa. So, Africans should restore their self-confidence, trust African expertise and promote the use of African endogenous knowledge and technology. Since development should be viewed as a multidimensional and complex process of transformation, there can be no genuine development without an active State. Proponents of State intervention have been vindicated by the demise of laisser-faire and the active State intervention in the United States and leading European countries.

However, the State is no longer the only player. It has to contend with civil society organizations which have become key players in the debate on Africa’s development. Therefore, African sub-regional and continental institutions should work with these organizations to explore an alternative development paradigm in Africa.

In the search for that paradigm, a number of key documents should be revisited. They include the Lagos Plan of Action (LPA, 1981); the African Alternative Framework to structural adjustment programs (AAF-SAPs, 1989); the Arusha Declaration on popular participation to development (1990); the Abuja Treaty on economic integration (1991), among others. All these documents were published under the leadership of the Economic Commission for Africa (ECA) and the Organization of African Unity, which was replaced by the African Union in 2001. This shows that African sub-regional and continental institutions had played a leading role in the debate on the continent’s development before the onslaught of the neoliberal ideology. They can play that role again by initiating the update of the above documents and taking into account the contributions made by civil society organizations in the areas of gender equality, trade; debt; food sovereignty, human and social rights and so forth.

C) Accelerate Regional Integration
One of the key issues in reclaiming the debate on Africa’s development is sub-regional and continental integration. It necessary to stress again that integration is one of the keys to Africa’s survival and long-term development. This was reiterated during the Summit of African Heads of State in Sirte (Libya) on July 1-3, 2009 and stressed by UNCTAD in its latest report on Africa.   
Despite an experience of sub-regional integration for more than 30 years, Africa is lagging behind other continents in terms of concrete achievements. In 1991, African countries tried to revive the spirit of integration by signing the Abuja Treaty, which projected an African Economic Community (AEC) by 2025. In the pursuit of that objective, the Treaty called for the rationalization of sub-regional economic communities in the continent’s five sub-regions. But years later, this recommendation has yet to be implemented.

1) Integration Trough Development or Market Model?
One of the main causes of the failure or mixed results of economic integration in Africa is the model used in the sub-regional groupings. Sub-regional groupings followed the European model of integration, the market model characterized by trade liberalization aimed at stimulating trade of goods and services. The European model was justified because European countries had mature industries and saturated internal markets. Therefore, the possibility of further growth depended on access to new markets. Hence, the model of trade liberalization aimed at opening up national markets to neighboring countries’ goods and services.

In Africa, the situation was different. These countries were at the early stages of their industrialization and were exporting mainly raw materials and semi-finished goods. Even today, roughly two-thirds of the continent’s exports are composed of raw materials and semi-processed goods, according to UNCTAD.  Therefore, following the market model would not lead to integration. This is exactly what happened. After decades of integration, intra-African exports in several sub-regions account for about 10% of their overall exports. Between 2004 and 2006, intra-African exports accounted for 8.7% of the continent’s total exports while intra-African imports were estimated at 9.6% of Africa’s total imports. However, for Sub-Saharan Africa, intra-African exports accounted for 12% of total exports  
The level of trade is low or negligible even among countries sharing the same currency, the cfa franc, like the West African Economic and Monetary Union (WAEMU) and the Central African Economic and Monetary Community (CAEMC).Yet, the common currency was supposed to be an integrating factor by eliminating exchange rate risks and providing some kind of “economic stability” to these countries! In CAEMC, intra-regional trade is less than 2%. In WAEMU, intra-regional trade is less than 10%. Only the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS)  and the Southern African Development Community (SADC) seem to have significant levels of intra-regional trade flows. For instance in 2006, UEMOA exports to ECOWAS and other African countries accounted for respectively 26% and 32%, while UEMOA imports from these groupings were respectively 20% and 23%, according to UNCTAD.   

Trade should serve production and development, not the other way around. Trade cannot be an end in itself. This is why integration through the market model makes no sense in most sub-regions in Africa since sub-regional economic communities have little to exchange because the bulk of their exports is composed of commodities. By contrast, the production model could provide the economies of scale indispensable to an effective and successful industrialization strategy that would help build industries capable to transform raw materials and commodities to meet people’s basic needs. By adding more value to Africa’s products, the production model may also lay the ground for a viable regional market, which in turn would support a regional demand-led growth strategy as opposed to the export-led growth strategy imposed by the IFIs and the WTO.      

2) Create Regional Currencies and New Regional Institutions
One of the obstacles to economic integration in West and Central Africa is the use of a currency inherited from French colonization, the cfa franc. Its use by the WAEMU has hampered efforts to merge that Union into ECOWAS, as recommended by the 1991 Abuja Treaty. Instead of the “benefits” the use of the cfa franc was supposed to bring, the 14 African countries using it are all classified as either “Least Developed Countries” (LDCs) and/or “Heavily Indebted Poor Countries” (HIPCs)! Moreover, while trade flows among these countries account for 10% or less of their overall trade, as already indicated, at the bilateral level, France continues to be the main trading partner of most of these countries. Their trade with the European Union (EU) accounts for more than half of their overall trade. This means that the common currency has reinforced these countries’ external dependence and the outward orientation of their economies.

The experience with the cfa franc has convinced African leaders that development cannot occur without exercising a sovereign control over their monetary policies. And it is now widely accepted that real progress toward economic integration requires abandoning the cfa franc in favor of common currencies in West and Central Africa. But so far discussions on the issue have been slow. One may hope that the current crises may open the eyes of policy makers and make them take the decisive steps toward creating new regional currencies, which can serve not only the process of economic integration but also the wider goal of an endogenous development.

Along with regional currencies, African countries need to move toward new institutions. There is a debate within the African Union Commission on setting up an African Monetary Fund (AMF) and an African Central Bank (ACB). Beyond technical difficulties, however, the main obstacle to achieving these projects is the African leadership. Building a consensus on these issues and on other key objectives depends on the political will and strong commitment of African leaders.

There is no doubt that Western countries and international financial institutions will do what they can to foil these projects and keep Africa under their control. For example, if African countries accept to sign the Economic Partnership Agreements (EPAs), on the terms dictated by the European Union, these projects are likely to be put on hold for the foreseeable future. On the other hand, so long as African countries continue to listen to the IMF and World Bank, they will never reclaim their sovereign right to design their own policies, which is the indispensable step toward exploring an alternative development paradigm.

3) Better Continental Coordination
The acceleration of sub-regional integration should go hand in hand with a greater and more effective coordination at the continental level. In November 2008, the African Union Commission, the Economic Commission for Africa and the African Development Bank organized a meeting of African Finance Ministers and Central Bank Governors to discuss Africa’s position on the responses to the financial crisis before the first G20 Summit in Washington, DC. At that meeting, a Committee, composed of 10 African Finance Ministers and Central and Regional Bank Governors (C10),  was formed with the mission to make recommendations on how Africa should respond to the global crises at the sub-regional and continental level.

So the crises seem to have given a new momentum to coordination of policies and greater cooperation at the continental level. Indeed, since the creation of the African Union (AU) in 2001, there seems to be a new consciousness about African economic integration and cooperation and the need for Africa to speak with one voice. The African Union Commission has taken a number of initiatives to strengthen that consciousness. It was under its sponsorship that African Ministers in charge of Economic Integration and Cooperation met in Burkina Faso in 2008 to assess the state of the integration process.

But once again, the issue of economic integration in Africa is essentially a political issue. Without a strong political commitment and will to move toward economic integration and a united Africa, nothing significant will happen. Therefore, African leaders should learn from the experiences of other regions of the Global South, especially South America. In that region, the Bolivarian Alternatives of the Americas (ALBA) and the South Bank are strengthening the solidarity and cooperation of States and peoples through closer economic, financial and political ties. .

D) Promote Policies of Collective Food Sovereignty
As indicated earlier, in the name of “free market”, structural adjustment programs (SAPs) destroyed agricultural policies put in place after independence, by dismantling parastatals that used to provide services to farmers. The IMF and World Bank compelled African countries to give priority to cash crops for exports in order to repay the external debt. As a result, food production was neglected which led to greater dependence on food imports to feed African citizens. For example, net food imports in Sub-Saharan Africa have increased from 1.3% to 1.9% of GDP between 2000 and 2007 and from 1.4% to 2.0% of GDP in West Africa during the same period.
Now the IMF and the World Bank are using the food crisis to make a comeback, while trying to hide their responsibility in the crisis of the agricultural sector in Africa.

What African countries need is to move toward policies of collective self-sufficiency in food production. Africa leaders should listen to their citizens and trust small-scale African farmers and other agricultural producers who need good public policies that would enable them to produce enough to feed the African population. Africa has water aplenty and vast arable lands, most of which are not exploited. In 2003 during an African Summit in Maputo (Mozambique), a recommendation was made to invest each year at least 10% of national budgets in agriculture. Only a few countries followed through this recommendation. The African Union Summit held in Libya (July 1-3, 2009) held a special session on agricultural policies and heads of State reiterated the pledge to invest more in agriculture to achieve “food security”. One may hope that African leaders have learned a good lesson from the food crisis and understood the urgent necessity to reverse current agricultural policies and pursue the objective food sovereignty.   

E) Resources for Financing Africa’s Development
In the short run, all financial flows to Africa in response to the financial, food and energy crises should be in the form of grants and concessional financing, not new loans, since Africa has no responsibility, whatsoever, in these crises. From that perspective, any flows to the continent by the IFIs and Western countries in the form of loans will be deemed illegitimate by African civil society organizations and pressure will bear on African governments not to repay these illegitimate loans.   

1) Moratorium and Debt Cancellation   
On the other hand, in May 2009 the Secretary General of UNCTAD called for a moratorium on the debt of “poor” countries”. African countries should support this proposal. However, African governments and institutions should seize this opportunity and take that proposal a step further by calling for the unconditional cancellation of the continent’s debt. In 2005, the African Union Commission had taken a number of initiatives to build a strong continental consensus on the continent’s external debt and this common position was instrumental in the decision made by G8 leaders at their Summit in Gleneagles in July of that year. The current crises offer an even greater opportunity to the African Union Commission to intensify the call for debt cancellation.   

One of the most important lessons to be learned by African leaders from the financial crisis is that Africa cannot count on its so-called “traditional partners”, i.e. Western countries and international financial institutions under their control. It is well known that none of the promises of “aid” to Africa has been completely fulfilled, including the one made at the G8 Summit in Scotland in 2005 to double “aid” to Africa to $50 billion a year beginning in 2010. By contrast, in 2008 and earlier this year, in just a few weeks, the United States and Europe had mobilized trillions of dollars to rescue their banks and industries. The first rescue package for AIG ($152 billion) by the US government was higher than the amount of “aid” promised in 2007 by the United States and European Union to all developing countries, estimated at $91 billion!

Therefore, African leaders should understand once for all that there must be a significant shift in the sources of financing for Africa’s development. Reclaiming its sovereign right to design its own policies goes with vigorous efforts to raise financial resources internally and the necessity to bear a greater part of the burden to finance its development. The African Development Bank (AfDB) rightly claims that “The continent needs to boost domestic resource mobilization – through financial and fiscal instruments- to support growth and investment. Addressing these issues require strategic interventions at various levels”

2) Domestic Resource Mobilization
So, African countries must put a greater emphasis on domestic resource mobilization. In this regard, African countries should adopt new monetary and fiscal policies aimed at increasing domestic savings. And the potential is huge indeed, if African countries give themselves the means to achieve this objective. In a study, Christian Aid indicates that African countries are losing close to $160 billion each year in tax revenues, as a result of tax exemptions and for lack of enforcement of agreements with foreign companies investing in various sectors, especially in the mining industry.  Dealing with weak and ineffective States, these companies resort to various means to pay lower taxes or avoid paying taxes at all. 

Therefore, to compel foreign companies to fulfill their obligations and expand the tax base, African countries need to reorganize their States into effective States able to enforce agreements and mobilize resources for development. Several international institutions have made this recommendation. UNCTAD devoted one of its reports on Africa to that issue.  It argues that it is time to build developmental States and put them at the centre of the development process in order for African countries to recover the policy space lost to neoliberal institutions over the last three decades. The Report says that such States should help African governments improve tax collection; formalize the informal sector; stop capital flight; make more productive use of remittances from African expatriates and adopt effective measures to repatriate resources held abroad.

Coordination of financial and monetary policies at the sub-regional level would put African countries in a stronger position to achieve this goal. Therefore, sub-regional economic communities have a crucial role to play in domestic resource mobilization by proposing common legalizations on capital flows and common tax policies vis a vis foreign investors.

3) South-South Cooperation and Solidarity
African economic integration will greatly benefit from building closer ties between Africa and other Southern regions. In particular, it would open a number of possibilities for non traditional financing for Africa. With the rise of new powers with substantial foreign exchange reserves and willing to build a new type of cooperation with African countries, the continent has new opportunities that should be used wisely. Already, several African countries are turning more and more to these powers, like China, India, Iran, Venezuela and Gulf countries, for loans, direct investments and joint-ventures. The South-South trade has increased from $577 billion to $1,700 billion between 1995 and 2005 and it keeps rising.  In 2008, trade between Africa and China was estimated at $107 billion, with a favorable balance for Africa.

Economic and political ties with South America are also growing. In June 2009, the President of the African Union Commission, Mr. Jean Ping, in a visit to Venezuela was quoted as saying that African countries would strengthen their cooperation with ALBA countries. He hailed the cooperation between Africa and South America in general and called for strengthening their ties at all levels. At the political level, the second Africa-South America Summit will be held in Caracas in September 2009 (9-14), after the first Summit held in November 2006 in Abuja (Nigeria).
These are very encouraging signs that a growing consciousness is taking place at the level of African leaders on the need to “look South”. Indeed, by developing its economic and financial cooperation as well as the political solidarity with the rest of the South, Africa will not only benefit from new sources of financing but also strengthen the policy space it needs to weaken the influence of “traditional partners”, especially the international financial institutions.   

4) Repatriation of Stolen/Illegal Wealth
The African Union Commission and the African Development Bank and the Economic Commission for Africa (ECA) have issued a joint document calling for the cooperation of Western countries and international institutions in Africa’s efforts to get back the wealth that rightfully belongs to the African people. This is a positive development that gives a new momentum to the demand made several years ago by African civil society organizations working on the issue of Africa’s illegitimate.
This campaign for the repatriation of the wealth stolen from the African people and illegally kept abroad with the complicity of Western States and financial institutions is long overdue. Therefore, sub-regional and continental institutions should work closely with civil society organizations for a strong and sustained mobilization on that issue. With only half of the wealth illegally kept in Western banks, Africa’s development financing could be largely covered. 


NOTES

[1] Director of the African Forum on Alternatives & Member of Jubilee South International Coordinating Committee (JS/ICC), Dakar (Senegal).

[2]UNCTAD, Economic Development in Africa 2008. Export Performance Following Trade Liberalization: Some Patterns and Policy Perspectives. United Nations: New York & Geneva, 2008.
[3] UNCTAD, Economic Development in Africa Report 2009: Strengthening Regional Economic Integration for Africa’s Development. New York & Geneva: United Nations, 2009

[4] UNCTAD. Economic Development in Africa. Trade Performance and Commodity Dependence. New York & Geneva: United Nations, 2004.
[5] UNCTAD, Economic Development in Africa Report 2009, op.cit, p.29
[6] ECOWAS is composed of 15 countries. It includes all 8 WAEMU members and 7 other countries, like Nigeria, Ghana, etc. Each of these 7 countries has its own currency.
[7] UNCTAD, Trade and Development Report, 2007, p.99

[8] The Committee is composed of the Finance Ministers of South Africa, Egypt, Nigeria, Cameroon and Tanzania and Central Bank Governors of Algeria, Botswana, Kenya, West African Central Bank (BCEAO), Central Bank of Central African States (BEAC) and African Development Bank President.  
[9] UNCTAD, Trade and Development Report, 2008, p. 34, table 2.3

[10] African Development Bank (2008), Ministerial Conference on the Financial Crisis, Tunis, November 12, 2008. Briefing Note No. 1: The Current Financial Crisis: Impact on African Economies
[11] Christian Aid (2008), Death and Taxes: the true toll of tax dodging. London, A Christian Aid Report (May)
[12] UNCTAD (2007), Economic Development in Africa. Reclaiming Policy Space: Domestic Resource Mobilisation and Developmental States. New York & Geneva: United Nations
[13] Le Monde Diplomatique, L’Atlas, February 2009, p. 183
[14]See Léonce Ndukumana and Hippolyte Fofack (2008), Capital Flight Repatriation. Investigation Into its Potential Gains for Sub-Saharan African countries (October 2008).



By Demba Moussa Dembele [1]

THE IMPACT OF THE CRISES ON AFRICA

The financial crisis and its transmission to the real economy are having devastating effects on Africa. According to the African Development Bank (AfDB), the average growth of the continent will be cut in half this year, from 5.9% to 2.8%, as a result of falling international demand and falling commodity prices. One illustration of that is the decline of exports projected to fall by 40% in 2009. The shortfall in exports will be compounded by the decrease in official development assistance (ODA) and remittances by African migrant workers. In 2007, these remittances were estimated at 28 billion US dollars, accounting for about 3% of the continent’s GDP. In several countries, these remittances are much higher than ODA. Private investments, in the form of foreign direct investments (FDIs) are also expected to fall sharply.

This bleak picture shows that Africa is paying a heavy price for the crises in which it has no responsibility. This situation in which Africa finds itself is the result of a set of neoliberal policies implemented over nearly three decades at the urging of the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank, joined later by the World Trade Organization (WTO). The food crisis has hit very hard several African countries and led to numerous food riots punctuated with dozens of deaths and hundreds of arrests. The food crisis has increased the external dependence of many countries and given a golden opportunity to the IMF and World Bank to expand their control over African economic policies.

REGIONAL RESPONSES FROM AFRICA
The above bleak picture shows that Africa is paying a heavy price for the crises in which it has no responsibility. Africa has been the main victim of ruthless neoliberal policies imposed by the IMF and World for nearly three decades, with the catastrophic economic, social and political consequences the African people are still witnessing. Therefore, the crises should be used as an opportunity by Africa to free itself from the shackles of neoliberal capitalism and explore new paths to an endogenous development with regional economic integration and cooperation as a key element in that process.

A) Challenge “Free Trade” Model and Theory.      
The first step should be to challenge neoliberal models, especially the “free trade” model. In that perspective, African regional communities must challenge “free trade” agreements, such as the African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA) with the United
States and the Economic Partnership Agreements (EPAs) with the European Union.
In connection with this challenge, it is the whole ideology of “free trade” that must be challenged and rejected. Indeed, it is that theory that underpins trade liberalization. It was in the name of “free trade” and “comparative advantage” that African countries were forced to accept sweeping trade liberalization that entailed huge economic and social costs, by increasing Africa’s external dependence, destroying domestic industries, accelerating deindustrialization and hampering sub-regional economic integration.

By contrast, none of the “benefits” that were supposed to accrue from trade liberalization, according to the IMF and World Bank, was achieved. Africa’s trade performance did not improve. Assessing the record of trade liberalization in Africa since the early 1980s, UNCTAD  came to the conclusion that the results were far from expectations. Indeed, the outcome of trade liberalization in Africa could hardly be different. While the IFIs and the WTO were extolling the virtues of “free trade”, the staggering subsidies that Western countries were providing to their agricultural exporters and the disguised or open trade barriers they erected to protect their markets have made “free trade” a farce.

B) Reclaim the Debate on Africa’s Development
The collapse of market fundamentalism and the discredit of IFIs provide Africa with a golden opportunity to reclaim the debate on its development. No external force can “develop” Africa. So, Africans should restore their self-confidence, trust African expertise and promote the use of African endogenous knowledge and technology. Since development should be viewed as a multidimensional and complex process of transformation, there can be no genuine development without an active State. Proponents of State intervention have been vindicated by the demise of laisser-faire and the active State intervention in the United States and leading European countries.

However, the State is no longer the only player. It has to contend with civil society organizations which have become key players in the debate on Africa’s development. Therefore, African sub-regional and continental institutions should work with these organizations to explore an alternative development paradigm in Africa.

In the search for that paradigm, a number of key documents should be revisited. They include the Lagos Plan of Action (LPA, 1981); the African Alternative Framework to structural adjustment programs (AAF-SAPs, 1989); the Arusha Declaration on popular participation to development (1990); the Abuja Treaty on economic integration (1991), among others. All these documents were published under the leadership of the Economic Commission for Africa (ECA) and the Organization of African Unity, which was replaced by the African Union in 2001. This shows that African sub-regional and continental institutions had played a leading role in the debate on the continent’s development before the onslaught of the neoliberal ideology. They can play that role again by initiating the update of the above documents and taking into account the contributions made by civil society organizations in the areas of gender equality, trade; debt; food sovereignty, human and social rights and so forth.

C) Accelerate Regional Integration
One of the key issues in reclaiming the debate on Africa’s development is sub-regional and continental integration. It necessary to stress again that integration is one of the keys to Africa’s survival and long-term development. This was reiterated during the Summit of African Heads of State in Sirte (Libya) on July 1-3, 2009 and stressed by UNCTAD in its latest report on Africa.   
Despite an experience of sub-regional integration for more than 30 years, Africa is lagging behind other continents in terms of concrete achievements. In 1991, African countries tried to revive the spirit of integration by signing the Abuja Treaty, which projected an African Economic Community (AEC) by 2025. In the pursuit of that objective, the Treaty called for the rationalization of sub-regional economic communities in the continent’s five sub-regions. But years later, this recommendation has yet to be implemented.

1) Integration Trough Development or Market Model?
One of the main causes of the failure or mixed results of economic integration in Africa is the model used in the sub-regional groupings. Sub-regional groupings followed the European model of integration, the market model characterized by trade liberalization aimed at stimulating trade of goods and services. The European model was justified because European countries had mature industries and saturated internal markets. Therefore, the possibility of further growth depended on access to new markets. Hence, the model of trade liberalization aimed at opening up national markets to neighboring countries’ goods and services.

In Africa, the situation was different. These countries were at the early stages of their industrialization and were exporting mainly raw materials and semi-finished goods. Even today, roughly two-thirds of the continent’s exports are composed of raw materials and semi-processed goods, according to UNCTAD.  Therefore, following the market model would not lead to integration. This is exactly what happened. After decades of integration, intra-African exports in several sub-regions account for about 10% of their overall exports. Between 2004 and 2006, intra-African exports accounted for 8.7% of the continent’s total exports while intra-African imports were estimated at 9.6% of Africa’s total imports. However, for Sub-Saharan Africa, intra-African exports accounted for 12% of total exports  
The level of trade is low or negligible even among countries sharing the same currency, the cfa franc, like the West African Economic and Monetary Union (WAEMU) and the Central African Economic and Monetary Community (CAEMC).Yet, the common currency was supposed to be an integrating factor by eliminating exchange rate risks and providing some kind of “economic stability” to these countries! In CAEMC, intra-regional trade is less than 2%. In WAEMU, intra-regional trade is less than 10%. Only the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS)  and the Southern African Development Community (SADC) seem to have significant levels of intra-regional trade flows. For instance in 2006, UEMOA exports to ECOWAS and other African countries accounted for respectively 26% and 32%, while UEMOA imports from these groupings were respectively 20% and 23%, according to UNCTAD.

Trade should serve production and development, not the other way around. Trade cannot be an end in itself. This is why integration through the market model makes no sense in most sub-regions in Africa since sub-regional economic communities have little to exchange because the bulk of their exports is composed of commodities. By contrast, the production model could provide the economies of scale indispensable to an effective and successful industrialization strategy that would help build industries capable to transform raw materials and commodities to meet people’s basic needs. By adding more value to Africa’s products, the production model may also lay the ground for a viable regional market, which in turn would support a regional demand-led growth strategy as opposed to the export-led growth strategy imposed by the IFIs and the WTO.

2) Create Regional Currencies and New Regional Institutions
One of the obstacles to economic integration in West and Central Africa is the use of a currency inherited from French colonization, the cfa franc. Its use by the WAEMU has hampered efforts to merge that Union into ECOWAS, as recommended by the 1991 Abuja Treaty. Instead of the “benefits” the use of the cfa franc was supposed to bring, the 14 African countries using it are all classified as either “Least Developed Countries” (LDCs) and/or “Heavily Indebted Poor Countries” (HIPCs)! Moreover, while trade flows among these countries account for 10% or less of their overall trade, as already indicated, at the bilateral level, France continues to be the main trading partner of most of these countries. Their trade with the European Union (EU) accounts for more than half of their overall trade. This means that the common currency has reinforced these countries’ external dependence and the outward orientation of their economies.

The experience with the cfa franc has convinced African leaders that development cannot occur without exercising a sovereign control over their monetary policies. And it is now widely accepted that real progress toward economic integration requires abandoning the cfa franc in favor of common currencies in West and Central Africa. But so far discussions on the issue have been slow. One may hope that the current crises may open the eyes of policy makers and make them take the decisive steps toward creating new regional currencies, which can serve not only the process of economic integration but also the wider goal of an endogenous development.

Along with regional currencies, African countries need to move toward new institutions. There is a debate within the African Union Commission on setting up an African Monetary Fund (AMF) and an African Central Bank (ACB). Beyond technical difficulties, however, the main obstacle to achieving these projects is the African leadership. Building a consensus on these issues and on other key objectives depends on the political will and strong commitment of African leaders.

There is no doubt that Western countries and international financial institutions will do what they can to foil these projects and keep Africa under their control. For example, if African countries accept to sign the Economic Partnership Agreements (EPAs), on the terms dictated by the European Union, these projects are likely to be put on hold for the foreseeable future. On the other hand, so long as African countries continue to listen to the IMF and World Bank, they will never reclaim their sovereign right to design their own policies, which is the indispensable step toward exploring an alternative development paradigm.

3) Better Continental Coordination
The acceleration of sub-regional integration should go hand in hand with a greater and more effective coordination at the continental level. In November 2008, the African Union Commission, the Economic Commission for Africa and the African Development Bank organized a meeting of African Finance Ministers and Central Bank Governors to discuss Africa’s position on the responses to the financial crisis before the first G20 Summit in Washington, DC. At that meeting, a Committee, composed of 10 African Finance Ministers and Central and Regional Bank Governors (C10),  was formed with the mission to make recommendations on how Africa should respond to the global crises at the sub-regional and continental level.

So the crises seem to have given a new momentum to coordination of policies and greater cooperation at the continental level. Indeed, since the creation of the African Union (AU) in 2001, there seems to be a new consciousness about African economic integration and cooperation and the need for Africa to speak with one voice. The African Union Commission has taken a number of initiatives to strengthen that consciousness. It was under its sponsorship that African Ministers in charge of Economic Integration and Cooperation met in Burkina Faso in 2008 to assess the state of the integration process.

But once again, the issue of economic integration in Africa is essentially a political issue. Without a strong political commitment and will to move toward economic integration and a united Africa, nothing significant will happen. Therefore, African leaders should learn from the experiences of other regions of the Global South, especially South America. In that region, the Bolivarian Alternatives of the Americas (ALBA) and the South Bank are strengthening the solidarity and cooperation of States and peoples through closer economic, financial and political ties. .

D) Promote Policies of Collective Food Sovereignty
As indicated earlier, in the name of “free market”, structural adjustment programs (SAPs) destroyed agricultural policies put in place after independence, by dismantling parastatals that used to provide services to farmers. The IMF and World Bank compelled African countries to give priority to cash crops for exports in order to repay the external debt. As a result, food production was neglected which led to greater dependence on food imports to feed African citizens. For example, net food imports in Sub-Saharan Africa have increased from 1.3% to 1.9% of GDP between 2000 and 2007 and from 1.4% to 2.0% of GDP in West Africa during the same period.
Now the IMF and the World Bank are using the food crisis to make a comeback, while trying to hide their responsibility in the crisis of the agricultural sector in Africa.

What African countries need is to move toward policies of collective self-sufficiency in food production. Africa leaders should listen to their citizens and trust small-scale African farmers and other agricultural producers who need good public policies that would enable them to produce enough to feed the African population. Africa has water aplenty and vast arable lands, most of which are not exploited. In 2003 during an African Summit in Maputo (Mozambique), a recommendation was made to invest each year at least 10% of national budgets in agriculture. Only a few countries followed through this recommendation. The African Union Summit held in Libya (July 1-3, 2009) held a special session on agricultural policies and heads of State reiterated the pledge to invest more in agriculture to achieve “food security”. One may hope that African leaders have learned a good lesson from the food crisis and understood the urgent necessity to reverse current agricultural policies and pursue the objective food sovereignty.

E) Resources for Financing Africa’s Development
In the short run, all financial flows to Africa in response to the financial, food and energy crises should be in the form of grants and concessional financing, not new loans, since Africa has no responsibility, whatsoever, in these crises. From that perspective, any flows to the continent by the IFIs and Western countries in the form of loans will be deemed illegitimate by African civil society organizations and pressure will bear on African governments not to repay these illegitimate loans.

1) Moratorium and Debt Cancellation   
On the other hand, in May 2009 the Secretary General of UNCTAD called for a moratorium on the debt of “poor” countries”. African countries should support this proposal. However, African governments and institutions should seize this opportunity and take that proposal a step further by calling for the unconditional cancellation of the continent’s debt. In 2005, the African Union Commission had taken a number of initiatives to build a strong continental consensus on the continent’s external debt and this common position was instrumental in the decision made by G8 leaders at their Summit in Gleneagles in July of that year. The current crises offer an even greater opportunity to the African Union Commission to intensify the call for debt cancellation.

One of the most important lessons to be learned by African leaders from the financial crisis is that Africa cannot count on its so-called “traditional partners”, i.e. Western countries and international financial institutions under their control. It is well known that none of the promises of “aid” to Africa has been completely fulfilled, including the one made at the G8 Summit in Scotland in 2005 to double “aid” to Africa to $50 billion a year beginning in 2010. By contrast, in 2008 and earlier this year, in just a few weeks, the United States and Europe had mobilized trillions of dollars to rescue their banks and industries. The first rescue package for AIG ($152 billion) by the US government was higher than the amount of “aid” promised in 2007 by the United States and European Union to all developing countries, estimated at $91 billion!

Therefore, African leaders should understand once for all that there must be a significant shift in the sources of financing for Africa’s development. Reclaiming its sovereign right to design its own policies goes with vigorous efforts to raise financial resources internally and the necessity to bear a greater part of the burden to finance its development. The African Development Bank (AfDB) rightly claims that “The continent needs to boost domestic resource mobilization – through financial and fiscal instruments- to support growth and investment. Addressing these issues require strategic interventions at various levels”

2) Domestic Resource Mobilization
So, African countries must put a greater emphasis on domestic resource mobilization. In this regard, African countries should adopt new monetary and fiscal policies aimed at increasing domestic savings. And the potential is huge indeed, if African countries give themselves the means to achieve this objective. In a study, Christian Aid indicates that African countries are losing close to $160 billion each year in tax revenues, as a result of tax exemptions and for lack of enforcement of agreements with foreign companies investing in various sectors, especially in the mining industry.  Dealing with weak and ineffective States, these companies resort to various means to pay lower taxes or avoid paying taxes at all.

Therefore, to compel foreign companies to fulfill their obligations and expand the tax base, African countries need to reorganize their States into effective States able to enforce agreements and mobilize resources for development. Several international institutions have made this recommendation. UNCTAD devoted one of its reports on Africa to that issue.  It argues that it is time to build developmental States and put them at the centre of the development process in order for African countries to recover the policy space lost to neoliberal institutions over the last three decades. The Report says that such States should help African governments improve tax collection; formalize the informal sector; stop capital flight; make more productive use of remittances from African expatriates and adopt effective measures to repatriate resources held abroad.

Coordination of financial and monetary policies at the sub-regional level would put African countries in a stronger position to achieve this goal. Therefore, sub-regional economic communities have a crucial role to play in domestic resource mobilization by proposing common legalizations on capital flows and common tax policies vis a vis foreign investors.

3) South-South Cooperation and Solidarity
African economic integration will greatly benefit from building closer ties between Africa and other Southern regions. In particular, it would open a number of possibilities for non traditional financing for Africa. With the rise of new powers with substantial foreign exchange reserves and willing to build a new type of cooperation with African countries, the continent has new opportunities that should be used wisely. Already, several African countries are turning more and more to these powers, like China, India, Iran, Venezuela and Gulf countries, for loans, direct investments and joint-ventures. The South-South trade has increased from $577 billion to $1,700 billion between 1995 and 2005 and it keeps rising.  In 2008, trade between Africa and China was estimated at $107 billion, with a favorable balance for Africa.

Economic and political ties with South America are also growing. In June 2009, the President of the African Union Commission, Mr. Jean Ping, in a visit to Venezuela was quoted as saying that African countries would strengthen their cooperation with ALBA countries. He hailed the cooperation between Africa and South America in general and called for strengthening their ties at all levels. At the political level, the second Africa-South America Summit will be held in Caracas in September 2009 (9-14), after the first Summit held in November 2006 in Abuja (Nigeria).
These are very encouraging signs that a growing consciousness is taking place at the level of African leaders on the need to “look South”. Indeed, by developing its economic and financial cooperation as well as the political solidarity with the rest of the South, Africa will not only benefit from new sources of financing but also strengthen the policy space it needs to weaken the influence of “traditional partners”, especially the international financial institutions.

4) Repatriation of Stolen/Illegal Wealth
The African Union Commission and the African Development Bank and the Economic Commission for Africa (ECA) have issued a joint document calling for the cooperation of Western countries and international institutions in Africa’s efforts to get back the wealth that rightfully belongs to the African people. This is a positive development that gives a new momentum to the demand made several years ago by African civil society organizations working on the issue of Africa’s illegitimate.
This campaign for the repatriation of the wealth stolen from the African people and illegally kept abroad with the complicity of Western States and financial institutions is long overdue. Therefore, sub-regional and continental institutions should work closely with civil society organizations for a strong and sustained mobilization on that issue. With only half of the wealth illegally kept in Western banks, Africa’s development financing could be largely covered.




NOTES

[1] Director of the African Forum on Alternatives & Member of Jubilee South International Coordinating Committee (JS/ICC), Dakar (Senegal).

[2]UNCTAD, Economic Development in Africa 2008. Export Performance Following Trade Liberalization: Some Patterns and Policy Perspectives. United Nations: New York & Geneva, 2008.
[3] UNCTAD, Economic Development in Africa Report 2009: Strengthening Regional Economic Integration for Africa’s Development. New York & Geneva: United Nations, 2009

[4] UNCTAD. Economic Development in Africa. Trade Performance and Commodity Dependence. New York & Geneva: United Nations, 2004.
[5] UNCTAD, Economic Development in Africa Report 2009, op.cit, p.29
[6] ECOWAS is composed of 15 countries. It includes all 8 WAEMU members and 7 other countries, like Nigeria, Ghana, etc. Each of these 7 countries has its own currency.
[7] UNCTAD, Trade and Development Report, 2007, p.99

[8] The Committee is composed of the Finance Ministers of South Africa, Egypt, Nigeria, Cameroon and Tanzania and Central Bank Governors of Algeria, Botswana, Kenya, West African Central Bank (BCEAO), Central Bank of Central African States (BEAC) and African Development Bank President.  
[9] UNCTAD, Trade and Development Report, 2008, p. 34, table 2.3

[10] African Development Bank (2008), Ministerial Conference on the Financial Crisis, Tunis, November 12, 2008. Briefing Note No. 1: The Current Financial Crisis: Impact on African Economies
[11] Christian Aid (2008), Death and Taxes: the true toll of tax dodging. London, A Christian Aid Report (May)
[12] UNCTAD (2007), Economic Development in Africa. Reclaiming Policy Space: Domestic Resource Mobilisation and Developmental States. New York & Geneva: United Nations
[13] Le Monde Diplomatique, L’Atlas, February 2009, p. 183
[14]See Léonce Ndukumana and Hippolyte Fofack (2008), Capital Flight Repatriation. Investigation Into its Potential Gains for Sub-Saharan African countries (October 2008).



INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE of GOVERNMENTS and SOCIAL MOVEMENTS “Regional Integration: an opportunity to face the crises”

DATES: 21 and 22 July 2009
VENUE: PRODEPA, Sala 1, Consejo Nacional del Deporte, Asunción del Paraguay
TIME: 9am-20pm


PROGRAME


21 JULY

09:00–09:30

Opening: Greeting from organisers

– Enrique Daza, Executive Secretary, Hemispheric Social Alliance, Colombia
– Brid Brennan, TNI/Peoples’ Agenda for Alternative Regionalisms, Netherlands
– Guillermo Ortega, Base IS, Iniciativa Paraguaya por la Integración de los Pueblos, Paraguay
– Héctor Lacognata, Minister of Foreign Affairs, Paraguay

09:30–11:30 Systemic Crisis, impacts of the crisis on regional integration processes

– Juan Gonzalez, MOSIP, Argentina
– Walden Bello, Member of Parliament, Philippines
– Tetteh Hormeku, TWN/ATN, Ghana

Moderation

Cecilia Olivet,

TNI, Netherlands

11:30-13:30 Regional responses to the crises

– Juan Castillo, Secretary for International Relations PIT-CNT, Uruguay

– Demba Moussa Dembele, African Forum on Alternatives, Senegal (DOWNLOAD
– Joy Chavez, Focus on the Global South, Philippines
– Frederic Viale, ATTAC France

Moderation

José Miguel Hernández,

CTC Nacional/ CC-ASC, Cuba

13:30-15:00 Lunch
15:00-17:30 Regional Integration: Re-thinking the development model. Complementarity versus competition. Integration and Asymmetries

– Jorge Lara Castro, Vice-Minister of Foreign Affairs, Paraguay
– Oscar Laborde, Government Argentina

– Tomas Palau, Base IS, Iniciativa Paraguaya por la Integración de los Pueblos, Paraguay

– Graciela Rodriguez, REBRIP, Brazil

– Dot Keet, SAPSN, South Africa

– Charles Santiago, Member of Parliament, Malaysia

Moderation

Gonzalo Berrón,

ASC/CSA, Brazil

17:30-18:00 Coffee break
18:00-20:00 Development Model and Infrastructure
– Guilherme Carvalho, Rede Brasil sobre  Instituições Financeiras Multilaterais, Brazil
– Ricardo Miranda, Confederación Sindical Única de Trabajadores Campesinos de Bolivia (CSUTCB), Bolivia
– Michelle Pressend, Trade Strategy Group, South Africa

Moderation

Ximana Centellas,

Directora General de

Gestión Pública,

Viceministerio de

Coordinación y Gestión Gubernamental, Bolivia


22 JULY


09:00-10:45 Energy Crisis and Climate Change: the challenge to find regional solutions

– Walden Bello, Member of Parliament, Philippines

– Pablo Bertinat, Cono Sur Sustentable, Argentina
– Roberto Colman, Coordinadora Soberanía Energética, Paraguay
– Tom Kucharz, Ecologistas en Accion, Spain

Moderation
Fernando Rojas, Decidamos,

Iniciativa Paraguaya por la

Integración de los Pueblos, Paraguay

10:45-11:00 Coffe Break
11:00-13:00 Production model and Food Sovereignty

– Juan José Dominguez, Member of Parliament, MPP–FA, Uruguay

– Rabindra Adhikari, Member of Parliament, Nepal
– Indra Lubis, La Via Campesina, Indonesia
– Lodwick Chizarura, SEATINI, Zimbabwe
– Francisca Rodriguez, CONAMURI/CLOC, Chile

Moderation

Sebastián Valdomir, Redes Amigos de la Tierra, Uruguay

13:00-14:00 Lunch
14:00–16:00 Finances and development model: New financial structures: (Bank of the South, regional currencies, etc)
– Pedro Paez, President of the Ecuadorian Presidential Technical Commission for the New Regional Financial Architecture and Bank of the South, Ecuador
– Beverly Keene, Jubilee South, Argentina
– Ivan Lukas, Glopolis, Czech Republic

Moderation

Veronique Sandoval, Espace Marx, France

16:00-17:00 Regional Peace, Democracy and Human Rights

– Lee, Seung-Heon, Chief External Relations Department of the Korea Democratic Labor Party, South Korea
– Camille Chalmers, Campaign for Demilitarisation of the Americas, Haiti

– Meena Menon, Focus on the Global South, India
– Thomas Wallgren, Coalition for comprehensive democracy – Vasudhaiva Kutumkakam, Finland (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION)
– Pezo Mateo-Phiri, SAPSN, Zambia

Moderation

Ramon Corvalan, SERPAJ

Paraguay/ Iniciativa

Paraguaya por la integracion de los Pueblos, Paraguay

17:00–17:30 Coffee break
17:30–20:00

Round Table: Regional Integration: challenges for the movements and the governments


– Chacho Alvarez, President Committee of Permanent Representatives of MERCOSUR, Argentina
– Ana Cristina Betancourt Garcia, Ministerio de Autonomía, Bolivia
– Gustavo Codas, Government Paraguay
– Franklin Gonzalez, Government Venezuela
– Edgardo Lander, Universidad Central de Venezuela/TNI, Venezuela
– Walden Bello, Focus on the Global South/MP, Philippines
– Nalu Farias, World March of Women, Brazil
– Brid Brennan, TNI, Netherlands
– Dot Keet, SAPSN, South Africa
Moderation
Héctor de la Cueva, RMALC, México


Co- Organisers
Hemispheric Social Alliance (HSA), Iniciativa Paraguaya para la Integración de los Pueblos, People’s Agenda for Alternative Regionalisms (PAAR), Focus on the Global South and Transnational Institute (TNI)

In cooperation with
Trade Union Confederation of the Americas (TUCA), Southern African People’s Solidarity Network (SAPSN), People’s SAARC, Solidarity for Asian People’s Advocacy (SAPA), TWN Africa, Trade Strategy Group, Jubilee South, REBRIP, Transform Europe, ATTAC France, Coalition for comprehensive democracy – Vasudhaiva Kutumkakam and Ecologistas en Acción

Supported by
Paraguayan Presidency Pro-tempore of Mercosur

With the contribution of
Oxfam/Novib, Oxfam Internacional, Christian Aid and Action Aid


INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE of GOVERNMENTS and SOCIAL MOVEMENTS “Regional Integration: an opportunity to face the crises”

DATES: 21 and 22 July 2009
VENUE: PRODEPA, Sala 1, click Consejo Nacional del Deporte, Asunción del Paraguay
TIME: 9am-20pm


PROGRAME


21 JULY

09:00–09:30

Opening: Greeting from organisers

– Enrique Daza, Executive Secretary, Hemispheric Social Alliance, Colombia
– Brid Brennan, TNI/Peoples’ Agenda for Alternative Regionalisms, Netherlands
– Guillermo Ortega, Base IS, Iniciativa Paraguaya por la Integración de los Pueblos, Paraguay
– Héctor Lacognata, Minister of Foreign Affairs, Paraguay

09:30–11:30 Systemic Crisis, impacts of the crisis on regional integration processes

– Juan Gonzalez, MOSIP, Argentina
– Walden Bello, Member of Parliament, Philippines
– Tetteh Hormeku, TWN/ATN, Ghana

Moderation

Cecilia Olivet,

TNI, Netherlands

11:30-13:30 Regional responses to the crises

– Juan Castillo, Secretary for International Relations PIT-CNT, Uruguay

– Demba Moussa Dembele, African Forum on Alternatives, Senegal
– Joy Chavez, Focus on the Global South, Philippines
– Frederic Viale, ATTAC France

Moderation

José Miguel Hernández,

CTC Nacional/ CC-ASC, Cuba

13:30-15:00 Lunch
15:00-17:30 Regional Integration: Re-thinking the development model. Complementarity versus competition. Integration and Asymmetries

– Jorge Lara Castro, Vice-Minister of Foreign Affairs, Paraguay
– Oscar Laborde, Government Argentina

– Tomas Palau, Base IS, Iniciativa Paraguaya por la Integración de los Pueblos, Paraguay

– Graciela Rodriguez, REBRIP, Brazil

– Dot Keet, SAPSN, South Africa

– Charles Santiago, Member of Parliament, Malaysia

Moderation

Gonzalo Berrón,

ASC/CSA, Brazil

17:30-18:00 Coffee break
18:00-20:00 Development Model and Infrastructure
– Guilherme Carvalho, Rede Brasil sobre  Instituições Financeiras Multilaterais, Brazil
– Ricardo Miranda, Confederación Sindical Única de Trabajadores Campesinos de Bolivia (CSUTCB), Bolivia
– Michelle Pressend, Trade Strategy Group, South Africa

Moderation

Ximana Centellas,

Directora General de

Gestión Pública,

Viceministerio de

Coordinación y Gestión Gubernamental, Bolivia


22 JULY


09:00-10:45 Energy Crisis and Climate Change: the challenge to find regional solutions

– Walden Bello, Member of Parliament, Philippines

– Pablo Bertinat, Cono Sur Sustentable, Argentina
– Roberto Colman, Coordinadora Soberanía Energética, Paraguay
– Tom Kucharz, Ecologistas en Accion, Spain

Moderation
Fernando Rojas, Decidamos,

Iniciativa Paraguaya por la

Integración de los Pueblos, Paraguay

10:45-11:00 Coffe Break
11:00-13:00 Production model and Food Sovereignty

– Juan José Dominguez, Member of Parliament, MPP–FA, Uruguay

– Rabindra Adhikari, Member of Parliament, Nepal
– Indra Lubis, La Via Campesina, Indonesia
– Lodwick Chizarura, SEATINI, Zimbabwe
– Francisca Rodriguez, CONAMURI/CLOC, Chile

Moderation

Sebastián Valdomir, Redes Amigos de la Tierra, Uruguay

13:00-14:00 Lunch
14:00–16:00 Finances and development model: New financial structures: (Bank of the South, regional currencies, etc)
– Pedro Paez, President of the Ecuadorian Presidential Technical Commission for the New Regional Financial Architecture and Bank of the South, Ecuador
– Beverly Keene, Jubilee South, Argentina
– Ivan Lukas, Glopolis, Czech Republic

Moderation

Veronique Sandoval, Espace Marx, France

16:00-17:00 Regional Peace, Democracy and Human Rights

– Lee, Seung-Heon, Chief External Relations Department of the Korea Democratic Labor Party, South Korea
– Camille Chalmers, Campaign for Demilitarisation of the Americas, Haiti

– Meena Menon, Focus on the Global South, India
– Thomas Wallgren, Coalition for comprehensive democracy – Vasudhaiva Kutumkakam, Finland (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION)
– Pezo Mateo-Phiri, SAPSN, Zambia

Moderation

Ramon Corvalan, SERPAJ

Paraguay/ Iniciativa

Paraguaya por la integracion de los Pueblos, Paraguay

17:00–17:30 Coffee break
17:30–20:00

Round Table: Regional Integration: challenges for the movements and the governments


– Chacho Alvarez, President Committee of Permanent Representatives of MERCOSUR, Argentina
– Ana Cristina Betancourt Garcia, Ministerio de Autonomía, Bolivia
– Gustavo Codas, Government Paraguay
– Franklin Gonzalez, Government Venezuela
– Edgardo Lander, Universidad Central de Venezuela/TNI, Venezuela
– Walden Bello, Focus on the Global South/MP, Philippines
– Nalu Farias, World March of Women, Brazil
– Brid Brennan, TNI, Netherlands
– Dot Keet, SAPSN, South Africa
Moderation
Héctor de la Cueva, RMALC, México


Co- Organisers
Hemispheric Social Alliance (HSA), Iniciativa Paraguaya para la Integración de los Pueblos, People’s Agenda for Alternative Regionalisms (PAAR), Focus on the Global South and Transnational Institute (TNI)

In cooperation with
Trade Union Confederation of the Americas (TUCA), Southern African People’s Solidarity Network (SAPSN), People’s SAARC, Solidarity for Asian People’s Advocacy (SAPA), TWN Africa, Trade Strategy Group, Jubilee South, REBRIP, Transform Europe, ATTAC France, Coalition for comprehensive democracy – Vasudhaiva Kutumkakam and Ecologistas en Acción

Supported by
Paraguayan Presidency Pro-tempore of Mercosur

With the contribution of
Oxfam/Novib, Oxfam Internacional, Christian Aid and Action Aid


INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE of GOVERNMENTS and SOCIAL MOVEMENTS “Regional Integration: an opportunity to face the crises”

DATES: 21 and 22 July 2009
VENUE: PRODEPA, ambulance Sala 1,
Consejo Nacional del Deporte, Asunción del Paraguay
TIME: 9am-20pm


PROGRAME


21 JULY

09:00–09:30

Opening: Greeting from organisers

– Enrique Daza, Executive Secretary, Hemispheric Social Alliance, Colombia
– Brid Brennan, TNI/Peoples’ Agenda for Alternative Regionalisms, Netherlands
– Guillermo Ortega, Base IS, Iniciativa Paraguaya por la Integración de los Pueblos, Paraguay
– Héctor Lacognata, Minister of Foreign Affairs, Paraguay

09:30–11:30 Systemic Crisis, impacts of the crisis on regional integration processes

– Juan Gonzalez, MOSIP, Argentina
– Walden Bello, Member of Parliament, Philippines
– Tetteh Hormeku, TWN/ATN, Ghana

Moderation

Cecilia Olivet,

TNI, Netherlands

11:30-13:30 Regional responses to the crises

– Juan Castillo, Secretary for International Relations PIT-CNT, Uruguay

– Demba Moussa Dembele, African Forum on Alternatives, Senegal (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION)
– Joy Chavez, Focus on the Global South, Philippines
– Frederic Viale, ATTAC France

Moderation

José Miguel Hernández,

CTC Nacional/ CC-ASC, Cuba

13:30-15:00 Lunch
15:00-17:30 Regional Integration: Re-thinking the development model. Complementarity versus competition. Integration and Asymmetries

– Jorge Lara Castro, Vice-Minister of Foreign Affairs, Paraguay
– Oscar Laborde, Government Argentina

– Tomas Palau, Base IS, Iniciativa Paraguaya por la Integración de los Pueblos, Paraguay

– Graciela Rodriguez, REBRIP, Brazil

– Dot Keet, SAPSN, South Africa

– Charles Santiago, Member of Parliament, Malaysia

Moderation

Gonzalo Berrón,

ASC/CSA, Brazil

17:30-18:00 Coffee break
18:00-20:00 Development Model and Infrastructure
– Guilherme Carvalho, Rede Brasil sobre  Instituições Financeiras Multilaterais, Brazil
– Ricardo Miranda, Confederación Sindical Única de Trabajadores Campesinos de Bolivia (CSUTCB), Bolivia
– Michelle Pressend, Trade Strategy Group, South Africa

Moderation

Ximana Centellas,

Directora General de

Gestión Pública,

Viceministerio de

Coordinación y Gestión Gubernamental, Bolivia


22 JULY


09:00-10:45 Energy Crisis and Climate Change: the challenge to find regional solutions

– Walden Bello, Member of Parliament, Philippines

– Pablo Bertinat, Cono Sur Sustentable, Argentina
– Roberto Colman, Coordinadora Soberanía Energética, Paraguay
– Tom Kucharz, Ecologistas en Accion, Spain

Moderation
Fernando Rojas, Decidamos,

Iniciativa Paraguaya por la

Integración de los Pueblos, Paraguay

10:45-11:00 Coffe Break
11:00-13:00 Production model and Food Sovereignty

– Juan José Dominguez, Member of Parliament, MPP–FA, Uruguay

– Rabindra Adhikari, Member of Parliament, Nepal
– Indra Lubis, La Via Campesina, Indonesia
– Lodwick Chizarura, SEATINI, Zimbabwe
– Francisca Rodriguez, CONAMURI/CLOC, Chile

Moderation

Sebastián Valdomir, Redes Amigos de la Tierra, Uruguay

13:00-14:00 Lunch
14:00–16:00 Finances and development model: New financial structures: (Bank of the South, regional currencies, etc)
– Pedro Paez, President of the Ecuadorian Presidential Technical Commission for the New Regional Financial Architecture and Bank of the South, Ecuador
– Beverly Keene, Jubilee South, Argentina
– Ivan Lukas, Glopolis, Czech Republic

Moderation

Veronique Sandoval, Espace Marx, France

16:00-17:00 Regional Peace, Democracy and Human Rights

– Lee, Seung-Heon, Chief External Relations Department of the Korea Democratic Labor Party, South Korea
– Camille Chalmers, Campaign for Demilitarisation of the Americas, Haiti

– Meena Menon, Focus on the Global South, India
– Thomas Wallgren, Coalition for comprehensive democracy – Vasudhaiva Kutumkakam, Finland (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION)
– Pezo Mateo-Phiri, SAPSN, Zambia

Moderation

Ramon Corvalan, SERPAJ

Paraguay/ Iniciativa

Paraguaya por la integracion de los Pueblos, Paraguay

17:00–17:30 Coffee break
17:30–20:00

Round Table: Regional Integration: challenges for the movements and the governments


– Chacho Alvarez, President Committee of Permanent Representatives of MERCOSUR, Argentina
– Ana Cristina Betancourt Garcia, Ministerio de Autonomía, Bolivia
– Gustavo Codas, Government Paraguay
– Franklin Gonzalez, Government Venezuela
– Edgardo Lander, Universidad Central de Venezuela/TNI, Venezuela
– Walden Bello, Focus on the Global South/MP, Philippines
– Nalu Farias, World March of Women, Brazil
– Brid Brennan, TNI, Netherlands
– Dot Keet, SAPSN, South Africa
Moderation
Héctor de la Cueva, RMALC, México


Co- Organisers
Hemispheric Social Alliance (HSA), Iniciativa Paraguaya para la Integración de los Pueblos, People’s Agenda for Alternative Regionalisms (PAAR), Focus on the Global South and Transnational Institute (TNI)

In cooperation with
Trade Union Confederation of the Americas (TUCA), Southern African People’s Solidarity Network (SAPSN), People’s SAARC, Solidarity for Asian People’s Advocacy (SAPA), TWN Africa, Trade Strategy Group, Jubilee South, REBRIP, Transform Europe, ATTAC France, Coalition for comprehensive democracy – Vasudhaiva Kutumkakam and Ecologistas en Acción

Supported by
Paraguayan Presidency Pro-tempore of Mercosur

With the contribution of
Oxfam/Novib, Oxfam Internacional, Christian Aid and Action Aid


By Demba Moussa Dembele [1]

* Presentation given at International Conference of governments and social movements “Regional Integration: an opportunity to face the crises” (21 and 22 July 2009, Asunción del Paraguay)


THE IMPACT OF THE CRISES ON AFRICA

The financial crisis and its transmission to the real economy are having devastating effects on Africa. According to the African Development Bank (AfDB), the average growth of the continent will be cut in half this year, from 5.9% to 2.8%, as a result of falling international demand and falling commodity prices. One illustration of that is the decline of exports projected to fall by 40% in 2009. The shortfall in exports will be compounded by the decrease in official development assistance (ODA) and remittances by African migrant workers. In 2007, these remittances were estimated at 28 billion US dollars, accounting for about 3% of the continent’s GDP. In several countries, these remittances are much higher than ODA. Private investments, in the form of foreign direct investments (FDIs) are also expected to fall sharply.

This bleak picture shows that Africa is paying a heavy price for the crises in which it has no responsibility. This situation in which Africa finds itself is the result of a set of neoliberal policies implemented over nearly three decades at the urging of the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank, joined later by the World Trade Organization (WTO). The food crisis has hit very hard several African countries and led to numerous food riots punctuated with dozens of deaths and hundreds of arrests. The food crisis has increased the external dependence of many countries and given a golden opportunity to the IMF and World Bank to expand their control over African economic policies.

REGIONAL RESPONSES FROM AFRICA
The above bleak picture shows that Africa is paying a heavy price for the crises in which it has no responsibility. Africa has been the main victim of ruthless neoliberal policies imposed by the IMF and World for nearly three decades, with the catastrophic economic, social and political consequences the African people are still witnessing. Therefore, the crises should be used as an opportunity by Africa to free itself from the shackles of neoliberal capitalism and explore new paths to an endogenous development with regional economic integration and cooperation as a key element in that process.

A) Challenge “Free Trade” Model and Theory.
The first step should be to challenge neoliberal models, especially the “free trade” model. In that perspective, African regional communities must challenge “free trade” agreements, such as the African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA) with the United
States and the Economic Partnership Agreements (EPAs) with the European Union.
In connection with this challenge, it is the whole ideology of “free trade” that must be challenged and rejected. Indeed, it is that theory that underpins trade liberalization. It was in the name of “free trade” and “comparative advantage” that African countries were forced to accept sweeping trade liberalization that entailed huge economic and social costs, by increasing Africa’s external dependence, destroying domestic industries, accelerating deindustrialization and hampering sub-regional economic integration.

By contrast, none of the “benefits” that were supposed to accrue from trade liberalization, according to the IMF and World Bank, was achieved. Africa’s trade performance did not improve. Assessing the record of trade liberalization in Africa since the early 1980s, UNCTAD  came to the conclusion that the results were far from expectations. Indeed, the outcome of trade liberalization in Africa could hardly be different. While the IFIs and the WTO were extolling the virtues of “free trade”, the staggering subsidies that Western countries were providing to their agricultural exporters and the disguised or open trade barriers they erected to protect their markets have made “free trade” a farce.

B) Reclaim the Debate on Africa’s Development
The collapse of market fundamentalism and the discredit of IFIs provide Africa with a golden opportunity to reclaim the debate on its development. No external force can “develop” Africa. So, Africans should restore their self-confidence, trust African expertise and promote the use of African endogenous knowledge and technology. Since development should be viewed as a multidimensional and complex process of transformation, there can be no genuine development without an active State. Proponents of State intervention have been vindicated by the demise of laisser-faire and the active State intervention in the United States and leading European countries.

However, the State is no longer the only player. It has to contend with civil society organizations which have become key players in the debate on Africa’s development. Therefore, African sub-regional and continental institutions should work with these organizations to explore an alternative development paradigm in Africa.

In the search for that paradigm, a number of key documents should be revisited. They include the Lagos Plan of Action (LPA, 1981); the African Alternative Framework to structural adjustment programs (AAF-SAPs, 1989); the Arusha Declaration on popular participation to development (1990); the Abuja Treaty on economic integration (1991), among others. All these documents were published under the leadership of the Economic Commission for Africa (ECA) and the Organization of African Unity, which was replaced by the African Union in 2001. This shows that African sub-regional and continental institutions had played a leading role in the debate on the continent’s development before the onslaught of the neoliberal ideology. They can play that role again by initiating the update of the above documents and taking into account the contributions made by civil society organizations in the areas of gender equality, trade; debt; food sovereignty, human and social rights and so forth.

C) Accelerate Regional Integration
One of the key issues in reclaiming the debate on Africa’s development is sub-regional and continental integration. It necessary to stress again that integration is one of the keys to Africa’s survival and long-term development. This was reiterated during the Summit of African Heads of State in Sirte (Libya) on July 1-3, 2009 and stressed by UNCTAD in its latest report on Africa.   
Despite an experience of sub-regional integration for more than 30 years, Africa is lagging behind other continents in terms of concrete achievements. In 1991, African countries tried to revive the spirit of integration by signing the Abuja Treaty, which projected an African Economic Community (AEC) by 2025. In the pursuit of that objective, the Treaty called for the rationalization of sub-regional economic communities in the continent’s five sub-regions. But years later, this recommendation has yet to be implemented.

1) Integration Trough Development or Market Model?
One of the main causes of the failure or mixed results of economic integration in Africa is the model used in the sub-regional groupings. Sub-regional groupings followed the European model of integration, the market model characterized by trade liberalization aimed at stimulating trade of goods and services. The European model was justified because European countries had mature industries and saturated internal markets. Therefore, the possibility of further growth depended on access to new markets. Hence, the model of trade liberalization aimed at opening up national markets to neighboring countries’ goods and services.

In Africa, the situation was different. These countries were at the early stages of their industrialization and were exporting mainly raw materials and semi-finished goods. Even today, roughly two-thirds of the continent’s exports are composed of raw materials and semi-processed goods, according to UNCTAD.  Therefore, following the market model would not lead to integration. This is exactly what happened. After decades of integration, intra-African exports in several sub-regions account for about 10% of their overall exports. Between 2004 and 2006, intra-African exports accounted for 8.7% of the continent’s total exports while intra-African imports were estimated at 9.6% of Africa’s total imports. However, for Sub-Saharan Africa, intra-African exports accounted for 12% of total exports  
The level of trade is low or negligible even among countries sharing the same currency, the cfa franc, like the West African Economic and Monetary Union (WAEMU) and the Central African Economic and Monetary Community (CAEMC).Yet, the common currency was supposed to be an integrating factor by eliminating exchange rate risks and providing some kind of “economic stability” to these countries! In CAEMC, intra-regional trade is less than 2%. In WAEMU, intra-regional trade is less than 10%. Only the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS)  and the Southern African Development Community (SADC) seem to have significant levels of intra-regional trade flows. For instance in 2006, UEMOA exports to ECOWAS and other African countries accounted for respectively 26% and 32%, while UEMOA imports from these groupings were respectively 20% and 23%, according to UNCTAD.

Trade should serve production and development, not the other way around. Trade cannot be an end in itself. This is why integration through the market model makes no sense in most sub-regions in Africa since sub-regional economic communities have little to exchange because the bulk of their exports is composed of commodities. By contrast, the production model could provide the economies of scale indispensable to an effective and successful industrialization strategy that would help build industries capable to transform raw materials and commodities to meet people’s basic needs. By adding more value to Africa’s products, the production model may also lay the ground for a viable regional market, which in turn would support a regional demand-led growth strategy as opposed to the export-led growth strategy imposed by the IFIs and the WTO.

2) Create Regional Currencies and New Regional Institutions
One of the obstacles to economic integration in West and Central Africa is the use of a currency inherited from French colonization, the cfa franc. Its use by the WAEMU has hampered efforts to merge that Union into ECOWAS, as recommended by the 1991 Abuja Treaty. Instead of the “benefits” the use of the cfa franc was supposed to bring, the 14 African countries using it are all classified as either “Least Developed Countries” (LDCs) and/or “Heavily Indebted Poor Countries” (HIPCs)! Moreover, while trade flows among these countries account for 10% or less of their overall trade, as already indicated, at the bilateral level, France continues to be the main trading partner of most of these countries. Their trade with the European Union (EU) accounts for more than half of their overall trade. This means that the common currency has reinforced these countries’ external dependence and the outward orientation of their economies.

The experience with the cfa franc has convinced African leaders that development cannot occur without exercising a sovereign control over their monetary policies. And it is now widely accepted that real progress toward economic integration requires abandoning the cfa franc in favor of common currencies in West and Central Africa. But so far discussions on the issue have been slow. One may hope that the current crises may open the eyes of policy makers and make them take the decisive steps toward creating new regional currencies, which can serve not only the process of economic integration but also the wider goal of an endogenous development.

Along with regional currencies, African countries need to move toward new institutions. There is a debate within the African Union Commission on setting up an African Monetary Fund (AMF) and an African Central Bank (ACB). Beyond technical difficulties, however, the main obstacle to achieving these projects is the African leadership. Building a consensus on these issues and on other key objectives depends on the political will and strong commitment of African leaders.

There is no doubt that Western countries and international financial institutions will do what they can to foil these projects and keep Africa under their control. For example, if African countries accept to sign the Economic Partnership Agreements (EPAs), on the terms dictated by the European Union, these projects are likely to be put on hold for the foreseeable future. On the other hand, so long as African countries continue to listen to the IMF and World Bank, they will never reclaim their sovereign right to design their own policies, which is the indispensable step toward exploring an alternative development paradigm.

3) Better Continental Coordination
The acceleration of sub-regional integration should go hand in hand with a greater and more effective coordination at the continental level. In November 2008, the African Union Commission, the Economic Commission for Africa and the African Development Bank organized a meeting of African Finance Ministers and Central Bank Governors to discuss Africa’s position on the responses to the financial crisis before the first G20 Summit in Washington, DC. At that meeting, a Committee, composed of 10 African Finance Ministers and Central and Regional Bank Governors (C10),  was formed with the mission to make recommendations on how Africa should respond to the global crises at the sub-regional and continental level.

So the crises seem to have given a new momentum to coordination of policies and greater cooperation at the continental level. Indeed, since the creation of the African Union (AU) in 2001, there seems to be a new consciousness about African economic integration and cooperation and the need for Africa to speak with one voice. The African Union Commission has taken a number of initiatives to strengthen that consciousness. It was under its sponsorship that African Ministers in charge of Economic Integration and Cooperation met in Burkina Faso in 2008 to assess the state of the integration process.

But once again, the issue of economic integration in Africa is essentially a political issue. Without a strong political commitment and will to move toward economic integration and a united Africa, nothing significant will happen. Therefore, African leaders should learn from the experiences of other regions of the Global South, especially South America. In that region, the Bolivarian Alternatives of the Americas (ALBA) and the South Bank are strengthening the solidarity and cooperation of States and peoples through closer economic, financial and political ties. .

D) Promote Policies of Collective Food Sovereignty
As indicated earlier, in the name of “free market”, structural adjustment programs (SAPs) destroyed agricultural policies put in place after independence, by dismantling parastatals that used to provide services to farmers. The IMF and World Bank compelled African countries to give priority to cash crops for exports in order to repay the external debt. As a result, food production was neglected which led to greater dependence on food imports to feed African citizens. For example, net food imports in Sub-Saharan Africa have increased from 1.3% to 1.9% of GDP between 2000 and 2007 and from 1.4% to 2.0% of GDP in West Africa during the same period.
Now the IMF and the World Bank are using the food crisis to make a comeback, while trying to hide their responsibility in the crisis of the agricultural sector in Africa.

What African countries need is to move toward policies of collective self-sufficiency in food production. Africa leaders should listen to their citizens and trust small-scale African farmers and other agricultural producers who need good public policies that would enable them to produce enough to feed the African population. Africa has water aplenty and vast arable lands, most of which are not exploited. In 2003 during an African Summit in Maputo (Mozambique), a recommendation was made to invest each year at least 10% of national budgets in agriculture. Only a few countries followed through this recommendation. The African Union Summit held in Libya (July 1-3, 2009) held a special session on agricultural policies and heads of State reiterated the pledge to invest more in agriculture to achieve “food security”. One may hope that African leaders have learned a good lesson from the food crisis and understood the urgent necessity to reverse current agricultural policies and pursue the objective food sovereignty.

E) Resources for Financing Africa’s Development
In the short run, all financial flows to Africa in response to the financial, food and energy crises should be in the form of grants and concessional financing, not new loans, since Africa has no responsibility, whatsoever, in these crises. From that perspective, any flows to the continent by the IFIs and Western countries in the form of loans will be deemed illegitimate by African civil society organizations and pressure will bear on African governments not to repay these illegitimate loans.

1) Moratorium and Debt Cancellation
On the other hand, in May 2009 the Secretary General of UNCTAD called for a moratorium on the debt of “poor” countries”. African countries should support this proposal. However, African governments and institutions should seize this opportunity and take that proposal a step further by calling for the unconditional cancellation of the continent’s debt. In 2005, the African Union Commission had taken a number of initiatives to build a strong continental consensus on the continent’s external debt and this common position was instrumental in the decision made by G8 leaders at their Summit in Gleneagles in July of that year. The current crises offer an even greater opportunity to the African Union Commission to intensify the call for debt cancellation.

One of the most important lessons to be learned by African leaders from the financial crisis is that Africa cannot count on its so-called “traditional partners”, i.e. Western countries and international financial institutions under their control. It is well known that none of the promises of “aid” to Africa has been completely fulfilled, including the one made at the G8 Summit in Scotland in 2005 to double “aid” to Africa to $50 billion a year beginning in 2010. By contrast, in 2008 and earlier this year, in just a few weeks, the United States and Europe had mobilized trillions of dollars to rescue their banks and industries. The first rescue package for AIG ($152 billion) by the US government was higher than the amount of “aid” promised in 2007 by the United States and European Union to all developing countries, estimated at $91 billion!

Therefore, African leaders should understand once for all that there must be a significant shift in the sources of financing for Africa’s development. Reclaiming its sovereign right to design its own policies goes with vigorous efforts to raise financial resources internally and the necessity to bear a greater part of the burden to finance its development. The African Development Bank (AfDB) rightly claims that “The continent needs to boost domestic resource mobilization – through financial and fiscal instruments- to support growth and investment. Addressing these issues require strategic interventions at various levels”

2) Domestic Resource Mobilization
So, African countries must put a greater emphasis on domestic resource mobilization. In this regard, African countries should adopt new monetary and fiscal policies aimed at increasing domestic savings. And the potential is huge indeed, if African countries give themselves the means to achieve this objective. In a study, Christian Aid indicates that African countries are losing close to $160 billion each year in tax revenues, as a result of tax exemptions and for lack of enforcement of agreements with foreign companies investing in various sectors, especially in the mining industry.  Dealing with weak and ineffective States, these companies resort to various means to pay lower taxes or avoid paying taxes at all.

Therefore, to compel foreign companies to fulfill their obligations and expand the tax base, African countries need to reorganize their States into effective States able to enforce agreements and mobilize resources for development. Several international institutions have made this recommendation. UNCTAD devoted one of its reports on Africa to that issue.  It argues that it is time to build developmental States and put them at the centre of the development process in order for African countries to recover the policy space lost to neoliberal institutions over the last three decades. The Report says that such States should help African governments improve tax collection; formalize the informal sector; stop capital flight; make more productive use of remittances from African expatriates and adopt effective measures to repatriate resources held abroad.

Coordination of financial and monetary policies at the sub-regional level would put African countries in a stronger position to achieve this goal. Therefore, sub-regional economic communities have a crucial role to play in domestic resource mobilization by proposing common legalizations on capital flows and common tax policies vis a vis foreign investors.

3) South-South Cooperation and Solidarity
African economic integration will greatly benefit from building closer ties between Africa and other Southern regions. In particular, it would open a number of possibilities for non traditional financing for Africa. With the rise of new powers with substantial foreign exchange reserves and willing to build a new type of cooperation with African countries, the continent has new opportunities that should be used wisely. Already, several African countries are turning more and more to these powers, like China, India, Iran, Venezuela and Gulf countries, for loans, direct investments and joint-ventures. The South-South trade has increased from $577 billion to $1,700 billion between 1995 and 2005 and it keeps rising.  In 2008, trade between Africa and China was estimated at $107 billion, with a favorable balance for Africa.

Economic and political ties with South America are also growing. In June 2009, the President of the African Union Commission, Mr. Jean Ping, in a visit to Venezuela was quoted as saying that African countries would strengthen their cooperation with ALBA countries. He hailed the cooperation between Africa and South America in general and called for strengthening their ties at all levels. At the political level, the second Africa-South America Summit will be held in Caracas in September 2009 (9-14), after the first Summit held in November 2006 in Abuja (Nigeria).
These are very encouraging signs that a growing consciousness is taking place at the level of African leaders on the need to “look South”. Indeed, by developing its economic and financial cooperation as well as the political solidarity with the rest of the South, Africa will not only benefit from new sources of financing but also strengthen the policy space it needs to weaken the influence of “traditional partners”, especially the international financial institutions.

4) Repatriation of Stolen/Illegal Wealth
The African Union Commission and the African Development Bank and the Economic Commission for Africa (ECA) have issued a joint document calling for the cooperation of Western countries and international institutions in Africa’s efforts to get back the wealth that rightfully belongs to the African people. This is a positive development that gives a new momentum to the demand made several years ago by African civil society organizations working on the issue of Africa’s illegitimate.
This campaign for the repatriation of the wealth stolen from the African people and illegally kept abroad with the complicity of Western States and financial institutions is long overdue. Therefore, sub-regional and continental institutions should work closely with civil society organizations for a strong and sustained mobilization on that issue. With only half of the wealth illegally kept in Western banks, Africa’s development financing could be largely covered.




NOTES

[1] Director of the African Forum on Alternatives & Member of Jubilee South International Coordinating Committee (JS/ICC), Dakar (Senegal).

[2]UNCTAD, Economic Development in Africa 2008. Export Performance Following Trade Liberalization: Some Patterns and Policy Perspectives. United Nations: New York & Geneva, 2008.
[3] UNCTAD, Economic Development in Africa Report 2009: Strengthening Regional Economic Integration for Africa’s Development. New York & Geneva: United Nations, 2009

[4] UNCTAD. Economic Development in Africa. Trade Performance and Commodity Dependence. New York & Geneva: United Nations, 2004.
[5] UNCTAD, Economic Development in Africa Report 2009, op.cit, p.29
[6] ECOWAS is composed of 15 countries. It includes all 8 WAEMU members and 7 other countries, like Nigeria, Ghana, etc. Each of these 7 countries has its own currency.
[7] UNCTAD, Trade and Development Report, 2007, p.99

[8] The Committee is composed of the Finance Ministers of South Africa, Egypt, Nigeria, Cameroon and Tanzania and Central Bank Governors of Algeria, Botswana, Kenya, West African Central Bank (BCEAO), Central Bank of Central African States (BEAC) and African Development Bank President.  
[9] UNCTAD, Trade and Development Report, 2008, p. 34, table 2.3

[10] African Development Bank (2008), Ministerial Conference on the Financial Crisis, Tunis, November 12, 2008. Briefing Note No. 1: The Current Financial Crisis: Impact on African Economies
[11] Christian Aid (2008), Death and Taxes: the true toll of tax dodging. London, A Christian Aid Report (May)
[12] UNCTAD (2007), Economic Development in Africa. Reclaiming Policy Space: Domestic Resource Mobilisation and Developmental States. New York & Geneva: United Nations
[13] Le Monde Diplomatique, L’Atlas, February 2009, p. 183
[14]See Léonce Ndukumana and Hippolyte Fofack (2008), Capital Flight Repatriation. Investigation Into its Potential Gains for Sub-Saharan African countries (October 2008).




MARCELO I. SAGUIER

Facultad Latinoamerica de Ciencias Sociales (FLACSO), try here  Argentina


El documento analiza la formación de una coalición transnacional de organizaciones de sociedades civiles coordinadas por la Alianza Social Hemisférica para oponerse al establecimiento de un área de libre comercio entre las Américas. La Alianza Social Hemisférica, purchase help representando sindicatos laborales, movimientos sociales, indígenas, organizaciones del medio ambiente y civiles a lo largo de las Américas, ha servido como mediadora entre múltiples expresiones de resistencia a procesos neoliberales con raíces locales/nacionales y una estrategia más amplia a nivel hemisférico, para lograr una forma sostenible y democrática de alternativa de desarrollo al proyecto de un Área de Libre Comercio entre las Américas (FTAA, por sus siglas en inglés). El documento explora los retos y oportunidades de la Alianza Social Hemisférica (HSA, por sus siglas en inglés) trazando un método del proceso político de la sociología de movimientos sociales, para construir alternativas políticas al plan del proyecto del FTAA. El argumento central es que mientras se logro ? un progreso significativo mediante la HSA al definir una base de consenso hemisférico para un plan político alternativo, permanece el reto de asegurar que el proceso de elaborar tales alternativas sea democra ?tico e incluya a la base y a los sectores populares. Por un lado, debe haber un equilibrio entre la necesidad de la capacidad de ampliar la Alianza Social Hemisférica (HSA, por sus siglas en inglés), para movilizar a las fuerzas sociales críticas del continente en una campaña contra el FTAA y, por el otro lado, para asegurarla cohesión de una coalición que se amplía cada vez más bajo la tensión por la alineación de nuevos sectores y actores.



>Descargar PDF



Asunción, 23 y 24 de julio de 2009

Nosotras y nosotros, ask organizaciones sociales y políticas de diferentes países y continentes, y pueblos originarios, nos reunimos en la ciudad de Asunción los días 23 y 24 de julio de 2009, en la Cumbre de los Pueblos del Sur “Protagonismo popular, construyendo soberanía” para debatir la coyuntura actual de la crisis del sistema capitalista y las salidas frente a ésta.

Nos plantean desde los poderes estatales, financieros y mediáticos que la crisis que atravesamos es una crisis financiera que puede ser resuelta con la inyección de fondos al Fondo Monetario Internacional y el Banco Mundial. Nunca en la historia del capitalismo se había otorgado tal cantidad de dinero para el salvataje de las empresas privadas. Así se benefician unos pocos que no casualmente son quienes causaron la crisis en un primer lugar. El objetivo del salvataje es entonces que el casino financiero siga funcionando, mientras millones de personas permanecen en la indigencia.

A la par, también promueven la idea de que estamos atravesando una crisis alimentaria diciendo que es a causa de que países como India y China están hoy aumentando su consumo diario de alimento. Pero esta argumentación no muestra que hay un nuevo patrón de producción basado en biotecnologías de avanzada que provocan la destrucción de la agricultura familiar-campesina, y las costumbres campesinas e indígenas.

Este modelo productivo basado en la agricultura mecanizada, extensiva e intensiva, con el uso masivo de transgénicos y agrotóxicos, impacta directamente sobre el medio ambiente, destruyendo y afectando muy fuertemente el clima del planeta. Es por esto que el segundo acuífero mas grande del mundo, el Acuífero Guaraní, está en grave peligro de contaminación por la implementación de este modelo extractivo de desarrollo que está ubicado justamente en las zonas de recarga de dicho acuífero.

Esto viene de la mano de la idea de que estamos viviendo una crisis energética, lo cual coincidió con una campaña mundial impulsada por países como EEUU y Brasil, donde se plantea la necesidad de aumentar la escala del monocultivo de soja, maíz y caña de azúcar para la producción de etanol y biocombustibles.

Frente a esto, nuestra conclusión es que se trata de una crisis integral del capitalismo, que no es momentánea y que no se va a solucionar con la inyección masiva de capitales. Esta crisis integral pone al desnudo el modelo de desarrollo imperante. La respuesta a esta crisis integral debe ser también integral. Hay que transformar el modelo de desarrollo para salir de la crisis. Esto quiere decir que tenemos que construir un proyecto propio desde los pueblos de América Latina.

Por ello hoy estamos en el proceso de construcción y reivindicación de la soberanía alimentaria desde y para los pueblos. Creemos en la necesidad de una producción autónoma, autogestionada y comunitaria, así como la distribución popular e igualitaria. Defendemos el derecho a alimentarnos sanamente, y por ello resistimos desde la defensa de las semillas y la producción agroecológica. Es imprescindible rescatar la memoria y el patrimonio para el saber identitario, desde la pluriculturalidad y desde la puesta en el centro del territorio como base de la identidad cultural. Asimismo, exigimos el diseño de políticas públicas que garanticen la soberanía alimentaria.

Creemos que en el proceso de devastación de nuestros recursos continentales, los pueblos originarios son los principales afectados. En ese sentido, exigimos políticas claras que vayan en el camino de la autodeterminación y soberanía de los pueblos originarios. Una de estas políticas es la generación de espacios nacionales de negociación colectiva en el marco del Convenio 169 de la OIT, así como la conformación de Paritarias Sociales por comunidad.

Reivindicamos la necesidad de construcción de una soberanía energética donde los pueblos podamos disponer libremente de nuestras fuentes de energía así como buscar los modos más convenientes para lograrlo. Vemos esta necesidad particularmente hoy en el caso paraguayo, donde se ha convertido en una causa nacional la recuperación de la soberanía energética sobre las represas de Ytaypu con Brasil y de Yacyreta con Argentina. Aquí reclamamos la revisión de las deudas binacionales y la posibilidad de que el pueblo paraguayo goce de libre disponibilidad y obtenga el precio justo sobre el 50% de la energía allí generada.

A su vez, impulsamos la creación del movimiento de víctimas de cambio climático y la instalación de los tribunales de los pueblos sobre justicia climática. Es central lograr el fortalecimiento de las legislaciones, pero fundamentalmente garantizar el funcionamiento de la justicia hacia las comunidades y territorios más vulnerables como afectados por el cambio climático y la deuda ecológicas. En el mismo sentido, exigimos la incorporación de políticas climáticas en las políticas públicas. Exigimos a los gobiernos del Mercosur que reclamen a los responsables del Norte el reconocimiento y pago de la deuda ecológica en todas las negociaciones internacionales. Y hacemos un llamado a la movilización global por la justicia climática en el marco de la reunión cumbre de Naciones Unidas sobre cambio climático en Copenhague.

También sabemos de la necesidad de construir soberanía financiera desde nuestros países, donde nos paremos en contra del pago de las deudas ilegítimas adquiridas a espaldas de nuestros pueblos. Tomamos el compromiso desde nuestros movimientos y organizaciones de realizar una Auditoría integral ciudadana de las deudas financieras, sociales y ecológicas generadas por la construcción y funcionamiento de Ytaypu y Yacyreta, y el reclamo a los gobiernos involucrados (Paraguay-Brasil-Argentina) de hacer lo mismo. Exigimos la restitución y reparación de las deudas ecológicas, sociales, económicas, etc. Asimismo, ahora más que nunca precisamos avanzar en la construcción de alternativas de soberanía financiera que respondan a las necesidades y los derechos de nuestros pueblos y la madre tierra. Al respecto, denunciamos la lentitud, la falta de diálogo y las trabas que siguen obstaculizando la creación del Banco del Sur. Reclamamos su inmediata puesta en funcionamiento, resguardando el principio de “un país-un voto” en todas sus instancias y niveles de decisión, y la necesidad de que esté al servicio de una integración desde los pueblos y para la transformación del modelo productivo vigente.

Exigimos que además se abran espacios y mecanismos formales de información y participación de la sociedad en la creación y funcionamiento del Banco del Sur. Llamamos a los movimientos y organizaciones sociales a multiplicar las acciones de sensibilización, debate y movilización acerca de la creación de este y otros instrumentos de una nueva arquitectura regional, como podrían ser una unidad de cuenta suramericana, como el sucre, y un sistema regional de reservas.

Apoyamos la decisión de los gobiernos de Bolivia y recientemente de Ecuador de salir del CIADI, mecanismo de solución de controversias sobre inversiones dependiente del Banco Mundial. Demandamos que los países de la región asuman igual compromiso, así como avancen en el rechazo de los Tratados Bilaterales de Inversión (TBI). Rechazamos cualquier forma de tratado comercial que violente la soberanía de los pueblos.

A su vez, repudiamos la represión constante y la criminalización de las luchas de campesinos y campesinas por obtener un pedazo de tierra. Esto sucede en todo el continente, pero se ve hoy con mayor crudeza en Paraguay. Estas represiones se volvieron sistemáticas y se realizan bajo el amparo de fiscales y jueces, que las hacen parecer legales. Exigimos el cese de las políticas de criminalización de la pobreza y de judicialización de la lucha social, así como la derogación de las llamadas leyes antiterroristas. Asimismo reclamamos el desprocesamiento de todos los luchadores y luchadoras sociales en toda América Latina.

Del mismo modo, rechazamos la militarización creciente del continente promovida por los Estados Unidos y sus aliados en la región y exigimos el retiro de la IV flota de Estados Unidos en el Atlántico; el fin de los ejercicios militares conjuntos con los Estados Unidos; el levantamiento de todas las bases y asentamientos militares extranjeros y la no instalación de nuevas bases; la eliminación de la fortaleza militar de la OTAN en Malvinas; la suspensión del envío de efectivos a la Escuela de las Américas u otros institutos similares; el fin de las misiones militares de Estados Unidos en nuestros países; la derogación de las inmunidades concedidas a los efectivos militares de las bases de Estados Unidos instaladas en nuestros países y castigar a los responsables de las violaciones sobre las poblaciones, particularmente a las mujeres.

También expresamos nuestro rechazo al golpe de estado perpetrado recientemente en Honduras y exigimos la inmediata restitución de Manuel Zelaya, legítimo presidente electo por este pueblo hermano. Apoyamos la lucha del pueblo hondureño por la institucionalidad democrática y el derecho a sostener al presidente que ellos mismos se han puesto. De la misma manera, repudiamos firmemente la violencia militar y policial ejercida contra este pueblo.

