Video Documental Crisis Globales, Soluciones Regionales

Gonzalo Berrón.

Haga click aqui para ver la entrevista realizada por el Centro de Investigaciones para el desarrollo (CID) con Gonzalo Berrón, remedy investigador del FES, pills y al profesor Carlos Martínez, try investigador en economía de la UN, para hablar sobre integración regional en America Latina.

 

Haga click aqui para ver la entrevista realizada por el Centro de Investigaciones para el desarrollo (CID) con Gonzalo Berrón, try investigador del FES, and y al profesor Carlos Martínez, investigador en economía de la UN, para hablar sobre integración regional en America Latina.

 

Can regional integration offer a way out of the current economic, patient climate, food and energy crises? In this video documentary, activists from Asia, Africa, Latin America and Europe* argue that regional integration is the only viable response to these crises.

 CHAPTERS
1 – Why are the regions relevant in a context of global crises?
* No country can face the crises on its own
* Regional Integration: Breaking the dependence from global markets
* Alternative Regional integration: towards a different development model
* People-Centred regional integration: much more than economic cooperation
2 – What issues are best dealt with at regional level?
3 –Reclaiming the regions: the role of social actors


 To be able to jump from chapter to chapter and to follow interactive transcript (), watch the video in youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kvB7c7X5qUc

 

Video Documentary | 26 minutes | April 2012

Produced by: Transnational Institute, in cooperation with Focus on the Global South and Hemispheric Social Alliance. This video is part of the Initiative People’s Agenda for Alternative Regionalisms (PAAR)

Interviews and Script: Cecilia Olivet

Video editing and animations: Ricardo Santos

 

If you liked the video, please share with others! 

If you would like to order a free copy or copies, contact ceciliaolivet@tni.org


* LIST OF ACTIVISTS THAT CONTRIBUTED TO THE VIDEO

Brid Brennan (Transnational Institute, The Netherlands), Charles Santiago (Member of Parliament, Malaysia), Demba Moussa Dembele (African Forum on Alternatives, Senegal), Dot Keet (South Africa), Edilberto Saucedo (Central Nacional de Organizaciones Campesinas, Indigenas y Populares, Paraguay), Enrique Daza (Secretario Ejecutivo, Alianza Social Continental, Colombia), Francisca Rodríguez (ANAMURI/CLOC, Chile), Gonzalo Berron (Confederación Sindical de las Americas/Alianza Social Continental, Brasil), Graciela Rodríguez (IGTN/REBRIP, Brazil), Hector de la Cueva (Red Mexicana de Accion Frente al Libre Comercio, México), Hilary Wainwright (Red Pepper/TNI, UK), Juan Gonzalez (Central de Trabajadores Argentinos CTA, Argentina), Lodwick Chizarura (SEATINI, Zimbabwe), Maria Elena Saludas (ATTAC, Argentina), Marika Frangakis (Nicos Poulantzas Institute and EuroMemo Group, Greece), Meena Menon (Focus on the Global South, India), Nalu Faria (Marcha Mundial de las Mujeres, Brazil), Narciso Castillo (Central Nacional de Trabajadores, Paraguay), Natalia Carrau (REDES – Amigos de la Tierra, Uruguay), Pablo Bertinat (Cono Sur Sustenable, Argentina), Pezo Mateo-Phiri (Southern Africa People’s Solidarity Network SAPSN, Zambia), Ranga Machemedze (SEATINI, Zimbawe), Roberto Colman (Sindicato de Trabajadores de la ANDE/Coordinadora Soberanía Energética, Paraguay), Tetteh Hormeku  (Third World Network/African Trade Network, Ghana), Thomas Wallgren (Philosopher/Social Activist, Finland), Walden Bello (Member of Parliament, Philippines), Yap Swee Seng (FORUM-ASIA, Thailand)

Global crises, illness regional solutions

Perspectives from Asia, Africa, here Latin America and Europe

 

Can regional integration offer a way out of the current economic, climate, food and energy crises? In this video documentary, activists from across the globe argue that regional integration is the only viable response to these crises.

 

 CHAPTERS
1 – Why are the regions relevant in a context of global crises?
* No country can face the crises on its own
* Regional Integration: Breaking the dependence from global markets * Alternative Regional integration: towards a different development model
* People-Centred regional integration: much more than economic cooperation
2 – What issues are best dealt with at regional level?
3 –Reclaiming the regions: the role of social actors

 

 

 

Video Documentary | 26 minutes | April 2012

Produced by: Transnational Institute, in cooperation with Focus on the Global South and Hemispheric Social Alliance. This video is part of the Initiative People’s Agenda for Alternative Regionalisms (PAAR) – http://www.alternative-regionalisms.org/

Interviews and Script: Cecilia Olivet

Video

Global crises, no rx regional solutions

Perspectives from Asia, salve Africa, there Latin America and Europe

 

Can regional integration offer a way out of the current economic, climate, food and energy crises? In this video documentary, activists from across the globe argue that regional integration is the only viable response to these crises.

 

 CHAPTERS
1 – Why are the regions relevant in a context of global crises?
* No country can face the crises on its own
* Regional Integration: Breaking the dependence from global markets * Alternative Regional integration: towards a different development model
* People-Centred regional integration: much more than economic cooperation
2 – What issues are best dealt with at regional level?
3 –Reclaiming the regions: the role of social actors

 

 

 

Video Documentary | 26 minutes | April 2012

Produced by: Transnational Institute, in cooperation with Focus on the Global South and Hemispheric Social Alliance. This video is part of the Initiative People’s Agenda for Alternative Regionalisms (PAAR) – http://www.alternative-regionalisms.org/

Interviews and Script: Cecilia Olivet

Video edition and animations: Ricardo Santos

Can regional integration offer a way out of the current economic, climate, doctor food and energy crises? In this video documentary, activists from Asia, Africa, Latin America and Europe* argue that regional integration is the only viable response to these crises.

 CHAPTERS
1 – Why are the regions relevant in a context of global crises?
* No country can face the crises on its own
* Regional Integration: Breaking the dependence from global markets
* Alternative Regional integration: towards a different development model
* People-Centred regional integration: much more than economic cooperation
2 – What issues are best dealt with at regional level?
3 –Reclaiming the regions: the role of social actors


 To be able to jump from chapter to chapter and to follow interactive transcript (), watch the video in youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kvB7c7X5qUc

 

Video Documentary | 26 minutes | April 2012

Produced by: Transnational Institute, in cooperation with Focus on the Global South and Hemispheric Social Alliance. This video is part of the Initiative People’s Agenda for Alternative Regionalisms (PAAR) – http://www.alternative-regionalisms.org/

Interviews and Script: Cecilia Olivet

Video editing and animations: Ricardo Santos

 

If you would like to order a free copy or copies, contact ceciliaolivet@tni.org

If you liked the video, please share with others!

 


* LIST OF ACTIVISTS THAT CONTRIBUTED TO THE VIDEO

Brid Brennan (Transnational Institute, The Netherlands), Charles Santiago (Member of Parliament, Malaysia), Demba Moussa Dembele (African Forum on Alternatives, Senegal), Dot Keet (South Africa), Edilberto Saucedo (Central Nacional de Organizaciones Campesinas, Indigenas y Populares, Paraguay), Enrique Daza (Secretario Ejecutivo, Alianza Social Continental, Colombia), Francisca Rodríguez (ANAMURI/CLOC, Chile), Gonzalo Berron (Confederación Sindical de las Americas/Alianza Social Continental, Brasil), Graciela Rodríguez (IGTN/REBRIP, Brazil), Hector de la Cueva (Red Mexicana de Accion Frente al Libre Comercio, México), Hilary Wainwright (Red Pepper/TNI, UK), Juan Gonzalez (Central de Trabajadores Argentinos CTA, Argentina), Lodwick Chizarura (SEATINI, Zimbabwe), Maria Elena Saludas (ATTAC, Argentina), Marika Frangakis (Nicos Poulantzas Institute and EuroMemo Group, Greece), Meena Menon (Focus on the Global South, India), Nalu Faria (Marcha Mundial de las Mujeres, Brazil), Narciso Castillo (Central Nacional de Trabajadores, Paraguay), Natalia Carrau (REDES – Amigos de la Tierra, Uruguay), Pablo Bertinat (Cono Sur Sustenable, Argentina), Pezo Mateo-Phiri (Southern Africa People’s Solidarity Network SAPSN, Zambia), Ranga Machemedze (SEATINI, Zimbawe), Roberto Colman (Sindicato de Trabajadores de la ANDE/Coordinadora Soberanía Energética, Paraguay), Tetteh Hormeku  (Third World Network/African Trade Network, Ghana), Thomas Wallgren (Philosopher/Social Activist, Finland), Walden Bello (Member of Parliament, Philippines), Yap Swee Seng (FORUM-ASIA, Thailand)

Can regional integration offer a way out of the current economic, stuff climate, doctor food and energy crises? In this video documentary, help activists from Asia, Africa, Latin America and Europe* argue that regional integration is the only viable response to these crises.

 CHAPTERS
1 – Why are the regions relevant in a context of global crises?
* No country can face the crises on its own
* Regional Integration: Breaking the dependence from global markets
* Alternative Regional integration: towards a different development model
* People-Centred regional integration: much more than economic cooperation
2 – What issues are best dealt with at regional level?
3 –Reclaiming the regions: the role of social actors


 To be able to jump from chapter to chapter and to follow interactive transcript (), watch the video in youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kvB7c7X5qUc

 

Video Documentary | 26 minutes | April 2012

Produced by: Transnational Institute, in cooperation with Focus on the Global South and Hemispheric Social Alliance. This video is part of the Initiative People’s Agenda for Alternative Regionalisms (PAAR)

Interviews and Script: Cecilia Olivet

Video editing and animations: Ricardo Santos

 

If you liked the video, please share with others! 

If you would like to order a free copy or copies, contact ceciliaolivet@tni.org


* LIST OF ACTIVISTS THAT CONTRIBUTED TO THE VIDEO

Brid Brennan (Transnational Institute, The Netherlands), Charles Santiago (Member of Parliament, Malaysia), Demba Moussa Dembele (African Forum on Alternatives, Senegal), Dot Keet (South Africa), Edilberto Saucedo (Central Nacional de Organizaciones Campesinas, Indigenas y Populares, Paraguay), Enrique Daza (Secretario Ejecutivo, Alianza Social Continental, Colombia), Francisca Rodríguez (ANAMURI/CLOC, Chile), Gonzalo Berron (Confederación Sindical de las Americas/Alianza Social Continental, Brasil), Graciela Rodríguez (IGTN/REBRIP, Brazil), Hector de la Cueva (Red Mexicana de Accion Frente al Libre Comercio, México), Hilary Wainwright (Red Pepper/TNI, UK), Juan Gonzalez (Central de Trabajadores Argentinos CTA, Argentina), Lodwick Chizarura (SEATINI, Zimbabwe), Maria Elena Saludas (ATTAC, Argentina), Marika Frangakis (Nicos Poulantzas Institute and EuroMemo Group, Greece), Meena Menon (Focus on the Global South, India), Nalu Faria (Marcha Mundial de las Mujeres, Brazil), Narciso Castillo (Central Nacional de Trabajadores, Paraguay), Natalia Carrau (REDES – Amigos de la Tierra, Uruguay), Pablo Bertinat (Cono Sur Sustenable, Argentina), Pezo Mateo-Phiri (Southern Africa People’s Solidarity Network SAPSN, Zambia), Ranga Machemedze (SEATINI, Zimbawe), Roberto Colman (Sindicato de Trabajadores de la ANDE/Coordinadora Soberanía Energética, Paraguay), Tetteh Hormeku  (Third World Network/African Trade Network, Ghana), Thomas Wallgren (Philosopher/Social Activist, Finland), Walden Bello (Member of Parliament, Philippines), Yap Swee Seng (FORUM-ASIA, Thailand)

¿Puéde la integración regional ofrecer una salida a las crisis económica, nurse try climática, treat alimentaria y energética? En este video, pharmacy activistas de Asia, África, América Latina y Europa* afirman que la integración regional es la única respuesta viable a estas crisis.