Alentamos la iniciativa del grupo del ALBA en convocar a sus asociados y hacer declaraciones de apoyo al gobierno de Zelaya. De la misma forma, los pueblos debemos esforzarnos de profundizar las diferentes alternativas de integración regionales que buscan enfrentar al sistema capitalista desde otro modelo. Del mismo modo, creemos que sería importante que los presidentes del Mercosur avancen en el mismo camino.

Es por todo esto que nosotros y nosotras hoy seguimos en el camino de la construcción de una integración latinoamericana desde los pueblos, fortaleciendo nuestra identidad regional. Sabemos que para ello debemos seguir en este proceso de lucha de nuestros pueblos para construir un nuevo sujeto que sea el protagonista de su historia y de su cultura.

Asunción, 23 y 24 de julio de 2009

Mensaje de la IV Cumbre de los Pueblos a la Cumbre de Gobiernos de las Américas

Statement issued at the end of joint Africa Trade Network (ATN) Southern African Peoples Solidarity Network (SAPSN) Pre-Cancun Strategy Conference, cheapest in Johannesburg 14-17 August 2003, purchase Resisting the WTO

1. From 14-17 August 2003, we activists from across Africa, representing African civil society organisations, labour unions and other social movements, gathered in Johannesburg, South Africa to evaluate the current state of negotiations in the World Trade Organisation (WTO), and to strategise and make known our positions on the 5th WTO Ministerial Conference due to be held in Cancun, Mexico from 10-14 September 2003.

2. Our stand on WTO’s role: We re-affirm our recognition of the WTO as a key instrument of transnational capital in its push for corporate globalisation. We noted the many destructive effects of WTO agreements on the lives of working people and the poor, especially women, in Africa and throughout the world. We renewed our determination to continue resisting corporate globalisation, and the WTO itself until it is replaced by a fully democratic institution.

3. The context of Cancun Meeting: We noted that the forthcoming WTO Ministerial meeting is taking place against a background of a crisis of credibility of neo-liberal policies and global capitalism, that have been deepened by the Enron and other corporate scandals exposing the duplicity and venality of the bosses of transnational capital. At the same time, the world is faced with the aggressive militarism of the United States under a political leadership whose illegal attack on Iraq under false pretences has shown that law and morality are no bar to what it will do to advance the interests of American capital. Across Africa and in other developing countries neo-liberal economic policies are putting basic services, such as health and education, beyond the reach of ordinary people and deepening unemployment, poverty and social inequality. We, however, take heart from the growing strength in the organised expression of all those around the world opposed to militarism and corporate globalisation.

4. Conclusions on the current state of affairs in WTO: After our deliberations on the WTO Doha agenda and related issues, we concluded as follows:

a. The WTO has ignored the continued and growing opposition by popular movements throughout the world to its policies and methods, such as the illegitimate ways by which the Doha Agenda was imposed on developing countries in the 4th Ministerial of the WTO.

b. The failure of the WTO to meet agreed deadlines in various negotiations – notably Agriculture, TRIPS and Public Health, Special and Differential Treatment and the many Implementation Issues is primarily due to the refusal of the Quad (USA, EU, Japan and Canada) to accept the legitimate demands of developing countries.

c. These failures are merely an aspect of the double standards the Quad countries apply in international trade issues; marked by one set of rules for themselves and another that they impose on developing countries, exposing the WTO as a thoroughly undemocratic institution.

d. We particularly condemn both the EU and the US for their role in resisting the fulfilment of the deadlines and undertakings on Agriculture, and their refusal to honour the compromise consensus on TRIPS and Public Health.

e. On the Singapore or New Issues (i.e. Investment, Competition, Government Procurement and Trade Facilitation) we reiterate our total opposition to their inclusion in the WTO, or the initiation of discussions on modalities with a view to the launch of negotiations on these in Cancun. We stand by our demand that these issues should be removed from the WTO’s agenda altogether.

f. It is clear that, as Cancun approaches, the Quad are accelerating the deployment of old and new undemocratic practices and pressures both in and outside the WTO so as to force their will on developing countries. In order to limit such illegitimate and underhand practices by the powerful, we endorse the campaign for internal transparency and participation in the WTO recently launched by many NGOs.

g. We note the opposition to the launch of negotiations on these issues expressed by African countries, especially the declaration by African Trade Ministers at the end of their meeting in Mauritius in June 2003. We also note a new initiative taken at the WTO on 13 August by a group of African countries to demand that the official WTO text that goes to Cancun includes proposals for improving the decision-making process in the WTO; as well as repeating their opposition to the new issues. We call on these countries to stand by these positions, as a matter of democratic principle, and also urge other African and developing countries to join them.

5. Call to Action: In the light of the above we have agreed and call on other African civil society organisations, labour unions and other social movements who share our views to join us to:

a. Mobilise the broadest possible sectors of African civil society to express their opposition to the continuing destructive role of the WTO in the lives of working people and the poor, and upon our countries’ development aspirations and prospects;

b. Mobilise and sustain strong political pressure on our governmental representatives, in ways best suited to the specific conditions in our countries, before and during the Cancun ministerial meeting; actively holding our governments accountable for the positions they take in the Cancun Ministerial meeting, and expose any attempt to betray the best interests of the African peoples;

c. Pressure institutions of government, and our legislatures, and relevant public officials in our various countries so as to ensure the defence of our peoples’ interests in the forthcoming Cancun ministerial meeting. Especially important are i) blocking the launch of negotiations on the Singapore issues and ii) rejecting any attempt by the Quad to manipulate developing countries into accepting negotiations on the Singapore Issues by linking these to issues of concern to developing countries;

d. Pressure our respective governments to endorse the two proposals tabled at the WTO by 11 African countries on 13 August 2003;

e. Be alert to, and therefore resist, the inevitable attempts by representatives of Quad countries and other governments who, between now and Cancun, will be visiting our national capitals under various guises, and contacting groups within our own countries to bully African governments to take positions detrimental to the African people on the issues on the Cancun agenda;

f. Launch an information dissemination campaign in our various countries to publicise what is happening in and around the WTO in the run up to and during the Cancun Ministerial meeting;

g. Mobilise a strong team of African activists to give voice to African perspectives in the activities of civil society organisations who will gather from around the world in Cancun;

h. Affirm our links with our partners in organisations of civil society outside Africa, including in the global North, to pressure their governments (especially of the Quad) in the interest of working people and the poor throughout the world, and in the interest of our planet;

i. Work together across Africa on the WTO, before and during Cancun, under the umbrella of the Africa Trade Network (ATN) to ensure common focus and strength in unity.

We issue this statement, and our call, as part of our commitment to the global movement against neo-liberalism and corporate globalisation, and the struggle for the establishment of alternative systems and institutions for all of humanity and the world.

Another Africa is possible!
Another world is possible!

THE ECONOMIC MODEL THAT IS IN CRISIS NEEDS URGENT CHANGE
NO MORE EXCLUSION, sale and NEOLIBERALISM, health “FREE TRADE” OR MILITARIZATION

MESSAGE FROM THE IV PEOPLES SUMMIT
TO THE PRESIDENTS GATHERED AT THE
V SUMMIT OF THE AMERICAS
Trinidad Tobago, April 18, 2009

As representatives from a wide diversity of trade union, farmer, indigenous, women’s, youth, consumer advocacy, human rights, environmental and, in general, social and civil organizations that are part of hemispheric networks such as the Hemispheric Social Alliance and united here at the IV Peoples’ Summit of the Americas in Trinidad and Tobago, we wish to transmit this message from the people we represent:

1)    The Summit of the Americas continues to be marked by exclusion and lack of democracy. First, we consider the continued exclusion of Cuba from hemispheric governmental forums to be inexplicable and unacceptable. No reason suffices to justify this exclusion, especially when nearly all countries of the hemisphere – the only exception being the U.S. – have diplomatic relations with this sovereign nation. We demand the full inclusion of Cuba in all hemispheric spaces in which it chooses to participate and, above all, an end to the illegitimate and unjust blockade that the United States has imposed on the island for decades. [This Summit represents an opportunity for President Obama to demonstrate whether or not he intends to truly change hemispheric relations that have been based on impositions]. For the majority of countries in the hemisphere, we also condemn the near complete lack of channels for democratic participation and consultation on decisions that are made in the official Summit, decisions which will affect the destinies of our nations. This exclusion is one of the reasons for which we are here meeting in the Peoples’ Summit. In this same vein, we want to raise the most energetic protest to the official treatment of our summit, which has included every conceivable obstacle, direct hostility and arbitrary actions that we have had to overcome to make the Summit possible. This has included detentions, deportations, interrogations, mistreatment, spying, denying us the use of facilities and retracting guarantees.

2)    In the face of the grave crisis shaking the world and our hemisphere in particular, which illustrates the failure of the so-called “free trade” model it is evident that the official Summit’s declaration is far from representing the indispensible and urgent change that current reality and hemispheric relations demand. We note with alarm that this ‘project’ chooses to ignore the significance of a crisis with such historic dimensions.  It is as if by doing this, one could ‘disappear’ the crisis. The official declaration covers with rhetoric, ambiguity, and meaningless good intentions its lack of an urgently needed turnaround in hemispheric policies.   What is worse, it insists on proposing solutions that are merely more of the same old policies, more of the medicine that has created the worst illness – in other words, more neoliberalism and free trade.  The declaration further ratifies support for antiquated institutions that contributed to the current debacle. Even if by omission, giving forums such as the G-20, which are illegitimate and exclusive, the power to determine so-called solutions to the crisis—such as “prescriptions” to dedicate more resources to the already repudiated IMF—is to maintain a vicious circle. Canceling the illegitimate debts of countries in the South, rather than condemning them to further indebtedness, is a solution that could actually provide countries the resources needed for development.

3)    The neoliberal model arose as a “solution” to previous crises, but it has only lead to an even worse crisis. The solution must not be more of the same. We, the social movements and organizations from the hemisphere, affirm that another solution to the crisis is possible and necessary. The solutions will not be found by reactivating the same economic model or establishing an even more perverse one.   The solution will not be found in continuing to convert everything – including life itself – into mere commodities. Instead, the solution must be one that puts ‘Living Well’ for all people above the profits of a few. It is not a question of resolving a financial crisis, but rather overcoming all of the dimensions of the crisis – which include the food, climate and energy crises. This requires guaranteeing the people’s food sovereignty, putting an end to the pillaging of the South’s natural resources, paying the ecological debt that is owed to the South and developing sustainable energy strategies. If the governments gathered in the official Summit refuse to explicitly address the urgent changes needed, they thereby renounce their right to receive support from their people.  We salute the fact that some presidents from the South are raising with dignity in the official event, alternatives which coincide with those which the people of the Americas are raising.

4)    We demand that in the short term, the working people of the hemisphere must not be made to bear the brunt of the crisis, which is what has been happening so far. Instead of dedicating billions of dollars to rescuing financial speculators and large corporations, that profited before the crisis, provoked the crisis, and then returned to the same behavior, we demand that the people be rescued. This is one way to strengthen our national economies and promote recovery directed towards real development that inverts the order of the beneficiaries, giving priority to the people.

5)    We also demand that the crisis not be used as a pretext to attack or reduce social rights that have been won. Rights do not have costs. On the contrary, the best solution to the crisis is to expand rights, making decent work, democratic freedoms, and human, economic, social and cultural rights a reality. To start with, the full rights of indigenous peoples must finally be recognized as well as womens’ rights.

6)    A just and sustainable solution to the crisis necessitates a complete reorganizing of hemispheric relations and a burial of the so-called “free trade” model. No more FTAs. It is necessary to replace the FTAs that have been proliferating throughout the region with a new model of agreements between nations based on equity, complementary arrangements, mutual benefit, cooperation and just trade. This model must protect the right to development, the right of nations to protect their goods, strategic resources and sovereignty. Processes of regional integration that are developed on these bases are also a strong lever for resolving the crisis and promoting alternative solutions. We especially call on the governments in countries of the South that have advanced these types of processes to deepen them, to not lose their autonomy and to not stray from this path. Perverse and hegemonic projects such as the FTAA should be buried forever. We ask governments in the region, namely the new United States administration headed by President Obama, to make explicit their position on the future of initiatives such as the one developed in the entrails of the Bush administration – Pathways to Prosperity in the Americas – that not only aims to revive the corpse of the FTAA, but also to subordinate the rest of the hemisphere to Washington’s policies and security forces. We hereby affirm that we, the people of the Americas, will not allow this to happen.

7)    Cooperation between nations must not, in any circumstance, include the militarization of our societies. The security policies of each country must not be subordinated to the interests of any power, nor should human rights and individual guarantees be restricted. We demand the closure of all military bases and the withdrawal of all troops and the U.S. IV Fleet from the waters and territories of Latin America and the Caribbean.  The future for our America demands an end, once and for all, to the colonial domination of Puerto Rico and all forms of colonialism in the Caribbean.

Presidents: listening to your people and acting in favor of their interests–not the profits of a small few—is the only true, lasting and sustainable solution to end the crisis and build another, more just America.

HEMISPHERIC SOCIAL ALLIANCE / IV PEOPLE’S SUMMIT OF THE AMERICAS

 


Es urgente cambiar las relaciones hemisfericas y el modelo economico en crisis:: NO MÁS EXCLUSIÓN, NEOLIBERALISMO, LIBRE COMERCIO Y MILITARIZACIÓN

MENSAJE DE LA IV CUMBRE DE LOS PUEBLOS A LA CUMBRE DE GOBIERNOS DE AMÉRICA

Trinidad y Tobago, 18 de abril del 2009

Las y los representantes de una gran diversidad de organizaciones sindicales, campesinas, indígenas, de mujeres, de jóvenes, de pobladores, de derechos humanos, del medio ambiente, en general de organizaciones sociales y civiles que integramos redes hemisféricas como la Alianza Social Continental y que nos encontramos reunidos en la IV Cumbre de los Pueblos de América también aquí, en Trinidad y Tobago, les hacemos llegar el mensaje de los pueblos que representamos:

1) La Cumbre de las Américas continúa estando marcada por la exclusión y la falta de democracia. En primer lugar, consideramos inexplicable e inaceptable que se continúe excluyendo a Cuba de los foros hemisféricos gubernamentales; no existe razón alguna que lo justifique, mucho menos cuando la totalidad de los países del continente, con la ya única excepción de EU, mantienen relaciones normales con esa nación soberana. Exigimos la inclusión plena de Cuba en todo espacio hemisférico en el que desee participar y, sobre todo, el fin del ilegitimo e injusto bloqueo impuesto por Estados Unidos contra la isla ya durante décadas. También condenamos la falta casi total en la mayoría de los países del hemisferio de vías de participación y consulta social democrática sobre las decisiones que se toman en la cumbre oficial y que afectan los destinos de nuestras naciones, exclusión que es una de las razones por las que nos encontramos aquí en la Cumbre de los Pueblos. Queremos en este sentido levantar la más enérgica protesta por todos los obstáculos, hostigamiento y arbitrariedades que ha debido enfrentar nuestra cumbre para su realización, entre ellas detenciones, deportaciones, interrogatorios, maltratos, vigilancia, falta de facilidades y garantías.

2) Ante la grave crisis que azota al mundo y en particular a nuestro hemisferio, que expresa también el fracaso del modelo del mal llamado “libre comercio”, resulta más evidente que el proyecto de declaración de la cumbre oficial está muy lejos de representar el indispensable y urgente cambio que la realidad actual y las relaciones hemisféricas reclaman. Notamos con alarma que tal proyecto opta por ignorar el significado de una crisis de dimensiones históricas, como si de esta manera pudiera desaparecerla. La declaración oficial cubre de retórica, de ambigüedad, de supuestas buenas intenciones sociales sin sustento concreto, la falta de un giro indispensable en la política hemisférica y, peor aún, de pasada insiste en dar como soluciones más de lo mismo, más de la medicina que se convirtió a su vez en la peor enfermedad, es decir, más neoliberalismo y libre comercio, además de ratificar el apoyo a instituciones anacrónicas que contribuyeron a la debacle actual. Así sea por omisión, dejar a espacios como el G-20, de por sí ilegitimo y excluyente, la determinación de una supuesta salida a la crisis, con “recetas” como el dar más recursos a través del repudiado FMI, es continuar en un circulo vicioso. Anular las deudas ilegitimas de los países del Sur, en lugar de volverlos a endeudar, es una salida que sí podría poner a disposición de los países recursos para el desarrollo.

3) De crisis anteriores surgió como “salida” el modelo neoliberal, que sólo condujo a una peor crisis. La salida de ésta no puede ser más de lo mismo. Los movimientos y organizaciones sociales del continente decimos que otra salida a la crisis es posible y necesaria, no aquella que reactive el mismo modelo económico o incluso uno aún mas perverso; no aquella que continúe mercantilizando todo, incluida la vida, sino aquella que posibilite avanzar en colocar el Buen Vivir para todos por encima de las ganancias de algunos. No se trata solo de resolver una crisis financiera, sino de superarla en todas sus dimensiones, que incluyen también las crisis alimentarias, climática y energética, garantizando la soberanía alimentaria de los pueblos, terminar con el saqueo de los recursos naturales del Sur y pagar la deuda ecológica que se tiene con ellos, y desarrollar estrategias energéticas sustentables. Si los gobiernos reunidos en la Cumbre oficial renuncian a abordar explícitamente los cambios urgentes que se necesitan, renuncian también a cualquier apoyo de sus pueblos. Saludamos desde ahora la posibilidad de que algunos presidentes del Sur manifiesten con dignidad en el evento oficial alternativas coincidentes con las levantadas por los pueblos de América.

4) Exigimos que en lo inmediato la crisis no signifique como siempre el cargar sus costos sobre los hombros del pueblo trabajador del continente, como ya se está haciendo. Exigimos que, en lugar de dedicar miles de millones de dólares al rescate de los especuladores financieros y las grandes corporaciones que se beneficiaron antes y provocaron la crisis, para luego volver a lo mismo, se rescate a los pueblos, porque además de esa manera puede potenciarse las economías nacionales y propiciar una recuperación dirigida a un desarrollo verdadero que invierta el orden de los beneficiarios, dando prioridad a los seres humanos.

5) Demandamos igualmente que la crisis no se convierta en un pretexto para atacar o reducir los derechos sociales conquistados. Los derechos no cuestan. Por el contrario, la mejor salida a la crisis es ampliar los derechos, hacer realidad el Trabajo Decente, las libertades democráticas, los Derechos Humanos, Económicos, Sociales y Culturales, comenzando por reconocer por fin el respeto pleno de los derechos colectivos de los pueblos originarios, y los derechos de más de la mitad de la humanidad, los de las mujeres.

6) Una salida justa y sustentable a la crisis pasa necesariamente por replantear en su totalidad las relaciones hemisféricas y enterrar el modelo del mal llamado libre comercio. No más TLC’S. Es necesario remplazar los TLC’S que han venido proliferando por un nuevo modelo de acuerdos entre naciones basado en la equidad, la complementariedad, el beneficio reciproco, la cooperación y el comercio justo, y que preserve el derecho al desarrollo, el derecho de las naciones a proteger sus bienes y recursos estratégicos y su soberanía. Procesos de integración regionales que se desarrollen sobre estas bases son también una palanca poderosa para enfrentar la crisis y promover otra salida; llamamos en particular a los gobiernos de países del Sur que han avanzado en procesos de esta naturaleza a profundizarlos, a no perder autonomía y a no apartarse de este camino. Proyectos perversos y hegemonistas como el ALCA deben ser enterrados para siempre. Emplazamos a los gobiernos de la región, y en particular a la nueva administración de Estados Unidos encabezada por el presidente Obama a que hagan explícita su postura sobre el futuro de iniciativas como la prohijada en los estertores de la administración Bush llamada Caminos para la Prosperidad en las Américas, que no solo pretende revivir el cadáver del ALCA sino extender la subordinación del continente a las políticas y fuerzas de seguridad de Washington. Desde ya decimos que los pueblos de América no lo permitiremos.

7) La cooperación entre las naciones no puede incluir la militarización de nuestras sociedades con pretexto alguno, ni la subordinación de las políticas de seguridad de cada país a los intereses de potencia alguna, o mucho menos la restricción de los derechos humanos y las garantías individuales. Exigimos el cierre de todas las bases militares, la salida de las tropas y la retirada de la IV Flota de Estados Unidos de aguas y territorios de América Latina y el Caribe. Cualquier futuro justo para las Américas implica acabar con toda forma de colonialismo en el Caribe y el continente, empezando por terminar con la dominación colonial sobre Puerto Rico.

Sras. y Sres presidentes: escuchar a sus pueblos y actuar en función de sus intereses y no de las ganancias de unos cuantos es la única salida real a la crisis, duradera, sustentable y hacia otra América más justa.

ALIANZA SOCIAL CONTINENTAL / IV CUMBRE DE LOS PUEBLOS DE AMÉRICA

La integración regional, una oportunidad frente a la crisis

Nosotros, representantes de movimientos sociales, sindicales y de organizaciones de la sociedad civil de América Latina, África, Asia y Europa, reunidos en Asunción para discutir la vital importancia de las respuestas regionales a la crisis global actual, instamos a los Jefes de Estado reunidos en Asunción para la Cumbre del Mercosur a tomar una decisión contundente de avanzar en la implementación de modalidades para la cooperación orientada a un verdadero desarrollo al servicio de los pueblos de nuestras regiones.
Estas nuevas modalidades deben, en primer lugar, revisar de manera fundamental los términos injustos del acuerdo de Itaipu firmados décadas atrás por gobiernos dictatoriales de Brasil y Paraguay. La energía es el principal recurso del Paraguay para diseñar un desarrollo sustentable que responda a la necesidad de mejoramiento de la calidad de vida de su pueblo. Los movimientos sociales y el gobierno de Paraguay han demandado el derecho soberano de su país, traducido en la libre disponibilidad y el precio justo, sobre el 50% de la energía producida en Itaipu y Yacyreta, y la revisión de la deuda contraída para la construcción de estas represas. Consideramos estas demandas como justas.
Sobre la base de esta caso altamente significativo y con el objetivo de asegurar que este tipo de mega-proyectos, basados en relaciones de poder desiguales entre países vecinos, no sean en el futuro replicados en ninguna de nuestras respectivas regiones, llamamos a la creación urgente de marcos regionales elaborados conjuntamente y basados en principios de equidad que regulen este tipo de proyectos conjuntos. Estos, en vez, deben incluir el involucramiento activo y los aportes de las fuerzas sociales y de trabajadores organizadas de todas las respectivas regiones.
Fue en este espíritu de cooperación que la conferencia incluyo la participación de parlamentarios de varios países de las distintas regiones, y el dialogo directo con representantes gubernamentales del Mercosur. Algunos de los temas claves que se discutieron incluyeron: :
* La urgente necesidad que los gobiernos creen instrumentos financieros regionales tales como Bancos regionales de desarrollo para defender sus economías y sus pueblos de los efectos destructivos del capitalismo globalizado neoliberal.
* El reconocimiento de que la integración regional debe estar basada en principios de solidaridad y programas de complementariedad que reconozcan las asimetrías en términos de tamaños, recursos, y niveles de desarrollo de los países participantes para transformar el modelo de desarrollo hacia un sistema productivo mas balanceado y sostenible entre todos los países, localidades y pueblos.
* En este contexto, la estratégica importancia de tomar una posición firme y activa para revertir el golpe de estado en Honduras y la restauración del gobierno legalmente elegido, desplazado por las fuerzas anti-democráticas que actuaron no solo en contra del Gobierno de Zelaya sino también con el objetivo de revertir las tendencias progresistas en la región buscando mantener el sistema de acumulación del capital, favoreciendo los intereses de las transnacionales de Estados Unidos y la Unión Europea.
* La imperativa urgencia de encontrar modalidades y medios de hacer efectiva la participación de los movimientos sociales, comunidades, trabajadores y trabajadoras para avanzar estrategias de integración regional, en una perspectiva holística, sustentable y de verdadera soberanía desde los pueblos.
Vemos este momento como una coyuntura histórica para el mundo cuando la crisis ha expuesto el funcionamiento fundamentalmente inestable y los efectos peligrosos del sistema capitalista global. Es también una oportunidad para desafiar el régimen económico-político global dominante y para avanzar alternativas enfocadas en las necesidades de los pueblos y la preservación del medio ambiente. Tenemos confianza que los pueblos de América Latina y algunos de sus gobiernos jugaran un papel significativo en la formulación y evolución de alternativas regionales, junto con todas las regiones y pueblos del mundo, que respondan a los intereses de nuestro planeta y nuestro futuro común.

Third World Network-Africa, sickness Volume 3 Number 1 May 2009

>Download PDF

Content
– FALL-OUT FROM EPA NEGOTIATIONS: Africa on the brink of
disintergration // pages 1-4
– UNCTAD PUBLIC SYPOSIUM: Regionalism – the south’s exit
strategy from global crises // pages 4-6
– EPA Negiations-Regional State of Play // pages 6-9
– Advocacy File // pages 9-11
– Dateline Africa // pages 12-13
– Global Round-Up // pages 13-15
– Notice Board
page 15

Third World Network-Africa, sovaldi seek Volume 3 Number 1 May 2009

>Download PDF

Hemispheric Social Alliance

March 2009

The crisis as a unique opportunity

The current economic crisis is systemic in nature and marks the demise of the neoliberal model of development and globalization. It is imperative that we build concrete alternatives to this model, until recently, had been artificially sustained by a bubble of multiple speculative operations. We must also reflect on the fact that this pattern of functioning of the world economy in general, and of the financial system in particular, has come to an end. In this context, Latin American countries have before them a historical opportunity for advancing towards a just and sustainable model of development for the region.

When proposing solutions to the crisis, we have the advantage of not having to confront the model while in its full force, as it has obviously reached its limits. Indeed, this is where opportunity lies, as such a broad space for proposing and constructing alternatives was not as visible a short while ago, nor was it expected to appear – especially in the world of “laissez faire – laissez passer”, of the dominant neoliberal “pensée unique” and “the end of history”.

The current crisis exposes the failure of a system full of promises, yet incapable of fulfilling them. The women and men excluded by capital’s policies have lost faith in the “free trade” myth and the current hegemonic model of production and management of natural and energy resources.

Why regional integration is a solution

Regional integration appears today as an alternative that will enable countries in the region to overcome the global economic crisis by creating dynamic economic relations and ties of solidarity among themselves.

– The global market crisis and the limits of domestic markets

The global markets have suffered a collapse and lost their capacity to generate dynamism for the economies in the region, which, in recent years, had gaily navigated the waves created by spectacular increases in food and livestock, mineral and energy commodity prices. The impacts of the crisis are already becoming visible in our countries, demonstrating that the improvements in some macroeconomic indicators, which had been achieved through this type of insertion into the world economy, have not been sufficient to produce structural changes to the development model. That is, the model has not become one of increased sectoral homogeneity, with a dynamic internal market based on the consumption of those at the “bottom of the pyramid”; diversified exports in terms of both products and trading partners; improved job and product quality; and greater social and environmental justice.

There is no guarantee that the economic situation after the crisis will be one of great liquidity of capital and credit, as there was in recent years. Therefore, national governments must face the dilemma of either waiting for the global crisis to pass and when it does, try to slowly recuperate the dynamism in sales of traditional export products on the international market, knowing that the chances of this happening are low; or pursuing limited nationalist solutions that are constrained by the lack of resources and markets most countries in the region face when acting alone.

– Energy, food and water for all

Latin America – as a region – has abundant water, environmental, social, cultural, mineral and energy resources, as well as considerable technological development capacities. Its chances of attaining food, water and energy sovereignty are greater than other regions of the planet. There are public and private enterprises that own infrastructure and could be brought into the regional integration process. Finally, there are governments and social movements in the region that share a reasonable level of political solidarity with regards to the integration process.

When faced with the dilemma posed by the current crisis, then, regional integration appears as a viable and important alternative, as a possibility of moving towards a new development model that is more sustainable and just than the one that has been implanted in our countries until now.

Regional integration, as conceived by the people in the region, offers greater opportunities for our countries. It proposes that the principle of solidarity replace savage competition and the free market, which – as we well know and the crisis has clearly demonstrated – lead neither to balance nor justice, as some theorists claimed it would. The peoples1’ integration would be founded on the principles of complementarity and solidarity and would focus on attaining more socially and economically equitable and just societies. The ultimate objective would be to ensure that system works to benefit all men and women in a holistic manner.

Non-traditional experiences in integration, like the ALBA (Alternativa Bolivariana para las Américas or Bolivarian Alternative for the Americas, in English), show that complementarity and solidarity between our countries can satisfy the needs of our population in a much more rational and efficient way than intra-regional competition, free trade or having the market act as the system’s only regulatory mechanism.

Processes of integration in the region and the dispute for a popular and sustainable integration model

While looking at the various integration processes in the Americas, one can say that, on the bright side, they have evolved slowly – so slow that they appearing to be paralysed. One cannot deny that some progressive measures have been taken in Mercosur: for example, the incorporation of concerns about the existing asymmetries within the block and incipient efforts to create funds for addressing this problem. The same can be said for changes in political institutions and the advances in the Union of South American Nations, or UNASUR (its abbreviation in Spanish). However, in more concrete terms, the processes’ potential to improve the quality of living of the peoples and workers in our region is far from becoming reality.

On the down side, one can observe the subjugation of these processes to neoliberal thought through the adoption of the “open regionalism” model. The application of this model has left grave marks on the Andean Community (CAN), Central America and the Caribbean. Encouraged by the promotion of indiscriminate competition – both within and between trading blocks – and the signing of bilateral free trade agreements with Europe and the United States, open regionalism has reduced integration to its commercial aspects (trade), thereby eroding possibilities to develop the other dimensions of integration. Nothing indicates that this type of integration has benefitted the societies of these countries.

In other words, when one observes the lengthy experience of regional integration processes in the Americas – some having lasted for over 40 years – and takes into consideration the path they have followed until now, it is not clear that regional integration could potentially benefit our people. What is evident, though, is that the rhetoric of political commitment to integration has often been confronted, in practice, with the adoption of solutions that give priority to national political or economic interests. Collective actions and solutions are relegated to a secondary plane, as governments have been unwilling to assume the so-called short-term “costs” of integration.

To overcome the political dimension of this problem, the pursuit of the consolidation of national sovereignty must be understood within the framework of a common commitment to deepening democracy and the autonomy of the region; an example of this is UNASUR’s recent intervention in conflicts in Bolivia. In this sense, consistent and sustained commitment of governments to the integration processes is fundamental. Such a commitment must be expressed through the building of solid institutions that function according to policies and common actions developed while truly exercising shared and genuine sovereignty.

It is undeniable that what has made an alternative form of integration possible and feasible is the fact that in many countries, the State has recuperated its ability to promote productive and social development or has made significant progress in this area. This is why we must insist that the alternative model of integration we pursue is not incompatible, but rather complementary to the defence of and advances in national sovereignty. This does not imply defending strict nationalism, but rather a possible path towards integration between nations – nations that are not simply victims of imperialist plans, but rather sovereign nations with national development projects. These projects must be articulated on a regional level.

Latin America, the new geopolitical situation and the construction of a new regionally based model of development

Regional integration can play a key role in this new historical context, especially when we consider two fundamental strategic perspectives that have widened in recent years:

– Countries in the region want to define their own role in the multi-polar world that is emerging, in spite of the growing difficulties caused by the U.S. government’s unilateralism. They are unable to assume this role on their own,

  • – No single country, not even the most powerful ones, acting isolatedly will be able to implement dynamics that differ from those driven by the globalized world market. In other words, to be “post-neoliberal”, national development processes must be linked to regional integration.
  • – However, to move forward in this direction, the integration process must be seen as part of a transition towards an alternative model of production and consumption that overcomes the limits of the current development model.

The crisis and the limits it imposes on the possibility of maintaining the status quo should compel us to overcome existing weaknesses and to develop the new dynamism that institutional developments must promote. These efforts must be linked to the need to respond to the crisis with an autonomous and alternative development project for the region – that is, one that has been emancipated from the interests of current world powers.

Defining the path that will lead us to the type of regional integration we propose:

  • A regionally organized and regulated production strategy
    First and foremost, this strategy must be radically different from providing support for major companies that are seeking to acquire at the regional level the strength they need to compete in the global market. This type of integration only results in increasing capital’s mobility and profits. This strategy has been promoted in the region for over a decade, through proposals such as the Free Trade Agreement of the Americas (FTAA) and the Initiative for the Integration of Regional Infrastructure in South America (IIRSA), as well as the push for progressive liberalization during negotiations at the World Trade Organization (WTO). These companies will soon attempt to reactivate this process, which could advance freely and rapidly if it is not confronted by an integration project based on solidarity that serves as a political and economic counterproposal. This is not, however, the kind of integration we want.



    To construct regional integration as an alternative to the crisis, we must focus our attention on two essential elements. First, one important task for the on-going process of building alternative regional institutions should be the regulation of these companies’ operations at the regional level, taking into account social, cultural, environmental and other interests. Second, it is fundamental that the production chains in the region be restructured according to a new scale of the companies’ operations at the regional level. This must be done in a way that ensures that their expansion is not seen as an attempt to reaffirm hegemonies and the power of some countries over others, but rather as one possible way of generating economic dynamism, employment and wealth for the entire region.

  • Overcoming asymmetries as a short-, medium- and long-term objective
    One of the priorities of the integration process should be to overcome asymmetries between countries and within the countries of the region, creating integrated production systems as well as production, service and trade circuits in which everyone may become integrated. The fundamental objective would be to use this process to generate dynamic development opportunities for regions and countries that are currently experiencing difficulties or suffering from stagnation. Given the historical accumulation of fragilities of entire regions and countries in Latin America, we should first adopt specific policies that seek to compensate existing asymmetries in the short run, namely in the area of social development, in a way that reduces the differences and, at the same time, allows these regions to develop their ability to take advantage of dynamic opportunities in the process.
  • Regional technical and cultural production
    Incentives could and should be provided for important elements, due to their capacity to propel the regional development process and to increase the visibility and popularity of our alternatives. They also have potential to generate dynamism and to contribute to finding solutions for specific problems in the region.



    One such element is the integration of centres of technological development and cultural production/broadcasting in the region. In several countries, there already exist centres for technological development (specialized or generic) in various fields ranging from agriculture and livestock to the aeronautic and pharmaceutical industries, among others. There is no reason not to integrate these centres. We should do so in order to take advantage of their synergies and use the resources generated in the region for the benefit of all of Latin America. The same can be said for the region’s enormous potential in audiovisual production and sports, and its even greater potential for development, which only the creation of a new scale of consumption derived from an expanded regional market could provide.

    Furthermore, this proposal must be defended during negotiations in the WTO and with other trading blocks (like the EU) on “Rules of Origin”. The major powers specifically use these rules to stop small countries and emerging economies from coordinating their productive activities with the goal of exporting to markets outside of the region.

  • Small and medium enterprises as a priority
    Another element is providing general or sector-based incentives for the development of small and medium enterprises (SMEs). SMEs could be stimulated by the integrated development of regional markets. They could also operate in a range of fields – from software development to tourism (e.g. a network small hostels or hotels) – and take advantage of the region’s diversity in cultures and environments. Small and medium enterprises offer real potential in terms of job creation. Moreover, by linking them to the regional integration process – that is, one that truly supports development – they could lend significant social legitimacy to the process.
  • Regional food sovereignty and support for family farming in small and medium production units
    The viability of certain local and regional items produced by family and peasant farmers is compromised by the limits of consumption in these regions and in some countries. Therefore, the creation of a regional market could help to guarantee the viability of a more diversified production of agricultural products. This production must differ from the homogeneity of the products and productive processes that are typical of agribusiness, with its highly concentrated and transnationalized commercialization structure and technological packages. The distribution of these products could also gain momentum and promote regional gastronomy, gastronomic tourism and other activities that could generate economic dynamism and foster cultural integration.
  • Facilitate intra-regional public transportation with the people as a priority
    Integrating the region’s transportation infrastructure is another fundamental element that would contribute to the regional integration process. It must take advantage of the diversity of existing modes of transportation and take into account local solutions for addressing environmental and climate issues. It must also consider regional perspectives for technological production and development and the possibility of creating regional public enterprises. Here, we need to think big, as problems in long-distance transportation cannot be resolved by building more highways. Why not think of reactivating and integrating local and regional railway systems? Why not think of integrating sea and river transportation by taking advantage of what already exists? Why not think of creating a regional airline company that makes the integration of a network of medium-size cities in the region feasibly by using small- and medium-size planes that the aeronautic industry in the region already has the potential to produce.. We are not talking about an abstract problem, but rather one that every Latin American who has attempted to travel or transport cargo within the region has faced. It is important that we consider the impact of these processes in each country. We must also reaffirm strong support for the improvement of public transportation in urban centres, as a way to discourage the use of individual means of transport that have impacts on the demand for energy.
  • Regional financial integration
    The debate about the Banco del Sur brought to light the political challenges and different perspectives that exist in various countries. But it also showed the enormous potential and the need to develop a regional financial system that could simultaneously regulate finances on the regional level and protect economies in the region and the regional economy from external shocks. It should also create one or more mechanisms for fostering regional development and allow for a dynamic process of exchange between the Latin American economies, which does not mean sanctioning, through the use of currency, the power of the central capitalist economies. In other words, it should allow for the creation of a regional currency or a system in which a common unit of reference (that does not necessarily aim to make a common currency feasible) would be used in the region. Rather than acting as restrictions, the difficulties and financial turbulence should serve as a motive for intensifying discussion on and actions aimed at moving forward with the process of regional regulation and financial development.
  • Regional energy solidarity and complementarity
    Difficulties in regulating potential energy generation through regional agreements should have led to the consolidation of a regional public entity that regulates and promotes an integrated energy system. Moving beyond limited national interests, efforts to render energy generation feasible at the regional level must promote the use of all alternative sources, so that production methods are the least harmful as possible to the environment while, at the same time, ensure the satisfaction of a new pattern of production and consumption that will be established by an alternative regional development process. Reducing distances between producers and consumers to decrease the amount of energy used to transport products could be one of the many initiatives that would help to consolidate a new energy model. Fundamentally, this new model must be based on the premise of energy sovereignty and solidarity, on striving for increased efficiency and the diversification of energy sources, namely renewable ones.
  • A new model for participation and transparency
    Political and social sectors in favour of deepening Latin American integration processes must come together to reflect on what the appropriate mechanisms for civil participation are. We must avoid reproducing the logic inherited from the 1990s. In this sense, in order to promote the consolidation of democracy, mechanisms of social participation must be effective channels of dialogue and for advancing proposals through which througsocial movements and organized civil society (made up of diverse political actors, including members of political parties and parliament) may express their needs and views on sensitive issues. For example, in the case of productive or infrastructure projects that have different kinds of territorial and environmental impacts, we need to develop a methodology that guarantees real participation in the decision-making process. This methodology must go beyond the logic of “presenting environmental impact studies”, which capital has learned to manipulate for its benefit. It must guarantee that the decisions made take into account the collective interests of those directly affected by the projects, social license (as foreseen by the U.N. International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, ESCR, art.1, paragraph 2.), the redistribution of the project’s benefits and its concrete contributions in terms of reducing poverty.

Constructing integration for and by the Peoples

The essence and the motor of a new regional development model must be: the integration of millions of Latin American women and men into a new system of consumption and production that generates wealth and employment, allows for the expansion of the market in the region, builds an alternative development process and strives to drastically reduce all kinds of inequalities that exist among the people in the region.

In the same way we have already stated that we must overcome asymmetries between countries and within countries in the region, we must also assume a commitment to reducing social inequalities between the peoples and within the peoples. Here, we, the social movements, are proposing the transformation – of the socioeconomic development model – by transforming ourselves; that is to say – we conceive the integration of diverse social subjects within our peoples as the starting point for the integration of the peoples. As such, the integration of the peoples – of our nations – must not only be “based on the political transformation for the peoples”, but also based on the social transformation of the people. We conceive this process as an opportunity to advance in the transition towards another model of production and consumption, which requires new forms of organizing social, community and labour relations.

Transforming weakness into strength, needs into potential for development, inequalities to be overcome into possibilities for transformation and technological development, respect for cultural differences into the driving force of the regional integration process, even in economic terms. This is to be the engine of an alternative we can build so that – far beyond the haziness and the turbulence of the current economic crisis – we may see our real potential for creating a different and better world in Latin America and the Caribbean. We can then integrate this new world with other regions that must also take advantage of and develop their own possibilities.

Today, we, the social movements, when addressing the current global crisis or the combination of specific crises, have the historical opportunity of contributing towards what could be the beginning of the final stage of an exhausted system, which has been backed into a corner. We must go beyond merely responding to the crisis, caused by the inherent contradictions of the system itself, and move towards a real confrontation between the included and the excluded. This will only be possible if we are able to build an alternative productive matrix that allows us to live well and enjoy the good life.


Edgardo Lander

No hay nada en la idea de integración que en sí mismo podamos considerar como favorable para el futuro de los pueblos del continente. No basta con que sea una integración latinoamericana o sudamericana para que corresponda a los intereses populares. Todo depende del modelo de integración en cuestión. ¿Quiénes lo impulsan? ¿Para qué? ¿Para quién? ¿En función de qué intereses y de que valores se diseña? Dependiendo de la respuesta a estas interrogantes,la integración puede afianzar las relaciones de dominación actualmente hegemónicas, physician o puede contribuir a abrir rendijas para socavarlas.

¿Un proyecto de integración orientado a abrir aún más estas economías para someterlas a los dictados de los dueños del capital? ¿O una integración defensiva que tenga como meta conquistar espacios de autonomía y soberanía para definir políticas públicas y opciones económicas propias? En otras palabras, treat ¿una integración que contribuya a desdibujar aún más los espacios y territorios del ejercicio de la soberanía democrática de los pueblos, o una integración orientada a recuperar lo que siglos de colonialismo y políticas imperiales le han arrebatado y continúan arrebatando a los pueblos del continente?