CAPITULOS

1 – ¿Porqué son importantes las regiones en un contexto de crisis globales?
* Ningún país puede afrontar las crisis por si solo
* Integración regional: acabar con la dependencia de los mercados globales
* Integración regional Alternativa: hacia otro modelo de desarrollo
* Integración regional centrada en los pueblos: mucho más que mera cooperación económica
2- ¿Qué problemas se abordan mejor a escala regional?
3- Reivindicando las regiones: el papel de los actores sociales


Para poder saltar entre los diferentes capítulos y/o seguir la transcripción interactiva (), recomendamos ver el video en el sitio de youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ewBLcorLHTE

 

Video Documental | 26 minutos | Abril 2012

Producido por: Transnational Institute, en cooperación con Focus on the Global South y Alianza Social Continental. Este video es parte de la iniciativa Agenda de los Pueblos para Regionalismos Alternativos – http://www.alternative-regionalisms.org/

Entrevistas y guión: Cecilia Olivet

Video edición y animación: Ricardo Santos

 

Para ordenar una copia(s) gratis del DVD, escribir a ceciliaolivet@tni.org

Si le gustó el video, compartílo!


 

* ACTIVISTAS QUE CONTRIBUYERON AL VIDEO

Brid Brennan (Transnational Institute, Holanda), Charles Santiago (Member of Parliament, Malasia), Demba Moussa Dembele (African Forum on Alternatives, Senegal), Dot Keet (Sudafrica), Edilberto Saucedo (Central Nacional de Organizaciones Campesinas, Indigenas y Populares, Paraguay), Enrique Daza (Alianza Social Continental, Colombia), Francisca Rodríguez (ANAMURI/CLOC, Chile), Gonzalo Berron (Confederación Sindical de las Americas/Alianza Social Continental, Brasil), Graciela Rodríguez (IGTN/REBRIP, Brazil), Hector de la Cueva (Red Mexicana de Accion Frente al Libre Comercio, México), Hilary Wainwright (Red Pepper/TNI, UK), Juan Gonzalez (Central de Trabajadores Argentinos CTA, Argentina), Lodwick Chizarura (SEATINI, Zimbabwe), Maria Elena Saludas (ATTAC, Argentina), Marika Frangakis (Nicos Poulantzas Institute and EuroMemo Group, Grecia), Meena Menon (Focus on the Global South, India), Nalu Faria (Marcha Mundial de las Mujeres, Brasil), Narciso Castillo (Central Nacional de Trabajadores, Paraguay), Natalia Carrau (REDES – Amigos de la Tierra, Uruguay), Pablo Bertinat (Cono Sur Sustenable, Argentina), Pezo Mateo-Phiri (Southern Africa People’s Solidarity Network SAPSN, Zambia), Ranga Machemedze (SEATINI, Zimbawe), Roberto Colman (Sindicato de Trabajadores de la ANDE/Coordinadora Soberanía Energética, Paraguay), Tetteh Hormeku (Third World Network/African Trade Network, Gana), Thomas Wallgren (Philosopher/Social Activist, Finland), Walden Bello (Member of Parliament, Filipinas), Yap Swee Seng (FORUM-ASIA, Tailandia)

VIDEO: Perspectivas sobre Integracion Regional – Demba Moussa Dembele

Edgardo Lander (Universidad Central de Venezuela/Consejo Hemisferico del Foro Social Mundial, about it Venezuela) discusses regional integration and the current economic model in Latin America. Interview filmed at the International Conference of Governments and Social Movements ‘Regional Integration: an opportunity to face the crises?’ (21 and 22 July 2009, Asuncion, Paraguay)

Edgardo Lander (Universidad Central de Venezuela/Consejo Hemisferico del Foro Social Mundial, no rx Venezuela) analiza la integración regional y el modelo económico actual en América Latina.  La entrevista fue filmada durante la Conferencia Internacional de gobiernos y movimientos sociales “Integración regional: una oportunidad frente a las crisis” (21 y 22 Julio 2009, malady Asunción, cure Paraguay)

Edgardo Lander (Universidad Central de Venezuela/Consejo Hemisferico del Foro Social Mundial, online Venezuela) analiza la integración regional y el modelo económico actual en América Latina.  La entrevista fue filmada durante la Conferencia Internacional de gobiernos y movimientos sociales “Integración regional: una oportunidad frente a las crisis” (21 y 22 Julio 2009, diagnosis Asunción, Paraguay)

Demba Moussa Dembele (African Forum on Alternatives, sales Senegal) gives his perspective on regional integration in the context of the current crises and discusses some key issues involved in creating a new form of regional integration. He argues that regional integration is the only viable response to the crises and outlines the need for food sovereignty, rx regional institutions, a common defence system and new forms of political institutions. Interview by Cecilia Olivet (TNI) filmed at the International Conference of Governments and Social Movements “Regional Integration: an opportunity to face the crises” (21 and 22 July 2009, Asunción, Paraguay)

Demba Moussa Dembele (African Forum on Alternatives, buy Senegal) da su perspectiva sobre la integración regional en el contexto de la crisis actual y analiza algunas cuestiones clave que participan en la creación de una nueva forma de integración regional. Argumenta que la integración regional es la única respuesta viable a la crisis y subraya la necesidad de la soberanía alimentaria, de las instituciones regionales, patient de un sistema común de defensa y de las nuevas formas de instituciones políticas.