¿Una integración orientada por los valores del individualismo posesivo, de la competencia de todos contra todos, en la cual se garantice el éxito de los más fuertes sobre la base de la explotación y exclusión de los más débiles, esto es, una integración que acentúe las inaceptables desigualdades actuales? ¿O una integración guiada por los valores de la igualdad, de la participación, la pluralidad, la solidaridad, la comunidad, una integración que reconozca, valore y haga posible el despliegue de la extraordinaria variedad de modos de vida de los pueblos de nuestro continente?

¿Una integración que sin límite alguno explote los recursos naturales, convirtiéndolos en mercancías exportables para generar los excedentes requeridos para pagar la deuda externa? ¿O una integración que se oriente a la recuperación y construcción de otras formas de ser los humanos parte de la naturaleza, que no la considere como un enemigo a ser sometido, controlado, explotado y por ende destruido?

¿Una integración pensada como área de libre comercio, concebida principalmente como la construcción de un espacio económico de libre circulación de mercancías y capitales? ¿O una integración geopolítica concebida como parte de los procesos de resistencia al orden global que busca imponer la política unilateral e imperial del capital transnacional y del gobierno de los Estados Unidos? El ALCA

El principal proyecto estratégico del gobierno de Estados Unidos hacia el continente americano en su conjunto durante los últimos diez años ha sido el ALCA o Área de Libre Comercio de las Américas. Mediante este acuerdo de alcance continental, Estados Unidos y sus empresas han buscado consolidar, profundizar y hacer irreversibles las políticas de ajuste estructural de las últimas décadas, pretendiendo establecer de una vez por todas la prioridad absoluta de los derechos del capital sobre los derechos de la gente.

Mediante la constitucionalización del orden neoliberal en un pacto supranacional de obligatorio cumplimento, se aspira a acotar drásticamente los ámbitos de la soberanía y del ejercicio de la democracia y la regulación social, concebidas todas como trabas ilegítimas al pleno y libre despliegue y movimiento del capital.

Hasta hace poco más de dos años, las negociaciones avanzaban en forma aparentemente indetenible. Gobiernos sumisos en todo el continente negociaban textos secretos a espaldas de sus pueblos, y parecía inevitable que para la fecha prevista, esto es, para finales del año 2004, se concluyeran la negociación y revisión del texto de manera que este pudiese ser ratificado en 2005. Sin embargo, a partir del año 2002 las cosas comenzaron a cambiar.

Los movimientos y organizaciones sociales de la resistencia al ALCA, especialmente mediante su articulación en la Alianza Social Continental, lograron sacar el debate del ámbito acotado de una negociación entre expertos en comercio internacional para colocarla en el terreno del debate y la movilización pública.

Organizaciones sindicales, indígenas, ecologistas, campesinas, de mujeres y académicas en todo el continente logran converger en una resistencia crecientemente organizada y capaz de grandes movilizaciones. Cada una de las principales reuniones de los negociadores del acuerdo pasó a estar acompañada de masivas protestas (Québec, Buenos Aires, Quito, Miami). Los cambios políticos representados por la elección de Chávez, Lula y Kirchner introdujeron perspectivas y posturas negociadoras no previstas.

En la reunión del Comité de Negociaciones Comerciales (CNC) celebrada en San Salvador en julio de 2003 se reconoce por primera vez, en la propia mesa de negociaciones, que estas están severamente estancadas. Se realizaron sucesivos intentos de salvar el acuerdo mediante un tratado más diluido (Alca light) o por la vía de un ALCA de dos niveles que permitiese a los gobiernos más comprometidos con el modelo de libre comercio preservar el contenido del proyecto original, facultando a otros gobiernos el asumir compromisos menores. Buscando destrancar las negociaciones, los Estados Unidos convocaron sucesivas “reuniones informales” entre diferentes grupos de países.

Persistieron los desacuerdos. Finalmente, en contra de todos los pronósticos, lo que no parecía posible es hoy un hecho. La resistencia continental ha derrotado al ALCA, quizás definitivamente. Desde comienzos del año 2003 no se ha llevado a cabo ninguna reunión formal. De hecho, aunque esto no se admita públicamente, las negociaciones han sido pospuestas en forma indefinida [1].

Diversas organizaciones del continente han sugerido que el 1 de enero de 2005, fecha en que se suponía que estuviese listo el acuerdo, sea celebrado como el día del triunfo de los movimientos populares de las Américas contra el ALCA. En estos tiempos neoliberales no son muchas las victorias populares: hay que celebrarlas. Los Tratados de Libre Comercio (TLCs)

El descarrilamiento del ALCA representa sin duda una victoria para la resistencia al proyecto imperial de libre comercio. Sin embargo, la agenda estratégica del gobierno de Estados Unidos hacia el continente no ha sido derrotada: avanza por otras vías. Dado que las dificultades en las negociaciones del ALCA las enfrentaba principalmente con tres países -Brasil, Argentina y Venezuela- el gobierno de Estados Unidos optó por continuar negociaciones vía TLCs con prácticamente todos los demás países. Negoció y firmó un TLC con Chile, concluyó las negociaciones con Centroamérica, y está en lo que se supone que es la fase final de las negociaciones con Colombia, Ecuador y Perú.

Dado el fraccionamiento de la resistencia y las posturas más amigables (tanto al libre comercio como al gobierno de Estados Unidos) de los gobiernos en cuestión, en estos acuerdos se radicaliza la agenda neoliberal. No sólo se va más allá de los acuerdos de la Organización Mundial de Comercio (OMC), sino incluso de lo previsto en los borradores del ALCA. La extraordinaria disparidad entre las partes de estas negociaciones queda ilustrada en el contenido, por ejemplo, de los capítulos sobre propiedad intelectual y agricultura del TLC andino, acuerdos que de aprobarse en su versión actual tendrían impactos catastróficos sobre la salud y la alimentación de los pueblos.

Estados Unidos ha exigido el patentamiento de plantas y animales (¡definidos como inventos!), así como de procedimientos diagnósticos, terapéuticos y quirúrgicos. Reafirmando una vez más que considera más importante las ganancias de sus transnacionales farmacéuticas que la salud pública, además de diversas medidas destinadas a impedir la utilización de medicamentes genéricos exige que se deje sin efecto la Declaración Relativa al Acuerdo sobre ADPIC [2] de Doha (2001), que autoriza cierta flexibilidad en la interpretación de los derechos de propiedad intelectual de los medicamentos y permite a los países miembros de la OMC “proteger la salud pública y, en particular, promover el acceso a los medicamentos para todos”.

En las negociaciones sobre agricultura Estados Unidos exige la eliminación de todos los instrumentos de protección y fomento agrícola utilizados por los países andinos (bandas de precios, cuotas de importación, etc.), a la vez que se niega en forma categórica a siquiera discutir sus opulentos subsidios agrícolas. Esta combinación no puede conducir sino a la devastación de la agricultura andina, a socavar las condiciones de la seguridad alimentaria y a la expulsión de millones de personas del campo.

A pesar de la firme oposición popular y de las masivas movilizaciones de organizaciones sociales y políticas centroamericanas y andinas [3], no ha sido posible hasta el momento frenar estas negociaciones.

MERCOSUR y la Comunidad Andina de Naciones

¿Constituyen hoy el MERCOSUR o la Comunidad Andina de Naciones (CAN) alternativas a este modelo de integración y desarrollo? La integración no puede pensarse como algo diferente a los proyectos nacionales, diferente a las sociedades que se prefiguran al interior de cada Estado-nación. Los proyectos de integración del continente dependen de los procesos políticos, de las estructuras productivas, de las correlaciones de fuerza existentes tanto global y regionalmente como al interior de cada uno de los países participantes.

Los actuales proyectos y prácticas de integración en América Latina se dan con estructuras productivas y condiciones políticas e ideológicas muy diferentes a las existentes cuando se debatía la integración latinoamericana en los ‘60 y ‘70. Como resultado de las dictaduras militares y de la aplicación sistemática de las políticas neoliberales de ajuste estructural, estas sociedades han cambiado profundamente tanto en su estructura productiva como en su tejido social. Como consecuencia de la represión, la desindustrialización y las reformas laborales, el movimiento sindical se encuentra extraordinariamente reducido y debilitado, y la mayor parte de los nuevos empleos se crean en el llamado sector informal.

El peso de empresarios cuya producción se orientaba prioritariamente al mercado interno ha igualmente declinado. La propiedad de la tierra se encuentra aún más concentrada que hace tres décadas. Los sectores más dinámicos de las economías del continente -los que tienen igualmente hoy mayor incidencia política, mayor capacidad de tener impacto sobre las políticas públicas- son los sectores triunfantes de estas transformaciones económicas. Son principalmente los grupos financieros, los de los servicios -como las telecomunicaciones- y los exportadores de productos primarios: en el caso del Cono Sur, principalmente el sector agroindustrial.

Estos sectores están controlados o asociados estrechamente con el capital transnacional, sus beneficios dependen de la apertura económica, de la desregulación, de las privatizaciones y del acceso a los mercados internacionales. Constituyen las fuerzas dinámicas internas detrás de las políticas del libre comercio.

El sentido común neoliberal hoy hegemónico, y los intereses de estos sectores que resultaron beneficiados de las transformaciones políticas y de la estructura económica producidas en las últimas tres décadas, condicionan las orientaciones básicas de los proyectos de integración que hoy operan y se negocian en todo el continente. Es posible constatar incluso que la razón fundamental por la cual los gobiernos de Brasil y Argentina pusieron una resistencia tan firme al ALCA tuvo que ver principalmente con el hecho de que los beneficios que esperaban estos sectores no estaban siendo garantizados suficientemente en la negociación.

No se trata de desconocer que estos gobiernos no han tenido posiciones únicas y que han existido tensiones entre visiones más orientadas hacia el libre comercio y visiones que reivindican mayor autonomía para el impulso de políticas públicas nacionales. Sin embargo, y más allá de los discursos, fue precisamente el hecho de que el ALCA no garantizaba un mayor acceso de los productos de la agroindustria del MERCOSUR al mercado de Estados Unidos, y que el gobierno de dicho país no estaba dispuesto a siquiera considerar la reducción de los subsidios a su producción agrícola, la verdadera razón por la cual se trancaron las negociaciones del ALCA.

El único gobierno participante en las negociaciones que formuló cuestionamientos conceptuales, políticos y doctrinarios fundamentales a cada una de las dimensiones del modelo de integración propuesto por el gobierno de Estados Unidos a través del ALCA fue el de Venezuela.

Esos mismos intereses han estado impulsando las negociaciones del MERCOSUR con la Unión Europea. De acuerdo a denuncias formuladas por las principales organizaciones sociales del Cono Sur [4], a cambio de un acceso limitado de los productos de la agroindustria del MERCOSUR al mercado de la Unión Europea, los negociadores del MERCOSUR están realizando concesiones que tendrían efectos nocivos sobre la agricultura familiar, limitarían la capacidad de los Estados para tener políticas industriales autónomas, y convertirían en mercancías áreas tan críticas como los denominados “servicios culturales” y “servicios ambientales”.

Se habrían ofrecido igualmente preferencias a la Unión Europea para las compras del Sector Público. No hay razón alguna por la cual se pueda suponer que las transnacionales basadas en Europa puedan tener efectos más benignos o sean menos rapaces que las estadounidenses, ni para asumir que los gobiernos europeos sean menos agresivos en la defensa de los intereses de sus corporaciones. Cualquier ilusión en este sentido quedó desmentida con la reciente crisis argentina. La Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones

Los gobiernos de Sudamérica celebran lo que denominan un nuevo momento histórico en el continente, la realización del sueño de Bolívar: la creación de la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones. ¿Podrá este acuerdo convertirse efectivamente en un punto de partida para nuevos proyectos económicos y geopolíticos alternativos a los modelos hegemónicos?

La retórica de la Declaración del Cusco, firmada por los presidentes o cancilleres de 12 países sudamericanos [5], parecería efectivamente apuntar en una nueva dirección. Predomina en esta un lenguaje diferente a la prioritaria del libre comercio que ha sido hegemónica durante los últimos lustros.

Partiendo de la “historia compartida y solidaria de nuestras naciones”, se reivindica “una identidad sudamericana compartida y valores comunes, tales como: la democracia, la solidaridad, los derechos humanos, la libertad, la justicia social, el respeto a la integridad territorial, a la diversidad, la no discriminación y la afirmación de su autonomía, la igualdad soberana de los Estados y la solución pacífica de controversias”.

Se reconoce que no es suficiente con el desarrollo económico, y que se requieren estrategias que junto a “una conciencia ambiental responsable y el reconocimiento de asimetrías en el desarrollo de sus países, aseguren una más justa y equitativa distribución del ingreso, el acceso a la educación, la cohesión y la inclusión social, así como la preservación del medio ambiente y la promoción del desarrollo sostenible”.

Se enfatiza un “compromiso esencial con la lucha contra la pobreza, la eliminación del hambre, la generación de empleo decente y el acceso de todos a la salud y a la educación como herramientas fundamentales para el desarrollo de los pueblos”. En el terreno internacional se apela a “los valores de la paz y la seguridad internacionales, a partir de la afirmación de la vigencia del derecho internacional y de un multilateralismo renovado y democrático que integre decididamente y de manera eficaz el desarrollo económico y social en la agenda mundial”.

Desde el punto de vista institucional, se afirma a la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones como proyecto que trasciende un área de libre comercio, acordándose que se va a “desarrollar un espacio sudamericano integrado en lo político, social, económico, ambiental y de infraestructura, que fortalezca la identidad propia de América del Sur y que contribuya, a partir de una perspectiva subregional y, en articulación con otras experiencias de integración regional, al fortalecimiento de América Latina y el Caribe y le otorgue una mayor gravitación y representación en los foros internacionales”.

De acuerdo al texto, se trata de un proyecto de integración de los pueblos. Se afirma: “Nuestra convicción en el sentido que la realización de los valores e intereses compartidos que nos unen, además de comprometer a los Gobiernos, sólo encontrará viabilidad en la medida que los pueblos asuman el rol protagónico que les corresponde en este proceso. La integración sudamericana es y debe ser una integración de los pueblos”.

Más allá de temas cruciales que están ausentes en el texto, como el de la deuda externa, y el de las relaciones de este proyecto con los acuerdos de libre comercio firmados o en proceso de negociación con Estados Unidos y la Unión Europea, ¿puede esperarse que los actuales gobiernos sudamericanos (los firmantes de la Declaración del Cusco) sean consecuentes con estas declaraciones de intención? ¿Se trata de un lenguaje destinado al público de galería, o es la expresión de una nueva voluntad política de los gobiernos sudamericanos?

Más que descartar de antemano la Declaración del Cusco como pura retórica y a la decisión de crear la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones como una mera formalidad, es conveniente analizar este proceso en la potencialidad que podría ofrecer para convertirse en un nuevo terreno de pugnas y tensiones entre diferentes visiones y diferentes fuerzas sociales en torno al futuro de América Latina. ¿Pretenden los gobiernos firmantes de la declaración (o algunos de ellos) adecuar las orientaciones de sus políticas públicas a los objetivos declarados de la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones?

Lo que resulta evidente es que hay flagrantes contradicciones entre los objetivos y metas formulados en esta declaración y el rumbo principal que hoy asumen las políticas públicas en la mayoría de los países sudamericanos. Los objetivos formulados en la Declaración del Cusco no son, de modo alguno, compatibles con las políticas públicas y orientaciones económicas que, gracias a la deuda externa, los organismos financieros internacionales continúan imponiendo en todo el continente. ¿Pueden los movimientos sociales y políticos populares del continente aprovechar estas tensiones para formular e impulsar propuestas contrahegemónicas?

¿Qué sentido tiene que los gobiernos andinos que hoy negocian un TLC con Estados Unidos, proyecto que constituye una severa amenaza a la salud, educación, alimentación y el ambiente de dichos países, se comprometan a garantizar la salud, la educación, la alimentación de sus pueblos, así como la preservación del ambiente? ¿Qué sentido tiene la reivindicación del derecho a un empleo decente cuando las políticas de apertura, privatización y desregulación, la desindustrialización, la flexibilidad laboral y las reformas de la legislación laboral impulsadas por estos mismos gobiernos continúan deteriorando y precarizando sistemáticamente las condiciones del empleo? ¿Para qué proclamar la autonomía e igualdad soberana de los Estados mientras se están negociando acuerdos comerciales que limitan cada vez más el ejercicio de la soberanía? ¿Por qué hablar de la equitativa distribución del ingreso, y de la cohesión y la inclusión social, si la experiencia confirma que las actuales políticas de predominio dogmático del libre comercio no conducen sino a la desintegración social y al incremento de las desigualdades sociales? ¿Qué sentido tiene destacar la importancia de la preservación del medio ambiente y la promoción del desarrollo sostenible si -como es evidente por ejemplo en el caso de Brasil- las actuales políticas de prioridad de las exportaciones primarias orientadas a generar un excedente en la balanza comercial para pagar la deuda externa requieren una sobreexplotación depredadora y no sostenible de los recursos naturales? ¿Qué tipo de infraestructura va a acompañar este proceso de integración? ¿Continuará la prioridad en la inversión en infraestructura orientada a facilitar las exportaciones y consolidar el modelo de crecimiento hacia afuera, la economía de puertos? ¿Pondrá esta infraestructura a la Amazonía y sus recursos a la disposición de las empresas transnacionales?6. ¿Podrá por el contrario dársele prioridad a las exigencias de un desarrollo endógeno, de ampliación de los mercados internos continentales y de la efectiva integración de los pueblos? ¿Será posible avanzar en la dirección de un modelo alternativo de integración cuando se está incorporando a la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones, en forma acrítica, la base jurídica y normativa que el MERCOSUR y la Comunidad Andina de Naciones fueron armando durante los lustros recientes de hegemonía neoliberal?

La retórica latinoamericanista, la reivindicación de la soberanía y la democracia, así como de los derechos de los pueblos, podría bajar la guardia de los movimientos sociales y políticos populares en torno a las negociaciones entre los gobiernos del continente mientras mantienen una actitud vigilante ante los acuerdos negociados con potencias extracontinentales (ALCA, TLCs, MERCOSUR-UE). No hay, sin embargo, nada en la idea de integración sudamericana que en sí misma, por su propia condición de ser latina o sudamericana, sea necesariamente más favorable a los intereses de los pueblos. Todo depende, como se señaló al comienzo de este texto, de los modelos de integración en juego.

Se abre con la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones un nuevo terreno de lucha continental. El destino de este proyecto de integración y la respuesta a la cuestión básica de si puede o no llegar a ser favorable a los intereses populares, más que del contenido de sus textos fundantes, dependerá del resultado de las luchas sociales y políticas, de la capacidad de las fuerzas populares para revertir las tendencias políticas y económicas hoy hegemónicas en la mayor parte del continente.

¿Será posible convertir a la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones en un nuevo terreno capaz de articular en forma efectiva las luchas de los pueblos del continente por la soberanía, la democracia, la igualdad, la pluralidad cultural? ¿Podrá este nuevo proyecto integrador jugar un papel en la resistencia a la hegemonía imperial de Estados Unidos?

Son estos nuevos retos y nuevas interrogantes que confronta hoy la lucha popular latinoamericana.

Edgardo Lander Sociólogo, profesor titular de la UCV Ver los artículos de Edgardo Lander

[1] Han circulado, sin embargo, rumores de acuerdo a los cuales los co-presidentes de la fase final de las negociaciones del ALCA, el Embajador Robert Zoellick de Estados Unidos y el Canciller de Brasil, Celso Amorim, tendrían previsto reunirse en el mes de enero de 2005 para explorar las posibilidades de un reinicio de las negociaciones. Mientras han estado absolutamente suspendidas todas las negociaciones sustantivas, ha continuado la pugna entre las ciudades candidatas a ser sede permanente del acuerdo

[2] Aspectos de Propiedad Intelectual Relacionados con el Comercio, mejor conocido por sus siglas en inglés: TRIPS.

[3] Ver, por ejemplo, la declaración conjunta de las cuatro centrales de trabajadores colombianas: Declaración frente al tratado de libre comercio con Estados Unidos y el tema laboral, Bogotá, 3 de diciembre 2004. En Red Colombiana de Acción Frente al Libre Comercio (Recalca)

[4] Autoconvocatoria No al ALCA (Argentina), “Acuerdo Unión Europea-MERCOSUR: ganancias para pocos, amenaza para la mayoría”

[5] Declaración del Cusco sobre la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones, Cumbre Presidencial Sudamericana, Cusco, 8 de diciembre de 2004. Los países firmantes de esta declaración son: Argentina, Bolivia, Brasil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Guyana, Paraguay, Perú, Surinam, Uruguay y Venezuela

Fuente: www.bilaterals.org

Edgardo Lander
No hay nada en la idea de integración que en sí mismo podamos considerar como favorable para el futuro de los pueblos del continente. No basta con que sea una integración latinoamericana o sudamericana para que corresponda a los intereses populares. Todo depende del modelo de integración en cuestión. ¿Quiénes lo impulsan? ¿Para qué? ¿Para quién? ¿En función de qué intereses y de que valores se diseña? Dependiendo de la respuesta a estas interrogantes, ed la integración puede afianzar las relaciones de dominación actualmente hegemónicas, help o puede contribuir a abrir rendijas para socavarlas.
¿Un proyecto de integración orientado a abrir aún más estas economías para someterlas a los dictados de los dueños del capital? ¿O una integración defensiva que tenga como meta conquistar espacios de autonomía y soberanía para definir políticas públicas y opciones económicas propias? En otras palabras, ¿una integración que contribuya a desdibujar aún más los espacios y territorios del ejercicio de la soberanía democrática de los pueblos, o una integración orientada a recuperar lo que siglos de colonialismo y políticas imperiales le han arrebatado y continúan arrebatando a los pueblos del continente?
¿Una integración orientada por los valores del individualismo posesivo, de la competencia de todos contra todos, en la cual se garantice el éxito de los más fuertes sobre la base de la explotación y exclusión de los más débiles, esto es, una integración que acentúe las inaceptables desigualdades actuales? ¿O una integración guiada por los valores de la igualdad, de la participación, la pluralidad, la solidaridad, la comunidad, una integración que reconozca, valore y haga posible el despliegue de la extraordinaria variedad de modos de vida de los pueblos de nuestro continente?
¿Una integración que sin límite alguno explote los recursos naturales, convirtiéndolos en mercancías exportables para generar los excedentes requeridos para pagar la deuda externa? ¿O una integración que se oriente a la recuperación y construcción de otras formas de ser los humanos parte de la naturaleza, que no la considere como un enemigo a ser sometido, controlado, explotado y por ende destruido?
¿Una integración pensada como área de libre comercio, concebida principalmente como la construcción de un espacio económico de libre circulación de mercancías y capitales? ¿O una integración geopolítica concebida como parte de los procesos de resistencia al orden global que busca imponer la política unilateral e imperial del capital transnacional y del gobierno de los Estados Unidos? El ALCA
El principal proyecto estratégico del gobierno de Estados Unidos hacia el continente americano en su conjunto durante los últimos diez años ha sido el ALCA o Área de Libre Comercio de las Américas. Mediante este acuerdo de alcance continental, Estados Unidos y sus empresas han buscado consolidar, profundizar y hacer irreversibles las políticas de ajuste estructural de las últimas décadas, pretendiendo establecer de una vez por todas la prioridad absoluta de los derechos del capital sobre los derechos de la gente.
Mediante la constitucionalización del orden neoliberal en un pacto supranacional de obligatorio cumplimento, se aspira a acotar drásticamente los ámbitos de la soberanía y del ejercicio de la democracia y la regulación social, concebidas todas como trabas ilegítimas al pleno y libre despliegue y movimiento del capital.
Hasta hace poco más de dos años, las negociaciones avanzaban en forma aparentemente indetenible. Gobiernos sumisos en todo el continente negociaban textos secretos a espaldas de sus pueblos, y parecía inevitable que para la fecha prevista, esto es, para finales del año 2004, se concluyeran la negociación y revisión del texto de manera que este pudiese ser ratificado en 2005. Sin embargo, a partir del año 2002 las cosas comenzaron a cambiar.
Los movimientos y organizaciones sociales de la resistencia al ALCA, especialmente mediante su articulación en la Alianza Social Continental, lograron sacar el debate del ámbito acotado de una negociación entre expertos en comercio internacional para colocarla en el terreno del debate y la movilización pública.
Organizaciones sindicales, indígenas, ecologistas, campesinas, de mujeres y académicas en todo el continente logran converger en una resistencia crecientemente organizada y capaz de grandes movilizaciones. Cada una de las principales reuniones de los negociadores del acuerdo pasó a estar acompañada de masivas protestas (Québec, Buenos Aires, Quito, Miami). Los cambios políticos representados por la elección de Chávez, Lula y Kirchner introdujeron perspectivas y posturas negociadoras no previstas.
En la reunión del Comité de Negociaciones Comerciales (CNC) celebrada en San Salvador en julio de 2003 se reconoce por primera vez, en la propia mesa de negociaciones, que estas están severamente estancadas. Se realizaron sucesivos intentos de salvar el acuerdo mediante un tratado más diluido (Alca light) o por la vía de un ALCA de dos niveles que permitiese a los gobiernos más comprometidos con el modelo de libre comercio preservar el contenido del proyecto original, facultando a otros gobiernos el asumir compromisos menores. Buscando destrancar las negociaciones, los Estados Unidos convocaron sucesivas “reuniones informales” entre diferentes grupos de países.
Persistieron los desacuerdos. Finalmente, en contra de todos los pronósticos, lo que no parecía posible es hoy un hecho. La resistencia continental ha derrotado al ALCA, quizás definitivamente. Desde comienzos del año 2003 no se ha llevado a cabo ninguna reunión formal. De hecho, aunque esto no se admita públicamente, las negociaciones han sido pospuestas en forma indefinida [1].
Diversas organizaciones del continente han sugerido que el 1 de enero de 2005, fecha en que se suponía que estuviese listo el acuerdo, sea celebrado como el día del triunfo de los movimientos populares de las Américas contra el ALCA. En estos tiempos neoliberales no son muchas las victorias populares: hay que celebrarlas. Los Tratados de Libre Comercio (TLCs)
El descarrilamiento del ALCA representa sin duda una victoria para la resistencia al proyecto imperial de libre comercio. Sin embargo, la agenda estratégica del gobierno de Estados Unidos hacia el continente no ha sido derrotada: avanza por otras vías. Dado que las dificultades en las negociaciones del ALCA las enfrentaba principalmente con tres países -Brasil, Argentina y Venezuela- el gobierno de Estados Unidos optó por continuar negociaciones vía TLCs con prácticamente todos los demás países. Negoció y firmó un TLC con Chile, concluyó las negociaciones con Centroamérica, y está en lo que se supone que es la fase final de las negociaciones con Colombia, Ecuador y Perú.
Dado el fraccionamiento de la resistencia y las posturas más amigables (tanto al libre comercio como al gobierno de Estados Unidos) de los gobiernos en cuestión, en estos acuerdos se radicaliza la agenda neoliberal. No sólo se va más allá de los acuerdos de la Organización Mundial de Comercio (OMC), sino incluso de lo previsto en los borradores del ALCA. La extraordinaria disparidad entre las partes de estas negociaciones queda ilustrada en el contenido, por ejemplo, de los capítulos sobre propiedad intelectual y agricultura del TLC andino, acuerdos que de aprobarse en su versión actual tendrían impactos catastróficos sobre la salud y la alimentación de los pueblos.
Estados Unidos ha exigido el patentamiento de plantas y animales (¡definidos como inventos!), así como de procedimientos diagnósticos, terapéuticos y quirúrgicos. Reafirmando una vez más que considera más importante las ganancias de sus transnacionales farmacéuticas que la salud pública, además de diversas medidas destinadas a impedir la utilización de medicamentes genéricos exige que se deje sin efecto la Declaración Relativa al Acuerdo sobre ADPIC [2] de Doha (2001), que autoriza cierta flexibilidad en la interpretación de los derechos de propiedad intelectual de los medicamentos y permite a los países miembros de la OMC “proteger la salud pública y, en particular, promover el acceso a los medicamentos para todos”.
En las negociaciones sobre agricultura Estados Unidos exige la eliminación de todos los instrumentos de protección y fomento agrícola utilizados por los países andinos (bandas de precios, cuotas de importación, etc.), a la vez que se niega en forma categórica a siquiera discutir sus opulentos subsidios agrícolas. Esta combinación no puede conducir sino a la devastación de la agricultura andina, a socavar las condiciones de la seguridad alimentaria y a la expulsión de millones de personas del campo.
A pesar de la firme oposición popular y de las masivas movilizaciones de organizaciones sociales y políticas centroamericanas y andinas [3], no ha sido posible hasta el momento frenar estas negociaciones.
MERCOSUR y la Comunidad Andina de Naciones
¿Constituyen hoy el MERCOSUR o la Comunidad Andina de Naciones (CAN) alternativas a este modelo de integración y desarrollo? La integración no puede pensarse como algo diferente a los proyectos nacionales, diferente a las sociedades que se prefiguran al interior de cada Estado-nación. Los proyectos de integración del continente dependen de los procesos políticos, de las estructuras productivas, de las correlaciones de fuerza existentes tanto global y regionalmente como al interior de cada uno de los países participantes.
Los actuales proyectos y prácticas de integración en América Latina se dan con estructuras productivas y condiciones políticas e ideológicas muy diferentes a las existentes cuando se debatía la integración latinoamericana en los ‘60 y ‘70. Como resultado de las dictaduras militares y de la aplicación sistemática de las políticas neoliberales de ajuste estructural, estas sociedades han cambiado profundamente tanto en su estructura productiva como en su tejido social. Como consecuencia de la represión, la desindustrialización y las reformas laborales, el movimiento sindical se encuentra extraordinariamente reducido y debilitado, y la mayor parte de los nuevos empleos se crean en el llamado sector informal.
El peso de empresarios cuya producción se orientaba prioritariamente al mercado interno ha igualmente declinado. La propiedad de la tierra se encuentra aún más concentrada que hace tres décadas. Los sectores más dinámicos de las economías del continente -los que tienen igualmente hoy mayor incidencia política, mayor capacidad de tener impacto sobre las políticas públicas- son los sectores triunfantes de estas transformaciones económicas. Son principalmente los grupos financieros, los de los servicios -como las telecomunicaciones- y los exportadores de productos primarios: en el caso del Cono Sur, principalmente el sector agroindustrial.
Estos sectores están controlados o asociados estrechamente con el capital transnacional, sus beneficios dependen de la apertura económica, de la desregulación, de las privatizaciones y del acceso a los mercados internacionales. Constituyen las fuerzas dinámicas internas detrás de las políticas del libre comercio.
El sentido común neoliberal hoy hegemónico, y los intereses de estos sectores que resultaron beneficiados de las transformaciones políticas y de la estructura económica producidas en las últimas tres décadas, condicionan las orientaciones básicas de los proyectos de integración que hoy operan y se negocian en todo el continente. Es posible constatar incluso que la razón fundamental por la cual los gobiernos de Brasil y Argentina pusieron una resistencia tan firme al ALCA tuvo que ver principalmente con el hecho de que los beneficios que esperaban estos sectores no estaban siendo garantizados suficientemente en la negociación.
No se trata de desconocer que estos gobiernos no han tenido posiciones únicas y que han existido tensiones entre visiones más orientadas hacia el libre comercio y visiones que reivindican mayor autonomía para el impulso de políticas públicas nacionales. Sin embargo, y más allá de los discursos, fue precisamente el hecho de que el ALCA no garantizaba un mayor acceso de los productos de la agroindustria del MERCOSUR al mercado de Estados Unidos, y que el gobierno de dicho país no estaba dispuesto a siquiera considerar la reducción de los subsidios a su producción agrícola, la verdadera razón por la cual se trancaron las negociaciones del ALCA.
El único gobierno participante en las negociaciones que formuló cuestionamientos conceptuales, políticos y doctrinarios fundamentales a cada una de las dimensiones del modelo de integración propuesto por el gobierno de Estados Unidos a través del ALCA fue el de Venezuela.
Esos mismos intereses han estado impulsando las negociaciones del MERCOSUR con la Unión Europea. De acuerdo a denuncias formuladas por las principales organizaciones sociales del Cono Sur [4], a cambio de un acceso limitado de los productos de la agroindustria del MERCOSUR al mercado de la Unión Europea, los negociadores del MERCOSUR están realizando concesiones que tendrían efectos nocivos sobre la agricultura familiar, limitarían la capacidad de los Estados para tener políticas industriales autónomas, y convertirían en mercancías áreas tan críticas como los denominados “servicios culturales” y “servicios ambientales”.
Se habrían ofrecido igualmente preferencias a la Unión Europea para las compras del Sector Público. No hay razón alguna por la cual se pueda suponer que las transnacionales basadas en Europa puedan tener efectos más benignos o sean menos rapaces que las estadounidenses, ni para asumir que los gobiernos europeos sean menos agresivos en la defensa de los intereses de sus corporaciones. Cualquier ilusión en este sentido quedó desmentida con la reciente crisis argentina. La Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones
Los gobiernos de Sudamérica celebran lo que denominan un nuevo momento histórico en el continente, la realización del sueño de Bolívar: la creación de la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones. ¿Podrá este acuerdo convertirse efectivamente en un punto de partida para nuevos proyectos económicos y geopolíticos alternativos a los modelos hegemónicos?
La retórica de la Declaración del Cusco, firmada por los presidentes o cancilleres de 12 países sudamericanos [5], parecería efectivamente apuntar en una nueva dirección. Predomina en esta un lenguaje diferente a la prioritaria del libre comercio que ha sido hegemónica durante los últimos lustros.
Partiendo de la “historia compartida y solidaria de nuestras naciones”, se reivindica “una identidad sudamericana compartida y valores comunes, tales como: la democracia, la solidaridad, los derechos humanos, la libertad, la justicia social, el respeto a la integridad territorial, a la diversidad, la no discriminación y la afirmación de su autonomía, la igualdad soberana de los Estados y la solución pacífica de controversias”.
Se reconoce que no es suficiente con el desarrollo económico, y que se requieren estrategias que junto a “una conciencia ambiental responsable y el reconocimiento de asimetrías en el desarrollo de sus países, aseguren una más justa y equitativa distribución del ingreso, el acceso a la educación, la cohesión y la inclusión social, así como la preservación del medio ambiente y la promoción del desarrollo sostenible”.
Se enfatiza un “compromiso esencial con la lucha contra la pobreza, la eliminación del hambre, la generación de empleo decente y el acceso de todos a la salud y a la educación como herramientas fundamentales para el desarrollo de los pueblos”. En el terreno internacional se apela a “los valores de la paz y la seguridad internacionales, a partir de la afirmación de la vigencia del derecho internacional y de un multilateralismo renovado y democrático que integre decididamente y de manera eficaz el desarrollo económico y social en la agenda mundial”.
Desde el punto de vista institucional, se afirma a la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones como proyecto que trasciende un área de libre comercio, acordándose que se va a “desarrollar un espacio sudamericano integrado en lo político, social, económico, ambiental y de infraestructura, que fortalezca la identidad propia de América del Sur y que contribuya, a partir de una perspectiva subregional y, en articulación con otras experiencias de integración regional, al fortalecimiento de América Latina y el Caribe y le otorgue una mayor gravitación y representación en los foros internacionales”.
De acuerdo al texto, se trata de un proyecto de integración de los pueblos. Se afirma: “Nuestra convicción en el sentido que la realización de los valores e intereses compartidos que nos unen, además de comprometer a los Gobiernos, sólo encontrará viabilidad en la medida que los pueblos asuman el rol protagónico que les corresponde en este proceso. La integración sudamericana es y debe ser una integración de los pueblos”.
Más allá de temas cruciales que están ausentes en el texto, como el de la deuda externa, y el de las relaciones de este proyecto con los acuerdos de libre comercio firmados o en proceso de negociación con Estados Unidos y la Unión Europea, ¿puede esperarse que los actuales gobiernos sudamericanos (los firmantes de la Declaración del Cusco) sean consecuentes con estas declaraciones de intención? ¿Se trata de un lenguaje destinado al público de galería, o es la expresión de una nueva voluntad política de los gobiernos sudamericanos?
Más que descartar de antemano la Declaración del Cusco como pura retórica y a la decisión de crear la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones como una mera formalidad, es conveniente analizar este proceso en la potencialidad que podría ofrecer para convertirse en un nuevo terreno de pugnas y tensiones entre diferentes visiones y diferentes fuerzas sociales en torno al futuro de América Latina. ¿Pretenden los gobiernos firmantes de la declaración (o algunos de ellos) adecuar las orientaciones de sus políticas públicas a los objetivos declarados de la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones?
Lo que resulta evidente es que hay flagrantes contradicciones entre los objetivos y metas formulados en esta declaración y el rumbo principal que hoy asumen las políticas públicas en la mayoría de los países sudamericanos. Los objetivos formulados en la Declaración del Cusco no son, de modo alguno, compatibles con las políticas públicas y orientaciones económicas que, gracias a la deuda externa, los organismos financieros internacionales continúan imponiendo en todo el continente. ¿Pueden los movimientos sociales y políticos populares del continente aprovechar estas tensiones para formular e impulsar propuestas contrahegemónicas?
¿Qué sentido tiene que los gobiernos andinos que hoy negocian un TLC con Estados Unidos, proyecto que constituye una severa amenaza a la salud, educación, alimentación y el ambiente de dichos países, se comprometan a garantizar la salud, la educación, la alimentación de sus pueblos, así como la preservación del ambiente? ¿Qué sentido tiene la reivindicación del derecho a un empleo decente cuando las políticas de apertura, privatización y desregulación, la desindustrialización, la flexibilidad laboral y las reformas de la legislación laboral impulsadas por estos mismos gobiernos continúan deteriorando y precarizando sistemáticamente las condiciones del empleo? ¿Para qué proclamar la autonomía e igualdad soberana de los Estados mientras se están negociando acuerdos comerciales que limitan cada vez más el ejercicio de la soberanía? ¿Por qué hablar de la equitativa distribución del ingreso, y de la cohesión y la inclusión social, si la experiencia confirma que las actuales políticas de predominio dogmático del libre comercio no conducen sino a la desintegración social y al incremento de las desigualdades sociales? ¿Qué sentido tiene destacar la importancia de la preservación del medio ambiente y la promoción del desarrollo sostenible si -como es evidente por ejemplo en el caso de Brasil- las actuales políticas de prioridad de las exportaciones primarias orientadas a generar un excedente en la balanza comercial para pagar la deuda externa requieren una sobreexplotación depredadora y no sostenible de los recursos naturales? ¿Qué tipo de infraestructura va a acompañar este proceso de integración? ¿Continuará la prioridad en la inversión en infraestructura orientada a facilitar las exportaciones y consolidar el modelo de crecimiento hacia afuera, la economía de puertos? ¿Pondrá esta infraestructura a la Amazonía y sus recursos a la disposición de las empresas transnacionales?6. ¿Podrá por el contrario dársele prioridad a las exigencias de un desarrollo endógeno, de ampliación de los mercados internos continentales y de la efectiva integración de los pueblos? ¿Será posible avanzar en la dirección de un modelo alternativo de integración cuando se está incorporando a la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones, en forma acrítica, la base jurídica y normativa que el MERCOSUR y la Comunidad Andina de Naciones fueron armando durante los lustros recientes de hegemonía neoliberal?
La retórica latinoamericanista, la reivindicación de la soberanía y la democracia, así como de los derechos de los pueblos, podría bajar la guardia de los movimientos sociales y políticos populares en torno a las negociaciones entre los gobiernos del continente mientras mantienen una actitud vigilante ante los acuerdos negociados con potencias extracontinentales (ALCA, TLCs, MERCOSUR-UE). No hay, sin embargo, nada en la idea de integración sudamericana que en sí misma, por su propia condición de ser latina o sudamericana, sea necesariamente más favorable a los intereses de los pueblos. Todo depende, como se señaló al comienzo de este texto, de los modelos de integración en juego.
Se abre con la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones un nuevo terreno de lucha continental. El destino de este proyecto de integración y la respuesta a la cuestión básica de si puede o no llegar a ser favorable a los intereses populares, más que del contenido de sus textos fundantes, dependerá del resultado de las luchas sociales y políticas, de la capacidad de las fuerzas populares para revertir las tendencias políticas y económicas hoy hegemónicas en la mayor parte del continente.
¿Será posible convertir a la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones en un nuevo terreno capaz de articular en forma efectiva las luchas de los pueblos del continente por la soberanía, la democracia, la igualdad, la pluralidad cultural? ¿Podrá este nuevo proyecto integrador jugar un papel en la resistencia a la hegemonía imperial de Estados Unidos?
Son estos nuevos retos y nuevas interrogantes que confronta hoy la lucha popular latinoamericana.
Edgardo Lander Sociólogo, profesor titular de la UCV Ver los artículos de Edgardo Lander
[1] Han circulado, sin embargo, rumores de acuerdo a los cuales los co-presidentes de la fase final de las negociaciones del ALCA, el Embajador Robert Zoellick de Estados Unidos y el Canciller de Brasil, Celso Amorim, tendrían previsto reunirse en el mes de enero de 2005 para explorar las posibilidades de un reinicio de las negociaciones. Mientras han estado absolutamente suspendidas todas las negociaciones sustantivas, ha continuado la pugna entre las ciudades candidatas a ser sede permanente del acuerdo
[2] Aspectos de Propiedad Intelectual Relacionados con el Comercio, mejor conocido por sus siglas en inglés: TRIPS.
[3] Ver, por ejemplo, la declaración conjunta de las cuatro centrales de trabajadores colombianas: Declaración frente al tratado de libre comercio con Estados Unidos y el tema laboral, Bogotá, 3 de diciembre 2004. En Red Colombiana de Acción Frente al Libre Comercio (Recalca)
[4] Autoconvocatoria No al ALCA (Argentina), “Acuerdo Unión Europea-MERCOSUR: ganancias para pocos, amenaza para la mayoría”
[5] Declaración del Cusco sobre la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones, Cumbre Presidencial Sudamericana, Cusco, 8 de diciembre de 2004. Los países firmantes de esta declaración son: Argentina, Bolivia, Brasil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Guyana, Paraguay, Perú, Surinam, Uruguay y Venezuela
Fuente:www.bilaterals.org

Edgardo Lander, healing ADITAL

La Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones

Los gobiernos de Sudamérica celebran lo que denominan un nuevo momento histórico en el continente, la realización del sueño de Bolívar: la creación de la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones. ¿Podrá este acuerdo convertirse efectivamente en un punto de partida para nuevos proyectos económicos y geopolíticos alternativos a los modelos hegemónicos?