La entrevista fue filmada durante la Conferencia Internacional de gobiernos y movimientos sociales “Integración regional: una oportunidad frente a las crisis” (21 y 22 Julio 2009, Asunción, Paraguay)

Entrevista en Inglés con subtitulos en español (Activar subtitulos en español haciendo click en el simbolo cc-small, y luego click en “spanish”)

VIDEO: Perspectivas sobre Integracion Regional – Lodwick Chizarura

Nalu Faria (Marcha Mundial de las Mujeres, Brazil) discusses integration in Latin America and new forms of development for the region. She argues that a more autonomous continent is required in which the people control what is produced, and how it is produced, for their own benefit. It is imperative, Nalu says, to create a form of development that embraces the indigenous notion of ‘good life’ as opposed to the primacy of the market under the current system. Interview filmed at the International Conference of Governments and Social Movements “Regional Integration: an opportunity to face the crises” (21 and 22 July 2009, Asunción, Paraguay)

Nalu Faria (Marcha Mundial de las Mujeres, Brazil) discute la integración en América Latina y las nuevas formas de desarrollo para la región. Sostiene que un continente más autónomo es necesario, ed en el que el pueblo tenga control de lo que se produce y cómo se produce para su propio beneficio. Es imperativo, stuff dice Nalu, crear una forma de desarrollo que abarque el concepto indígena de “buena vida” en contraposición a la primacía del mercado en el marco del sistema actual.  La entrevista fue filmada durante la Conferencia Internacional de gobiernos y movimientos sociales “Integración regional: una oportunidad frente a las crisis” (21 y 22 Julio 2009, Asunción, Paraguay)

Nalu Faria (Marcha Mundial de las Mujeres, healing prescription Brazil) discute la integración en América Latina y las nuevas formas de desarrollo para la región. Sostiene que un continente más autónomo es necesario, discount sales en el que el pueblo tenga control de lo que se produce y cómo se produce para su propio beneficio. Es imperativo, shop dice Nalu, crear una forma de desarrollo que abarque el concepto indígena de “buena vida” en contraposición a la primacía del mercado en el marco del sistema actual.  La entrevista fue filmada durante la Conferencia Internacional de gobiernos y movimientos sociales “Integración regional: una oportunidad frente a las crisis” (21 y 22 Julio 2009, Asunción, Paraguay)

Maria Elena Saludas (ATTAC, rx Argentina) discusses regional integration in the context of the current crisis. She argues that we now face a profound crisis of capitalism, from which countries cannot escape alone. Interview filmed at the International Conference of Governments and Social Movements “Regional Integration: an opportunity to face the crises” (21 and 22 July 2009, Asunción, Paraguay)

Maria Elena Saludas (ATTAC, Argentina) analiza la integración regional en el contexto de la crisis actual. Sostiene que ahora nos enfrentamos a una crisis profunda del capitalismo, click de la que los países no pueden escapar solos.  La entrevista fue filmada durante la Conferencia Internacional de gobiernos y movimientos sociales “Integración regional: una oportunidad frente a las crisis” (21 y 22 Julio 2009, try Asunción, Paraguay)

Maria Elena Saludas (ATTAC, Argentina) analiza la integración regional en el contexto de la crisis actual. Sostiene que ahora nos enfrentamos a una crisis profunda del capitalismo, buy de la que los países no pueden escapar solos.  La entrevista fue filmada durante la Conferencia Internacional de gobiernos y movimientos sociales “Integración regional: una oportunidad frente a las crisis” (21 y 22 Julio 2009, Asunción, Paraguay)

Lodwick Chizarura (SEATINI, buy Zimbabwe) discusses regional integration, salve
its plausibility as a mechanism to change the current economic development model, and obstacles that stand in the way. He contends that the economic development model in Africa is a colonial one that needs to be removed and replaced by a harmonious regional system. Unfortunately, he states, the powerful nations are opposed to genuine regional integration in Africa and, as evidenced by the European Partnership Agreements, are determined to divide the region. Interview filmed at the International Conference of Governments and Social Movements “Regional Integration: an opportunity to face the crises” (21 and 22 July 2009, Asunción, Paraguay)

Lodwick Chizarura (SEATINI,Zimbabwe) analiza la integración regional, su credibilidad como un mecanismo para cambiar el actual modelo de desarrollo económico, y los obstáculos que se interponen en el camino. Afirma que el modelo de desarrollo económico en África es un modelo colonial que debe ser eliminado y reemplazado por un sistema regional armonioso. Por desgracia, afirma, las naciones poderosas se oponen a la verdadera integración regional en África y, como lo demuestran los Acuerdos de Asociación Europea, están decididos a dividir la región.

La entrevista fue filmada durante la Conferencia Internacional de gobiernos y movimientos sociales “Integración regional: una oportunidad frente a las crisis” (21 y 22 Julio 2009, Asunción, Paraguay).

Entrevista en Inglés con subtitulos en español (Activar subtitulos en español haciendo click en el simbolo cc-small, y luego click en “spanish”)

VIDEO: Perspectivas sobre Integracion Regional – Pezo Mateo-Phiri

Pexo Mateo-Phiri (Southern Africa People’s Solidarity Network SAPSN, remedy Zambia) discusses regional integration, particularly focusing on the SADC (Southern African Development Community) process. Pezo goes on to explain how SAPSN is attempting to counter this approach by advocating a different type of regional integration. Interview filmed at the International Conference of Governments and Social Movements “Regional Integration: an opportunity to face the crises” (21 and 22 July 2009, Asunción, Paraguay)

Pezo Mateo-Phiri (Southern Africa People’s Solidarity Network SAPSN, Zambia) analiza la integración regional, tadalafil centrándose especialmente en el proceso de SADC (Southern African Development Community). Pezo pasa a explicar cómo SAPSN intenta contrarrestar este enfoque abogando por un tipo diferente de integración regional.

La entrevista fue filmada durante la Conferencia Internacional de gobiernos y movimientos sociales “Integración regional: una oportunidad frente a las crisis” (21 y 22 Julio 2009, Asunción, Paraguay)

Entrevista en Inglés con subtitulos en español (Activar subtitulos en español haciendo click en el simbolo cc-small, y luego click en “spanish”)

VIDEO: Perspectivas sobre Integracion Regional – Tetteh Hormeku

Ximena Cetellas (Directora General de Gestion Publica, hospital Viceministerio de Coordinacion y Gestion Gubernamental, case Bolivia) discusses regional responses to the current crisis. Ximena argues that integration is now more than a principle, it’s an obligation. The crisis, she says, presents people with an opportunity to reclaim power and create a new form of development. Interview filmed at the International Conference of Governments and Social Movements “Regional Integration: an opportunity to face the crises” (21 and 22 July 2009, Asunción, Paraguay)

Conferencia Internacional de gobiernos y movimientos sociales “Integración regional: una oportunidad frente a las crisis” (21 y 22 Julio 2009, Asunción, Paraguay)