La retórica de la Declaración del Cusco, firmada por los presidentes o cancilleres de 12 países sudamericanos5, parecería efectivamente apuntar en una nueva dirección. Predomina en esta un lenguaje diferente a la prioritaria del libre comercio que ha sido hegemónica durante los últimos lustros. Partiendo de la “historia compartida y solidaria de nuestras naciones”, se reivindica “una identidad sudamericana compartida y valores comunes, tales como: la democracia, la solidaridad, los derechos humanos, la libertad, la justicia social, el respeto a la integridad territorial, a la diversidad, la no discriminación y la afirmación de su autonomía, la igualdad soberana de los Estados y la solución pacífica de controversias”. Se reconoce que no es suficiente con el desarrollo económico, y que se requieren estrategias que junto a “una conciencia ambiental responsable y el reconocimiento de asimetrías en el desarrollo de sus países, aseguren una más justa y equitativa distribución del ingreso, el acceso a la educación, la cohesión y la inclusión social, así como la preservación del medio ambiente y la promoción del desarrollo sostenible”.

Se enfatiza un “compromiso esencial con la lucha contra la pobreza, la eliminación del hambre, la generación de empleo decente y el acceso de todos a la salud y a la educación como herramientas fundamentales para el desarrollo de los pueblos”. En el terreno internacional se apela a “los valores de la paz y la seguridad internacionales, a partir de la afirmación de la vigencia del derecho internacional y de un multilateralismo renovado y democrático que integre decididamente y de manera eficaz el desarrollo económico y social en la agenda mundial”.

Desde el punto de vista institucional, se afirma a la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones como proyecto que trasciende un área de libre comercio, acordándose que se va a “desarrollar un espacio sudamericano integrado en lo político, social, económico, ambiental y de infraestructura, que fortalezca la identidad propia de América del Sur y que contribuya, a partir de una perspectiva subregional y, en articulación con otras experiencias de integración regional, al fortalecimiento de América Latina y el Caribe y le otorgue una mayor gravitación y representación en los foros internacionales”.

De acuerdo al texto, se trata de un proyecto de integración de los pueblos. Se afirma: “Nuestra convicción en el sentido que la realización de los valores e intereses compartidos que nos unen, además de comprometer a los Gobiernos, sólo encontrará viabilidad en la medida que los pueblos asuman el rol protagónico que les corresponde en este proceso. La integración sudamericana es y debe ser una integración de los pueblos”.

Más allá de temas cruciales que están ausentes en el texto, como el de la deuda externa, y el de las relaciones de este proyecto con los acuerdos de libre comercio firmados o en proceso de negociación con Estados Unidos y la Unión Europea, ¿puede esperarse que los actuales gobiernos sudamericanos (los firmantes de la Declaración del Cusco) sean consecuentes con estas declaraciones de intención? ¿Se trata de un lenguaje destinado al público de galería, o es la expresión de una nueva voluntad política de los gobiernos sudamericanos?

Más que descartar de antemano la Declaración del Cusco como pura retórica y a la decisión de crear la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones como una mera formalidad, es conveniente analizar este proceso en la potencialidad que podría ofrecer para convertirse en un nuevo terreno de pugnas y tensiones entre diferentes visiones y diferentes fuerzas sociales en torno al futuro de América Latina. ¿Pretenden los gobiernos firmantes de la declaración (o algunos de ellos) adecuar las orientaciones de sus políticas públicas a los objetivos declarados de la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones?

Lo que resulta evidente es que hay flagrantes contradicciones entre los objetivos y metas formulados en esta declaración y el rumbo principal que hoy asumen las políticas públicas en la mayoría de los países sudamericanos. Los objetivos formulados en la Declaración del Cusco no son, de modo alguno, compatibles con las políticas públicas y orientaciones económicas que, gracias a la deuda externa, los organismos financieros internacionales continúan imponiendo en todo el continente. ¿Pueden los movimientos sociales y políticos populares del continente aprovechar estas tensiones para formular e impulsar propuestas contrahegemónicas?

¿Qué sentido tiene que los gobiernos andinos que hoy negocian un TLC con Estados Unidos, proyecto que constituye una severa amenaza a la salud, educación, alimentación y el ambiente de dichos países, se comprometan a garantizar la salud, la educación, la alimentación de sus pueblos, así como la preservación del ambiente? ¿Qué sentido tiene la reivindicación del derecho a un empleo decente cuando las políticas de apertura, privatización y desregulación, la desindustrialización, la flexibilidad laboral y las reformas de la legislación laboral impulsadas por estos mismos gobiernos continúan deteriorando y precarizando sistemáticamente las condiciones del empleo? ¿Para qué proclamar la autonomía e igualdad soberana de los Estados mientras se están negociando acuerdos comerciales que limitan cada vez más el ejercicio de la soberanía? ¿Por qué hablar de la equitativa distribución del ingreso, y de la cohesión y la inclusión social, si la experiencia confirma que las actuales políticas de predominio dogmático del libre comercio no conducen sino a la desintegración social y al incremento de las desigualdades sociales? ¿Qué sentido tiene destacar la importancia de la preservación del medio ambiente y la promoción del desarrollo sostenible si -como es evidente por ejemplo en el caso de Brasil- las actuales políticas de prioridad de las exportaciones primarias orientadas a generar un excedente en la balanza comercial para pagar la deuda externa requieren una sobreexplotación depredadora y no sostenible de los recursos naturales? ¿Qué tipo de infraestructura va a acompañar este proceso de integración? ¿Continuará la prioridad en la inversión en infraestructura orientada a facilitar las exportaciones y consolidar el modelo de crecimiento hacia afuera, la economía de puertos? ¿Pondrá esta infraestructura a la Amazonía y sus recursos a la disposición de las empresas transnacionales?6. ¿Podrá por el contrario dársele prioridad a las exigencias de un desarrollo endógeno, de ampliación de los mercados internos continentales y de la efectiva integración de los pueblos? ¿Será posible avanzar en la dirección de un modelo alternativo de integración cuando se está incorporando a la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones, en forma acrítica, la base jurídica y normativa que el MERCOSUR y la Comunidad Andina de Naciones fueron armando durante los lustros recientes de hegemonía neoliberal?

La retórica latinoamericanista, la reivindicación de la soberanía y la democracia, así como de los derechos de los pueblos, podría bajar la guardia de los movimientos sociales y políticos populares en torno a las negociaciones entre los gobiernos del continente mientras mantienen una actitud vigilante ante los acuerdos negociados con potencias extracontinentales (ALCA, TLCs, MERCOSUR-UE). No hay, sin embargo, nada en la idea de integración sudamericana que en sí misma, por su propia condición de ser latina o sudamericana, sea necesariamente más favorable a los intereses de los pueblos. Todo depende, como se señaló al comienzo de este texto, de los modelos de integración en juego. Se abre con la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones un nuevo terreno de lucha continental. El destino de este proyecto de integración y la respuesta a la cuestión básica de si puede o no llegar a ser favorable a los intereses populares, más que del contenido de sus textos fundantes, dependerá del resultado de las luchas sociales y políticas, de la capacidad de las fuerzas populares para revertir las tendencias políticas y económicas hoy hegemónicas en la mayor parte del continente.

¿Será posible convertir a la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones en un nuevo terreno capaz de articular en forma efectiva las luchas de los pueblos del continente por la soberanía, la democracia, la igualdad, la pluralidad cultural? ¿Podrá este nuevo proyecto integrador jugar un papel en la resistencia a la hegemonía imperial de Estados Unidos?

Son estos nuevos retos y nuevas interrogantes que confronta hoy la lucha popular latinoamericana.

Notas

5 Declaración del Cusco sobre la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones, Cumbre Presidencial Sudamericana, Cusco, 8 de diciembre de 2004. Los países firmantes de esta declaración son: Argentina, Bolivia, Brasil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Guyana, Paraguay, Perú, Surinam, Uruguay y Venezuela

6 Decisiones fundamentales para el futuro de Sudamérica, con consecuencias a largo plazo para los modelos productivos y de integración continental (energía, transporte, telecomunicaciones), están siendo tomadas, en lo fundamental, al margen del debate público, en el contexto del IIRSA, Iniciativa para la Integración de la Infraestructura Regional Sudamericana, que tiene su origen en la Primera Cumbre de Presidentes de América del Sur celebrada Brasilia en el año 2000, y que agrupa a los mismos 12 países que han acordado la creación de la Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones. Está previsto que sus proyectos sean financiados por los gobiernos, el sector privado e instituciones financieras multilaterales como el Banco Interamericano de Desarrollo (BID), la Corporación Andina de Fomento (CAF), el Fondo Financiero para el Desarrollo de la Cuenca del Plata (FONPLATA) y el Banco Mundial. El discurso de Enrique Iglesias en dicha cumbre presidencial debe servir de llamado de alerta respecto al tipo de proyecto de infraestructura al cual estos organismos financieros le otorgarán prioridad. La concepción de la integración que defiende el BID aparece sintetizada en los siguientes términos: “La integración regional es siempre una tarea desafiante, y los primeros esfuerzos de América Latina y el Caribe en los años de posguerra encontraron obstáculos muy importantes. Afortunadamente, algunos de estos obstáculos tradicionales han sido sustancialmente superados en años más recientes. El proceso de reforma de las estructuras económicas en los países de América Latina y el Caribe, que el Banco viene apoyando activamente, ha hecho que nuestras economías sean más receptivas a la integración regional, a partir de condiciones macroeconómicas más estables, la apertura unilateral de nuestras economías, la reducción de la intervención directa estatal en los mercados y un ambiente más favorable a la iniciativa privada” http://www.caf.com/view/index.asp?ms=8&pageMs=10180

[1] El presente artículo fue publicado en el Nº 15 de la revista OSAL (Observatorio Social de América Latina), CLACSO, Buenos Aires.

Edgardo Lander es socio del Transnational Institute y Profesor de la Escuela de Sociología de la Universidad Central de Venezuela

Andres Musacchio

Las teorías económicas tradicionales proponen un modelo de interpretación de los procesos de integración que permite analizarlos con un conjunto de herramientas standard, mediante las cuales se los reduce a un conjunto de elementos comunes a todos ellos. De allí que las diferencias entre las diversas experiencias quedan reducidas a una cuestión de grado, click que alude a la profundidad que cada una de ellas ha alcanzado. Sin embargo, stuff este tipo de análisis oculta las profundas diferencias en las estructuras económicas y sociales que los motivan.
>Descargar PDF

Alianza Social Continental

marzo 2009

English

Esta crisis es una oportunidad única

La crisis económica actual tiene fundamentos sistémicos y marca el agotamiento del modelo de desarrollo y globalización de tipo neoliberal. Es necesario construir alternativas concretas frente a tal modelo, illness que venía funcionando sobre una burbuja de múltiples operaciones especulativas. Debe reflexionarse sobre el fin del patrón de funcionamiento de la economía mundial, en general y del sistema financiero, en particular. Al respecto, los países de A.L. están frente a una oportunidad histórica de avanzar hacia un modelo de desarrollo justo y sustentable en la región.

La salida a la crisis no se hará contra un modelo en pleno funcionamiento, puesto que es evidente que éste está agotado y es aquí donde yace tal oportunidad, pues aparece un espacio de proposición y construcción amplio que no era tan visible y esperado algún tiempo atrás, en el mundo del laissez faire – laissez passer, en el mundo del “pensamiento único neoliberal” y del “fin de la historia”.

La crisis en curso expresa la quiebra de un sistema lleno de promesas, que ha mostrado su incapacidad de cumplirlas. El mito del “libre comercio” y el actual modelo hegemónico de producción y gestión de los recursos naturales y energéticos ya no convencen a las mujeres y hombres, quienes han sido excluidos por estas políticas impulsadas por el gran capital.

Por qué la integración regional es una salida

La integración regional aparece hoy como una alternativa para que los países de la región superen la crisis económica global a través de la creación de lazos económicos, dinámicos y solidarios entre ellos.

– Crisis de mercado global y límites de los mercados domésticos

En primer lugar, los mercados globales sufrieron un colapso y perdieron su capacidad de generar dinamismo en las economías de la región, que en los últimos dos añosnavegaron animadamente por las olas de la subida vertiginosa de los precios de las commodities agropecuarias, minerales y energéticas. Inclusive, los impactos de esta crisis que ya se han manifestado en nuestros países, evidencian que las mejoras en algunos indicadores macroeconómicos, logradas mediante este tipo de inserción, no han sido suficientes para producir un cambio estructural del modelo de desarrollo. Es decir, un modelo con mayor homogeneidad sectorial, un mercado interno basado en el consumo de la “base de la pirámide”, exportación diversificada en productos y destinos, calidad de los empleos y los productos generados y mayor justicia social y ambiental.

Por otro lado, no hay garantías de que el panorama económico posterior a la crisis sea el de un mundo con gran liquidez de capitales y de crédito, como el que tuvimos en los últimos años. Por eso, los gobiernos nacionales se ven obligados a construir una propuesta para enfrentar el dilema de esperar a que pase la crisis mundial y, con esto, intentar retomar lentamente el dinamismo de las ventas de los productos de exportación tradicional en el mercado internacional, conscientes de que las probabilidades de que esto ocurra son pocas; o buscar construir limitadas salidas nacionales dentro de los límites de recursos y mercados de la mayor parte de los países de la región.

– Energía, alimentos y agua para todos

América Latina – como región –dispone de abundantes recursos hídricos, bienes ambientales, sociales, culturales, energéticos, minerales y una importante capacidad de desarrollo tecnológico; tiene más posibilidades de autonomía alimentaria, hídrica y energética en comparación con otras regiones del planeta; posee infraestructura en empresas públicas y privadas, que podrían involucrarse en el proceso de construcción de la integración regional; dispone, finalmente, de gobiernos y movimientos sociales con un razonable grado de solidaridad política frente a la perspectiva de integración.

Frente al dilema de la crisis actual, la integración regional aparece como una alternativa viable e importante, como posibilidad de caminar hacia un nuevo modelo de desarrollo, más sustentable y justo que el que hasta hoy fue delineado en nuestros países.

La Integración regional pensada desde los pueblos de la región ofrece mayores oportunidades para nuestros países, pues puede sobreponer el principio de la solidaridad al de la competencia salvaje y el libre mercado, que como sabemos, y bien lo ha demostrado esta crisis, ni lleva al equilibrio ni apunta a la justicia, como pretenden algunos teóricos. Esta integración tendrá que estar fundada en los principios de la complementariedad y solidaridad, y enfocada como resultante hacia el alcance de sociedad más justas y equitativas económica y socialmente, donde el beneficio de los hombres y mujeres de manera integral, sean el objetivo supremo.

Experiencias no tradicionales de integración como el ALBA apuntan a la complementariedad y la solidaridad entre nuestros países para la satisfacción de las necesidades de nuestra población de forma mucho más racional e eficiente que la competencia intra-regional, el libre comercio o el mercado como único mecanismo de regulación.

Los procesos de integración en la región y la disputa por un modelo de integración popular y sustentable.

En el mejor de los casos, el escenario de los procesos de integración en las Américas muestra una evolución lenta que lindera con la parálisis. Algunos avances progresistas en el Mercosur son innegables, como por ejemplo la incorporación formal de la preocupación por las asimetrías existentes en el bloque y la embrionaria creación de fondos para tratar el problema. Se puede hacer un balance similar del establecimiento político y los avances de la UNASUR. Sin embargo, en términos sustantivos, la potencialidad para mejorar la calidad de vida de nuestros pueblos y de los trabajadores en nuestras regiones aún está distante de una realidad.

En el peor de los casos, se observa la funcionalización de los procesos a la lógica neoliberal a través de la adopción del modelo de “regionalismo abierto” cuya aplicación ha dejado huellas enormes en la CAN, América Central y el Caribe. Incentivado mediante la promoción de la competencia indiscriminada hacia dentro y hacia fuera de los bloques y la firma de tratados bilaterales de libre comercio con Europa y Estados Unidos, esta reducción de la integración regional a una mera integración comercial sólo ha erosionado la posibilidad de profundizar otras dimensiones de la integración y nada indica que haya sido beneficiosa para la sociedades de estos países en su conjunto.

Es decir, al observar la extensa experiencia de los procesos de integración regional en las Américas – más de 40 años en algunos casos – no es evidente que la misma, por el camino que hasta ahora ha transitado, tenga un potencial benéfico para nuestros pueblos. Es evidente, en cambio, que la retórica del compromiso político con la integración se ha confrontado frecuentemente en la práctica con soluciones que han dado prioridad a intereses políticos o económicos nacionales, relegando las acciones y soluciones comunes, ante los llamados “costos” de corto plazo de la integración.

Para superar la dimensión política de este problema, la búsqueda de la consolidación de las soberanías nacionales debe ser entendida en el marco del compromiso conjunto de profundización de la democracia y de la autonomía de la región; como ocurrió en el caso de la intervención de UNASUR en la elucidación de los conflictos en Bolivia. En este sentido, el compromiso consistente y sostenido de los gobiernos para tales procesos integradores se tornan piezas fundamentales. Dicho compromiso debe expresarse en la construcción de una institucionalidad sólida, que funcione con políticas y acciones comunes en un verdadero ejercicio de soberanía compartida y real.

No se puede negar que lo que ha hecho posible y viable una integración alternativa es que en muchos países los Estados han recuperado la capacidad de promover el desarrollo productivo y social o han avanzado mucho en ese sentido. Por esta razón, debemos insistir en que esa integración alternativa que buscamos no es incompatible sino complementaria con la defensa y avances en la soberanía nacional. No es la defensa de un nacionalismo estrecho, sino de la posibilidad de un camino hacia la integración entre naciones, que no son simplemente víctimas de los designios de los imperios, sino naciones soberanas que tienen proyectos nacionales de desarrollo, que deben ser articulados regionalmente.

Latinoamérica, la nueva geopolítica y la construcción de un nuevo modelo de desarrollo con base regional.

La integración regional es clave para dos perspectivas estratégicas fundamentales que se abrieron con esta nueva coyuntura histórica:


  • Los países de la región quieren jugar un papel propio en un mundo multipolar que se desarrolla a pesar de las crecientes dificultades del unilateralismo del gobierno de los EUA; ese papel no lo conseguirían separadamente,
  • Cada país aisladamente, incluso los más grandes, no tendría condiciones de implementar dinámicas diferentes a las impulsadas por el mercado mundial globalizado, es decir, los procesos de desarrollo nacional si se quieren pos-neoliberales, necesariamente pasan por la integración regional.
  • Sin embargo, para que una integración camine en ese sentido, es necesario asociar el proceso de integración a uno de transición hacia otro modelo de producción y consumo que supere los límites del actual modelo de desarrollo

La crisis y los límites que ella impone con el fin de mantener el status quo deben ser el motor para la superación de las debilidades hoy existentes y el nuevo dinamismo que las construcciones institucionales deben promover, ligado a la necesidad de responder a la crisis desde un proyecto autónomo y alternativo de desarrollo para la región, es decir, emancipado de los intereses de las potencias centrales.

Cuál es entonces la salida para la integración regional de la que hablamos.


  • Una estrategia productiva organizada y regulada regionalmente
    Antes que nada, debe ser radicalmente diferente al apoyo a las actividades de las grandes empresas, que buscan ganar en el espacio regional la musculatura necesaria para competir e insertarse en el mercado global. El resultado de este tipo de integración es el favorecimiento del aumento de la movilidad y las ganancias del gran capital; estrategia que conocimos durante la década pasada, a través de propuestas como el ALCA y el IIRSA y el empeño por la liberalización progresiva que orienta las negociaciones en la OMC. Aunque estas empresas van a intentar en breve reavivar este movimiento, que podrá caminar libremente si no enfrenta un proyecto de integración solidario que sirva de contrapunto político y económico, esta no es la integración que queremos.


    Esto debe llamar la atención sobre dos elementos importantes para la construcción de la integración regional como alternativa a la crisis. El primero es que una tarea importante de una institucionalidad regional alternativa en proceso de creación, debe ser la regulación de la operación de esas empresas en la escala regional, teniendo en cuenta los intereses sociales, culturales, ambientales y otros. Además, es fundamental estructurar las cadenas de producción en el conjunto de la región a partir de la nueva escala de operación de esas empresas en un ambiente regional, de modo que su expansión no sea vista como un proceso de afirmación de hegemonías y de poderes de algunos países sobre otros, sino como la posibilidad de generación de dinamismo económico, empleo y riqueza en toda la región.

  • La superación de las asimetrías como objetivo de corto, medio y largo plazo
    Una de las prioridades del proceso de integración debe ser la superación de las asimetrías entre los países y dentro de los países de la región: crear sistemas de producción integrados, circuitos de producción, servicios y comercio a los cuales todos puedan integrarse, con el objetivo fundamental de utilizar este proceso para generar oportunidades dinámicas de desarrollo para las regiones y países que hoy presentan más dificultades o se encuentran estancados. Dada la acumulación histórica de fragilidades de regiones y países enteros en América Latina, este proceso debe ser completado, en un primer momento, con políticas específicas que busquen compensar en el corto plazo las asimetrías hoy existentes, principalmente en lo que se refiere al desarrollo social, de forma tal que se reduzcan las diferencias al mismo tiempo que se desarrolla en estas regiones la capacidad de aprovechar las oportunidades dinámicas del proceso.
  • Producción regional de tecnología y cultura
    Hay importantes aspectos que pueden ser incentivados, y que deberían serlo, por su capacidad de impulsar el proceso de desarrollo regional, por la popularización y por el dinamismo que pueden generar, más allá de contribuir con la búsqueda de soluciones a problemas específicos en la región.


    Uno de ellos es la integración de los centros de producción de tecnología y producción/difusión cultural de la región. En diversos países de la región existen espacios de generación de tecnología, especializada o genérica, en diversas áreas (de agricultura y ganadería, pasando por medicamentos hasta industria aeronáutica entre otras). No hay una razón para no integrar esos centros, aprovechando sus sinergias, a través de recursos estimulados en la región, haciendo que las ganancias devenidas de este proceso puedan ser utilizadas en toda América Latina. Lo mismo cuenta para la enorme producción audiovisual, el potencial deportivo, y la capacidad aún mayor, que sólo la creación de una escala de consumo derivada de un mercado ampliado regional puede proporcionar.

    Esta propuesta, además, debe ser defendida en las negociaciones de la OMC y otras negociaciones con otros bloques -como es el caso de la UE- sobre “Normas de Origen”, que son específicamente utilizadas por las grandes potencias para impedir la articulación productiva de los pequeños países y economías emergentes con destino a terceros mercados.

  • Prioridad a las pequeñas y medianas empresas
    Otro punto es el incentivo general o sectorial al desarrollo de pequeñas y medianas empresas, que puede ser estimulado por el desarrollo integrado de los mercados regionales. Desde el desarrollo de software hasta la industria de turismo basada en un esquema de pequeñas posadas, aprovechando la diversidad de ambientes y culturas existentes en la región. Las empresas pequeñas o medianas presentan un potencial efectivo de generación de empleos, pero además de eso, acoplarlas al proceso de integración regional – y de un proceso de integración que alimente el desarrollo – podría dar una enorme legitimidad social al proceso.
  • Soberanía alimentaria regional y estímulo a la agricultura familiar en pequeñas y medias unidades de producción
    La viabilidad de algunos productos locales y regionales de la agricultura familiar y campesina choca con los límites del consumo en esas regiones y en algunos países. Por eso, la creación de un mercado regional podría servir para viabilizar una producción agrícola más diversificada, que escapase a la homogeneidad de los productos y procesos de producción tan característica del agronegocio, con sus paquetes tecnológicos y su estructura de comercialización, ambos concentrados e internacionalizados. La difusión de productos puede al mismo tiempo ganar impulso y empujar la gastronomía regional, el turismo gastronómico, y otros aspectos generadores de dinamismo económico e integración cultural.
  • Facilitar el transporte colectivo intra regional con prioridad en las personas
    La integración de la infraestructura de transportes de la región, aprovechando la diversidad de opciones, las posibilidades locales de superar los dilemas ambientales y climáticos y las perspectivas de la producción y desarrollo tecnológico, además de la posible construcción de empresas públicas regionales es otro eje fundamental que puede dar soporte a un proceso integrado regional. Aquí es necesario pensar en grande, pues el problema del transporte en largas distancias no se resuelve con la difusión del transporte rodoviario. Por qué no pensar la reactivación e integración de los sistemas ferroviarios locales y de un sistema ferroviario regional? Por qué no pensar en la integración del transporte marítimo y fluvial aprovechando lo que ya existe? Por qué no pensar en la creación de una compañía aérea regional que permita y viabilice la integración de una red de ciudades medianas de la región, con aeronaves de pequeño y medio porte que el potencial de producción aeronáutica existente en la región permite? No estamos hablando de ningún problema abstracto, sino de un problema que probablemente todo latinoamericano que intentó moverse, o mover una carga por el interior de la región ya enfrentó. Es importante considerar el impacto de estos procesos en cada país, lo que significa reafirmar, también, una opción clara por el fortalecimiento del transporte colectivo en los centros urbanos, como forma de desestimular el uso de medios individuales que impactan en la demanda energética.
  • Integración financiera regional
    El proceso de discusión en torno al Banco del Sur mostró las dificultades políticas y las diferentes perspectivas entre los diversos países de la región. Pero mostró también el enorme potencial y las necesidades de desarrollo de un sistema financiero regional que pueda, simultáneamente, regular las finanzas en el ámbito regional y proteger las economías de la región y la economía regional de los shocks externos, crear uno o más mecanismos de fomento al desarrollo regional y permitir un proceso de intercambio dinámico entre las economías de Latinoamérica que no pase por sancionar, a través de la utilización de sus monedas, al poder de las economías centrales del capitalismo – o sea, permitir la creación de una moneda regional, o un sistema en el que una unidad común de referencia, sin necesariamente viabilizar una moneda común, pueda ser utilizada en la región. Las dificultades y la turbulencia financiera, más que una restricción, deberían servir para incrementar las discusiones y acciones orientadas a transitar este proceso de regulación y de desarrollo financiero regional.
  • Solidaridad y complementariedad energética regional
    Las dificultades en la regulación de la generación potencial de energía a través de acuerdos regionales deberían haber conllevado a la consolidación de un ente público regional que regule e impulse un sistema energético integrado. Más allá de los intereses nacionales limitados, la viabilización de la generación de energía en el ámbito regional debe promover el aprovechamiento de todas las alternativas, de modo que la producción sea lo menos nociva posible del medio ambiente y, al mismo tiempo, permita atender a un nuevo patrón de consumo y producción articulado con el proceso de desarrollo regional. La reducción de las distancias entre la producción y el consumo, reduciendo el gasto de energía con el transporte de los productos podría ser una de las muchas iniciativas para cimentar un nuevo patrón energético que, fundamentalmente, debería estar basado en la premisa de la soberanía y solidaridad energética, buscando la eficiencia, la diversificación de las fuentes y el foco en energías renovables.
  • Un nuevo patrón de participación y transparencia
    Es necesario pensar de manera conjunta entre sectores políticos y sociales afines a la profundización de los procesos de integración latinoamericana, cuáles son los mecanismos idóneos para no reproducir lógicas heredadas de la década del 90, en términos de participación de la ciudadanía. En este sentido, los mecanismos de participación social tienen que ser canales de diálogo y proposición que convoquen y expresen las necesidades y sensibilidades de los movimientos sociales y de los diversos actores y actrices políticos, como partidos y parlamentos, que conforman la sociedad civil organizada, impulsando así la consolidación de la democracia. Por ejemplo, en el caso de los proyectos productivos o de infraestructura que tienen diferentes tipos de impactos territoriales y ambientales, es necesario construir una metodología de participación real en la toma de decisiones que supere la lógica de la “presentación de estudios de impacto ambiental” hoy instrumentalizada por el capital, para garantizar que habrá toma de decisiones en función de los intereses colectivos de los directamente afectados, licencia social (prevista en el Pacto Internacional de Derechos Económicos, Sociales y Culturales de las Naciones Unidas, DESC en su art. 1, inc. 2), repartición de los beneficios e impactos concretos en términos de abatimiento de la pobreza.

La construcción de la integración de y para los pueblos

Ésta, en definitiva, debe ser la esencia y el motor de un nuevo modelo de desarrollo regional, la integración de decenas de millones de latinoamericanas y latinoamericanos a un nuevo patrón de consumo y producción, generador de riqueza y empleo, que permita impulsar el mercado de la región y construir un proceso diferenciado de desarrollo, buscando reducir drásticamente las desigualdades de toda naturaleza, existentes entre las poblaciones de la región.

Pero así como decimos que debemos superar las asimetrías entre los países y dentro de los países de la región, también debemos asumir el compromiso con la reducción de las desigualdades sociales entre los pueblos y dentro de los pueblos. De aquí, que los movimientos sociales nos planteamos la transformación alternativa – del modelo socioeconómico de desarrollo – transformándonos; es decir, que la integración de los pueblos la concebimos partiendo desde la integración de los sujetos sociales diversos dentro de los pueblos. Por ello, la integración de los pueblos – de nuestras naciones – debería ser hecha, no sólo “desde la transformación política para los pueblos”, sino necesariamente con la transformación social desde los pueblos. Entendiendo este proceso como la oportunidad de avanzar en uno de transición hacia otro modelo de producción y consumo, que implica nuevas formas de organización de relaciones sociales, comunitarias y del trabajo.

Transformar debilidad en fuerza, carencias en potencial de desarrollo, desigualdades a ser superadas en posibilidades de transformación y desarrollo tecnológico, el respeto a las diferencias culturales en potencial de impulso, inclusive económico, del proceso de integración regional. Éste es el motor de una alternativa que puede ser construida para que, más allá de la bruma y de las turbulencias de la crisis económica actual, se pueda vislumbrar el potencial real de creación de un mundo diferente y mejor en Latinoamérica y el Caribe y, a partir de allí, integrarlo necesariamente a otras regiones que también deberán aprovechar y desarrollar sus posibilidades.

Hoy los movimientos sociales, frente a la actual crisis global o a la combinación de crisis especificas, tenemos la oportunidad histórica de contribuir a lo que pudiera ser el inicio de la etapa final de un sistema agotado y acorralado, superando la mera respuesta a una crisis desarrollada por las propias contradicciones del sistema que la ha engendrado, con el enfrentamiento real entre incluidos y excluidos.. Este camino sólo será posible en la medida en que podamos construir otra matriz productiva para el desarrollo del vivir bien o el buen vivir.

Alianza Social Continental

marzo 2009

English

Esta crisis es una oportunidad única

La crisis económica actual tiene fundamentos sistémicos y marca el agotamiento del modelo de desarrollo y globalización de tipo neoliberal. Es necesario construir alternativas concretas frente a tal modelo, doctor que venía funcionando sobre una burbuja de múltiples operaciones especulativas. Debe reflexionarse sobre el fin del patrón de funcionamiento de la economía mundial, en general y del sistema financiero, en particular. Al respecto, los países de A.L. están frente a una oportunidad histórica de avanzar hacia un modelo de desarrollo justo y sustentable en la región.

La salida a la crisis no se hará contra un modelo en pleno funcionamiento, puesto que es evidente que éste está agotado y es aquí donde yace tal oportunidad, pues aparece un espacio de proposición y construcción amplio que no era tan visible y esperado algún tiempo atrás, en el mundo del laissez faire – laissez passer, en el mundo del “pensamiento único neoliberal” y del “fin de la historia”.

La crisis en curso expresa la quiebra de un sistema lleno de promesas, que ha mostrado su incapacidad de cumplirlas. El mito del “libre comercio” y el actual modelo hegemónico de producción y gestión de los recursos naturales y energéticos ya no convencen a las mujeres y hombres, quienes han sido excluidos por estas políticas impulsadas por el gran capital.

Por qué la integración regional es una salida

La integración regional aparece hoy como una alternativa para que los países de la región superen la crisis económica global a través de la creación de lazos económicos, dinámicos y solidarios entre ellos.

– Crisis de mercado global y límites de los mercados domésticos

En primer lugar, los mercados globales sufrieron un colapso y perdieron su capacidad de generar dinamismo en las economías de la región, que en los últimos dos añosnavegaron animadamente por las olas de la subida vertiginosa de los precios de las commodities agropecuarias, minerales y energéticas. Inclusive, los impactos de esta crisis que ya se han manifestado en nuestros países, evidencian que las mejoras en algunos indicadores macroeconómicos, logradas mediante este tipo de inserción, no han sido suficientes para producir un cambio estructural del modelo de desarrollo. Es decir, un modelo con mayor homogeneidad sectorial, un mercado interno basado en el consumo de la “base de la pirámide”, exportación diversificada en productos y destinos, calidad de los empleos y los productos generados y mayor justicia social y ambiental.

Por otro lado, no hay garantías de que el panorama económico posterior a la crisis sea el de un mundo con gran liquidez de capitales y de crédito, como el que tuvimos en los últimos años. Por eso, los gobiernos nacionales se ven obligados a construir una propuesta para enfrentar el dilema de esperar a que pase la crisis mundial y, con esto, intentar retomar lentamente el dinamismo de las ventas de los productos de exportación tradicional en el mercado internacional, conscientes de que las probabilidades de que esto ocurra son pocas; o buscar construir limitadas salidas nacionales dentro de los límites de recursos y mercados de la mayor parte de los países de la región.

– Energía, alimentos y agua para todos

América Latina – como región –dispone de abundantes recursos hídricos, bienes ambientales, sociales, culturales, energéticos, minerales y una importante capacidad de desarrollo tecnológico; tiene más posibilidades de autonomía alimentaria, hídrica y energética en comparación con otras regiones del planeta; posee infraestructura en empresas públicas y privadas, que podrían involucrarse en el proceso de construcción de la integración regional; dispone, finalmente, de gobiernos y movimientos sociales con un razonable grado de solidaridad política frente a la perspectiva de integración.

Frente al dilema de la crisis actual, la integración regional aparece como una alternativa viable e importante, como posibilidad de caminar hacia un nuevo modelo de desarrollo, más sustentable y justo que el que hasta hoy fue delineado en nuestros países.

La Integración regional pensada desde los pueblos de la región ofrece mayores oportunidades para nuestros países, pues puede sobreponer el principio de la solidaridad al de la competencia salvaje y el libre mercado, que como sabemos, y bien lo ha demostrado esta crisis, ni lleva al equilibrio ni apunta a la justicia, como pretenden algunos teóricos. Esta integración tendrá que estar fundada en los principios de la complementariedad y solidaridad, y enfocada como resultante hacia el alcance de sociedad más justas y equitativas económica y socialmente, donde el beneficio de los hombres y mujeres de manera integral, sean el objetivo supremo.

Experiencias no tradicionales de integración como el ALBA apuntan a la complementariedad y la solidaridad entre nuestros países para la satisfacción de las necesidades de nuestra población de forma mucho más racional e eficiente que la competencia intra-regional, el libre comercio o el mercado como único mecanismo de regulación.

Los procesos de integración en la región y la disputa por un modelo de integración popular y sustentable.

En el mejor de los casos, el escenario de los procesos de integración en las Américas muestra una evolución lenta que lindera con la parálisis. Algunos avances progresistas en el Mercosur son innegables, como por ejemplo la incorporación formal de la preocupación por las asimetrías existentes en el bloque y la embrionaria creación de fondos para tratar el problema. Se puede hacer un balance similar del establecimiento político y los avances de la UNASUR. Sin embargo, en términos sustantivos, la potencialidad para mejorar la calidad de vida de nuestros pueblos y de los trabajadores en nuestras regiones aún está distante de una realidad.

En el peor de los casos, se observa la funcionalización de los procesos a la lógica neoliberal a través de la adopción del modelo de “regionalismo abierto” cuya aplicación ha dejado huellas enormes en la CAN, América Central y el Caribe. Incentivado mediante la promoción de la competencia indiscriminada hacia dentro y hacia fuera de los bloques y la firma de tratados bilaterales de libre comercio con Europa y Estados Unidos, esta reducción de la integración regional a una mera integración comercial sólo ha erosionado la posibilidad de profundizar otras dimensiones de la integración y nada indica que haya sido beneficiosa para la sociedades de estos países en su conjunto.

Es decir, al observar la extensa experiencia de los procesos de integración regional en las Américas – más de 40 años en algunos casos – no es evidente que la misma, por el camino que hasta ahora ha transitado, tenga un potencial benéfico para nuestros pueblos. Es evidente, en cambio, que la retórica del compromiso político con la integración se ha confrontado frecuentemente en la práctica con soluciones que han dado prioridad a intereses políticos o económicos nacionales, relegando las acciones y soluciones comunes, ante los llamados “costos” de corto plazo de la integración.

Para superar la dimensión política de este problema, la búsqueda de la consolidación de las soberanías nacionales debe ser entendida en el marco del compromiso conjunto de profundización de la democracia y de la autonomía de la región; como ocurrió en el caso de la intervención de UNASUR en la elucidación de los conflictos en Bolivia. En este sentido, el compromiso consistente y sostenido de los gobiernos para tales procesos integradores se tornan piezas fundamentales. Dicho compromiso debe expresarse en la construcción de una institucionalidad sólida, que funcione con políticas y acciones comunes en un verdadero ejercicio de soberanía compartida y real.

No se puede negar que lo que ha hecho posible y viable una integración alternativa es que en muchos países los Estados han recuperado la capacidad de promover el desarrollo productivo y social o han avanzado mucho en ese sentido. Por esta razón, debemos insistir en que esa integración alternativa que buscamos no es incompatible sino complementaria con la defensa y avances en la soberanía nacional. No es la defensa de un nacionalismo estrecho, sino de la posibilidad de un camino hacia la integración entre naciones, que no son simplemente víctimas de los designios de los imperios, sino naciones soberanas que tienen proyectos nacionales de desarrollo, que deben ser articulados regionalmente.

Latinoamérica, la nueva geopolítica y la construcción de un nuevo modelo de desarrollo con base regional.

La integración regional es clave para dos perspectivas estratégicas fundamentales que se abrieron con esta nueva coyuntura histórica:

  • Los países de la región quieren jugar un papel propio en un mundo multipolar que se desarrolla a pesar de las crecientes dificultades del unilateralismo del gobierno de los EUA; ese papel no lo conseguirían separadamente,
  • Cada país aisladamente, incluso los más grandes, no tendría condiciones de implementar dinámicas diferentes a las impulsadas por el mercado mundial globalizado, es decir, los procesos de desarrollo nacional si se quieren pos-neoliberales, necesariamente pasan por la integración regional.
  • Sin embargo, para que una integración camine en ese sentido, es necesario asociar el proceso de integración a uno de transición hacia otro modelo de producción y consumo que supere los límites del actual modelo de desarrollo

La crisis y los límites que ella impone con el fin de mantener el status quo deben ser el motor para la superación de las debilidades hoy existentes y el nuevo dinamismo que las construcciones institucionales deben promover, ligado a la necesidad de responder a la crisis desde un proyecto autónomo y alternativo de desarrollo para la región, es decir, emancipado de los intereses de las potencias centrales.

Cuál es entonces la salida para la integración regional de la que hablamos.

  • Una estrategia productiva organizada y regulada regionalmente
    Antes que nada, debe ser radicalmente diferente al apoyo a las actividades de las grandes empresas, que buscan ganar en el espacio regional la musculatura necesaria para competir e insertarse en el mercado global. El resultado de este tipo de integración es el favorecimiento del aumento de la movilidad y las ganancias del gran capital; estrategia que conocimos durante la década pasada, a través de propuestas como el ALCA y el IIRSA y el empeño por la liberalización progresiva que orienta las negociaciones en la OMC. Aunque estas empresas van a intentar en breve reavivar este movimiento, que podrá caminar libremente si no enfrenta un proyecto de integración solidario que sirva de contrapunto político y económico, esta no es la integración que queremos.

    Esto debe llamar la atención sobre dos elementos importantes para la construcción de la integración regional como alternativa a la crisis. El primero es que una tarea importante de una institucionalidad regional alternativa en proceso de creación, debe ser la regulación de la operación de esas empresas en la escala regional, teniendo en cuenta los intereses sociales, culturales, ambientales y otros. Además, es fundamental estructurar las cadenas de producción en el conjunto de la región a partir de la nueva escala de operación de esas empresas en un ambiente regional, de modo que su expansión no sea vista como un proceso de afirmación de hegemonías y de poderes de algunos países sobre otros, sino como la posibilidad de generación de dinamismo económico, empleo y riqueza en toda la región.

  • La superación de las asimetrías como objetivo de corto, medio y largo plazo
    Una de las prioridades del proceso de integración debe ser la superación de las asimetrías entre los países y dentro de los países de la región: crear sistemas de producción integrados, circuitos de producción, servicios y comercio a los cuales todos puedan integrarse, con el objetivo fundamental de utilizar este proceso para generar oportunidades dinámicas de desarrollo para las regiones y países que hoy presentan más dificultades o se encuentran estancados. Dada la acumulación histórica de fragilidades de regiones y países enteros en América Latina, este proceso debe ser completado, en un primer momento, con políticas específicas que busquen compensar en el corto plazo las asimetrías hoy existentes, principalmente en lo que se refiere al desarrollo social, de forma tal que se reduzcan las diferencias al mismo tiempo que se desarrolla en estas regiones la capacidad de aprovechar las oportunidades dinámicas del proceso.
  • Producción regional de tecnología y cultura
    Hay importantes aspectos que pueden ser incentivados, y que deberían serlo, por su capacidad de impulsar el proceso de desarrollo regional, por la popularización y por el dinamismo que pueden generar, más allá de contribuir con la búsqueda de soluciones a problemas específicos en la región.