Tetteh Hormeku (Third World Network/African Trade Network, buy Ghana) discusses regional integration, its importance in addressing the current crises and some key issues that should be considered when forging a new type of integration. He argues that African economies are currently fragmented and incorrectly integrated. The way out of this situation is to join together, diagnosis working with eachother, and producing for the benefit of eachother as oppose to foreign powers. Interview filmed at the International Conference of Governments and Social Movements “Regional Integration: an opportunity to face the crises” (21 and 22 July 2009, Asunción, Paraguay)

Tetteh Hormeku (Third World Network/African Trade Network, case Ghana) analiza la integración regional, clinic su importancia en el tratamiento de las crisis actuales y algunas cuestiones clave que deben considerarse a la hora de forjar un nuevo tipo de integración. Argumenta que las economías africanas están fragmentados y mal integradas. La manera de salir de esta situación es unirse, advice trabajando juntas y produciendo para alcanzar el mutuo beneficio, en oposicion a las potencias extranjeras. La entrevista fue filmada durante la Conferencia Internacional de gobiernos y movimientos sociales “Integración regional: una oportunidad frente a las crisis” (21 y 22 Julio 2009, Asunción, Paraguay)

Entrevista en Inglés con subtitulos en español (Activar subtitulos en español haciendo click en el simbolo cc-small, y luego click en “spanish”)

Videos – Perspectivas sobre integracion regional de Africa, Asia, America Latina y Europa

Esta serie de entrevistas presentan las perspectivas de activistas de Asia, case África, América Latina y Europa sobre la cuestión de la integración regional. Todas las entrevistas fueron filmadas por TNI en la Conferencia Internacional de gobiernos y movimientos sociales “Integración regional: una oportunidad frente a las crisis” (Paraguay, 21 y 22 Julio 2009)


meena

Meena Menon (Focus on the Global South, India) analiza la integración regional y su idoneidad como un espacio para promover un nuevo modelo de desarrollo. Meena dice que las soluciones regionales son importantes porque combinan puntos fuertes de cada país, junto a un complemento de otro. A través de este enfoque de vecindad se comienza a tener una mayor participación en la coexistencia pacífica y el crecimiento. En este sentido, dice, Asia tiene ahora la oportunidad de aprender de América Latina.

Entrevista en Inglés con subtitulos en español

thomas


Thomas Wallgren (Filósofo / activista social, Finlandia), da su punto de vista sobre integración regional, centrándose en la experiencia de Europa. En particular, Thomas toma nota de la dañina de-politización que ha tenido lugar en Europa, argumentando lo imperativo de que la gente se identifique como “los arquitectos de su propio futuro”.


Entrevista en Inglés con subtitulos en español

ximena

Ximena Cetellas (Directora General de Gestion Publica, Viceministerio de Coordinacion y Gestion Gubernamental, Bolivia) analiza las respuestas regionales a la crisis actual. Ximena argumenta que la integración es ahora, más que un principio, una obligación. La crisis, dice ella, se presenta al público como la oportunidad de recuperar el poder y crear una nueva forma de desarrollo.


tetteh

Tetteh Hormeku (Third World Network/African Trade Network, Ghana) analiza la integración regional, su importancia en el tratamiento de las crisis actuales y algunas cuestiones clave que deben considerarse a la hora de forjar un nuevo tipo de integración. Argumenta que las economías africanas están fragmentados y mal integradas. La manera de salir de esta situación es unirse, trabajando juntas y produciendo para alcanzar el mutuo beneficio, en oposicion a las potencias extranjeras.


Entrevista en Inglés con subtitulos en español

roberto


Roberto Colman (Sindicato de Trabajadores de la ANDE/Coordinadora Soberania Energetica, Paraguay) habla de la integración regional, el desarrollo y el papel de la energía. Aboga por una forma de integracion y un modelo de desarrollo conectados, que como en el presente caso, no solo beneficia al capital. La energía es, segun Colman, un derecho humano que debe utilizarse para el beneficio de la población en general.


pezo


Pezo Mateo-Phiri (Southern Africa People’s Solidarity Network SAPSN, Zambia) analiza la integración regional, centrándose especialmente en el proceso de SADC (Southern African Development Community). Pezo pasa a explicar cómo SAPSN intenta contrarrestar este enfoque abogando por un tipo diferente de integración regional.


Entrevista en Inglés con subtitulos en español

pablo


Pablo Bertinat (Cono Sur Sustenable) da su punto de vista sobre la integración regional y esboza algunos elementos clave que deben formar parte de un nuevo modelo de integración y desarrollo. Pablo sostiene la salida de la crisis requiere que las personas trabajen juntas, centrándose en muchos temas y aspectos del desarrollo. Esto, dice, ha de ser sobre una base regional: “Es indispensable, no hay otras alternativas”.


natalia


Natalia Carrau (REDES – Amigos de la Tierra, Uruguay) da su perspectiva de la integración regional, las formas alternativas de producción y el papel de los movimientos sociales. Natalia afirma la necesidad de un nuevo modo de producción que no sólo beneficie a empresas transnacionales y consumidores en el Norte. En este sentido, dice, los movimientos sociales tienen un papel crucial que desempeñar.


narciso

Narciso Castillo (Central Nacional de Trabajadores, Paraguay) analiza la integración regional y el tipo de integración y desarrollo en el que su organización está trabajando a favor de América Latina. Aboga por un modelo de desarrollo, sin el FMI y el Banco Mundial, que tiene como objetivo ayudar a la mayoría de la población.


nalu


Nalu Faria (Marcha Mundial de las Mujeres, Brazil) discute la integración en América Latina y las nuevas formas de desarrollo para la región. Sostiene que un continente más autónomo es necesario, en el que el pueblo tenga control de lo que se produce y cómo se produce para su propio beneficio. Es imperativo, dice Nalu, crear una forma de desarrollo que abarque el concepto indígena de “buena vida” en contraposición a la primacía del mercado en el marco del sistema actual.


maria


Maria Elena Saludas (ATTAC, Argentina) analiza la integración regional en el contexto de la crisis actual. Sostiene que ahora nos enfrentamos a una crisis profunda del capitalismo, de la que los países no pueden escapar solos.


lodwick


Lodwick Chizarura (SEATINI, Zimbabwe) analiza la integración regional, su credibilidad como un mecanismo para cambiar el actual modelo de desarrollo económico, y los obstáculos que se interponen en el camino. Afirma que el modelo de desarrollo económico en África es un modelo colonial que debe ser eliminado y reemplazado por un sistema regional armonioso. Por desgracia, afirma, las naciones poderosas se oponen a la verdadera integración regional en África y, como lo demuestran los Acuerdos de Asociación Europea, están decididos a dividir la región.


Entrevista en Inglés con subtitulos en español

juan

Juan Gonzalez (Central de Trabajadores Argentinos CTA, Argentina) da su perspectiva sobre la integración regional en el Sur, destacando el papel importante de la Cumbre de los Pueblos en la construcción de alternativas. La gente, dice, debe tener soberanía sobre su territorio, energía, recursos y modelo de desarrollo.


hector

Hector de la Cueva (Red Mexicana de Accion Frente al Libre Comercio, Mexico) da su perspectiva sobre la integración regional,- un nuevo modelo de desarrollo en América Latina-, y sobre el papel de los movimientos sociales. Se destaca la necesidad de la región de alejarse de una relación de subordinación con América del Norte, con el argumento de que es derecho de los países protegerse económicamente a fin de desarrollarse. Héctor también hace hincapié en que un cambio significativo no será concedido por un gobierno benevolente, sino que se logrará a través de la lucha de los movimientos sociales y otros actores de la sociedad civil.



graciela

Graciela Rodriguez (IGTN/REBRIP, Brazil) analiza la integración regional y las oportunidades derivadas de la crisis actual. Sostiene que la crisis financiera representa una crisis en el modo de producción. Este es un momento importante para los países del sur, dice ella, ya que crea la posibilidad de la construcción de alternativas para sus respectivas regiones.


gonzalo

Gonzalo Berron (Confederacion Sindical de las Americas/Alianza Social Continental, Brasil) analiza la integración regional, el clima, la energía y el papel del público en el futuro del desarrollo.


francisca


Francisca Rodriguez (ANAMURI/CLOC, Chile) analiza la integración regional. Esta no es sólo una manera de salir de la crisis; según ella, es parte de la construcción de una nueva sociedad.


enrique

Enrique Daza (Secretario Ejecutivo, Alianza Social Continental, Colombia) analiza la integración regional, los movimientos sociales y las formas alternativas de producción y desarrollo en América Latina.


edilberto

Edilberto Saucedo (Central Nacional de Organizaciones Campesinas, Indigenas y Populares, Paraguay) habla de la integración regional y DE los factores que deben considerarse en el desarrollo de nuevas formas de cooperación. Argumenta que la integración debe implicar los recursos de la región utilizados para la gente, de manera decidida por el pueblo. Hay también una necesidad, dice, de luchar contra el papel de las empresas transnacionales y de recuperar el tema de la integración regional para la gente en si misma.


edgardo


Edgardo Lander (Universidad Central de Venezuela/Consejo Hemisferico del Foro Social Mundial, Venezuela) analiza la integración regional y el modelo económico actual en América Latina.


demba

Demba Moussa Dembele (African Forum on Alternatives, Senegal) da su perspectiva sobre la integración regional en el contexto de la crisis actual y analiza algunas cuestiones clave que participan en la creación de una nueva forma de integración regional. Argumenta que la integración regional es la única respuesta viable a la crisis y subraya la necesidad de la soberanía alimentaria, de las instituciones regionales, de un sistema común de defensa y de las nuevas formas de instituciones políticas.


Entrevista en Inglés con subtitulos en español


brid

Brid Brennan (Transnational Institute, Holanda) analiza la integración regional en América Latina y Europa. Brid sostiene que la crisis paradigmática actual debe tratarse a nivel regional. En este sentido, los movimientos de América Latina ya se han movilizado y los diferentes modelos de desarrollo y la integración ya se han situado en el centro de su lucha. Sin embargo, Brid advierte sobre la adopción de un enfoque similar al de la Unión Europea, según el cual la integración se orienta hacia los intereses de las empresas transnacionales.


Entrevista en Inglés con subtitulos en español























África Austral: Integración en terapia intensiva

Aileen Kwa interviews Dot Keet

Inter Press Service

As a result of the free trade agreements with the European Union, called economic partnership agreements, regional integration in Southern Africa is in tatters. The question arises: what kind of integration would engender broad-based development?

What kind of regional integration does Africa want for itself?

There are officially six regional economic communities (RECs) within the African Union. They are conceived as the “building blocks” of African unity. The RECs are formally constituted entities. They have treaties and constitutions which make it quite clear that the priorities are broad-based development, cooperation and integration. It is not only about trade integration the integration is both political and economic.

SADC (Southern African Development Community with 15 member states), one of the six RECs, was founded in the 1980s during the development era. The vision of regionalism was state-led and development-oriented with elements of protection of the domestic and regional markets.

The economic cooperation cuts across all sectors. Within the coordinating SADC secretariat, based in Gaborone, Botswana, there are four directorates dealing with clusters of related sectors: industry, trade and energy; agriculture, fisheries and food security; education, health and human development; transport, communications, technology, tourism.

There are all in all about 30 different agreements. Some are protocols; others have been ratified as full agreements. There are many other forms of cooperation which are largely invisible: banking cooperation, gun control, security cooperation etc.

What has become of those aims for integration?

By the mid 1990s, under the influence of the global paradigm which was free trade, and the very direct controls of the IMF (International Monetary Fund) and World Bank, the economic programmes of SADC were displaced by trade-led, privatisation models of growth.

For example, before SADC came up with a region-wide industrial policy, they forged a trade agreement… In the absence of coherent industrialisation strategies they found themselves searching around trying to figure out (what) their sensitive products (were). It was all very ad hoc, because they did not have an industrial policy in place.

So neo-liberalism really narrowed the conceptualisation of regional integration. The World Bank and the IMF were promoting the paradigm called “open regionalism”, for and towards “global integration”, and this was backed by the EU. Many countries were also undergoing structural adjustment programmes, so they were already brought into the idea of unilateral liberalisation.