    Uno de ellos es la integración de los centros de producción de tecnología y producción/difusión cultural de la región. En diversos países de la región existen espacios de generación de tecnología, especializada o genérica, en diversas áreas (de agricultura y ganadería, pasando por medicamentos hasta industria aeronáutica entre otras). No hay una razón para no integrar esos centros, aprovechando sus sinergias, a través de recursos estimulados en la región, haciendo que las ganancias devenidas de este proceso puedan ser utilizadas en toda América Latina. Lo mismo cuenta para la enorme producción audiovisual, el potencial deportivo, y la capacidad aún mayor, que sólo la creación de una escala de consumo derivada de un mercado ampliado regional puede proporcionar.

    Esta propuesta, además, debe ser defendida en las negociaciones de la OMC y otras negociaciones con otros bloques -como es el caso de la UE- sobre “Normas de Origen”, que son específicamente utilizadas por las grandes potencias para impedir la articulación productiva de los pequeños países y economías emergentes con destino a terceros mercados.

  • Prioridad a las pequeñas y medianas empresas
    Otro punto es el incentivo general o sectorial al desarrollo de pequeñas y medianas empresas, que puede ser estimulado por el desarrollo integrado de los mercados regionales. Desde el desarrollo de software hasta la industria de turismo basada en un esquema de pequeñas posadas, aprovechando la diversidad de ambientes y culturas existentes en la región. Las empresas pequeñas o medianas presentan un potencial efectivo de generación de empleos, pero además de eso, acoplarlas al proceso de integración regional – y de un proceso de integración que alimente el desarrollo – podría dar una enorme legitimidad social al proceso.
  • Soberanía alimentaria regional y estímulo a la agricultura familiar en pequeñas y medias unidades de producción
    La viabilidad de algunos productos locales y regionales de la agricultura familiar y campesina choca con los límites del consumo en esas regiones y en algunos países. Por eso, la creación de un mercado regional podría servir para viabilizar una producción agrícola más diversificada, que escapase a la homogeneidad de los productos y procesos de producción tan característica del agronegocio, con sus paquetes tecnológicos y su estructura de comercialización, ambos concentrados e internacionalizados. La difusión de productos puede al mismo tiempo ganar impulso y empujar la gastronomía regional, el turismo gastronómico, y otros aspectos generadores de dinamismo económico e integración cultural.
  • Facilitar el transporte colectivo intra regional con prioridad en las personas
    La integración de la infraestructura de transportes de la región, aprovechando la diversidad de opciones, las posibilidades locales de superar los dilemas ambientales y climáticos y las perspectivas de la producción y desarrollo tecnológico, además de la posible construcción de empresas públicas regionales es otro eje fundamental que puede dar soporte a un proceso integrado regional. Aquí es necesario pensar en grande, pues el problema del transporte en largas distancias no se resuelve con la difusión del transporte rodoviario. Por qué no pensar la reactivación e integración de los sistemas ferroviarios locales y de un sistema ferroviario regional? Por qué no pensar en la integración del transporte marítimo y fluvial aprovechando lo que ya existe? Por qué no pensar en la creación de una compañía aérea regional que permita y viabilice la integración de una red de ciudades medianas de la región, con aeronaves de pequeño y medio porte que el potencial de producción aeronáutica existente en la región permite? No estamos hablando de ningún problema abstracto, sino de un problema que probablemente todo latinoamericano que intentó moverse, o mover una carga por el interior de la región ya enfrentó. Es importante considerar el impacto de estos procesos en cada país, lo que significa reafirmar, también, una opción clara por el fortalecimiento del transporte colectivo en los centros urbanos, como forma de desestimular el uso de medios individuales que impactan en la demanda energética.
  • Integración financiera regional
    El proceso de discusión en torno al Banco del Sur mostró las dificultades políticas y las diferentes perspectivas entre los diversos países de la región. Pero mostró también el enorme potencial y las necesidades de desarrollo de un sistema financiero regional que pueda, simultáneamente, regular las finanzas en el ámbito regional y proteger las economías de la región y la economía regional de los shocks externos, crear uno o más mecanismos de fomento al desarrollo regional y permitir un proceso de intercambio dinámico entre las economías de Latinoamérica que no pase por sancionar, a través de la utilización de sus monedas, al poder de las economías centrales del capitalismo – o sea, permitir la creación de una moneda regional, o un sistema en el que una unidad común de referencia, sin necesariamente viabilizar una moneda común, pueda ser utilizada en la región. Las dificultades y la turbulencia financiera, más que una restricción, deberían servir para incrementar las discusiones y acciones orientadas a transitar este proceso de regulación y de desarrollo financiero regional.
  • Solidaridad y complementariedad energética regional
    Las dificultades en la regulación de la generación potencial de energía a través de acuerdos regionales deberían haber conllevado a la consolidación de un ente público regional que regule e impulse un sistema energético integrado. Más allá de los intereses nacionales limitados, la viabilización de la generación de energía en el ámbito regional debe promover el aprovechamiento de todas las alternativas, de modo que la producción sea lo menos nociva posible del medio ambiente y, al mismo tiempo, permita atender a un nuevo patrón de consumo y producción articulado con el proceso de desarrollo regional. La reducción de las distancias entre la producción y el consumo, reduciendo el gasto de energía con el transporte de los productos podría ser una de las muchas iniciativas para cimentar un nuevo patrón energético que, fundamentalmente, debería estar basado en la premisa de la soberanía y solidaridad energética, buscando la eficiencia, la diversificación de las fuentes y el foco en energías renovables.
  • Un nuevo patrón de participación y transparencia
    Es necesario pensar de manera conjunta entre sectores políticos y sociales afines a la profundización de los procesos de integración latinoamericana, cuáles son los mecanismos idóneos para no reproducir lógicas heredadas de la década del 90, en términos de participación de la ciudadanía. En este sentido, los mecanismos de participación social tienen que ser canales de diálogo y proposición que convoquen y expresen las necesidades y sensibilidades de los movimientos sociales y de los diversos actores y actrices políticos, como partidos y parlamentos, que conforman la sociedad civil organizada, impulsando así la consolidación de la democracia. Por ejemplo, en el caso de los proyectos productivos o de infraestructura que tienen diferentes tipos de impactos territoriales y ambientales, es necesario construir una metodología de participación real en la toma de decisiones que supere la lógica de la “presentación de estudios de impacto ambiental” hoy instrumentalizada por el capital, para garantizar que habrá toma de decisiones en función de los intereses colectivos de los directamente afectados, licencia social (prevista en el Pacto Internacional de Derechos Económicos, Sociales y Culturales de las Naciones Unidas, DESC en su art. 1, inc. 2), repartición de los beneficios e impactos concretos en términos de abatimiento de la pobreza.

La construcción de la integración de y para los pueblos

Ésta, en definitiva, debe ser la esencia y el motor de un nuevo modelo de desarrollo regional, la integración de decenas de millones de latinoamericanas y latinoamericanos a un nuevo patrón de consumo y producción, generador de riqueza y empleo, que permita impulsar el mercado de la región y construir un proceso diferenciado de desarrollo, buscando reducir drásticamente las desigualdades de toda naturaleza, existentes entre las poblaciones de la región.

Pero así como decimos que debemos superar las asimetrías entre los países y dentro de los países de la región, también debemos asumir el compromiso con la reducción de las desigualdades sociales entre los pueblos y dentro de los pueblos. De aquí, que los movimientos sociales nos planteamos la transformación alternativa – del modelo socioeconómico de desarrollo – transformándonos; es decir, que la integración de los pueblos la concebimos partiendo desde la integración de los sujetos sociales diversos dentro de los pueblos. Por ello, la integración de los pueblos – de nuestras naciones – debería ser hecha, no sólo “desde la transformación política para los pueblos”, sino necesariamente con la transformación social desde los pueblos. Entendiendo este proceso como la oportunidad de avanzar en uno de transición hacia otro modelo de producción y consumo, que implica nuevas formas de organización de relaciones sociales, comunitarias y del trabajo.

Transformar debilidad en fuerza, carencias en potencial de desarrollo, desigualdades a ser superadas en posibilidades de transformación y desarrollo tecnológico, el respeto a las diferencias culturales en potencial de impulso, inclusive económico, del proceso de integración regional. Éste es el motor de una alternativa que puede ser construida para que, más allá de la bruma y de las turbulencias de la crisis económica actual, se pueda vislumbrar el potencial real de creación de un mundo diferente y mejor en Latinoamérica y el Caribe y, a partir de allí, integrarlo necesariamente a otras regiones que también deberán aprovechar y desarrollar sus posibilidades.

Hoy los movimientos sociales, frente a la actual crisis global o a la combinación de crisis especificas, tenemos la oportunidad histórica de contribuir a lo que pudiera ser el inicio de la etapa final de un sistema agotado y acorralado, superando la mera respuesta a una crisis desarrollada por las propias contradicciones del sistema que la ha engendrado, con el enfrentamiento real entre incluidos y excluidos.. Este camino sólo será posible en la medida en que podamos construir otra matriz productiva para el desarrollo del vivir bien o el buen vivir.

Alianza Social Continental

marzo 2009

Esta crisis es una oportunidad única

La crisis económica actual tiene fundamentos sistémicos y marca el agotamiento del modelo de desarrollo y globalización de tipo neoliberal. Es necesario construir alternativas concretas frente a tal modelo, que venía funcionando sobre una burbuja de múltiples operaciones especulativas. Debe reflexionarse sobre el fin del patrón de funcionamiento de la economía mundial, view en general y del sistema financiero, en particular. Al respecto, los países de A.L. están frente a una oportunidad histórica de avanzar hacia un modelo de desarrollo justo y sustentable en la región.

La salida a la crisis no se hará contra un modelo en pleno funcionamiento, puesto que es evidente que éste está agotado y es aquí donde yace tal oportunidad, pues aparece un espacio de proposición y construcción amplio que no era tan visible y esperado algún tiempo atrás, en el mundo del laissez faire – laissez passer, en el mundo del “pensamiento único neoliberal” y del “fin de la historia”.

La crisis en curso expresa la quiebra de un sistema lleno de promesas, que ha mostrado su incapacidad de cumplirlas. El mito del “libre comercio” y el actual modelo hegemónico de producción y gestión de los recursos naturales y energéticos ya no convencen a las mujeres y hombres, quienes han sido excluidos por estas políticas impulsadas por el gran capital.

Por qué la integración regional es una salida

La integración regional aparece hoy como una alternativa para que los países de la región superen la crisis económica global a través de la creación de lazos económicos, dinámicos y solidarios entre ellos.

– Crisis de mercado global y límites de los mercados domésticos

En primer lugar, los mercados globales sufrieron un colapso y perdieron su capacidad de generar dinamismo en las economías de la región, que en los últimos dos añosnavegaron animadamente por las olas de la subida vertiginosa de los precios de las commodities agropecuarias, minerales y energéticas. Inclusive, los impactos de esta crisis que ya se han manifestado en nuestros países, evidencian que las mejoras en algunos indicadores macroeconómicos, logradas mediante este tipo de inserción, no han sido suficientes para producir un cambio estructural del modelo de desarrollo. Es decir, un modelo con mayor homogeneidad sectorial, un mercado interno basado en el consumo de la “base de la pirámide”, exportación diversificada en productos y destinos, calidad de los empleos y los productos generados y mayor justicia social y ambiental.

Por otro lado, no hay garantías de que el panorama económico posterior a la crisis sea el de un mundo con gran liquidez de capitales y de crédito, como el que tuvimos en los últimos años. Por eso, los gobiernos nacionales se ven obligados a construir una propuesta para enfrentar el dilema de esperar a que pase la crisis mundial y, con esto, intentar retomar lentamente el dinamismo de las ventas de los productos de exportación tradicional en el mercado internacional, conscientes de que las probabilidades de que esto ocurra son pocas; o buscar construir limitadas salidas nacionales dentro de los límites de recursos y mercados de la mayor parte de los países de la región.

– Energía, alimentos y agua para todos

América Latina – como región –dispone de abundantes recursos hídricos, bienes ambientales, sociales, culturales, energéticos, minerales y una importante capacidad de desarrollo tecnológico; tiene más posibilidades de autonomía alimentaria, hídrica y energética en comparación con otras regiones del planeta; posee infraestructura en empresas públicas y privadas, que podrían involucrarse en el proceso de construcción de la integración regional; dispone, finalmente, de gobiernos y movimientos sociales con un razonable grado de solidaridad política frente a la perspectiva de integración.

Frente al dilema de la crisis actual, la integración regional aparece como una alternativa viable e importante, como posibilidad de caminar hacia un nuevo modelo de desarrollo, más sustentable y justo que el que hasta hoy fue delineado en nuestros países.

La Integración regional pensada desde los pueblos de la región ofrece mayores oportunidades para nuestros países, pues puede sobreponer el principio de la solidaridad al de la competencia salvaje y el libre mercado, que como sabemos, y bien lo ha demostrado esta crisis, ni lleva al equilibrio ni apunta a la justicia, como pretenden algunos teóricos. Esta integración tendrá que estar fundada en los principios de la complementariedad y solidaridad, y enfocada como resultante hacia el alcance de sociedad más justas y equitativas económica y socialmente, donde el beneficio de los hombres y mujeres de manera integral, sean el objetivo supremo.

Experiencias no tradicionales de integración como el ALBA apuntan a la complementariedad y la solidaridad entre nuestros países para la satisfacción de las necesidades de nuestra población de forma mucho más racional e eficiente que la competencia intra-regional, el libre comercio o el mercado como único mecanismo de regulación.

Los procesos de integración en la región y la disputa por un modelo de integración popular y sustentable.

En el mejor de los casos, el escenario de los procesos de integración en las Américas muestra una evolución lenta que lindera con la parálisis. Algunos avances progresistas en el Mercosur son innegables, como por ejemplo la incorporación formal de la preocupación por las asimetrías existentes en el bloque y la embrionaria creación de fondos para tratar el problema. Se puede hacer un balance similar del establecimiento político y los avances de la UNASUR. Sin embargo, en términos sustantivos, la potencialidad para mejorar la calidad de vida de nuestros pueblos y de los trabajadores en nuestras regiones aún está distante de una realidad.

En el peor de los casos, se observa la funcionalización de los procesos a la lógica neoliberal a través de la adopción del modelo de “regionalismo abierto” cuya aplicación ha dejado huellas enormes en la CAN, América Central y el Caribe. Incentivado mediante la promoción de la competencia indiscriminada hacia dentro y hacia fuera de los bloques y la firma de tratados bilaterales de libre comercio con Europa y Estados Unidos, esta reducción de la integración regional a una mera integración comercial sólo ha erosionado la posibilidad de profundizar otras dimensiones de la integración y nada indica que haya sido beneficiosa para la sociedades de estos países en su conjunto.

Es decir, al observar la extensa experiencia de los procesos de integración regional en las Américas – más de 40 años en algunos casos – no es evidente que la misma, por el camino que hasta ahora ha transitado, tenga un potencial benéfico para nuestros pueblos. Es evidente, en cambio, que la retórica del compromiso político con la integración se ha confrontado frecuentemente en la práctica con soluciones que han dado prioridad a intereses políticos o económicos nacionales, relegando las acciones y soluciones comunes, ante los llamados “costos” de corto plazo de la integración.

Para superar la dimensión política de este problema, la búsqueda de la consolidación de las soberanías nacionales debe ser entendida en el marco del compromiso conjunto de profundización de la democracia y de la autonomía de la región; como ocurrió en el caso de la intervención de UNASUR en la elucidación de los conflictos en Bolivia. En este sentido, el compromiso consistente y sostenido de los gobiernos para tales procesos integradores se tornan piezas fundamentales. Dicho compromiso debe expresarse en la construcción de una institucionalidad sólida, que funcione con políticas y acciones comunes en un verdadero ejercicio de soberanía compartida y real.

No se puede negar que lo que ha hecho posible y viable una integración alternativa es que en muchos países los Estados han recuperado la capacidad de promover el desarrollo productivo y social o han avanzado mucho en ese sentido. Por esta razón, debemos insistir en que esa integración alternativa que buscamos no es incompatible sino complementaria con la defensa y avances en la soberanía nacional. No es la defensa de un nacionalismo estrecho, sino de la posibilidad de un camino hacia la integración entre naciones, que no son simplemente víctimas de los designios de los imperios, sino naciones soberanas que tienen proyectos nacionales de desarrollo, que deben ser articulados regionalmente.

Latinoamérica, la nueva geopolítica y la construcción de un nuevo modelo de desarrollo con base regional.

La integración regional es clave para dos perspectivas estratégicas fundamentales que se abrieron con esta nueva coyuntura histórica:

  • Los países de la región quieren jugar un papel propio en un mundo multipolar que se desarrolla a pesar de las crecientes dificultades del unilateralismo del gobierno de los EUA; ese papel no lo conseguirían separadamente,
  • Cada país aisladamente, incluso los más grandes, no tendría condiciones de implementar dinámicas diferentes a las impulsadas por el mercado mundial globalizado, es decir, los procesos de desarrollo nacional si se quieren pos-neoliberales, necesariamente pasan por la integración regional.
  • Sin embargo, para que una integración camine en ese sentido, es necesario asociar el proceso de integración a uno de transición hacia otro modelo de producción y consumo que supere los límites del actual modelo de desarrollo

La crisis y los límites que ella impone con el fin de mantener el status quo deben ser el motor para la superación de las debilidades hoy existentes y el nuevo dinamismo que las construcciones institucionales deben promover, ligado a la necesidad de responder a la crisis desde un proyecto autónomo y alternativo de desarrollo para la región, es decir, emancipado de los intereses de las potencias centrales.

Cuál es entonces la salida para la integración regional de la que hablamos.

  • Una estrategia productiva organizada y regulada regionalmente
    Antes que nada, debe ser radicalmente diferente al apoyo a las actividades de las grandes empresas, que buscan ganar en el espacio regional la musculatura necesaria para competir e insertarse en el mercado global. El resultado de este tipo de integración es el favorecimiento del aumento de la movilidad y las ganancias del gran capital; estrategia que conocimos durante la década pasada, a través de propuestas como el ALCA y el IIRSA y el empeño por la liberalización progresiva que orienta las negociaciones en la OMC. Aunque estas empresas van a intentar en breve reavivar este movimiento, que podrá caminar libremente si no enfrenta un proyecto de integración solidario que sirva de contrapunto político y económico, esta no es la integración que queremos.



    Esto debe llamar la atención sobre dos elementos importantes para la construcción de la integración regional como alternativa a la crisis. El primero es que una tarea importante de una institucionalidad regional alternativa en proceso de creación, debe ser la regulación de la operación de esas empresas en la escala regional, teniendo en cuenta los intereses sociales, culturales, ambientales y otros. Además, es fundamental estructurar las cadenas de producción en el conjunto de la región a partir de la nueva escala de operación de esas empresas en un ambiente regional, de modo que su expansión no sea vista como un proceso de afirmación de hegemonías y de poderes de algunos países sobre otros, sino como la posibilidad de generación de dinamismo económico, empleo y riqueza en toda la región.

  • La superación de las asimetrías como objetivo de corto, medio y largo plazo
    Una de las prioridades del proceso de integración debe ser la superación de las asimetrías entre los países y dentro de los países de la región: crear sistemas de producción integrados, circuitos de producción, servicios y comercio a los cuales todos puedan integrarse, con el objetivo fundamental de utilizar este proceso para generar oportunidades dinámicas de desarrollo para las regiones y países que hoy presentan más dificultades o se encuentran estancados. Dada la acumulación histórica de fragilidades de regiones y países enteros en América Latina, este proceso debe ser completado, en un primer momento, con políticas específicas que busquen compensar en el corto plazo las asimetrías hoy existentes, principalmente en lo que se refiere al desarrollo social, de forma tal que se reduzcan las diferencias al mismo tiempo que se desarrolla en estas regiones la capacidad de aprovechar las oportunidades dinámicas del proceso.
  • Producción regional de tecnología y cultura
    Hay importantes aspectos que pueden ser incentivados, y que deberían serlo, por su capacidad de impulsar el proceso de desarrollo regional, por la popularización y por el dinamismo que pueden generar, más allá de contribuir con la búsqueda de soluciones a problemas específicos en la región.



    Uno de ellos es la integración de los centros de producción de tecnología y producción/difusión cultural de la región. En diversos países de la región existen espacios de generación de tecnología, especializada o genérica, en diversas áreas (de agricultura y ganadería, pasando por medicamentos hasta industria aeronáutica entre otras). No hay una razón para no integrar esos centros, aprovechando sus sinergias, a través de recursos estimulados en la región, haciendo que las ganancias devenidas de este proceso puedan ser utilizadas en toda América Latina. Lo mismo cuenta para la enorme producción audiovisual, el potencial deportivo, y la capacidad aún mayor, que sólo la creación de una escala de consumo derivada de un mercado ampliado regional puede proporcionar.

    Esta propuesta, además, debe ser defendida en las negociaciones de la OMC y otras negociaciones con otros bloques -como es el caso de la UE- sobre “Normas de Origen”, que son específicamente utilizadas por las grandes potencias para impedir la articulación productiva de los pequeños países y economías emergentes con destino a terceros mercados.

  • Prioridad a las pequeñas y medianas empresas
    Otro punto es el incentivo general o sectorial al desarrollo de pequeñas y medianas empresas, que puede ser estimulado por el desarrollo integrado de los mercados regionales. Desde el desarrollo de software hasta la industria de turismo basada en un esquema de pequeñas posadas, aprovechando la diversidad de ambientes y culturas existentes en la región. Las empresas pequeñas o medianas presentan un potencial efectivo de generación de empleos, pero además de eso, acoplarlas al proceso de integración regional – y de un proceso de integración que alimente el desarrollo – podría dar una enorme legitimidad social al proceso.
  • Soberanía alimentaria regional y estímulo a la agricultura familiar en pequeñas y medias unidades de producción
    La viabilidad de algunos productos locales y regionales de la agricultura familiar y campesina choca con los límites del consumo en esas regiones y en algunos países. Por eso, la creación de un mercado regional podría servir para viabilizar una producción agrícola más diversificada, que escapase a la homogeneidad de los productos y procesos de producción tan característica del agronegocio, con sus paquetes tecnológicos y su estructura de comercialización, ambos concentrados e internacionalizados. La difusión de productos puede al mismo tiempo ganar impulso y empujar la gastronomía regional, el turismo gastronómico, y otros aspectos generadores de dinamismo económico e integración cultural.
  • Facilitar el transporte colectivo intra regional con prioridad en las personas
    La integración de la infraestructura de transportes de la región, aprovechando la diversidad de opciones, las posibilidades locales de superar los dilemas ambientales y climáticos y las perspectivas de la producción y desarrollo tecnológico, además de la posible construcción de empresas públicas regionales es otro eje fundamental que puede dar soporte a un proceso integrado regional. Aquí es necesario pensar en grande, pues el problema del transporte en largas distancias no se resuelve con la difusión del transporte rodoviario. Por qué no pensar la reactivación e integración de los sistemas ferroviarios locales y de un sistema ferroviario regional? Por qué no pensar en la integración del transporte marítimo y fluvial aprovechando lo que ya existe? Por qué no pensar en la creación de una compañía aérea regional que permita y viabilice la integración de una red de ciudades medianas de la región, con aeronaves de pequeño y medio porte que el potencial de producción aeronáutica existente en la región permite? No estamos hablando de ningún problema abstracto, sino de un problema que probablemente todo latinoamericano que intentó moverse, o mover una carga por el interior de la región ya enfrentó. Es importante considerar el impacto de estos procesos en cada país, lo que significa reafirmar, también, una opción clara por el fortalecimiento del transporte colectivo en los centros urbanos, como forma de desestimular el uso de medios individuales que impactan en la demanda energética.
  • Integración financiera regional
    El proceso de discusión en torno al Banco del Sur mostró las dificultades políticas y las diferentes perspectivas entre los diversos países de la región. Pero mostró también el enorme potencial y las necesidades de desarrollo de un sistema financiero regional que pueda, simultáneamente, regular las finanzas en el ámbito regional y proteger las economías de la región y la economía regional de los shocks externos, crear uno o más mecanismos de fomento al desarrollo regional y permitir un proceso de intercambio dinámico entre las economías de Latinoamérica que no pase por sancionar, a través de la utilización de sus monedas, al poder de las economías centrales del capitalismo – o sea, permitir la creación de una moneda regional, o un sistema en el que una unidad común de referencia, sin necesariamente viabilizar una moneda común, pueda ser utilizada en la región. Las dificultades y la turbulencia financiera, más que una restricción, deberían servir para incrementar las discusiones y acciones orientadas a transitar este proceso de regulación y de desarrollo financiero regional.
  • Solidaridad y complementariedad energética regional
    Las dificultades en la regulación de la generación potencial de energía a través de acuerdos regionales deberían haber conllevado a la consolidación de un ente público regional que regule e impulse un sistema energético integrado. Más allá de los intereses nacionales limitados, la viabilización de la generación de energía en el ámbito regional debe promover el aprovechamiento de todas las alternativas, de modo que la producción sea lo menos nociva posible del medio ambiente y, al mismo tiempo, permita atender a un nuevo patrón de consumo y producción articulado con el proceso de desarrollo regional. La reducción de las distancias entre la producción y el consumo, reduciendo el gasto de energía con el transporte de los productos podría ser una de las muchas iniciativas para cimentar un nuevo patrón energético que, fundamentalmente, debería estar basado en la premisa de la soberanía y solidaridad energética, buscando la eficiencia, la diversificación de las fuentes y el foco en energías renovables.
  • Un nuevo patrón de participación y transparencia
    Es necesario pensar de manera conjunta entre sectores políticos y sociales afines a la profundización de los procesos de integración latinoamericana, cuáles son los mecanismos idóneos para no reproducir lógicas heredadas de la década del 90, en términos de participación de la ciudadanía. En este sentido, los mecanismos de participación social tienen que ser canales de diálogo y proposición que convoquen y expresen las necesidades y sensibilidades de los movimientos sociales y de los diversos actores y actrices políticos, como partidos y parlamentos, que conforman la sociedad civil organizada, impulsando así la consolidación de la democracia. Por ejemplo, en el caso de los proyectos productivos o de infraestructura que tienen diferentes tipos de impactos territoriales y ambientales, es necesario construir una metodología de participación real en la toma de decisiones que supere la lógica de la “presentación de estudios de impacto ambiental” hoy instrumentalizada por el capital, para garantizar que habrá toma de decisiones en función de los intereses colectivos de los directamente afectados, licencia social (prevista en el Pacto Internacional de Derechos Económicos, Sociales y Culturales de las Naciones Unidas, DESC en su art. 1, inc. 2), repartición de los beneficios e impactos concretos en términos de abatimiento de la pobreza.

La construcción de la integración de y para los pueblos

Ésta, en definitiva, debe ser la esencia y el motor de un nuevo modelo de desarrollo regional, la integración de decenas de millones de latinoamericanas y latinoamericanos a un nuevo patrón de consumo y producción, generador de riqueza y empleo, que permita impulsar el mercado de la región y construir un proceso diferenciado de desarrollo, buscando reducir drásticamente las desigualdades de toda naturaleza, existentes entre las poblaciones de la región.

Pero así como decimos que debemos superar las asimetrías entre los países y dentro de los países de la región, también debemos asumir el compromiso con la reducción de las desigualdades sociales entre los pueblos y dentro de los pueblos. De aquí, que los movimientos sociales nos planteamos la transformación alternativa – del modelo socioeconómico de desarrollo – transformándonos; es decir, que la integración de los pueblos la concebimos partiendo desde la integración de los sujetos sociales diversos dentro de los pueblos. Por ello, la integración de los pueblos – de nuestras naciones – debería ser hecha, no sólo “desde la transformación política para los pueblos”, sino necesariamente con la transformación social desde los pueblos. Entendiendo este proceso como la oportunidad de avanzar en uno de transición hacia otro modelo de producción y consumo, que implica nuevas formas de organización de relaciones sociales, comunitarias y del trabajo.

Transformar debilidad en fuerza, carencias en potencial de desarrollo, desigualdades a ser superadas en posibilidades de transformación y desarrollo tecnológico, el respeto a las diferencias culturales en potencial de impulso, inclusive económico, del proceso de integración regional. Éste es el motor de una alternativa que puede ser construida para que, más allá de la bruma y de las turbulencias de la crisis económica actual, se pueda vislumbrar el potencial real de creación de un mundo diferente y mejor en Latinoamérica y el Caribe y, a partir de allí, integrarlo necesariamente a otras regiones que también deberán aprovechar y desarrollar sus posibilidades.

Hoy los movimientos sociales, frente a la actual crisis global o a la combinación de crisis especificas, tenemos la oportunidad histórica de contribuir a lo que pudiera ser el inicio de la etapa final de un sistema agotado y acorralado, superando la mera respuesta a una crisis desarrollada por las propias contradicciones del sistema que la ha engendrado, con el enfrentamiento real entre incluidos y excluidos.. Este camino sólo será posible en la medida en que podamos construir otra matriz productiva para el desarrollo del vivir bien o el buen vivir.

Declaración de la Asamblea de los movimientos sociales, FSM 2009

Allan Wallis
In her book, sales Medieval People, Eileen Powers describes the everyday lives of individuals living in the Middle Ages. She begins her study by asking the deceptively simple question, how did people know they were medieval? Clearly, they could not open the morning paper or turn on the evening news and read: “Rome Falls: Middle Ages Begin!” Often, momentous transformations fail our perception, in part, because we try to frame them in our old ways of seeing.
Bruce Katz, of the Brooking Institution observes that today we live our lives regionally. We live in one community, work in another, shop in still others–where the price or selection is right, and cheer for a “home” team that is twenty-five miles away. Yet we continue to identify ourselves locally, focusing on how different we are from our near neighbors. We are trying to frame the new in term of the old, and our resulting actions are producing failure.
Bill Fulton, author of Reluctant Metropolis, about the Los Angeles area, analyzes that region’s failure to come to terms with its reality. If metro-LA were an independent nation it would have the sixth largest economy in the world, and if it were an independent nation people would have no difficulty identifying with it. Meanwhile, LA continues to tear itself apart from inside.
But not all regions suffer the same paralysis. Around the world–in developed as well as in developing countries, in metropolitan as well as in rural areas–there is an extraordinary amount of innovation directed toward the challenges of creating effective regions.
* In England, a little more than two years ago, British Prime Minister Tony Blair expanded the boundaries of the historic City of London–an area of about one square mile–to encompass the entire region. His action simultaneously created the post of mayor, which has the potential of becoming the second most powerful position in the nation.
* In the Netherlands, at about the same time, Parliament past legislation establishing new regional governments with sweeping powers. As part of that action, a proposal to dissolve the City of Rotterdam–the world’s busiest port–and restructure the region into municipalities of equal size is seriously being considered.
* In the metro region of Denver, Colorado, county and municipal governments have joined together in a voluntary compact to establish an urban growth boundary.
* In the Silicon Valley area of California, a private industry group led development of a regional vision and plan, and has been tracking progress toward its implementation through annual benchmark reports.
All of these examples speak to the emergence of a powerful regional consciousness driving a wide variety of efforts to invent a new capacity for governing regions.
The New System of Regions
The motivating force behind the renewed interest in regionalism is emerging from several sources. First, globalization of the economy. Syndicated columnist Neal Pierce and his colleagues at the Citistates Group observe that the end of the Cold War had the effect of accelerating the globalization of a post-industrial economy. International trade agreements like NAFTA, and the development of a European Community all demonstrate reduced economic competitiveness on a country-by-country basis, and increased competitiveness on a region-by-region basis.
A second challenge consists of achieving sustainable development. Around the world, population pressures are pushing against environmental capacity. Increasingly, we are trying to balance economic growth, with environmental preservation and social equity. Part of the solution requires acting regionally. After all, water basins, air shed, and commuter shed are all regions.
Finally, the US and several other countries are undergoing a devolution revolution. More of the policy making and service delivery functions mandated by federal and state governments are being directed to the local level. Many of these–transportation, air and water quality planning, and an increasing amount of social services planning–are required to be carried out at on a regional basis. Others are becoming regional on a voluntary basis.
In short, we are seeing the rapid emergence of a global system of regions. As Pierce and his colleagues interpret it, a return to citi-states.
The Regional System: What’s new about the “new regionalism”?
These challenges are not transitory. They mark a major shift in the environment in which all sectors–public, private and nonprofit operate–and they call for invention of a new regional system.
Several scholars have begun to use the phrase “the new regionalism.” They mean to contrast current experiments with the old regionalism, which generally refers to a varied body of theory and practice spanning the period from the 1880’s to the 1980s. But what’s new about this new regionalism? Let me briefly describe a set of six contrasting characteristics that I believe help define and distinguish it from the old regionalism.
Governance vs. government. First, the old regionalism was basically about government, specifically about how to insert a new layer in the hierarchy of state-local relations. By contrast, the new regionalism is about governance; that is, establishing vision and goals, and setting policy to achieve them.
The work of governance involves private, nonprofit and public interests. Moreover, it’s not always the public sector that invites the other sectors in. Sometimes it’s the private sector, as in the case of the Silicon Valley in California, that takes the lead. In other cases it’s the nonprofit sector, as in Cleveland, Ohio, that initiates the regional policy dialog.
Emphasis on governance recognizes that ensuring the future quality of life and competitiveness of a region is a shared responsibility of all sectors. Moreover, it requires the shared powers and talents of these sectors working strategically to affect change.
Process vs. structure. The emphasis on governance suggests another characteristic of the new regionalism, it focuses significantly on process rather than on structure. The old regionalism spent a great deal of time looking at structural alternatives such as city/county consolidations, creation of urban counties, the formation of special purpose and multi-purpose authorities, etc. The new regionalism sometimes elects a structural alternative as a strategy for achieving an objective, but its main focus is on processes such as visioning, strategic planning, resolving conflict and building consensus.
In referring to the process-orientation of the new regionalism, it is important to distinguish this from the proceduralism of the old regionalism. The old regionalism used procedures as the pathway through structure. The new regionalism uses process as an alternative to structure and, at times, as a mechanism for creating structure.
Open vs. Closed. The old regionalism was concerned with defining boundaries and jurisdictions. It wanted to clearly demarcate the region in terms of boundaries for growth, service delivery, job markets, pollution sheds, and the like. The region was, in effect, closed. You were either in it, or outside of it.
The new regionalism accepts that boundaries are open, fuzzy or elastic. What defines the extent of the region varies with the issue we’re trying to address or the characteristic we are considering. The fuzziness of boundaries makes it easier to put together the type of cross-sectoral governing coalitions mentioned previously.
Collaboration vs. coordination. The old regionalism focused on coordination including land use, infrastructure development, services, and the like. Coordination typically implied hierarchy; for example, a regional authority with powers to determine the allocation of resources to units of government within its boundaries.
By contrast, the new regionalism focuses on collaboration and voluntary agreement among equals. Collaboration abhors a hierarchy, because that suggests that someone, or some position, is in control. Collaboration thrives when parties to it see each other as distinct yet equal.
Trust vs. Accountability. The old regionalism’s emphasis on coordination was often accompanied by demand for accountability. We are fearful of the accumulation of power, especially in the public sector, so we try to keep it in check through procedures of accountability. More often than not, accountability results in inflexibility.
Rather than accountability, we are now more inclined to talk about trust as a binding element in relations among regional interests. Part of the discussion about trust relates to the idea of employing regional social capital and civic infrastructure. These seem like very odd terms if we are thinking in the context of the old regionalism, but they are essential to ways of doing business under the new regionalism.
Empowerment vs. Power. The old regionalism was perceived as drawing its powers from units of government above and below it. If effect, power was viewed as a zero-sum game, so the power to govern had to be taken from somewhere. Local jurisdictions often felt threatened that their powers would be diminished.
The new regionalism gains power by empowering. In many places, part of this empowerment is directed toward neighborhoods and communities, with the objective of getting them constructively engaged in regional decision making. Empowerment also consists of engaging nonprofits and for-profits in governance decisions that were once treated as the domain of the public sector alone. Rather than assuming a zero-sum game, employing empowerment is based on the assumption that new interests bring new energy, authority, and credibility; in short, it grows power or capacity in order to move a regional agenda.
These combine characteristics describe two different types of systems. The old regionalism is a system that can be characterized as a hierarchy. It models itself after the vertically integrated corporation that attempts to dominate a market by incorporating all of the means of production and distribution associated with its product line. In the corporate world, the hierarchical model is General Motors that tries to own its parts manufacturing and sales enterprises.
The new regionalism is a network-based system. Its center shifts to accommodate different tasks. Likewise, its membership expands to achieve necessary capacity, but shrinks when that capacity is no longer needed. In the corporate world, the network model is Wal-Mart, with a just-in-time relationship with its suppliers.
It’s important to stress that the system that I’ve called the new regionalism does not require dismantling the old regionalism. The old regionalism continues to offer important solutions to significant problems. Rather, the new regionalism is most centrally a response to a new set of problems that the old regionalism was either not aware of, or was not designed to address.
Inventing Regionalism
I want to focus a little more on some of the kinds of efforts that characterize the new regionalism. As I do this, you will see application of many of the system characteristics that I’ve already described.
Visioning. An important activity that often forms part of the new regionalism, is an attempt to define a vision. Normally we think of an established organization trying to articulate a vision as a way to mobilize resources in new directions. Marshall McLuhan tells the story of IBM in the early 1960’s. It had been a company making typewriters, adding machines and the like. It was only when IBM realized that it was in the business of processing information that it could plot a clear course.
Most of the visioning being done in regions is not about setting a new course (e.g., revising a comprehensive plan), but about establishing an initial identity and direction. In 1990, a newly formed group, Silicon Valley Inc., brought the key stakeholders of the San Jose Region of California together to talk about how to make their community a more effective setting for attracting and maintaining computer-associated manufacturing. The process of forming the vision was integral to making the region real, that is, making it a collective entity capable of creating and implementing policy choices.
Benchmarks and indicators. Many regions have developed benchmarking projects. For example, the Citizens League of Greater Cleveland has a benchmarking project comparing the performance of its region with a group of peer regions. A key objective of the project is to stimulate greater regional action as the result of showing people how their region as a whole rates along side others. These benchmarks have simulated diverse interests in the region to begin to think about how they can make themselves more competitive by acting more collaboratively.
In a similar way, the rural and resort area that runs along the spine of California’s Sierra Nevada Mountains, has developed a benchmarking projected called the Sierra Wealth Index. Again, a principal objective was to foster regional identity and mobilization by showing characteristics of the region’s economy, environment and social structure.
These benchmarking projects precede and can operate independent of a vision. But many regions have used benchmarks as a way of demonstrating that they are making progress toward realizing their visions and its goals. The Silicon Valley vision, mentioned previously, was followed by an indicators project that has been repeated every year for almost a decade now. The indicator report reminds people that there is a vision and that work is being done to realize it.
Media/civic journalism. Another way that regional awareness is being developed and shaped is by the media. Regional reporting has become part of the new civic journalism, providing stories that convey news across the region, but also developing a shared sense of regional assets and challenges. For example, the Miami Herald published a story recently on racial and ethnic relations in that region. It was based on a survey and focus groups conducted by the paper.
For almost twenty years now, the syndicated journalist Neal Pierce has been publishing reports on regions that are sponsored by and appear in the newspaper of that region. The Pierce Reports are designed to raise awareness of regional issues as well as to suggest solutions.
In addition to this kind of reporting, some of the most powerful–though unintentional–ways that the media conveys a sense of regionalism is in the images it provides as part of the evening weather forecast or the morning traffic report. We may be glad that we don’t have to commute on a particular freeway, but we nevertheless know that traffic there is part of life in our region.
Leadership development. One of the resources often lacking in regions is a corps of leaders who are willing to be advocates and champions for regional issues. Collaborative Economics, a research and training organization in Palo Alto, California has used the term “civic entrepreneurs” to describe such people. Others have referred to them as boundary-crossers. However you describe them, they serve the same role; to build bridges across sectors and jurisdictions in order to help unify a region. Many regions have developed training programs to try to grow new leaders capable of addressing regional problems.
I’ve already mentioned the idea of vision, so it’s important to stress with regard to regional leadership that such individuals are typically not the creators of a vision. Rather, they work collaboratively to facilitate a shared vision among stakeholders of a region.
Network formation and growing social capital. The new regionalism is highly dependent on formal and informal networks of social interaction. Research by political scientists, such as Robert Putnam at Harvard, conclude that regions rich in such networks are in a better position to identify opportunities and mobilize resources to advance themselves. Putnam calls these networks “social capital.”
One of the things that many regions are trying to do, often in connection with leadership development, is to grow more social capital by expanding existing networks and creating new ones. Many US cities have leadership training programs that focus on a specific city, but there are still relatively few that have an explicit regional focus. Nevertheless, they are emerging and becoming a little more common.
One form that these new networks are taking is as regional civic organizations. These are nonprofits that draw membership from the public, private and nonprofit sectors. Their goal is to foster regional awareness and action.
Collaboration and Conflict Resolution. A final area that I want to mention, one where a good deal of innovation is taking place, is around building skills of collaboration and conflict resolution. The Greenbelt Alliance in the Bay area has been working with individual communities to achieve the collective development of a greenbelt. In Denver, county and municipal governments have signed on to implementing a voluntary growth boundary.
In several regions collaboration has taken a form that some business analysts have described a “coop-etition”. That is a situation where the jurisdictions in a region collaborate on selected activities, but compete on others. An example of this, again from Denver, is the Denver Network. This initiative, supported by all of the region’s chambers of commerce, involves marketing to region as a whole to out-of-state prospects. Once strong interest is expressed by a firm in locating there, individual communities are free to compete to get it for themselves.
In addition to such collaborative efforts, many regions have developed a conflict resolution capacity in order to reduce inter-jurisdictional disputes. Such disputes can paralyze a region, making it impossible to provide affordable housing, site landfills, or widening roads. Developing skills of collaborative leadership and conflict resolution are important, if not essential, in overcoming this paralysis, as well as in implementing a shared vision. Although these are skills that one would ideally like to find in, or train regional leaders to have, they are needed by more than leaders. Ciizens of the region also have to adopt an ethic of collaboration.
These kinds of activities or initiatives are increasingly common in US regions. Most of the time they are initiated independently, often by separate organizations, but the regions which appear to benefits most from them try to sequence such activities so as to developed increasing regional awareness and mobilization.
Regional Capacities
Every region is going about the process of responding to challenges focused on a regional-scale in somewhat different and unique ways. One reason for the diversity of approaches is that the needs fostering regionalism differ from place-to-place. Some places are struggling to transform an old economy into a new one (e.g., Pittsburgh); other places are too new to ever have had an old economy (e.g., Las Vegas). In some places a threat to the natural environment (water pollution) or a threat from the natural environment (hurricanes) is the motivating factor.
It’s important to recognize that it is not needs per se that motivate regional action, but the perception of need. There are many regions that face significant environmental threats, but these threats are not mobilizing. Something like the threat of a declining economy can serve as a clarion call to action in one region, but only stimulates internal fragmentation in another region.
The approach taken by regions can also vary based on the degree to which residents of a region identify with it and perceive themselves to be citizens of a region. Distinguishing geographic features and natural boundaries can help foster regional identity. A common economy, a distinct cuisine, dialects, customs, a unique architectural style, a winning national sports franchise, and the like can all be elements fostering identity and citizenship.
We can think of the combination of perceived regional needs and identity as being strong or weak along a continuum. Residents who not only identify with the region, but who have developed a commitment of stewardship will characterize a region with strong identity. They will be concerned about preserving its physical environment and those aspects of its quality of life that are uniquely associated with the region
Beyond differences in motivating needs and strength of identity, regions vary in terms of capacity. For example, a region that already has a strong tradition of environmental stewardship will find it easier to form a regional response to an environmental threat than one where no such capacity has been developed.
An important part of regional capacity, that we have only recently come to appreciate, is the idea of social capital that I mentioned previously. This consists of the formal and informal networks of communication among individuals and interest groups comprising a region. Shared values and trust among participants further define such networks.
We can also think of capacity as forming a continuum from strong to weak. Strong capacity consists of the ability to identity threats, as well as opportunities, and to mobile resources to move a regional in a positive direction. Capacity includes such things as being able to perform technical analysis, institution in which people have trust and who are able to work with one another, and leadership which is regionally and not just locally focused.
Path Dependency
Economic historians observe that the way organizations, as well as nations, respond to a challenge depends on their past experiences. The picture just painted of regional capacities can be thought of more holistically in terms of establishing pathways of action embedded, in part, in institutional capacities.
Economic historian Douglass C. North concludes, “once a development path is set on a particular course, the network externalities, the learning process of organizations, and the historically derived subjective modeling of the issues reinforce the course. In the case of economic growth, an adaptively efficient pathÉallows for a maximum of choices under uncertainty for the pursuit of various trial methods of undertaking activities, and for an efficient feedback mechanism to identify methods that are relatively inefficient and to eliminate them” (1990, p.99)
Applying North’s observation to regions, one could conclude that those regions that have developed formal and informal institutional arrangements for identifying challenges, as well as opportunities, not only act on them, but in so doing reinforce their strength as regions. Such regions will have lower costs in engaging in regional transaction because they are able to employ established capacity.
By contrast, the greatest challenge is for regions with low capacity to develop the ability to act regionally. They will have to place considerable resources into the effort, and will quite likely have to circumvent the work of some established institutions that effectively fragment the region. This is a formable task, but failure to address it may mean that such regions will fall further and further behind in the new world order that is so rapidly forming around us.