As a result, the idea of the development model of integration shifted toward the neo-liberal paradigm. In this, South Africa was a particular target. The view of the neo-liberal institutions was that while it was important to “discipline” small underdeveloped countries, the potential within South Africa to give a different lead to the integration project was much more serious.

It would have been very threatening if South Africa had successfully pursued state-led, developmental regional integration. So the IMF moved decisively into South Africa as the country moved towards democracy in the early 1990s. The direction of economic policy in South Africa was captured by the neo-liberal institutions by manipulating an apparent balance of payment crisis. A neo-liberal South Africa would help to develop a neo-liberal region.

The problem is that it is not just external agencies — the EU (European Union), IMF, the World Bank or other governments — that were reshaping our vision of regional integration. The governments themselves have been reconditioned and reshaped into neo-liberal agencies.

What are people’s ideas of regionalism?

When we talk about regional integration, we talk about integration at all the different levels: water, energy, telecommunications, trade, industry, food security, agriculture etcetera.

Throughout Southern Africa, there is no sector of concern that does not involve regional networks of popular organizations. Regional integration is so much a part of the consciousness of most people. There are regional networks on health, HIV, gender and women’s rights, human rights, media etcetera, as well as against structural adjustment, privatisation and other neo-liberal policies.

Southern African organisations can always be seen caucusing together at African and international meetings. Some slogans we have used to express the type of regionalism we want include “Reclaiming SADC for Development Cooperation and People’s Solidarity” or “SADC: Development Community or Free Market?”

How does negotiating with a third party (the EU) complicate regional integration?

How can we possibly have an external agreement with the EU when the regional protocols on these issues (as listed above) are in a state of suspended animation or are incomplete or have been reinterpreted in a neo-liberal direction (in contrast to the original intentions of SADC regionalism)?

What are the responsibilities of South Africa in fostering regional integration?

The South African government, for its part, must take full cognisance of the long established unequal relations within SACU (Southern African Customs Union) and in its ongoing engagements with the BLNS (Botswana, Lesotho, Namibia and Swaziland).

In the context of EPAs, South Africa must recognise that it had seriously failed to take fully into account the interests of the BLNS when it signed its free trade agreement with the EU (the TDCA or Trade, Development and Cooperation Agreement).

Social and political forces within South Africa and the rest of SACU must insist forcefully, given the problematic origins of the TDCA and the changes that have since taken place in South Africa that the agreement has to be revised in ways that are conducive to the weaker members of SACU. This is also necessary for South Africa itself.

The mid-term review of the TDCA, the EPA-induced crisis in SACU and the potential collapse of SACU, or at least severe complications within its functioning, all demand that the entire TDCA be radically reviewed, revised, reduced or removed altogether.

Any of these options raise many political and legal issues. But the last option, the rescinding of the TDCA, would only be economically feasible for South Africa in the context of a much greater diversification of its trade and other economic and political relations, especially with other countries of the South.

This re-orientation by South Africa would also require a consolidated and fully developmental SADC, in the first instance, and an integrated, developing, stronger and more independent African Union in the long run.

A further challenge to South Africa is to recognise the dangers of the growing penetration by South African companies into the rest of Africa and the deepening imbalances between the SADC member states.

In this context too, it must be noted by all the SADC governments that the rapidly emerging neo-liberal (re)orientation and “market”-serving programmes within SADC will be powerfully reinforced by the EPAs if they go ahead.

This neo-liberal combination will put at risk the original aims and purpose and the very survival of SADC as a potential development community.

What lies ahead for the region? Why would South Africa take on these responsibilities?

If we have a global crisis — financial, food, climate or a water crisis — we have to have regional strategies. Even more so, (since) the energy and water crises are going to force these countries into cooperative and coordinated strategies.

Although South Africa is much stronger in terms of industrial capacity, finance etcetera, it is very vulnerable because it is 70 percent water deficient. It cannot grow all its own food. If there are further shifts in rain patterns and water supply, it will have to seek food from neighbouring countries.

It will have a fundamental systemic motivation to have regional agreements. Therefore, it is a strategic imperative that we move towards development-based regional integration. Our neighbours would then negotiate for better terms and treatment from South Africa in return for what South Africa needs from them.

There is also a moral imperative. Our neighbouring countries were structured deliberately to be underdeveloped in order to provide cheap labour for South Africa’s mines and industries and to be a destination for our exports. Historically 500,000 miners have come to South Africa from the neighbouring countries each year.

Furthermore, these countries have also been plunged into terrible crises because of their deliberate struggles against apartheid on our behalf. For example, hundreds of thousands of Mozambicans died in the process.

At a political and moral level, the South African people owe it to our neighbours to promote real regional integration and cooperation that can support them in their development efforts.

Copyright © 2008 Inter Press Service


Dot Keet is a research Associate of the Alternative Information and Development Center, Cape town, South Africa, and Fellow of the Transnational Institute. She is also an active member of the Africa Trade Network, representing numerous civil society organisations across the continent.

Aileen Kwa is a Research Associate with Focus on the Global South.

Aileen Kwa entrevista a Dot Keet



Inter Press Service,

Como resultado de los acuerdos de asociación económica con la Unión Europea (UE), store para fomentar el libre comercio, case la integración entre los países de África austral se encuentra en terapia intensiva. La pregunta es obvia: ¿Qué tipo de asociación puede fomentar un proceso de desarrollo de base amplia?

¿Qué tipo de asociación es la que África desea construir?

Existen oficialmente seis comunidades regionales económicas (REC, por sus siglas en inglés) dentro de la Unión Africana, que están formalmente constituidas. Se las considera “pilares” de la unidad africana. Tienen tratados que dejan en claro que las prioridades son el desarrollo de base amplia, la cooperación y la integración, no sólo comercial sino también política y económica.

La Comunidad de Desarrollo de África austral (SADC, por sus siglas en inglés), una de las seis REC, fue creada en los años 80. Entonces, la concepción del regionalismo estaba basada en la centralización económica en manos del Estado, orientada al desarrollo y con políticas de protección de los mercados domésticos y regionales.