MuniMall.net

Belém

Para hacer frente a la crisis son necesarias alternativas anticapitalistas, antiracistas, anti-imperialistas, feministas, ecológicas y socialistas.

Estamos en América Latina donde en las últimas décadas se ha dado el reencuentro entre los movimientos sociales y los movimientos indígenas que desde su cosmovisión cuestionan radicalmente el sistema capitalista; y en los últimos años ha conocido luchas sociales muy radicales que condujeron al derrocamiento de gobiernos neoliberales y el surgimiento de gobiernos que han llevado a cabo reformas positivas como la nacionalización de sectores vitales de la economia y reformas constitucionales democráticas.
En este contexto, los movimientos sociales de America latina han actuado de forma acertada: apoyar las medidas positivas que adoptan estos gobiernos, manteniendo su independencia y su capacidad de crítica en relación a ellos. Esas experiencias nos ayudarán a reforzar la firme resistencia de los pueblos contra la política de los gobiernos, de las grandes empresas y los banqueros que están descargando los efectos de esta crisis sobre las espaldas de las y los oprimidos.
En la actualidad los movimientos sociales a escala planetaria afrontamos un desafió de alcance histórico. La crisis capitalista internacional que impacta a la humanidad se expresa en varios planos : es una crisis alimentaría, financiera, económica, climática, energética, migratoria…, de civilización, que viene a la par de la crisis del orden y las estructuras políticas internacionales.
Estamos ante una crisis global provocada por el capitalismo que no tiene salida dentro de este sistema. Todas las medidas adoptadas para salir de la crisis sólo buscan socializar las pérdidas para asegurar la supervivencia de un sistema basado en la privatización de sectores estratégicos de la economía, de los servicios públicos, de los recursos naturales y energéticos, la mercantilización de la vida y la explotación del trabajo y de la naturaleza, así como la transferencia de recursos de la periferia al centro y de los trabajadores y trabajadoras a la clase capitalista.
Este sistema se rige por la explotación, la competencia exarcebada, la promoción del interés privado individual en detrimento del colectivo y la acumulación frenética de riqueza por un puñado de acaudalados. Genera guerras sangrientas, alimenta la xenofobia, el racismo y los extremismos religiosos; agudiza la opresión de las mujeres e incrementa la criminalización de los movimientos sociales. En el cuadro de estas crisis, los derechos de los pueblos son sistemáticamente negados.
La salvaje agresión del gobierno israelí contra el pueblo palestino, violando el derecho internacional, constituye un crimen de guerra, un crimen contra la humanidad y un símbolo de esta negación que también sufren otros pueblos del mundo.
Esta vergonzosa impunidad debe terminar. Los movimientos sociales reafirman aquí su activo sostén a la lucha del pueblo palestino así como todas las acciones de los pueblos del mundo contra la opresión.
Para hacer frente a esta crisis es necesario ir a la raíz de los problemas y avanzar los más rápidamente posible hacia la construcción de una alternativa radical que erradique el sistema capitalista y la dominación patriarcal.
Es necesario construir una sociedad basada en la satisfacción de las necesidades sociales y el respeto de los derechos de la naturaleza, asi como en la participación popular en un contexto de plenas libertades políticas. Es necesario garantizar la vigencia de todos los tratados internacionales sobre los derechos civiles, políticos, sociales y culturales (individuales y colectivos), que son indivisibles.
En este camino tenemos que luchar, impulsando la más amplia movilización popular, por una serie de medidas urgentes como:
– La nacionalización de la banca sin indemnización y bajo control social
– Reducción del tiempo de trabajo sin reducción del salario
– Medidas para garantizar la soberanía alimentaria y enérgetica
– Poner fin a las guerras, retirar las tropas de ocupación y desmantelar las bases militares extranjeras
– Reconocer la soberanía y autonomía de los pueblos, garantizando el derecho a la autodeterminación
– Garantizar el derecho a la tierra, territorio, trabajo, educación y salud para todas y todos
– Democratizar los medios de comunicación y de conocimiento
– ….
El proceso de emancipación social que persigue el proyecto ecologista, socialista y feminista del siglo 21 aspira a liberar a la sociedad de la dominación que ejercen los capitalistas sobre los grandes medios de producción, comunicación y servicios, apoyando formas de propiedad de interés social: pequeña propiedad territorial familiar, propiedad pública, propiedad cooperativa, propiedad comunal y colectiva…
Esta alternativa debe ser feminista porque resulta imposible construir una sociedad basada en la justicia social y la igualdad de derechos si la mitad de la humanidad es oprimida y explotada.
Por último, nos comprometemos a enriquecer el proceso de la construcción de la sociedad basada en el “buen vivir” reconociendo el protagonismo y la aportación de los pueblos indígenas.
Los movimientos sociales estamos ante una ocasión histórica para desarrollar iniciativas de emancipación a escala internacional. Sólo la lucha social de masas puede sacar al pueblo de la crisis. Para impulsarla es necesario desarrollar un trabajo de base de concienciación y movilización.
El desafió para los movimientos sociales es lograr la convergencia de las movilizaciones globales a escala planetaria y reforzar nuestra capacidad de acción favoreciendo la convergencia de todos los movimientos que buscan resistir todas las formas de opresión y explotación.

Para ello nos comprometemos a:
* Desarrollar una semana de acción global contra el capitalismo y la guerra del 28 de marzo al 4 de abril 2009:
– Movilización contra el G-20 el 28 de marzo;
– Movilización contra la guerra y la crisis el 30 de marzo;
– Día de solidaridad con el pueblo palestino impulsando el boicot, las desinversiones y sanciones contra Israel, el 30 de marzo;
– Movilización contra la OTAN en su 60 aniversario 4 de abril;
– etc.
* Fortalecer las movilizaciones que desarrollamos anualmente:
– 8 de marzo: Día internacional de la Mujer
– 17 de abril: Día Internacional por la Soberanía Alimentaria
– 1 de Mayo: Día Internacional de los trabajadores y trabajadoras
– 12 de octubre: Movilización Global de lucha por la Madre Tierra contra la colonización y la mercantilización de la Vida
* Impulsar las agendas de resistencia contra la cumbre del G-8 en Cerdeña, la cumbre climática en Copenhaguer, la cumbre de las Américas en Trinidad y Tobago…
Respondamos a la crisis con soluciones radicales e iniciativas imancipatorias.

Cumbre de los Pueblos del Sur. Declaración de Bahía

Prospectiva Consultoria Brasileira de asuntos Internacionais
Este texto, more about realizado pela Prospectiva Consultoria por solicitação da Central Única dos Trabalhadores, está dividido em três tópicos básicos.
Na primeira parte, discutem-se os principais marcos teóricos sobre a integração regional nos países periféricos, a partir de uma análise da evolução das idéias da Cepal e da Unctad.
O segundo tópico versa sobre o processo real de integração, descrevendo as principais características de blocos como o Mercado Comum Centro-Americano (MCCA), Caricom, Comunidade Andina de Nações (CAN) e Mercosul, as suas semelhanças e diferenças, assim como iniciativas comuns desenvolvidas entre estes projetos de integração. Discutese também a proposta alternativa protagonizada pela Alba e as suas diferenças conceituais e práticas em relação às iniciativas predominantes de integração.
Finalmente, a terceira parte do presente trabalho realiza uma síntese da visão da Aliança Social Continental sobre a integração no âmbito do continente americano, a partir do documento “Alternativa para as Américas”, contrapondo-a com a dinâmica assumida pelo processo real de integração ao longo dos anos noventa.
O objetivo central deste relatório foi o de contrastar a dinâmica concreta da integração regional com os princípios defendidos pela Aliança Social Continental. Desta forma, ele cumpre um papel relevante na medida em que estimula o movimento social organizado do
continente americano a refletir sobre os rumos da integração, mas também sobre as possibilidades de intervenção em processos que não estão concluídos e nem se mostram inexoráveis.
Parte-se do pressuposto de que a reflexão constitui etapa necessária e fundamental para qualquer ação propositiva sobre a realidade econômica e social da região.
>Descargar PDF
Arequipa – Perú, try 11 al 14 de septiembre de 2007
Desde la Ciudad de Arequipa, try escenario de lucha y resistencia, las organizaciones del pueblo y el movimiento social reunidos en la CUMBRE DE LOS PUEBLOS DEL SUR, declaramos:
El modelo económico neoliberal y la criminalización de la protesta social son dos caras de una misma moneda. Así lo demuestra el gobierno aprista en su compromiso con este modelo económico y su alianza con las empresas transnacionales, a las que sirve fielmente, multiplicándoles las facilidades para que continúen con el saqueo de nuestros pueblos y sus recursos naturales.
Lo demuestra, entre otras cosas, en su alianza con las transnacionales mineras, como es el caso de la empresa minera Majaz. Su oposición a la Consulta Vecinal convocada para el domingo 16 por los municipios distritales de las provincias de Ayabaca y Huancabamba (Piura), traducida en la persecución policial y judicial a los dirigentes de esos pueblos y la militarización de las comunidades de Segunda, Caja y Yanta, muestran como el modelo neoliberal recurre cada vez más a la criminalización de las protestas para permanecer, arraigarse y profundizarse intentando arrasar con la legítima protesta social del pueblo peruano.
La XXVIII Convención Minera que se reúne en esta ciudad es una clara expresión de esta alianza empresa-gobierno. Una reunión sectaria y prepotente de los empresarios mineros y los funcionarios gubernamentales para acordar los mecanismos que les permitan continuar con el saqueo de nuestros recursos naturales y la destrucción de las aguas, los territorios y los modos de vida de los pueblos y las comunidades campesinas e indígenas impactadas, a cuyas demandas no solo cierran los oídos y las mentes sino que responden con la represión.
El compromiso del gobierno con el modelo neoliberal y las empresas transnacionales se manifiesta también en su reacción frente al desastre sufrido por la vecina Región Ica el pasado 15 de agosto, donde no solo mostró su total incapacidad para organizar la necesaria asistencia a los damnificados, sino que entregó esta responsabilidad estatal a las manos de la empresa privada y sus cuestionados voceros, para que los inversionistas privados sigan lucrando con el dolor del pueblo.
Este modelo de explotación y depredación es impuesto a nivel global a los países pobres por las transnacionales y los gobiernos de los países ricos. Parte de ese proceso son los tratados de libre comercio, la IIRSA, iniciativa que pretende interconecar nuestros territorios para extraer sus recursos naturales, y el Acuerdo que se está negociando a espaldas de los pueblos entre la Unión Europea y la Comunidad Andina de Naciones, negociación que tendrá un momento crucial en la próxima Cumbre Hemisférica de Presidentes y Jefes de Estado de la UE, América Latina y El Caribe, que se reunirá en Lima en mayo del 2008.
Frente a estos procesos de “integración” comercial, surge la respuesta de los movimientos sociales de ambos continentes, decididos a construir una real integración desde y para los pueblos, articulando las luchas locales y globales, bajo los principios de equidad, solidaridad,reciprocidad y complementariedad. Esta respuesta se expresa en Enlazando Alternativas III.
Enlazando Alternativas Perú es un espacio que reúne a la más amplia diversidad de organizaciones del movimiento social: mujeres, obreros, campesinos, indígenas, afrodescendientes, jóvenes, jubilados y muchos más, todos empeñados en la construcción de un mundo donde se respete y valore la diversidad, un mundo sin dominadores ni dominados. Un mundo equitativo y solidario.
La decisión de construir sociedades más justas y solidarias para forjar un mundo justo, libre y solidario, se manifiesta en los procesos de resistencia surgidos desde los movimientos sociales latinoamericanos (indígenas, campesinos, laborales, etc.) contra los modelos económicos neoliberales impuestos. Resistencia expresada por el pueblo venezolano con el Caracazo de 1989 que respondió al ajuste económico decretado por el gobierno de Carlos Andrés Pérez; por el movimiento indígena ecuatoriano que logró sacar del gobierno a dos presidentes de la república; por el Movimiento de los Trabajadores Rurales Sin Tierra de Brasil; por las comunidades afectadas por la minería del Perú; por la Marcha de los Cuatro Suyos y la Jornada Nacional de Lucha del 11 y 12 de julio también en Perú; por los indígenas bolivianos, entre otros muchos ejemplos de lucha de los pueblos.
Enlazando Alternativas III se reunirá en mayo próximo en la Cumbre de los Pueblos 2008. Camino a ella se están desarrollando cuatro Encuentros Macro Regionales. El primero de ellos esta Cumbre de los Pueblos del Sur de Arequipa, a la que seguirán los Encuentros Macro Regionales Norte, Centro y Lima Metropolitana.
POR TANTO:
Primero: Rechazamos el desarrollo de la XXVIII Convención Minera, expresión de una clara alianza entre los empresarios mineros transnacionales y el gobierno aprista, que acuerdan con prepotencia desconocer la consulta democrática de los pueblos de Ayabaca y Huancabamba, persiguiendo a líderes y dirigentes que defienden derechos de los pueblos, con el apoyo de sectores de la prensa amarilla que defienden los intereses transnacionales neoliberales.
Segundo: Desde este Primer Encuentro Macro Regional, la Cumbre de los Pueblos del Sur, llamamos a todo el país a participar en la organización de la Cumbre de los Pueblos 2008, en respuesta a la Cumbre Hemisférica Oficial y a la negociación de acuerdos comerciales y falsos procesos de integración. Es un espacio amplio y solidario donde todos tenemos cabida, sin afanes hegemónicos ni falsas vanguardias. Todo el movimiento social tiene hoy el deber y la oportunidad históricos de pasar de la protesta a la propuesta política de construir un nuevo Estado para avanzar en la construcción de un nuevo mundo.
Tercero: Llamamos también a participar de manera organizada y unitaria en la Movilización Continental del 12 de octubre, que en el caso peruano tendrá su actividad central en Cusco. En esa fecha y esa ciudad, todos los pueblos y todas las organizaciones del movimiento social dirán un NO rotundo a la imposición de modelos económicos, iniciada hace 515 años, y un SÍ a la unidad para avanzar en el logro de nuestros objetivos. Y se unirán a las voces de todo el Continente, nuestro Abya Yala, en un canto universal.
Cuarto: En la coyuntura actual, asumimos las tareas de vencer las políticas económicas neoliberales, forjando en el camino de la Cumbre de los Pueblos del Perú, un movimiento unitario nacional de resistencia, capaz de asumirse como alternativa de poder.
Quinto: Acordamos penalizar a las empresas transnacionales que contaminan el medio ambiente y afectan la biodiversidad.
Sexto: Acordamos luchar por la nacionalización de los recursos naturales.
Arequipa – Perú, online 11 al 14 de septiembre de 2007
Desde la Ciudad de Arequipa, prescription escenario de lucha y resistencia, salve las organizaciones del pueblo y el movimiento social reunidos en la CUMBRE DE LOS PUEBLOS DEL SUR, declaramos:
El modelo económico neoliberal y la criminalización de la protesta social son dos caras de una misma moneda. Así lo demuestra el gobierno aprista en su compromiso con este modelo económico y su alianza con las empresas transnacionales, a las que sirve fielmente, multiplicándoles las facilidades para que continúen con el saqueo de nuestros pueblos y sus recursos naturales.
Lo demuestra, entre otras cosas, en su alianza con las transnacionales mineras, como es el caso de la empresa minera Majaz. Su oposición a la Consulta Vecinal convocada para el domingo 16 por los municipios distritales de las provincias de Ayabaca y Huancabamba (Piura), traducida en la persecución policial y judicial a los dirigentes de esos pueblos y la militarización de las comunidades de Segunda, Caja y Yanta, muestran como el modelo neoliberal recurre cada vez más a la criminalización de las protestas para permanecer, arraigarse y profundizarse intentando arrasar con la legítima protesta social del pueblo peruano.
La XXVIII Convención Minera que se reúne en esta ciudad es una clara expresión de esta alianza empresa-gobierno. Una reunión sectaria y prepotente de los empresarios mineros y los funcionarios gubernamentales para acordar los mecanismos que les permitan continuar con el saqueo de nuestros recursos naturales y la destrucción de las aguas, los territorios y los modos de vida de los pueblos y las comunidades campesinas e indígenas impactadas, a cuyas demandas no solo cierran los oídos y las mentes sino que responden con la represión.
El compromiso del gobierno con el modelo neoliberal y las empresas transnacionales se manifiesta también en su reacción frente al desastre sufrido por la vecina Región Ica el pasado 15 de agosto, donde no solo mostró su total incapacidad para organizar la necesaria asistencia a los damnificados, sino que entregó esta responsabilidad estatal a las manos de la empresa privada y sus cuestionados voceros, para que los inversionistas privados sigan lucrando con el dolor del pueblo.
Este modelo de explotación y depredación es impuesto a nivel global a los países pobres por las transnacionales y los gobiernos de los países ricos. Parte de ese proceso son los tratados de libre comercio, la IIRSA, iniciativa que pretende interconecar nuestros territorios para extraer sus recursos naturales, y el Acuerdo que se está negociando a espaldas de los pueblos entre la Unión Europea y la Comunidad Andina de Naciones, negociación que tendrá un momento crucial en la próxima Cumbre Hemisférica de Presidentes y Jefes de Estado de la UE, América Latina y El Caribe, que se reunirá en Lima en mayo del 2008.
Frente a estos procesos de “integración” comercial, surge la respuesta de los movimientos sociales de ambos continentes, decididos a construir una real integración desde y para los pueblos, articulando las luchas locales y globales, bajo los principios de equidad, solidaridad,reciprocidad y complementariedad. Esta respuesta se expresa en Enlazando Alternativas III.
Enlazando Alternativas Perú es un espacio que reúne a la más amplia diversidad de organizaciones del movimiento social: mujeres, obreros, campesinos, indígenas, afrodescendientes, jóvenes, jubilados y muchos más, todos empeñados en la construcción de un mundo donde se respete y valore la diversidad, un mundo sin dominadores ni dominados. Un mundo equitativo y solidario.
La decisión de construir sociedades más justas y solidarias para forjar un mundo justo, libre y solidario, se manifiesta en los procesos de resistencia surgidos desde los movimientos sociales latinoamericanos (indígenas, campesinos, laborales, etc.) contra los modelos económicos neoliberales impuestos. Resistencia expresada por el pueblo venezolano con el Caracazo de 1989 que respondió al ajuste económico decretado por el gobierno de Carlos Andrés Pérez; por el movimiento indígena ecuatoriano que logró sacar del gobierno a dos presidentes de la república; por el Movimiento de los Trabajadores Rurales Sin Tierra de Brasil; por las comunidades afectadas por la minería del Perú; por la Marcha de los Cuatro Suyos y la Jornada Nacional de Lucha del 11 y 12 de julio también en Perú; por los indígenas bolivianos, entre otros muchos ejemplos de lucha de los pueblos.
Enlazando Alternativas III se reunirá en mayo próximo en la Cumbre de los Pueblos 2008. Camino a ella se están desarrollando cuatro Encuentros Macro Regionales. El primero de ellos esta Cumbre de los Pueblos del Sur de Arequipa, a la que seguirán los Encuentros Macro Regionales Norte, Centro y Lima Metropolitana.
POR TANTO:
Primero: Rechazamos el desarrollo de la XXVIII Convención Minera, expresión de una clara alianza entre los empresarios mineros transnacionales y el gobierno aprista, que acuerdan con prepotencia desconocer la consulta democrática de los pueblos de Ayabaca y Huancabamba, persiguiendo a líderes y dirigentes que defienden derechos de los pueblos, con el apoyo de sectores de la prensa amarilla que defienden los intereses transnacionales neoliberales.
Segundo: Desde este Primer Encuentro Macro Regional, la Cumbre de los Pueblos del Sur, llamamos a todo el país a participar en la organización de la Cumbre de los Pueblos 2008, en respuesta a la Cumbre Hemisférica Oficial y a la negociación de acuerdos comerciales y falsos procesos de integración. Es un espacio amplio y solidario donde todos tenemos cabida, sin afanes hegemónicos ni falsas vanguardias. Todo el movimiento social tiene hoy el deber y la oportunidad históricos de pasar de la protesta a la propuesta política de construir un nuevo Estado para avanzar en la construcción de un nuevo mundo.
Tercero: Llamamos también a participar de manera organizada y unitaria en la Movilización Continental del 12 de octubre, que en el caso peruano tendrá su actividad central en Cusco. En esa fecha y esa ciudad, todos los pueblos y todas las organizaciones del movimiento social dirán un NO rotundo a la imposición de modelos económicos, iniciada hace 515 años, y un SÍ a la unidad para avanzar en el logro de nuestros objetivos. Y se unirán a las voces de todo el Continente, nuestro Abya Yala, en un canto universal.
Cuarto: En la coyuntura actual, asumimos las tareas de vencer las políticas económicas neoliberales, forjando en el camino de la Cumbre de los Pueblos del Perú, un movimiento unitario nacional de resistencia, capaz de asumirse como alternativa de poder.
Quinto: Acordamos penalizar a las empresas transnacionales que contaminan el medio ambiente y afectan la biodiversidad.
Sexto: Acordamos luchar por la nacionalización de los recursos naturales.
Representantes de organizaciones y movimientos sociales de América Latina y el Caribe, online reunidos a raíz de la histórica realización de cinco cumbres simultáneas de presidentes de MERCOSUR, stuff UNASUR, pills ALADI, del Grupo de Río y de América Latina y Caribe en Salvador, Bahía.
Asumiendo el rumbo que marcan los resultados de las Cumbres de los Pueblos realizadas en Posadas 2008, Lima 2008, Santiago de Chile 2007, Cochabamba 2006 y Mar del Plata 2005.
Reafirmando que los hombres y mujeres de América Latina y Caribe venimos construyendo la integración desde los pueblos, avanzando en la disputa por la profunda transformación del modelo productivo actual en una perspectiva soberana, sustentable y justa.
Teniendo en cuenta los cambios que se están realizando en el escenario mundial a raíz del desencadenamiento de la crisis económica del sistema capitalista que es producto de las políticas neoliberales de la globalización que han sumido a la humanidad en una profunda crisis energética, alimentaria, climática y social y que ahora se expresan en la crisis económica y financiera.
Observando que bajo la conducción del actual gobierno de Estados Unidos se busca dividir la región, reeditar la fracasada propuesta del ALCA y profundizar los esquemas de libre comercio, apertura a las inversiones, endeudamiento en varios países y militarización, y que la Unión Europea busca impulsar políticas similares en nuestra región.
Reconociendo no obstante, que algunos gobiernos de la región han iniciado caminos alternativos de desarrollo planteando nuevas formas de organización económica, constatamos el mantenimiento de las políticas neoliberales que han conducido a muchos pueblos a escala global a la profundización de la pobreza, la discriminación y el abandono de la capacidad de los estados de promover el desarrollo económico y social.
Declaramos:
Asumir el compromiso de profundizar la integración desde los pueblos, en este momento histórico de lucha y movilización de América Latina y el Caribe, construyendo la soberanía popular.
Por eso consideramos que la salida a la crisis económica global debe tener como respuesta estratégica la integración soberana de los países de la región y la construcción de un nuevo orden internacional económico, financiero, basado en la solidaridad, la justicia y el respeto a la naturaleza, que valorice el trabajo y que incentive el derecho al desarrollo sustentable de los Países del Sur. Las Américas que queremos construir en la perspectiva de los pueblos deben fundarse en los valores de solidaridad, superación del patriarcado, y ser necesariamente anti-racista, respetuosa de las culturas de los pueblos originarios y de la diversidad como un valor a ser defendido. En este sentido saludamos y nos solidarizamos con los procesos constitucionales en curso en Bolivia y en Ecuador.Asi vemos con satisfacción que en la región se impulse la autonomía, el fortalecimiento de los mercados internos, el abandono del dólar como referente en los cambios internacionales, el dotarse de una capacidad financiera propia y el replanteo de los esquemas ilegítimos de endeudamiento, como lo ilustra el caso de la auditoria en Ecuador. Así como a fortalecer la democracia, y la autodeterminación, la no injerencia en los asuntos de otros Estados y la búsqueda de una relación respetuosa y fraterna entre las naciones.
Señalamos con agrado que han surgido propuestas de integración que reflejan el sentimiento popular de aumentar los lazos solidarios, la cooperación, el intercambio mutuamente beneficioso y la superación de las inequidades.
Al mismo tiempo vemos con preocupación que en buena medida se mantienen los esquemas neoliberales y el modelo depredatorio, monoproductivo, orientado a la exportación de recursos naturales y basado en la construcción de megaproyectos dirigidos a la consolidación de este modelo el cual produce incalculables daños a los pueblos originarios, las mujeres, las comunidades campesinas, las fuentes de agua, el medio ambiente y el desarrollo social, así como se mantiene un modelo energético no sostenible.
Señalamos que el mantenimiento de las políticas de libre comercio es obstáculo para la integración de los pueblos, la justicia social, la soberanía y la democracia y cualquier esfuerzo para retomar las negociaciones de liberalización en la OMC contribuirá a mantener el injusto orden internacional contribuyendo a profundizar la crisis alimentaria y climática, asi como también los TLCs y el ASPAN que precisan ser rechazados para que la integración que queremos pueda avanzar.
Por estas razones proponemos como alternativas desde los pueblos:
1. Ligar el proceso de integración al cambio en el modelo productivo asegurando la soberanía alimentaria, que solo puede alcanzarse con la profundización de una Reforma Agraria, que permita planificar y controlar la producción de alimentos para atender a las necesidades de los pueblos, revalorizando la cultura agroalimentaria de los mismos, en una nueva organización de la vida y de las relaciones entre el campo y la ciudad. La integración debe incluir también la complementariedad de las economías y el fomento a la producción sustentable. La biodiversidad y el conocimiento tradicional son patrimonio de nuestros pueblos, por ello exigimos el cumplimiento del convenio 169 de OIT y la Declaración Universal de Derechos de los Pueblos Indígenas. Asegurar que el uso humano y la preservación de las fuentes y acuíferos vitales al abastecimiento público estén en primer lugar en el ordenamiento jurídico y administrativo de nuestros países; que sea efectivizado un Comité Latinoamericano y Caribeño para el monitoreo y enfrentamiento de las causas y consecuencias del calentamiento global; y que se garantice a los pueblos originarios y tradicionales respeto en los procesos de desarrollo y prioridad en la aplicación de los fondos para la reparación de las injusticias climáticas que afectan nuestros países.
2. Garantizar la soberanía de los países sobre los bienes naturales y sus fuentes energéticas, que no podrá ser alcanzada en detrimento de la soberanía alimentaria y del medio ambiente, y que permita alcanzar el bienestar de sus pueblos. Llamamos a los gobiernos de la región a buscar soluciones dentro de marcos de justicia y solidaridad frente a la demanda del pueblo paraguayo en torno a la renegociación de los tratados de Itaipu y Yaciretá.
3. Asegurar la primacía de los derechos humanos, la vigencia y exigibilidad de los derechos económicos, sociales, culturales y ambientales, adoptando los instrumentos legales para ello. Exigimos garantizar los derechos de las y los migrantes y la libre circulación de personas y no solamente el flujo del capital y las mercancias. Demandamos el compromiso de los gobiernos en ratificar los Convenios 97 y 143 de la OIT y la Convención de la ONU sobre los Derechos de los Trabajadores Migrantes y sus Famílias.
4. Considerando que los trabajadores y las trabajadoras son duramente afectados por la actual crisis del capitalismo, con despidos en masa, reducción de salarios y flexibilización de derechos, exigimos medidas que protejan los intereses del trabajo y hagan que los ricos paguen el precio de la crisis. Defendemos la reducción de la jornada de trabajo sin reducción de salarios, condicionar la liberación de recursos públicos para empresas con dificultades para mantener el nivel de empleo, ampliar el seguro de desempleo, ratificar y aplicar la Convención 158 de la OIT, y prohibir los despidos en masa.
5. Denunciar la criminalización de las mujeres en su lucha por la autonomía y el derecho a decidir sobre sus cuerpos y sus vidas en la lucha por la legalización del aborto.
6. Por entender que el acceso a la salud pública de calidad es un derecho de todos y todas, reivindicamos que los medicamentos y la propiedad intelectual no sean incluidos en la agenda de la OMC. Deseamos que los países tengan la posibilidad de construir un modelo alternativo de patentes que sirva a sus pueblos, y mecanismos de transferencia de tecnología al servicio de la soberanía popular.
7. El modelo capitalista actual no es capaz de ofrecer tierra urbana y vivienda en una localización segura a los trabajadores y trabajadoras; denunciamos que el financiamiento del Banco Mundial y del BID en las ciudades ataca el derecho de la población al medio ambiente. Necesitamos de la democratización de los espacios públicos de las ciudades, con políticas intersectoriales de saneamiento, deporte y recreación; además de la redefinición de las prioridades del gasto público orientado a políticas redistributivas.
8. Es necesario el fortalecimiento de la educación como un bien público, social, un derecho universal y un deber del estado. Exigimos el retiro de la educación de los acuerdos de la OMC. Reafirmamos la necesidad de una cooperación e integración tecnológica y científica, basada en valores solidarios, justos y soberanos.
9. Demandamos la democratización de los medios de comunicación de América Latina e Caribe.
10. Se advierte sobre el peligro que entraña la IV Flota (imperial) de los Estados Unidos que amenaza la paz de la región, ante lo cual, expresamos nuestro más categórico rechazo a la presencia del Comando Sur en nuestro continente. Nos sumamos a la exigencia del pueblo haitiano para el inmediato proceso de retiro de todas las fuerzas armadas extranjeras. Celebramos la ratificación de Ecuador para el retiro definitivo de la Base de Manta y su auditoria, y demandamos que no se desloque la base de Ecuador a Perú. Denunciamos la creciente criminalización y judicialización de la protesta social, como así también la implementación de las llamadas leyes antiterroristas y advertimos al mismo tiempo una nueva ofensiva estadounidense para homologar nuestro marco jurídico regional con la Ley Patriota norteamericana.
11. Las instituciones financieras multilaterales son las principales responsables de las actuales crisis económica, climática, alimentaria y energética. Los pueblos necesitamos de otras instituciones; su sola reforma significará la profundización de las crisis y resultará en una nueva etapa de endeudamiento ilegitimo para nuestros países. Reclamamos a los gobiernos de América Latina y el Caribe que se retiren de estas instituciones, incluyendo al CIADI; una simple reforma en el sistema de poder de decisión no va a superar su lógica. Las deudas ilegitimas que se reclaman a nuestros países ya fueron pagadas varias veces y representan un mecanismo de dominación. Exigimos el reconocimiento del derecho al no pago y el compromiso de los gobiernos de priorizar los derechos de los pueblos y la naturaleza sobre el pago de una deuda financiera ilegítima. Saludamos el no pago de la deuda decidido por el gobierno ecuatoriano, respaldado por un proceso integral de auditoria, y nos solidarizamos con la intención de iniciar nuevos procesos en Paraguay, Bolivia, Venezuela y la creación de la CPI de la deuda en Brasil. Conclamamos a los demas gobiernos de la región y del mundo a respaldar la acción soberana del gobierno ecuatoriano, a emprender iniciativas similares y avanzar en la creación de nuevas instituciones, como el Banco del Sur, que pueden contribuir en la construcción de una nueva arquitectura financiera regional y global.
12. Demandamos que los gobiernos reconozcan la deuda ecológica y que destinen recursos para la necesaria reparación ambiental.
13. Fortalecer y dotar de herramientas eficaces y equitativas a los procesos de integración en curso, buscando su convergencia y superando sus deficiencias, especialmente en lo que se refiere a dotarlos de una institucionalidad operante, garantías para la superación de las asimetrías, resolución de los conflictos por medio del diálogo y teniendo como mira permanente el beneficio de la población.
14. Pedimos el pleno reintegro de Cuba a la comunidad latino americana y caribeña y la eliminación del bloqueo a la isla y la libertad para los cinco patriotas cubanos presos injustamente en las cárceles de EUA.
15. Exigimos la libertad y el fin de la persecución de las feministas nicaragüenses presas por defender los derechos sexuales y reproductivos de las mujeres.
16. Exigimos el fin de la criminalización de los movimientos sociales en nuestra región.
Llamamos a los pueblos de América Latina y el Caribe a la movilización para avanzar en la integración regional y la preservación de las conquistas realizadas y de la democracia, construyendo alternativas de cambio social que nos permitan la realización de una sociedad más justa, equitativa y soberana.
Salvador, Bahia, Brasil
14 de diciembre de 2008

Declaración de la Cumbre de los Pueblos Enlazando Alternativas 3

Tintorero – Venezuela
Consideraciones Generales:
• Los Movimientos Sociales y fuerzas políticas Latinoamericanos y del Caribe reunidos por primera vez con los representantes de gobiernos del ALBA, online en la V Cumbre celebrada en la ciudad de Barquisimeto, Edo. Lara en Venezuela, entre el 28 y 29 de abril de 2007, reiteramos nuestro apoyo y compromiso de unión de los Pueblos de la América Latina y del Caribe con el proceso de integración política e ideológica enmarcada en el ALBA, como un hilo que permitirá conectar las diferentes expresiones sociales, quienes han resistido siglos de exclusión en nuestros pueblos (campesinos, obreros, cultores populares) impuesta por el modelo capitalista neoliberal, y reafirmamos nuestro apoyo a los Gobiernos Progresistas de la región para la realización de encuentros encaminados a lograr no sólo el acercamiento gubernamental sino el acercamiento de los pueblos hermanos del continente.
• Creemos en el proceso de construcción del ALBA que debe fundamentarse en el legado histórico de nuestros Libertadores y libertadoras, con un claro contenido ético, de valores y principios que se contrapongan a los neoliberales. Un ALBA que haga suyo el análisis y la perspectiva de genero que contribuya a una nueva cultura entre los géneros en paridad sin opresión y sin discriminación de un sexo sobre otro. Por ello reiteramos los principios fundamentales sobre los cuales se propulsó esta iniciativa, a saber: autodeterminación de los pueblos, complementariedad económica, comercio justo, cooperación entre los países participantes (intra-ALBA), desarrollo económico equilibrado en cada país, lucha contra la pobreza, preservación de la identidad cultural de los pueblos, integración energética, defensa de la cultura latinoamericana y caribeña, de la identidad de los pueblos de la región, fomento de la cultura autóctona e indígena.
• Proponemos incorporar a los anteriores principios: integración tecnológica-productiva, solidaridad entre nuestros pueblos, lucha contra la exclusión social, defensa de los derechos humano, laborales y de las mujeres, defensa del ambiente, integración física, soberanía alimentaria, participación de los pueblos en los asuntos públicos, garantía de comercio justo y sustentable, complementariedad económica, competencia productiva con los países no miembros del ALBA (países extra-ALBA), justicia social, soberanía, corresponsabilidad, pluriculturalidad, diversidad, reconocimiento de la cultura afrodescendiente, y el derecho de la autodeterminación de los pueblos indígenas tal como lo establece los pactos de derechos humanos.
• Mantenemos el ALBA en su espíritu originario como alternativa que se contrapone al ALCA tratado neoliberal, que impone condiciones de pobreza, desigualdad y exclusión en nuestros pueblos, y más allá como un ente que facilita el diálogo de saberes y la unión de los movimientos sociales entre ellos y con los gobiernos nacionales, estadales, regionales, municipales, comunales, departamentales, que suscriben el acuerdo del ALBA.
• Reafirmamos la lucha actual contra los Tratados de Libre de Comercio con los EEUU, como mecanismo auxiliar del ALCA, proponiendo el Tratado de Comercio de los Pueblos, de acuerdo a los principios establecidos en el ALBA, como vía para lograr el crecimiento equitativo de la región, y como instrumentos de liberación y emancipación de los pueblos de América Latina y el Caribe, frente al imperialismo norteamericano.
En relación a cómo organizarnos, proponemos lo siguiente:
• Que la adhesión de los Movimientos Sociales al ALBA se conformen respetando el principio de autonomía y la estructura horizontal de los mismos, donde la integración con los representantes de los gobiernos permita el diseño de planes, programas y proyectos coordinados en base a los interese comunes, con los siguientes criterios: anti-imperialista, humanista, ambientalista, con visión de género.
• Proponemos proyectos nacionales de articulación cuyo objetivo fundamental sea la unidad y la diversidad de los movimientos sociales y político transformando el ALBA en una herramienta inclusiva de las amplias mayorías de nuestros pueblos.
PROPUESTAS
• Creación de la Carta ALBA: esta debe contener su definición, objetivos, principios, valores y estructuras; siendo esta última la que permita la articulación de los entes gubernamentales nacionales, con los movimientos sociales, pueblos indígenas, afrodescendientes, gobiernos locales, grupos de mujeres y feministas, ecológicos, culturales, entre otros.
• Articulación con los Gobiernos Locales: debe constituir un puente entre los gobiernos nacionales y los gobiernos locales de los diferentes países que integran el ALBA a los efectos de acercar las gestiones de gobierno a los pueblos organizados.
1. En los países no integrados al ALBA se debe ampliar y profundizar la incorporación de los gobiernos locales y regionales progresistas y que se adhieran al ALBA. Teniendo como base la primera esfera administrativa del estado más cerca de la población.
2. Los gobiernos y estados del ALBA deberían hacer las reformas legales a sus marcos normativos para facilitar los procesos de cooperación y comercio justos.
3.Dentro de las estrategias de cooperación energética deberá también priorizarse proyectos de generación eléctrica, eólica e hídrica para facilitar capacidades en competencias a las pequeñas unidades productivas y mejorar la renta real de las familias de más bajos recursos y excluidos de la población.
• Multiplicar las Misiones Sociales: los Movimientos Sociales están en disposición de profundizar las experiencias positivas en cada país de la Región, mediante el impulso de las diferentes misiones sociales: en salud, educación, producción; creando las condiciones organizativas, institucionales y financieras que permitan la sociabilización de las mismas. Proponemos además, un Plan Regional de Salud Pública, construido sobre las bases de programas de cooperación como Misión Milagro, que brinde acceso gratuito y universal a toda la población, fortalecer la participación popular a través de redes populares humanitarias misioneras, que se extiendan a los pueblos donde sus gobiernos no se han suscrito al ALBA.
• Plan de Cooperación para Haití: La grave situación económica, política y social que sufre nuestra hermana república, merece un esfuerzo verdadero por nuestra parte para cooperar con su desarrollo social y humano, no en los términos explotadores que ofrece el modelo neoliberal y sus instituciones financieras, sino bajo un verdadero esquema de solidaridad. Exhortamos a los gobiernos del ALBA a cooperar con Haití en áreas como: proyectos de salud y educación, especialmente alfabetización, agricultura, cooperación económica, comercio justo. Por nuestra parte, reiteramos nuestro compromiso de apoyar al pueblo haitiano para fortalecer los procesos de organización, producción y distribución que garanticen la soberanía y seguridad alimentaria del pueblo haitiano.
• Plan Educativo y Cultural Integral: desde la alfabetización hasta el desarrollo universitario, basado en la experiencia del método: Yo Sí Puedo, importantes proyectos con la participación de movimientos sociales como el IALA y la ELAM, y la creación de la Universidad del Sur y de la Escuela Latinoamericana y Caribeña de Políticas Públicas con una lógica nueva, que rompa con la mercantilización del sistema educativo y promueva nuevos valores éticos, humanistas y solidarios, así también la cultura de la emancipación debe ser tomada como un eje transversal en la construcción del poder popular.
• Capacitación de los Movimientos Sociales: debe articularse una estrategia regional que permita fortalecer las capacidades sociales, técnicas y políticas del los diversos Movimientos Sociales, para ello debe aprovecharse las experiencias exitosas emprendidas por los Movimientos Sociales en la Región. Crear un mecanismo que se pueda incluir en el marco del ALBA para solucionar la problemática de los desplazad@s de la migración estimulada por el terrorismo de estado y el neoliberalismo de los gobiernos sometidos a las dictaduras del imperialismo para brindar oportunamente el apoyo requerido a esta población.
• Democratización de las Telecomunicaciones y la Informática como herramientas estratégicas para construir el poder popular liberador nuestroamericano: donde se articule los espacios para consolidar un sistema público de comunicación en manos de las comunidades populares (radio, la televisión y el Internet), dándole cabida a las redes alternativas de información existentes en Nuestra América que ofrecen una perspectiva desde los movimientos populares. Redefinición y expansión de TELESUR, la Editorial ALBA y la creación de una Agencia de Noticias ALBA.
• Democratización Financiera: creación de instituciones financieras con instrumentos modalidades, plazos, tasas y montos que se adapten a las necesidades de financiamiento de los emprendimientos sociales. Por ello solicitamos que en la estructura organizativa del BANCO DEL SUR se incluya un área de atención a la economía social, concretamente un fondo solidario para impulsar la Alternativa Bolivariana de las Mujeres de América con miras a erradicar la feminización de la pobreza.
• Defensa de la Soberanía y Seguridad Agroalimentaria: se debe articular una estrategia de autosuficiencia en la producción de alimentos a partir del potencial para la producción agroecológica que tiene la Región. Cuyo fundamento se encuentra en la activación social de los movimientos campesinos y de los pequeños productores. Se refuerza el principio de lucha contra los transgénicos y la protección del ambiente. Se propone la Red para la Producción e intercambio de Alimentos sanos. Llamamos a profundizar la lucha que elimine el latifundio, la desigualdad social en el campo y se garantice la soberanía alimentaria de los pueblos, y que nuestros cultivos y nuestra inversión en la agricultura y desarrollo agrícola sea para alimentar nuestros pueblos.
• Derecho a la vivienda y un hábitat digno: asegurar el derecho a la vivienda de todas y todos de los y las habitantes garantizando ciudades y municipios libres de desalojos, apoyar la creación de fondos populares y proyectos autogestionarios y cooperativos y de desarrollo endógeno, acceso al suelo y a la vivienda.
• Contraloría Social del ALBA: debe articularse una instancia de los Movimientos Sociales para la vigilancia y control de los diferentes acuerdos y Proyectos suscritos por los Gobiernos del ALBA, donde se realicen periódicamente encuentros en los cuales los gobiernos del ALBA hagan un balance de los alcances y la implementación del ALBA a los pueblos organizados a través de reportes. Esta estructura es vital y su organización debe partir desde las bases, ya que entendemos que sólo una profunda participación popular es capaz de garantizar la viabilidad del ALBA
• Apoyar la red de Parlamentarios y Parlamentarias por el ALBA: se debe exhortar a los parlamentarios de los diferentes países del ALBA a establecer canales con los demás parlamentarios y parlamentarias de América Latina y el Caribe para difundir la estrategia del ALBA a todos los Poderes Legislativos de la Región con miras a la conformación de un espacio parlamentario ALBA.
• Apoyar la red de mujeres por el ALBA: que articule todos los movimientos de mujeres en América Latina y el Caribe, que impulse la lucha por la desconstrucción de las desigualdades de poder entre las personas y promuevan la unidad en la diversidad, a demás de establecer agendas feministas de lucha de incidencia política.
• Redes Productivas de los Movimientos Sociales: aprovechar toda la experiencia organizativa de los Movimientos Sociales para organizar las cadenas de producción en pro del aprovechamiento de las capacidades endógena que tenemos.
• Propuesta Organizativa: se debe generar una estructura que permita incorporar en la organicidad del ALBA a través de mecanismos que viabilicen la participación de los movimientos sociales, que permita alcanzar una democracia participativa y protagónica de acuerdo a los intereses populares socialmente organizados. Se Propone la creación de un Consejo Consultivo Planificador de los Movimientos Sociales
.
• Impulsar la integración energética de Latinoamérica y el Caribe: donde se incluyan las necesidades de los sectores menos favorecidos mediante una alianza estratégica con los Movimientos Sociales.
• Proyecto de integración cultural: donde se cree la Casa del ALBA en cada país y que esté primordialmente orientado a la difusión de la identidad de nuestros pueblos, destacando principalmente las culturas de nuestros pueblos indígenas originarios y afrodescendientes, así como la solidaridad de los pueblos en lucha.
Por último, los movimientos sociales y políticos, junto con representantes de gobiernos locales, reunidos durante la V Cumbre del ALBA-TCP en Tintorero, Venezuela, en aras de impulsar el fortalecimiento del ALBA como alternativa de los Pueblos contra la lógica neoliberal e imperialista confrontar el modelo neoliberal, el imperialismo y la guerra, impulsaremos campañas centrales a lo largo del 2007:
1.Llamado a movilizaciones de solidaridad con la lucha costarricense contra el TLC.
Nos solidarizamos con las luchas del pueblo costarricense contra el Tratado de Libre Comercio y apoyamos su iniciativa para rechazarlo en el referéndum a realizarse en el mes de septiembre. El ALBA debe profundizar su labor de crear alternativas a los TLC bajo los principios del comercio justo y solidario. Asimismo, reiteramos nuestra exigencia de que ningún gobierno se adhiera al TLC sin una consulta popular democrática que sea precedida por un gran debate nacional.
2. Jornada de movilización en rechazo a liberación del terrorista Luis Posada Carriles y a favor de la liberación de los 5 presos antiterroristas cubanos en cárceles de Estados Unidos.
Contra el Terrorismo y la Doble Moral del Imperialismo: ¡Extradición ya!
Demandamos la inmediata extradición del terrorista confeso Luis Posada Carriles a Venezuela, para continuar el proceso judicial en su contra por la explosión de un avión civil cubano que dejó un saldo de 73 muertos en 1976. Rechazamos la continua violación de las leyes internacionales por parte del gobierno estadounidense y su negativa de entregar a Posada Carriles a las autoridades correspondientes. Asimismo, exigimos la libertad inmediata de los cinco luchadores cubanos que siguen encarcelados en los Estados Unidos.
3. Llamado a un Encuentro entre Pueblos y Gobiernos del ALBA.
Los movimientos sociales latinoamericanos, respondiendo al llamado de los Jefes de Estado del ALBA se comprometen a elaborar una propuesta de agenda social previa a la próxima convocatoria de la Cumbre de Jefes de Estado, así como organizar una Cumbre de Movimientos Sociales del ALBA que nos permita avanzar en una interlocución con los gobiernos del ALBA, que contribuya a fortalecer el movimiento social y popular, a organizar y concienciar a nuestros pueblos en torno a los principios y valores del alba, a extender las misiones y logros sociales al resto de los países de América Latina y el Caribe, que coadyuve a la creación de redes de gobiernos locales. Parlamentarios, mujeres, campesinos, sindicatos y otros para construir desde abajo el ALBA de los pueblos
4.Llamado a una movilización en memoria de los 40 años de la caída en combate del Guerrillero Heroico, Comandante Che Guevara.
Al conmemorarse cuarenta años de la siembra de este vivo ejemplo de desprendimiento y entrega por la causa de la liberación y la integración latinoamericana y caribeña, hacemos un llamado a movilizaciones en todos nuestros países para conmemorar su heroica gesta y su legado.
CONSIDERACIONES FINALES
Los Movimientos Sociales de América reunidos en Tintorero, Estado Lara, Venezuela; saludamos y nos solidarizamos con el Aniversario número XXX de las Madres de la Plaza de Mayo en Argentina. Apoyamos desde todos nuestros países su lucha por la justicia, la paz y en contra de la impunidad.
Nos declaramos en lucha permanente para alcanzar un territorio libre de analfabetismo y transgénicos.
El Encuentro Social del ALBA, expresa su solidaridad con los pueblos de Bolivia y Ecuador en su lucha de liberación y protagonismo de los Movimientos Sociales y Pueblos Originarios; y manifiesta su firme apoyo a los procesos constituyentes emprendidos para transformar las viejas estructuras políticas, económicas y sociales de opresión y explotación.
En el marco de la Cumbre Iberoamericana de Presidentes y Jefes de Estado que se realizará en Santiago de Chile entre el 8 y 10 de noviembre de 2007, expresamos nuestra solidaridad con los Presidentes y Jefes de Estados integrantes del ALBA, y hacemos un llamado a todos los Movimientos Sociales a participar en la Cumbre Alternativa Iberoamericana a realizarse en la misma fecha.
Expresamos nuestro apoyo a los Movimientos Sociales que en EEUU y Canadá luchan por los derechos de sus pueblos y se solidarizan con la construcción del ALBA y la liberación de todos los pueblos del Continente Americano.
Finalmente, saludamos el triunfo del pueblo ecuatoriano que impuso su voluntad soberana de convocar la Asamblea Constituyente.
Tintorero – Venezuela
Consideraciones Generales:
• Los Movimientos Sociales y fuerzas políticas Latinoamericanos y del Caribe reunidos por primera vez con los representantes de gobiernos del ALBA, rx en la V Cumbre celebrada en la ciudad de Barquisimeto, treat Edo. Lara en Venezuela, entre el 28 y 29 de abril de 2007, reiteramos nuestro apoyo y compromiso de unión de los Pueblos de la América Latina y del Caribe con el proceso de integración política e ideológica enmarcada en el ALBA, como un hilo que permitirá conectar las diferentes expresiones sociales, quienes han resistido siglos de exclusión en nuestros pueblos (campesinos, obreros, cultores populares) impuesta por el modelo capitalista neoliberal, y reafirmamos nuestro apoyo a los Gobiernos Progresistas de la región para la realización de encuentros encaminados a lograr no sólo el acercamiento gubernamental sino el acercamiento de los pueblos hermanos del continente.
• Creemos en el proceso de construcción del ALBA que debe fundamentarse en el legado histórico de nuestros Libertadores y libertadoras, con un claro contenido ético, de valores y principios que se contrapongan a los neoliberales. Un ALBA que haga suyo el análisis y la perspectiva de genero que contribuya a una nueva cultura entre los géneros en paridad sin opresión y sin discriminación de un sexo sobre otro. Por ello reiteramos los principios fundamentales sobre los cuales se propulsó esta iniciativa, a saber: autodeterminación de los pueblos, complementariedad económica, comercio justo, cooperación entre los países participantes (intra-ALBA), desarrollo económico equilibrado en cada país, lucha contra la pobreza, preservación de la identidad cultural de los pueblos, integración energética, defensa de la cultura latinoamericana y caribeña, de la identidad de los pueblos de la región, fomento de la cultura autóctona e indígena.
• Proponemos incorporar a los anteriores principios: integración tecnológica-productiva, solidaridad entre nuestros pueblos, lucha contra la exclusión social, defensa de los derechos humano, laborales y de las mujeres, defensa del ambiente, integración física, soberanía alimentaria, participación de los pueblos en los asuntos públicos, garantía de comercio justo y sustentable, complementariedad económica, competencia productiva con los países no miembros del ALBA (países extra-ALBA), justicia social, soberanía, corresponsabilidad, pluriculturalidad, diversidad, reconocimiento de la cultura afrodescendiente, y el derecho de la autodeterminación de los pueblos indígenas tal como lo establece los pactos de derechos humanos.
• Mantenemos el ALBA en su espíritu originario como alternativa que se contrapone al ALCA tratado neoliberal, que impone condiciones de pobreza, desigualdad y exclusión en nuestros pueblos, y más allá como un ente que facilita el diálogo de saberes y la unión de los movimientos sociales entre ellos y con los gobiernos nacionales, estadales, regionales, municipales, comunales, departamentales, que suscriben el acuerdo del ALBA.
• Reafirmamos la lucha actual contra los Tratados de Libre de Comercio con los EEUU, como mecanismo auxiliar del ALCA, proponiendo el Tratado de Comercio de los Pueblos, de acuerdo a los principios establecidos en el ALBA, como vía para lograr el crecimiento equitativo de la región, y como instrumentos de liberación y emancipación de los pueblos de América Latina y el Caribe, frente al imperialismo norteamericano.
En relación a cómo organizarnos, proponemos lo siguiente:
• Que la adhesión de los Movimientos Sociales al ALBA se conformen respetando el principio de autonomía y la estructura horizontal de los mismos, donde la integración con los representantes de los gobiernos permita el diseño de planes, programas y proyectos coordinados en base a los interese comunes, con los siguientes criterios: anti-imperialista, humanista, ambientalista, con visión de género.
• Proponemos proyectos nacionales de articulación cuyo objetivo fundamental sea la unidad y la diversidad de los movimientos sociales y político transformando el ALBA en una herramienta inclusiva de las amplias mayorías de nuestros pueblos.
PROPUESTAS
• Creación de la Carta ALBA: esta debe contener su definición, objetivos, principios, valores y estructuras; siendo esta última la que permita la articulación de los entes gubernamentales nacionales, con los movimientos sociales, pueblos indígenas, afrodescendientes, gobiernos locales, grupos de mujeres y feministas, ecológicos, culturales, entre otros.
• Articulación con los Gobiernos Locales: debe constituir un puente entre los gobiernos nacionales y los gobiernos locales de los diferentes países que integran el ALBA a los efectos de acercar las gestiones de gobierno a los pueblos organizados.
1. En los países no integrados al ALBA se debe ampliar y profundizar la incorporación de los gobiernos locales y regionales progresistas y que se adhieran al ALBA. Teniendo como base la primera esfera administrativa del estado más cerca de la población.
2. Los gobiernos y estados del ALBA deberían hacer las reformas legales a sus marcos normativos para facilitar los procesos de cooperación y comercio justos.
3.Dentro de las estrategias de cooperación energética deberá también priorizarse proyectos de generación eléctrica, eólica e hídrica para facilitar capacidades en competencias a las pequeñas unidades productivas y mejorar la renta real de las familias de más bajos recursos y excluidos de la población.
• Multiplicar las Misiones Sociales: los Movimientos Sociales están en disposición de profundizar las experiencias positivas en cada país de la Región, mediante el impulso de las diferentes misiones sociales: en salud, educación, producción; creando las condiciones organizativas, institucionales y financieras que permitan la sociabilización de las mismas. Proponemos además, un Plan Regional de Salud Pública, construido sobre las bases de programas de cooperación como Misión Milagro, que brinde acceso gratuito y universal a toda la población, fortalecer la participación popular a través de redes populares humanitarias misioneras, que se extiendan a los pueblos donde sus gobiernos no se han suscrito al ALBA.
• Plan de Cooperación para Haití: La grave situación económica, política y social que sufre nuestra hermana república, merece un esfuerzo verdadero por nuestra parte para cooperar con su desarrollo social y humano, no en los términos explotadores que ofrece el modelo neoliberal y sus instituciones financieras, sino bajo un verdadero esquema de solidaridad. Exhortamos a los gobiernos del ALBA a cooperar con Haití en áreas como: proyectos de salud y educación, especialmente alfabetización, agricultura, cooperación económica, comercio justo. Por nuestra parte, reiteramos nuestro compromiso de apoyar al pueblo haitiano para fortalecer los procesos de organización, producción y distribución que garanticen la soberanía y seguridad alimentaria del pueblo haitiano.
• Plan Educativo y Cultural Integral: desde la alfabetización hasta el desarrollo universitario, basado en la experiencia del método: Yo Sí Puedo, importantes proyectos con la participación de movimientos sociales como el IALA y la ELAM, y la creación de la Universidad del Sur y de la Escuela Latinoamericana y Caribeña de Políticas Públicas con una lógica nueva, que rompa con la mercantilización del sistema educativo y promueva nuevos valores éticos, humanistas y solidarios, así también la cultura de la emancipación debe ser tomada como un eje transversal en la construcción del poder popular.
• Capacitación de los Movimientos Sociales: debe articularse una estrategia regional que permita fortalecer las capacidades sociales, técnicas y políticas del los diversos Movimientos Sociales, para ello debe aprovecharse las experiencias exitosas emprendidas por los Movimientos Sociales en la Región. Crear un mecanismo que se pueda incluir en el marco del ALBA para solucionar la problemática de los desplazad@s de la migración estimulada por el terrorismo de estado y el neoliberalismo de los gobiernos sometidos a las dictaduras del imperialismo para brindar oportunamente el apoyo requerido a esta población.
• Democratización de las Telecomunicaciones y la Informática como herramientas estratégicas para construir el poder popular liberador nuestroamericano: donde se articule los espacios para consolidar un sistema público de comunicación en manos de las comunidades populares (radio, la televisión y el Internet), dándole cabida a las redes alternativas de información existentes en Nuestra América que ofrecen una perspectiva desde los movimientos populares. Redefinición y expansión de TELESUR, la Editorial ALBA y la creación de una Agencia de Noticias ALBA.
• Democratización Financiera: creación de instituciones financieras con instrumentos modalidades, plazos, tasas y montos que se adapten a las necesidades de financiamiento de los emprendimientos sociales. Por ello solicitamos que en la estructura organizativa del BANCO DEL SUR se incluya un área de atención a la economía social, concretamente un fondo solidario para impulsar la Alternativa Bolivariana de las Mujeres de América con miras a erradicar la feminización de la pobreza.
• Defensa de la Soberanía y Seguridad Agroalimentaria: se debe articular una estrategia de autosuficiencia en la producción de alimentos a partir del potencial para la producción agroecológica que tiene la Región. Cuyo fundamento se encuentra en la activación social de los movimientos campesinos y de los pequeños productores. Se refuerza el principio de lucha contra los transgénicos y la protección del ambiente. Se propone la Red para la Producción e intercambio de Alimentos sanos. Llamamos a profundizar la lucha que elimine el latifundio, la desigualdad social en el campo y se garantice la soberanía alimentaria de los pueblos, y que nuestros cultivos y nuestra inversión en la agricultura y desarrollo agrícola sea para alimentar nuestros pueblos.
• Derecho a la vivienda y un hábitat digno: asegurar el derecho a la vivienda de todas y todos de los y las habitantes garantizando ciudades y municipios libres de desalojos, apoyar la creación de fondos populares y proyectos autogestionarios y cooperativos y de desarrollo endógeno, acceso al suelo y a la vivienda.
• Contraloría Social del ALBA: debe articularse una instancia de los Movimientos Sociales para la vigilancia y control de los diferentes acuerdos y Proyectos suscritos por los Gobiernos del ALBA, donde se realicen periódicamente encuentros en los cuales los gobiernos del ALBA hagan un balance de los alcances y la implementación del ALBA a los pueblos organizados a través de reportes. Esta estructura es vital y su organización debe partir desde las bases, ya que entendemos que sólo una profunda participación popular es capaz de garantizar la viabilidad del ALBA
• Apoyar la red de Parlamentarios y Parlamentarias por el ALBA: se debe exhortar a los parlamentarios de los diferentes países del ALBA a establecer canales con los demás parlamentarios y parlamentarias de América Latina y el Caribe para difundir la estrategia del ALBA a todos los Poderes Legislativos de la Región con miras a la conformación de un espacio parlamentario ALBA.
• Apoyar la red de mujeres por el ALBA: que articule todos los movimientos de mujeres en América Latina y el Caribe, que impulse la lucha por la desconstrucción de las desigualdades de poder entre las personas y promuevan la unidad en la diversidad, a demás de establecer agendas feministas de lucha de incidencia política.
• Redes Productivas de los Movimientos Sociales: aprovechar toda la experiencia organizativa de los Movimientos Sociales para organizar las cadenas de producción en pro del aprovechamiento de las capacidades endógena que tenemos.
• Propuesta Organizativa: se debe generar una estructura que permita incorporar en la organicidad del ALBA a través de mecanismos que viabilicen la participación de los movimientos sociales, que permita alcanzar una democracia participativa y protagónica de acuerdo a los intereses populares socialmente organizados. Se Propone la creación de un Consejo Consultivo Planificador de los Movimientos Sociales
.
• Impulsar la integración energética de Latinoamérica y el Caribe: donde se incluyan las necesidades de los sectores menos favorecidos mediante una alianza estratégica con los Movimientos Sociales.
• Proyecto de integración cultural: donde se cree la Casa del ALBA en cada país y que esté primordialmente orientado a la difusión de la identidad de nuestros pueblos, destacando principalmente las culturas de nuestros pueblos indígenas originarios y afrodescendientes, así como la solidaridad de los pueblos en lucha.
Por último, los movimientos sociales y políticos, junto con representantes de gobiernos locales, reunidos durante la V Cumbre del ALBA-TCP en Tintorero, Venezuela, en aras de impulsar el fortalecimiento del ALBA como alternativa de los Pueblos contra la lógica neoliberal e imperialista confrontar el modelo neoliberal, el imperialismo y la guerra, impulsaremos campañas centrales a lo largo del 2007:
1.Llamado a movilizaciones de solidaridad con la lucha costarricense contra el TLC.
Nos solidarizamos con las luchas del pueblo costarricense contra el Tratado de Libre Comercio y apoyamos su iniciativa para rechazarlo en el referéndum a realizarse en el mes de septiembre. El ALBA debe profundizar su labor de crear alternativas a los TLC bajo los principios del comercio justo y solidario. Asimismo, reiteramos nuestra exigencia de que ningún gobierno se adhiera al TLC sin una consulta popular democrática que sea precedida por un gran debate nacional.
2. Jornada de movilización en rechazo a liberación del terrorista Luis Posada Carriles y a favor de la liberación de los 5 presos antiterroristas cubanos en cárceles de Estados Unidos.
Contra el Terrorismo y la Doble Moral del Imperialismo: ¡Extradición ya!
Demandamos la inmediata extradición del terrorista confeso Luis Posada Carriles a Venezuela, para continuar el proceso judicial en su contra por la explosión de un avión civil cubano que dejó un saldo de 73 muertos en 1976. Rechazamos la continua violación de las leyes internacionales por parte del gobierno estadounidense y su negativa de entregar a Posada Carriles a las autoridades correspondientes. Asimismo, exigimos la libertad inmediata de los cinco luchadores cubanos que siguen encarcelados en los Estados Unidos.
3. Llamado a un Encuentro entre Pueblos y Gobiernos del ALBA.
Los movimientos sociales latinoamericanos, respondiendo al llamado de los Jefes de Estado del ALBA se comprometen a elaborar una propuesta de agenda social previa a la próxima convocatoria de la Cumbre de Jefes de Estado, así como organizar una Cumbre de Movimientos Sociales del ALBA que nos permita avanzar en una interlocución con los gobiernos del ALBA, que contribuya a fortalecer el movimiento social y popular, a organizar y concienciar a nuestros pueblos en torno a los principios y valores del alba, a extender las misiones y logros sociales al resto de los países de América Latina y el Caribe, que coadyuve a la creación de redes de gobiernos locales. Parlamentarios, mujeres, campesinos, sindicatos y otros para construir desde abajo el ALBA de los pueblos
4.Llamado a una movilización en memoria de los 40 años de la caída en combate del Guerrillero Heroico, Comandante Che Guevara.
Al conmemorarse cuarenta años de la siembra de este vivo ejemplo de desprendimiento y entrega por la causa de la liberación y la integración latinoamericana y caribeña, hacemos un llamado a movilizaciones en todos nuestros países para conmemorar su heroica gesta y su legado.
CONSIDERACIONES FINALES
Los Movimientos Sociales de América reunidos en Tintorero, Estado Lara, Venezuela; saludamos y nos solidarizamos con el Aniversario número XXX de las Madres de la Plaza de Mayo en Argentina. Apoyamos desde todos nuestros países su lucha por la justicia, la paz y en contra de la impunidad.
Nos declaramos en lucha permanente para alcanzar un territorio libre de analfabetismo y transgénicos.
El Encuentro Social del ALBA, expresa su solidaridad con los pueblos de Bolivia y Ecuador en su lucha de liberación y protagonismo de los Movimientos Sociales y Pueblos Originarios; y manifiesta su firme apoyo a los procesos constituyentes emprendidos para transformar las viejas estructuras políticas, económicas y sociales de opresión y explotación.
En el marco de la Cumbre Iberoamericana de Presidentes y Jefes de Estado que se realizará en Santiago de Chile entre el 8 y 10 de noviembre de 2007, expresamos nuestra solidaridad con los Presidentes y Jefes de Estados integrantes del ALBA, y hacemos un llamado a todos los Movimientos Sociales a participar en la Cumbre Alternativa Iberoamericana a realizarse en la misma fecha.
Expresamos nuestro apoyo a los Movimientos Sociales que en EEUU y Canadá luchan por los derechos de sus pueblos y se solidarizan con la construcción del ALBA y la liberación de todos los pueblos del Continente Americano.
Finalmente, saludamos el triunfo del pueblo ecuatoriano que impuso su voluntad soberana de convocar la Asamblea Constituyente.
Lima – Peru, 13 al 16 de mayo de 2008
Las organizaciones sociales, healing políticas y populares, de trabajadores y trabajadoras, de migrantes, las comunidades indígenas y campesinas, el movimiento de mujeres, de jóvenes y sindical de América Latina, el Caribe y Europa, reunidos en Lima durante la Cumbre de los Pueblos, Enlazando Alternativas III, declaramos:
La cooperación y la integración de nuestros pueblos pasan en primer lugar por la construcción de un sistema en el cual los derechos económicos, políticos, sociales, culturales y ambientales de las mayorías sean prioridad y razón de ser de las políticas gubernamentales. Por lo mismo, rechazamos el proyecto de Acuerdos de Asociación propuesto por la Unión Europea y avalado por diversos gobiernos latinoamericanos y caribeños que solo buscan profundizar y perpetuar el actual sistema de dominación que tanto daño a hecho a nuestros pueblos.
La estrategia de la Unión Europea “Europa Global: Competir en el mundo”, supone la profundización de las políticas de competitividad y crecimiento económico que buscan implementar la agenda de sus transnacionales y profundizar las políticas neoliberales, incompatibles con el discurso sobre el cambio climático, la reducción de la pobreza y la cohesión social. A pesar de que se pretende velar su naturaleza incorporando temas de cooperación y diálogo político, la esencia de la propuesta es abrir los mercados de capitales, bienes y servicios, proteger la inversión extranjera y reducir la capacidad del Estado de promover el desarrollo económico y social. Esto tiene implicaciones en ambas regiones:
Para América Latina y el Caribe, esta estrategia reproduce el esquema de los Tratados de Libre Comercio que han suscrito la mayoría de países de la región con Estados Unidos y van más allá de las políticas de la OMC que rechazamos. Los recursos naturales de estos países están siendo explotados indiscriminadamente, desplazando a comunidades enteras, devastando la biodiversidad, agotando las fuentes hídricas, y pauperizando a la mano de obra, y en ello tienen mucha responsabilidad las multinacionales europeas. América Latina ha sido víctima secular del saqueo de las transnacionales y, ahora, cuando avances democráticos estimulan la búsqueda de caminos propios de desarrollo en diversos países y de formas de integración al servicio de los pueblos, varios gobiernos que siguen las recetas del libre comercio estimulan la fragmentación de la región, los enfrentamientos nacionales y las contradicciones entre ellos. En Europa una de las grandes amenazas para la democracia, la justicia, la paz y el equilibrio ecológico, es el Tratado de Lisboa, que está siendo ratificado por las élites sin consultar a la población y que rechazamos como ya lo hicimos en el pasado. Este tratado refuerza una Europa neoliberal, aumenta la militarización, la exclusión, las desigualdades y la mercantilización, así como endurece las políticas securitarias-represivas. Ello se refleja en un aumento de la precariedad, un ataque generalizado a todos los derechos sociales, en particular a las conquistas laborales. Al mismo tiempo, se acelera la construcción de la “Europa Fortaleza”, lo que implica cerrar las fronteras, violando el derecho de asilo y criminalizando los migrantes y los movimientos sociales, creando muros virtuales o reales, que no se diferencian con los que construyen en la frontera al Norte de América.
Los Acuerdos de Asociación que ha firmado la Unión Europea con México y Chile han profundizado las desigualdades y muestran el camino que seguirán quienes firmen estos Acuerdos en Centro América, la Comunidad Andina de Naciones y el MERCOSUR cuyas negociaciones se quiere resucitar. Para los países del Caribe, estos Acuerdos, recientemente firmados, aumentarán la vulnerabilidad y dependencia de sus economías, al mismo tiempo que fracturan la dinámica de integración subregional.
En el momento en que en Lima los gobiernos hablan de cohesión social, cambio climático y reducción de la pobreza, conviene recordar que la principal causa de desigualdad, polarización social, degradación ambiental y discriminaciones, es la primacía del mercado por sobre los derechos de las personas y el otorgamiento de todas las garantías a las corporaciones que eliminan la capacidad estatal de definir proyectos nacionales de desarrollo con la complicidad de los gobiernos. Las transnacionales actúan bajo un doble rasero apoyándose en las asimetrías que los Acuerdos de Asociación tienden a reforzar. En consecuencia, el discurso sobre Cooperación y Diálogo Político es la carnada que esconde el anzuelo de los intereses de esas corporaciones.
Frente a la crisis alimentaria que afecta a decenas de países, denunciamos la hipocresía y las políticas de las instituciones multilaterales (OMC, FMI, BM, BID, BEI) que pretenden esconder sus verdaderas causas : direccionamiento de la producción de los países a la exportación, pérdida del papel del Estado en la regulación alimentaria y conversión de los alimentos en fuente de especulación financiera, todo ello como resultado de las políticas de “libre comercio”. Por lo mismo, es inadmisible que se proponga, como salida a la crisis, más liberalización y desprotección. La producción masiva de agrocombustibles agrava las ya difíciles condiciones de vida de millones de habitantes. Rechazamos una vez más esta pretendida salida a la crisis energética y climática.
Ante esta situación, las organizaciones que hacemos parte de Enlazando Alternativas, reiteramos que es posible una integración distinta basada en la libre determinación de los pueblos, el respeto al medio ambiente, a los derechos humanos y a los procesos democráticos emprendido por aquellos gobiernos que se alejan del neoliberalismo y buscan para sus pueblos relaciones de igualdad con todos los países del mundo. Esto supone el fortalecimiento de la cooperación en todos los ámbitos entre los pueblos, el reforzamiento de la solidaridad, el fin de toda forma de discriminaciones y la superación de prácticas violatorias de la soberanía de los países. Como ha mostrado la II Sesión del Tribunal Permanente de los Pueblos, exigimos justicia y la reparación de los agravios, daños y perjuicios, provocados por las empresas europeas, y el replanteamiento de las relaciones con estas empresas, de tal forma que asuman los pasivos sociales y ambientales en que incurren.
Saludamos las acciones de nacionalización de empresas estratégicas para el desarrollo nacional y los recursos naturales, que pertenecen a los pueblos, no a las transnacionales, como por ejemplo la de la empresa boliviana de telecomunicaciones ETI/ENTEL.Llamamos a los gobiernos que romuevan políticas progresistas a sumarse al proceso de transformación que impulsamos. Rechazamos las desafiantes intervenciones de EE.UU. y la Unión Europea contra la soberanía de los pueblos. La Unión Europea debe asumir su deuda histórica con los pueblos de América Latina y el Caribe, en particular con los pueblos originarios. Llamamos la atención sobre la dramática situación de Haití, resultado de décadas de expoliación, agravada por la actual ocupación militar. Así mismo denunciamos la política complaciente de la Unión Europea con el gobierno de Colombia.
La única salida de los pueblos latinoamericanos, caribeños y europeos es unirse en torno a la defensa de su bienestar y fortalecer la resistencia y movilización contra las políticas neoliberales. Ella debe nutrirse de los aportes de mujeres, pueblos originarios, campesinos y demás fuerza sociales que, con su presencia masiva en la Cumbre Social, han dado ejemplo de combatividad y de elaboración de alternativas en búsqueda de un progreso sustentado en la armonía con la naturaleza, los derechos humanos y la eliminación de todas las formas de discriminación.
Exigimos a los gobiernos atender efectivamente las demandas de los pueblos por construir otro tipo de relaciones entre las regiones, basadas en la superación del modelo de mercado. Hacemos un llamado a la población a no dejarse engañar más por gobiernos autoritarios que pretenden criminalizar la justa protesta civil. Instamos a los habitantes de América Latina, el Caribe y Europa a sumarse a la fuerza cada vez mayor de organizaciones que buscan un mundo mejor para todos, y así estar a la altura de los desafíos que hoy enfrenta la humanidad.
Invitamos a todas las organizaciones sociales y populares de ambos Continentes a preparar desde ahora la próxima Cumbre Social de los Pueblos, Enlazando Alternativas IV, que tendrá cita en el Estado Español en el año 2010.
www.asc-hsa.org/node/509

Declaración del VII Encuentro Hemisférico de Lucha contra los TLCs y por la Integración de los Pueblos

Cuba
A todos los movimientos y organizaciones sociales y civiles de América:
Nuestro continente vive una nueva etapa crucial de su historia, ailment con agudas contradicciones entre los progresos y la reafirmación de la soberanía de varios países, y el aumento de las tendencias intervencionistas y agresivas de Estados Unidos. Entre los avances en las luchas de los movimientos sociales y la represión y criminalización de la protesta social.
El ALCA representó el intento de apuntalar y volver irreversible la política neoliberal por medio de un tratado internacional, política que se venía implementando en el continente desde la década del 80. A dos años de su derrota se evidencia que su contenido fundamental se sigue implementando en muchas partes del Continente, a través de los Tratados de Libre Comercio y otras políticas como las reformas internas, la privatización, la desregulación estatal, la liberalización comercial, la financiarización, la flexibilización laboral, la militarización, entre otras. A escala mundial las multinacionales siguen promoviendo su agenda y existe el grave peligro de que la OMC, en su cumbre ministerial, profundice la liberalización económica mundial.
En muchos países del continente se mantiene la imposición de este modelo basado en el libre comercio exterior y en la inversión extranjera con todas las garantías y beneficios, afectando el medio ambiente, la soberanía alimentaria, el desarrollo propio y las prioridades sociales y productivas de los países. En particular, se expresa en la profundización de la extracción de recursos naturales para la exportación, y en los agronegocios -especialmente los agrocombustibles- los cuales han sido una importante causa del aumento de los precios y de la escasez de alimentos en el mundo y de la deforestación de la selva amazónica. Otros mecanismos en los que se sustenta son la sobre explotación de la mano de obra y la construcción de infraestructura dirigida exclusivamente al comercio internacional.
De igual forma, Estados Unidos pretende trasladar su crisis económica hacia los demás países de América ocasionando múltiples efectos negativos. En este contexto, la pobreza se profundiza, estimulando procesos migratorios que son tratados por Estados Unidos y otros países desarrollados como una amenaza a su seguridad nacional y, por lo tanto, las y los migrantes son reprimidos como si fueran terroristas.
Pero lo más alarmante en estos momentos es que esta “lógica” de neoliberalismo y libre comercio va acompañada ahora de una creciente militarización, subordinada a las políticas de seguridad de Estados Unidos, como está plasmado claramente en la Alianza para la Seguridad y la Prosperidad de América del Norte – ASPAN. Con el pretexto del combate al terrorismo y el narcotráfico se promueve el recorte de las garantías ciudadanas, por medio de reformas a las leyes penales; se criminaliza la protesta social y se da un nuevo impulso a instrumentos como el Plan Colombia, ahora claramente conectados a la campaña de la derecha internacional para provocar una situación de conflicto en la región, que le permita a Estados Unidos y sus aliados, las oligarquías privilegiadas de siempre, recuperar por la vía de la violencia el espacio que les ha sido arrebatado en el terreno político y de las luchas sociales.
El neoliberalismo y la persecución amenazan particularmente a los pueblos indígenas, campesinos y afrodescendientes, quienes sufren los efectos de las disputas sobre sus tierras y riquezas naturales, por parte de las multinacionales con la complicidad de los gobiernos locales. En el mismo sentido, se aplica una tendencia regresiva en derechos sexuales y reproductivos que las mujeres conquistaron con esfuerzos años atrás y la persistencia en el aprovechamiento de la división sexual del trabajo en desmedro de los derechos y la calidad de vida de las mujeres y fortaleciendo el patriarcalismo neoliberal.
Estados Unidos no se resigna a perder el control del continente y a permitir que países soberanos desafíen su hegemonía y entorpezcan su saqueo, y está peligrosamente intentando revertir los avances habidos en el sur del continente, por medio de desestabilizar la región -como es su campaña contra Venezuela y el “populismo”, con la ayuda de la derecha internacional-, alentar los conflictos internos y la reacción de las oligarquías -como está haciendo al auspiciar el separatismo oligárquico en Bolivia- e incluso promover provocaciones armadas para incendiar la región y facilitar su intervención -como ha sucedido recientemente con el ataque del gobierno colombiano en territorio de Ecuador. Denunciamos que como parte de la agresividad imperial cinco patriotas cubanos permanecen encarcelados ya por diez años en las prisiones de Estados Unidos por el crimen que ha cometido Cuba de ser ejemplo de autodeterminación y justicia social para el resto de América Latina y exigimos su inmediata e incondicional liberación.
Al mismo tiempo alertamos sobre la ofensiva de la Unión Europea que presiona la suscripción de nuevos tratados de libre comercio en Centroamérica, la región andina, y a reanudar las negociaciones hace años paralizadas con MERCOSUR, e incorporar a todo el Caribe a su agenda neoliberal. La Cumbre Social Birregional Enlazando Alternativas 3, ha realizarse del 13 al 16 de mayo de 2008 en Lima, en forma simultánea a la Cumbre presidencial Unión Europea – América Latina y el Caribe, debe ser una ocasión para denunciar estos propósitos, develar el papel de las multinacionales europeas y avanzar en la construcción de procesos de resistencia social.
Aquellos países en los cuales han asumido gobiernos progresistas, los pueblos enfrentan conflictos relativos al alcance de las transformaciones del modelo y las oportunidades y limitaciones para garantizar caminos alternativos en búsqueda de la integración de los pueblos. En este escenario, las alternativas de integración como el Tratado de Comercio de los Pueblos – TCP y el ALBA sufren los embates del imperialismo que intenta desactivar su potencial renovador. Incluso la UNASUR está siendo boicoteada para que no se materialice. Procesos innovadores en el terreno financiero, como la auditoría de la deuda adelantada por el gobierno ecuatoriano, deben ser apoyados. Estaremos vigilantes para que la propuesta del Banco del Sur garantice la financiación de un desarrollo alternativo distinto al neoliberal.
El movimiento social continental debe, en estas circunstancias, reforzar sus vínculos, estimular la solidaridad y cooperación entre sus diferentes sectores, reforzar su capacidad de lucha, integrar activamente a los nuevos protagonistas sociales y a los sectores más dinámicos de la lucha social, y resistir los intentos de reversar las conquistas realizadas. Pero también debe mantener la capacidad crítica y movilizadora ante la permanencia a nivel continental de numerosas políticas que quieren apuntalar un modelo que ha demostrado su incapacidad de solucionar los problemas del pueblo.
Frente a todo lo señalado, desde este Encuentro hacemos un llamamiento a:
1. Renovar el pacto de unidad de los movimientos sociales y revitalizar la coordinación de nuestras luchas a escala continental, a lo que contribuye el Plan de Acción que acompaña a este llamamiento.
2. Fortalecer la resistencia contra los tratados de libre comercio ahí donde ya existen, impedir el paso de estos tratados en donde está pendiente su definición y prevenir su firma en aquellos países donde se están negociando actualmente, incluyendo aquellos con la Unión Europea y Canadá.
3. Multiplicar y fortalecer nuestras luchas en defensa de las conquistas alcanzadas por nuestros pueblos, que buscan proteger los derechos sociales, los recursos estratégicos y la soberanía, contra la globalización neoliberal.
4. Oponernos y condenar las acciones de militarización del continente que provocan conflictos en la región, a la anulación de las libertades democráticas y a las políticas reaccionarias contra los derechos integrales de las mujeres.
5. Consolidar los procesos de integración alternativa e influir en ellos para que verdaderamente representen la superación de la política neoliberal y un camino de desarrollo sustentable para los pueblos.
6. Estar alerta frente a la estrategia de separatismo oligárquico alimentado por Estados Unidos contra el proceso de recuperación de soberanía, democracia y dignidad del pueblo boliviano. Estar listos para movilizarnos a defender el derecho del pueblo boliviano de conducir su destino sin la amenaza y la violencia de las oligarquías que buscan preservar sus ilegítimos privilegios.
7. Debatir y rechazar el Acuerdo para la Seguridad y Prosperidad de América del Norte – ASPAN, que pretende llevar a un nuevo nivel el Nafta, incorporándole los temas energéticos y el agua como parte la agenda de seguridad estadounidense, convirtiéndose en el referente para aplicar en todo el Continente.
8. Desarrollar acciones de solidaridad con los cincos patriotas cubanos presos en Estados Unidos.
9. Mantenernos vigilantes sobre la amenaza de fraude electoral en Paraguay, ante la posibilidad del triunfo de un candidato progresista.
10. Exigir la retirada de las tropas extranjeras de Haití, el cierre de la Base de Manta y la desmilitarización del continente.
“Los 200 millones de pobres, 53 millones de hambrientos y 43 millones de analfabetos de América necesitan alimentos, trabajo, educación y salud, no libre comercio ni nuevas recetas neoliberales, y mucho menos la militarización y la violencia”