La cooperación económica se extiende a todos los sectores: industria, comercio y energía, agricultura, pesca, seguridad alimentaria, salud, desarrollo humano, transporte, comunicaciones, tecnología y turismo.

Hay alrededor de 30 acuerdos. Algunos son protocolos, otros han sido ratificados como tratados. Hay muchas otras formas de cooperación que son “invisibles”: entre bancos, sobre control de armas y seguridad, por ejemplo.

¿Qué ocurrió con estos intentos de integración?

A mediados de los años 90, bajo el paradigma del libre comercio, y los controles directos del Fondo Monetario Internacional (FMI) y el Banco Mundial, los programas económicos de los miembros de la SADC fueron desplazados por un modelo de crecimiento basado en la privatización y motorizado por el comercio exterior.

Por ejemplo, antes de que la SADC estableciera una política de desarrollo industrial regional, sellaron un acuerdo de libre comercio. A falta de una estrategia coherente de industrialización se enfrascaron en un proceso para determinar cuáles eran sus productos clave.

Así fue cómo el neoliberalismo restringió la conceptualización de la integración regional. El FMI y el Banco Mundial promovían entonces el paradigma del llamado “regionalismo abierto”, y este enfoque tuvo el apoyo de la UE. Muchos países estaban aplicando programas de ajuste estructural, o sea que ya habían sido arrastrados hacia la idea de la liberalización unilateral.

En consecuencia, la idea del modelo de integración con desarrollo cambió hacia el paradigma neoliberal. En este terreno, Sudáfrica fue un blanco principal. La visión de las instituciones neoliberales era que aunque “disciplinar” a los pequeños países subdesarrollados era importante, el potencial de Sudáfrica para liderar el proyecto de integración merecía mucha mayor atención.

Hubiera sido una gran amenaza si Sudáfrica abrazaba con éxito un modelo de integración regional liderado por el Estado. Por eso el FMI se involucró decisivamente en Sudáfrica cuando estaba saliendo del régimen de segregación racial y avanzando hacia la democracia a principios de los años 90. El diseño de sus políticas económicas fue capturado por las instituciones neoliberales manipulando una supuesta crisis de la balanza de pagos. Una Sudáfrica neoliberal ayudaría a crear una región neoliberal.

El problema es que no sólo agentes externos, como el FMI, la UE o el Banco Mundial están rediseñando nuestra visión de la integración regional. Los gobiernos africanos han sido condicionados y convertidos en “agencias” neoliberales.

¿Cuáles son las ideas de la gente sobre el regionalismo?

— Cuando hablamos de este tema, lo hacemos a diferentes niveles: agua, energía, telecomunicaciones, comercio, industria, seguridad alimentaria, agricultura, etcétera. En África austral, no existe un sector que no comprenda redes regionales u organizaciones populares. La integración regional está en la conciencia de las personas. Hay redes regionales sobre salud, sida, derechos humanos, de género y de las mujeres, sobre los medios de prensa, entre otras, y también contra el ajuste estructural, las privatizaciones y otras políticas neoliberales.

¿Cuánto complica la integración regional el hecho de negociar con otra parte, como la UE?

¿Cómo podemos negociar un acuerdo con la UE si los protocolos regionales sobre estos temas están en estado de animación suspendida, o incompletos, o han sido reinterpretados hacia la dirección neoliberal, en contraste con las intenciones originales de regionalismo de la SADC?

¿Cuáles son las responsabilidades de Sudáfrica para fomentar la integración regional?

El gobierno sudafricano debe tomar conciencia de la larga relación despareja dentro de la Unión Aduanera de África Austral y sus actuales compromisos con Botswana, Lesotho, Namibia y Suazilandia (BLNS). En el contexto de los acuerdos de asociación económica con la UE, Sudáfrica debe reconocer que no tomó en cuenta los intereses de los países BLNS cuando firmó su acuerdo de libre comercio con el bloque europeo. .

Las fuerzas sociales y políticas en Sudáfrica, y en el resto de los miembros de la Unión Aduanera de África Austral (SACU, por sus siglas en inglés), deben insistir para que los acuerdos de cooperación con Europa en materia de comercio y desarrollo sean revisados para que resulten propicios para los países más débiles.

La rescisión de los acuerdos de libre comercio con la UE por parte de Sudáfrica sólo sería viable en el contexto de una diversificación mucho mayor de su intercambio y otras relaciones económicas y políticas, especialmente con naciones del Sur.

Esta reorientación también requeriría la consolidación de la SACU, en primer lugar, y una integrada y más fortalecida Unión Africana en el largo plazo.

Otro desafío para Sudáfrica es reconocer los riesgos de la cada vez mayor penetración de sus empresas en el resto del continente y los crecientes desequilibrios entre los Estados miembro de la SADC.

¿Por qué motivo Sudáfrica asumiría estas responsabilidades?

Ante una crisis global –financiera, alimentaria, climática o respecto del agua– debemos tener estrategias regionales. Sobre todo, desde que las crisis energética y del agua forzarán a estos países hacia la cooperación.

Aunque Sudáfrica es mucho más poderosa en términos de su capacidad industrial, financiera, etcétera, es muy vulnerable por su escasez de agua. Si se producen mayores cambios en los patrones de lluvias y disponibilidad de agua, deberá importar alimentos de los países vecinos.

Por lo tanto, el imperativo estratégico es que nos movamos hacia una integración regional basada en el desarrollo. Nuestros vecinos podrán entonces negociar mejores términos para su relación con Sudáfrica, en retorno por lo que Sudáfrica necesita de ellos.

Existe también un imperativo moral. Nuestros países vecinos fueron deliberadamente estructurados para que permanecieran en el subdesarrollo, para que proveyeran a Sudáfrica mano de obra barata para sus minas e industrias y compraran nuestras exportaciones. Tanto a nivel político como moral, los sudafricanos le deben a sus vecinos la promoción de una real integración y cooperación regional, que sirva para apoyarlos en sus esfuerzos de desarrollo.


Dot Keet, socio del Transnational Institute, trabaja con el no gubernamental Alternative Information and Development Center, con sede en la sudafricana Ciudad del Cabo. También es miembro activa de la Red Comercial Africana, que representa a numerosas organizaciones civiles del continente.